Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3307858 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 7, 1967
Filing dateSep 22, 1965
Priority dateSep 22, 1965
Publication numberUS 3307858 A, US 3307858A, US-A-3307858, US3307858 A, US3307858A
InventorsSanden Stig
Original AssigneeStig Sanden Aktiebolag
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Block of lottery tickets
US 3307858 A
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

'Mal-11 7,1967 'S'.SANDEN I 3,307,858

BLOCK OF LOTTERY TICKETS Filed sept'. 22,*1965 4 sheetsfsheet 1 @@PQQGQQC 23 f 6 INVENTOR y March?, 1967 SSANDENA 3,307,858 l BLOCK oF LOTTERY TICKETS f Filed sept. 22, 1965 4 sheets-sheet z INVENTOR March 7, 1967 s. sANDEN 3,307,858

BLOCK OF LOTTERY TICKETS Filed Sept. 22, 1965 4 Sheets-Sheet 4.

INVENTOR Enited States PatentY iiice 3,307,858 Patented Mar. 7, 1967 3,307,858 BLOCK F LOTTERY TICKETS Stig Sanden, Eslov', Sweden, assignor to Stig Sanden Aktiebolag, Eslov, Sweden, a body corporate of Sweden Filed Sept. 22, 1965, Ser. No. 489,257 9 Claims. (Cl. 283-8) The present invention relates to a new design for sets of lottery tickets to be sold in the case of lotteries with prizes in the form of goods etc. The purpose of the invention is to make the sale of the tickets easier for the organizer and to simplify the task of the checker and also to guarantee absolute fairness. For this purpose, a set of any desired number of lottery tickets is combined and sealed in a block from which the tickets are torn olf as and when sold, the value of the block then being `automatically reduced. The block is constructed in such a manner that it is absolutely impossible for the numbers on the tickets inserted into the block or present therein to be read or for any tickets already torn off the block Y to be reinserted.

According to the invention, the block of lottery tickets consists of a number of slips which are arranged in a pile and ea-ch consist of a main portion with text, e.g. particulars of the lottery, the number of drawing programme and the list of prizes, and also of sections which follow on to the main portion but which are otherwise separate from one another. In one of the sections the number of the lottery ticket may be shown. This section or the other sections are connected with the main part partly by a line of perforations to enable it to be torn of and partly by sealing devices of a kind already known. All the sections are sealed -with a sheet metal casing which covers them and which is rigidly connected with the last section or sections mentioned. The first section mentioned, on the other hand, can be separated from the sheet metal covering without diiculty, by tearing ofrr the main part from the block.

If a lottery ticket is extracted from the block, the latter is de-valued by the sealing device, at the same time -as the tearing lines of the ticket are opened, and the section bearing the number likewise becomes visible at the same time. It is easy to verify whether the lottery tickets in the block are intact. The system by which the block of lottery tickets is sealed in a sheet metal covering guarantees yabsolute fairness. Any attempt to break the seal damages the block to such an extent that the lottery tickets can no longer be sold from the packing. The way in which the tickets are secured makes it absolutely impossible for the numbers of the tickets in the block to be read, even if the number of lottery tickets has been reduced in the course of their sale.

The zones following on to the -main portion of the lottery tickets still more diiiicult, one or more plates of a adjacent portions, of which the side portions are iirmly attached to the main part'via the tearing line and the sealing, as Well as with the sheet metal covering, while the central portion may show any lottery numbers. The sheet metal covering preferably has a U-shaped cross section, this metal sheet surrounding and completely cov ering that part -of the block which is formed by the portions or sections.

To make access to the contents of a partly sold set of lottery tickets still more difficult, one or more plates of a rigid metal such as tin can be inserted in that part of the block which is formed by the sections.

Further features and details of the invention will emerge from the following description of a possible version of a block of lottery tickets, by reference to the accompanying drawing. In the drawing:

FIG. 1 is a front view of the block of lottery tickets.

FIG. 2 is a side view of the same block.

FIG. 3 is a front view of the material of the sheet metal covering, before it is bent U-wise.

FIG. 4 is a side view of the same unit.

FIG. 5 shows a stitfening plate intended for insertion into the block.

FIG. 6 is `a front view of a block of lottery tickets before insertion into the sheet metal covering.

FIG. 7 shows a lottery ticket that has been torn off.

1 In the drawing 1 is a pile of lottery tickets consisting of punched out, numbered and printed slips. Each lottery ticket has a main part 2, on the front of which the text 3 is printed, such as information concerning the lottery, the number drawing programme and the list of prizes, and also three sections which are connected to the main part and adjacent to one another at one end of the lottery ticket. The two side portions 4 are separated from the central section 5 by slits 6, which are widened at the bottom. The outer edges 8 of the side portions 4 and the outer edge 9 of the central portion 5 are aligned with one another. Immediately ladjacent to the outer edge 9 of the central portion 5 is the lottery ticket number 10 (e.g. 00028"). The side portions 4 are connected with the main part 2 by transverse and for example perforated, tearing lines 11, which extend from the side edges of the lottery ticket to the widened parts 7. The central portion 5, on the other hand, forms a direct prolongation of the main part 2 of the lottery ticket and accompanies the latter when it is t-orn off.

Each side portion 4 is provided with two square holes 12 and one round hole 13. Those corners of the main part 2 which are nearest to the side portions 4 are provided with round holes 14.

That part of the block which is formed by the portions 4 and 5 is covered on the top and on the bottom side by a metal sheet 15 of U-shaped cross section, the arms of which are the same length as the sections. In each arm, four tongues 16 are stamped out, their outer ends 17 being bent at right angles. The tongues 16 are so arranged that they coincide with the square holes 12 in the side portions 4, their ends 17 extending into these holes and being connected with the inside of the opposite `arm by spot welding, so that the block is firmly connected with and sealed by the metal sheet of U shape.

On the upper side of the block a pasteboard disc 18a is provided between theA ton-gues 4 and 5 of the uppermost lottery ticket and the lower side of the upper arm of the metal sheet 15.

The metal sheet 15 is also provided, in each corner, with holes 18, which, after it has been bent over, coineide with the round holes 13 in the side portions 4. Through these holes and the holes 14 in the corners of the main part 2 there is a sealing thread or sealing Wire 20 with a lead seal 21. When the lottery tickets are torn ofi, therefore, they are torn in two at the corners, by the sealing wire 20.

Within that part of the block which is formed by the respective sections, there is inserted a stiiiening plate 22 which is provided, like the side portions 4, with holes 27 for the tongues 16 and 17, holes 28 for the sealing wire 20 and holes 29 for two clamps 25. The purpose of this plate is to prevent the contents of the block from being seen by bending up or down the part formed by 1ts respective sections.

The U-shaped plate 15 is provided on the outside with a pasteboard cover 23 which is gummed to the plate. On the back of the block the plate 15 is prolonged towards the bottom, to form a sheet metal back 24. The cover 23 can have text on the visible por-tions. An -unpunched lottery ticket is inserted in the block as a control ticket.

As shown in FIG. 6, the gaps 6 extend between the sections 4 and 5 at such an .angle with respect to the lonitudinal axes of the sections that the `free end of the action 5, i.e. the edge 9, is longer than the distance be- Neen the internal edges of the side portions 4 is at the orners formed by the widened parts 7. This makes it ar more diiiicult for a lottery ticket which has already een off to be inserted in the block, since the edge 9 of he ticket is then blocked by the corners.

The block of lottery tickets may be made up, or exmple, of twenty five punched out, numbered and printed attery tickets, which are combined together not lonly by asteboard disc 18a 4and lthe insert stiiening plate 22 but lso by the clamps 25. The metal sheet is bent U- .lise around that -part of the block which is formed by ts respective sections, so that the tongues 16 engage the orresponding holes in the lottery tickets, the stitening )late 22 and the pasteboard disc 18a, whereupon the ongues are spot Welded to the opposite arm. The :overing 23 is provided `for this purpose with holes 26 pposite each such sealing point. The block of lottery ickets is then sealed Iwith the wire 2li, `which is drawn hrough the holes 13, 14, 18 and 2S and sealed by means )f the lead seal 21.

I claim:

1. A block of lottery tickets comprising: a plurality of .lips arranged in a pile, each slip consisting of a main aart; at least one separate section connected to the main v)art and partially separated from the main part by a slit; rlottery number in the main part adjacent said slit; said iection being connected with the main part by a tearng line; sealing means passing through said slips and iecuring all the slips together, a sheet metal member :overing one end of all the slips, including the main part yea-ring the lottery number and said section; and the main part with the lottery number being detachable without difficulty from within said covering by tearing at said :caring line.

2. A block of lottery tickets, in accordance with claim l, wherein the slips consist of three adjacent parts of which side sections are connected with the main part by means of tearing lines and a sealing device, and are also rmly connected with the sheet metal covering.

3. A block of lottery tickets, in accordance with claim 2, wherein the sheet rnetal covering consists of a metal sheet of U-shaped cross section which surrounds and completely covers that part of the block which is formed by the separate sections.

4. A block of lottery tickets, in accordance with claim 3, wherein the arms of' the U-shaped metal sheet are rmly connected to one another by means of devices which, engage the side sections.

5. A block of lottery tickets, in accordance with claim 4, wherein the connecting devices consist of projections which are punched out of each arm of the metal sheet and are welded to the inside of the opposite arrn.

6. A block of lottery tickets, inaccordance with claim 1, wherein a stiff material, such as sheet metal, is inserted in that part of the block which is formed by its respective separate sections.

7. A block of lottery tickets, in accordance with claim 2, wherein the adjacent side edges of the central section and of the side sections are parallel but spaced from one another and are at such `an angle with respect to the longitudinal axes of the sections that the width :of the central section, at its free end, exceeds the distance between the side sections at the point where they are attached.

8. A Iblock of lottery tickets in accordance with claim 7, wherein the side edges of the side sections are provided, at the point where they are a-ttached, with widened parts.

9. A block of lottery tickets, in accordance with claim 1, wherein a sheet of a stiffer material than the lottery tickets is a-ttached, to the outside of the sheet metal covering, and is extended downwards, on the 'back of the block, to form a rear part of the block.

FOREIGN PATENTS 883,2696 1l/l96l Great Britain.

LAWRENCE CHARLES, Primary Examiner'.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US879015 *Dec 13, 1907Feb 11, 1908Globe Ticket CoHolder for tickets, checks, &c.
GB883296A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4004813 *Mar 12, 1975Jan 25, 1977Stig Ingemar SandenLottery-ticket assembly
US4403883 *Sep 11, 1981Sep 13, 1983Sorin Georgia LPaper fastener device system
US5106090 *Dec 12, 1990Apr 21, 1992Ace Novelty Co., Inc.Apparatus and method for selling game tickets
Classifications
U.S. Classification283/72, 206/39.1, 40/632, 283/105, 281/18, 283/903, 281/21.1, 283/103, 273/139, 402/80.00R, 402/79
International ClassificationB42D15/00, A63F3/06
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/065, B42D15/00, Y10S283/903
European ClassificationB42D15/00, A63F3/06F