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Publication numberUS3308996 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 14, 1967
Filing dateMay 13, 1965
Priority dateMay 13, 1965
Publication numberUS 3308996 A, US 3308996A, US-A-3308996, US3308996 A, US3308996A
InventorsLouis B Beck
Original AssigneeDaisy Mfg Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bb carton
US 3308996 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

L. B. BECK March i4, 1967 BB CARTON 2 Sheets-Sheet l Filed May 13, 1965 Manlch i4, l967 B. BECK f 3,308,996

BB CARTON Filed May 13, 1965 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 United States Patent Office 3,3%,396 Paten-red Mar. 14, 1967 3,308,996 IEB CARION Louis B. Beck, Little Rock, Aris., assigner to Daisy Manufacturing Company, Rogers, Ark., a corporation of Nevada Filed May 13, 1965, Ser. No. 455,427 6 Claims. (Cl. Z22-456) The present invention relates generally to containers and particularly to an improved dry materials container having a built-in pourin-g spout.

The container of the present invention is particularly adapted for handling and pouring BB shot. In general, containers for this purpose must be strong and secure enough to hold large quantities of BB shot. More importantly, these containers desirably should afford easy pouring or delivery of the BB shot without spilling and should be reclosable after a desired quantity of the materiais has been removed therefrom. Significantly, these containers must also be susceptible to easy and relatively inexpensive manufacture.

The main objects of the present invention, therefore, are an improved dry materials container having a builtin closable pouring spout and a container reinforcing liner which additionally provides controlled delivery of small quantities of the material to the spout for pouring.

Other objects of the present invention include an improved dry materials container of the above character which is easily handled and stored and which is relatively inexpensive to manufacture, simple but sturdy in construction and reliable in use.

Further objects and advantages of this invention will become more apparent from a consideration of the following detailed description taken in conjunction with the drawings in which:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of a containenconstructed according to the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a View similar to FIG. 1 partially broken away and showin-g the container spout open and ready for pouring;

FIG. 3 is a sectional view of FIG. 1 taken along the line 3 3 there-of;

FIG. 4 is a sectional view of FIG. 1 taken along the line 4 4 thereof;

FIG. 5 is a plan view illustrating a container blank prior to folding and assembly thereof; and

FIG. 6 is a plan view illustrating a container reinforcing liner blank prior to folding and assembly thereof.

Broadly described, this invention includes a container constructed of a foldable relatively inexpensive material having a top portion pinched and secured together and wherein the top has a tear tab adapted to permit one end of the container top portion to be folded outwardly into a pouring spout. The remainder of the top'remains secured so that the spout can thereafter be folded back to its original closed position. In addition, the container has a reinforcing liner constructed to controllably permit delivery of only small quantities of the dry materials to the pouring spout.

Referring now more particularly to the drawings, one

form of container embodying the present invention is shown in the assembled condition generally at 11 and is seen to include a base 13 and a first pair of upstanding generally parallel wall portions 15 and 17 joined at their vertical edges by a second pair of opstanding, generally parallel wall portions 19 and 21. Preferably, the wall portions 15 and 17 are wider than the Wall portions 19 and 21 and together these Wall portions form an elongated rectangular container shaped for ease in handling and pouring. However, it is to be understood that the relative widths of these wall portions 15 and 17, 19 and 2l can vary according to the particular needs and desires of the consumer. The upper ends of thev wall portions 19 and 21 are folded inwardly toward the center of the container 11 to permit the upper ends of the wall portions 1.5 and 17 to be pinched together and secured, as by a staple 23 or other suitable fastener, to close the container.

Considering now FIG. 1 along with FIG. 5, the container 11 is seen to be fabricated from a blank generally indicated at 25 in FIG. 5 having a particular configuration. Although the particular manner in which this blank 25 is formed is not critical and is not a part of this invention, it is noteworthy that convetnion-al mass production techniques may be employed wherein a continuous web of material is fed through a conventional blanking machine provided with a die havin-g a configuration conforrni ing to that of the desired blank, thereby facilitating the continuous formation of a series of blanks 25.

The material used in the construction of the container is preferably a relatively light and inexpensive material which is easily folded, such as, for example, cardboard. If desired, the side of this cardboard material forming the outside of the container 11 may be treated, such as by glazing, to increase its Wear resistance and improve its overall appearance.

The container blank 25 shown in FIG. 5 is provided with a plurality of creases or folds, formed during or after the blanking operation in any desirable manner, and these creases are arranged so that the blank can be easily folded and assembled into the configuration shown in FIG. 1. Thus, the blank 25 has four transversely extending creases 27, 29, 31 and 33 which define the container wall portions 15, 17, 19 and 21. A tab 35 extends beyond the crease 33 and is adapted to underly the edge of the container wall portion 17 and be secured thereto as by gluing. See FIG. 4.

The base 13 of the container 11 is seen to be formed integral with the container wall portion 15 and extends outwardly thereof and is separated therefrom by a longitudinally extending crease 37 (see FIG. 5). A pair of reinforcing webs 39 and 41 are formed integral with the base 13, one on either side thereof, and with the container wall portions 19 and 21, respectively. The longitudinal crease 37 divides the webs 39 and 41 and the respective wall portions 19 and 21 while the creases 29 and 31 separate these webs and the base 13. In addition, each of the webs 39 and 41 has a bisecting crease 43 and 45, respectively, to permit the webs 39 and 41 to be folded inwardly Ibeneath the ybase 13 when the container 11 is assembled (see FIG. 4). Thus, these webs 39 and 41 reinforce the container base which supports the dry materials and, in addition, prevents the container base 13 from tearing along the crease 37. A closure tab 47, formed integral `with the base 13 and separated therefrom by avcrease, 49, is adapted to =be received between the container wall portion 17 and the adjacent ends of the webs 39 and 41 lwhen the container 11 is formed to secure the base 13 in the closed position. See FIGS. 3 and 4.v

In assembling the container, the blank 25 shown in FIG. 5 isfolded along the. creases 27, 29, 31 and 33k and the tab 35 placed under thewallportion 17 and secured thereto as by gluing. Thereafter, the base 13 is folded along the crease 37 and the webs 39 and 41. along the creases 43 and-45, respectively,zand along the crease 37 to close the base 13 beneath the container wall portions 15, 17, 19 and 21. The tab 47, after being foldedfalong the crease 49, is inserted upwardly between the wall 17 and the webs 39 and 41.

The container top is, as described above, closed by pinching together the upper ends of the wall portions 15 and 17 after the upper ends of the wall portions 19 and 21kk have been folded inwardly. To facilitate this, the container blank 25, shown in FIG. 5, is provided at theupper end of each of the wall portions 19and 21 with an elongated .creasel or fold 51 and 53, respectively. Each of the folds 51 and 53 has an inner bifurcated end forming pairs of equall'ength creases 55 and 57, and 59 and 61Which extend to the creases 27, 29, 31 and 33, respectively. The

container blank additionally has a second longitudinalk crease 63A intersecting the inner terminal ends of each of the'creases 55,257, 59 and 61, and a third longitudinal crease l65 substantially midway betweenthe crease 63 and the adjacent edge of the blank 25. Thus, after the blank 25 has been folded along creases 27,29, 31 and 33, the, tab 35 secured to the wall portion 17, the base 13 and Webs 39 and 41 folded beneath the walls and the tab 47 inserted between the webs 39 and 41 and the wall portion 17, the upper ends of the wall portions 19 and A21 above the longitudinal crease 63 are f-oldedinwar-dly along the creases 51,55 and 57,.and along the creases 53, 59 and 61, respec tively. Thereafter, the upper ends of the wall portions 15 and 17 are folded along the longitudinal crease 63 and are pinched together above the longitudinal crease 65,.

As seen in FIG. has an extension 67 formed integral therewith. This eX- tension 67 is separated from the wall portion 17 by a crease 69 and is adapted after the upper ends of the wall portions 15 yand 17 are pinched together, to be folded over the end of the wall portion 15. The fastener, -in this instance, the staple 23, secures the extension 67 and the upper ends of the wall portions 15 :and 17 toy completely close the container 11 at its upper end.

The pouring spout, indicated generally at 86 in FIG. 2, is formed as an integral .part of the container thereby requiring no addtional or special parts. As seen in FIG. 5, the blank 25,has a pair of angularly and 89 formed in the wall portion 19 above they crease 63, anda pair of creases 91 'and 93 formed in the wall portions. 15 and 17, and extending generally parallel to the creases 87` and 89, respectively. The extension 67 is serrated, or otherwise weakened, along a line 95 to form a tear tab 97. Thus, after the container 11 has been assembled and the top thereof closed and secured, the tab 97 is torn along they line l95 whereupon the spout 86 can be folded out by folding the container top outwardly along the creases 27l and 29 and then outwardly along the crease 51 to the position shown in FIG. 2. After the desired amount ofl dry materials has been removed from the container 11, the spout 86 is reclosed by folding the top inwardly along the crease 51 and then inwardly along the creases k27 and 29 to substantially the position shownin FIG. 1.

One feature of the; present invention includes a ,novel container reinforcing liner positionable within the container 11., This liner is shown in plan vew in FIG. 6 at 71 and isl shown in place within the container 11 in FIGS.

5, the-container blank wall portion 17 related creases 87 4 2-4. In the embodiment shc'nfv'n,l the liner 71 underlies and reinforces the container wall portions 15 and 17 since these wall portions are the widest and therefore are more susceptible to bending or crushing.

As seen in FIG. 6, the line 71 is-elongate, generallyl rectangular in configuration and, as formed, is providedA with three transverse creases 73 and 75 and 77 which define liner portions '72, 74, 76 and 78.v The length of the portion '74 which is and 75 and the lengthof-the portion 78 which is the diss tance between the tudinal creases 37 and 63 of thecontainer blank 25. Also, the length ofthe portion 7 6 which is the distance between the liner creases 75 and 77 and the length of the portion 72 which is the distance between the crease 73 and the adjacent liner end is substantially equal to the distance between the container rcreases 27 and 29 and 31 and 33. Further, the width of the liner blank 71 is substantially equal to the width of thewall portions 15 and 17. Thus, when the liner blank r7.1 is folded along the creases 73 and 75 and 77, thefliner is easily inserted within the container in the position perhaps best seen in FIG. 2, the liner portion 72 dividing the container interior into an upper and a lower chamber 8% .and 82, respectively. See FIG. 3. To assist in handling and assembling, the liner'71 is provided with a projection 79 at one end adapted to bereceived within a complementary recess 81 at the opposite end thereof when the liner blank is folded pursuant to assembly thereof. j

The liner 71 isformed of a cardboard material havsembled position, is located at the top and adjacent one f edge thereof. The purpose ofthis slot is to regulate the amount of dry materials delivered to the pouring spout 86` after it has been folded out and to prevent spillage of Ithese materials. Thus, as seen in FIG. 2, the notch 83 is located opposite the pouring spout 86 so that as the container 11 is tilted towardrthewpouring spout during pouring, only the dry materials above the liner portion 72, or in the upper chamber 80, can iiow out of the container. This is especially, advantageous in pouring BB shot since it prevents uncontrolled pouring of the BBs which generally results in spillage.

To deliver small compartment above the liner portion 72, .it is only necessary to tiltthe container 11 inthe direction of the notch 83 so that a small quantity of the drymaterials passes through this notch whereupon the container 11 is tilted back toward the pouring spout S6. This traps thequantity of dry materials above the liner portion 72 and within the chamber 86 so that it may be easily deliveredto the spout 86; In addition, since the notch 83 is opposite the spout 86, none of the dry materials below the liner portion 72 and within the chamber 82 caniget to the spout during pouring.

After the container 11 is assembled, asdescribed above, by folding the'blank 25 first along the creases 27,29, 31 and 33 and securing the tab 35 to the wall portion 17 as by gluing or the like, the base 13 isrthen folded along the crease 37 tainer 11.; Thereafter, the dry materials such as, for example, BB shot 99- shown in FIG. 3, are placed Within the the distance between the creases 73 crease '77 and the adjacent inner end substantiallyV coincides with the distance between the longi.

outerwalls with an undulating intermediate l also be seen by reference to quantities of they dry materials to, the l and the creases 43, 45 and 49 and the tab 47 is inserted beneath the wall portion 17 Before the container v '5 container lower chamber 82 whereupon the liner 71 is folded along the crease 73 and the projection 79 iitted within the notch 81. Thereafter, the container top is closed by folding along the creases S1, 55 and 57, and along the creases 53, S9 and 61. The top ends of the wall portions and 17 above the crease 65 are then pinched together and the extension 67 folded over the end of the wall portion 15 and secured thereto as by the staple 23. For convenience in handling and storing, the top end of the container 11 has a hole 5 whereby the containers can be hung on a hook or the like. This hole 85 can be formed in the wall portions 15 and 17 of the blank 25 by punching during the processing thereof. Alternatively, this hole 85 can be punched in the container top after assembly.

While a preferred embodiment of the present invention has been illustrated and described above in detail, various additions, substitutions, modifications and omissions may be made thereto without departing from the spirit of the invention as encompassed by the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A dry materials container including a hollow body having side walls and a top and bottom, a pouring spout in said top, a liner positioned within said body having side walls and a horizontal portion connecting said side walls, said side walls and said horizontal portion being coextensive in length with said side walls of said container, said side walls of said liner lining the interior faces of said side walls, said horizontal portion located between said top and bottom and separating said body into an upper and a lower chamber, an opening in said liner horizontal portion near one side thereof away from said pouring spout, whereby dry materials in said lower chamber are delivered to said upper chamber when said body is tilted in one direction toward said opening and dry materials in said upper chamber are delivered to said pouring spout when said body is tilted toward said spout and away from said one direction.

2. A dry materials container comprising a base, opposed pairs of spaced walls extending upwardly from said base and interconnected with each other along adjacent edges, one opposed pair of said walls being pinched together adjacent the top thereof with the other opposed pair of said walls being folded inwardly adjacent the top thereof and held between said first-mentioned opposed pair of walls, one of said walls of said first-mentioned pair having an extended portion folded over and secured to the other wall of said first pair, said folded-over portion having a releasable tab adjacent one end thereof and unsecured relative to the other said wall, whereby to permit the wall of said other pair adjacent said tab to be folded outwardly to form a pouring spout upon releasing said tab, a reinforcing liner within said container and having an upper portion engaging each of said walls below their upper portions and forming with said walls an upper and lower chamber within said container, and an opening formed in said liner upper portion at the opposite end thereof from said pouring spout.

3. A dry materials container comprising a base, opposed pairs of spaced Walls extending upwardly from said base and interconnected with each other along adjacent edges, one opposed pair of said walls being pinched together adjacent the top thereof with the other opposed pair of said walls being folded inwardly adjacent the top thereof and held between said first-mentioned opposed pair of walls, one of said walls of said iirst-mentioned pair having an extended portion folded over and secured to the other wall of said first pair, said folded-over portion having a releasable tab adjacent one end thereof and unsecured relative to the other said wall, whereby to permit the wall of said other pair adjacent said tab to be folded outwardly to form a pouring spout upon releasing said tab, a reinforcing liner Within said container and having a bottom portion substantially coextensive with said container base, a pair of upstanding walls substantially coextensive with one pair of said walls and an upper portion engaging each of said walls below their upper portions and forming with said walls an upper and lower chamber within said container, and an opening formed in said liner upper portion at the opposite end thereof from said pouring spout.

4. A dry materials container comprising a base and two opposedfpairs of spaced parallel upstanding walls formed from a single blank of foldable material, opposite edges of said blank forming said walls bein-g joined together forming a container of generally rectangular configuration, a reinforcing liner formed from a single blank of foldable material removably positioned within said container, said liner engaging the interior faces of one pair of said walls and having a top portion extending substantially transversely of Asaid walls and in engagement therewith at a point spaced from the top thereof thereby dividing said container into an upper and lower chamber, the ends of one pair of said 4walls above said liner top being pinched together and with the ends of said other pair of walls above said liner top being folded inwardly and held between the ends -of said one pair, one of said walls of said one pair having an integral extension folded over and secured to the other wall of said one pair, said extension having a tear tab adjacent one end thereof and unsecured to said other wall, whereby upon tearing said tab, the ends of said one pair of walls and the end of one of said other pair of walls adjacent said tab can be folded outwardly of said container to form a pouring spout, said liner top portion having an opening therein at the opposite end thereof from said pouring spout.

5. A dry materials container comprising a base and two opposed pairs of spaced parallel upstanding walls formed from a single blank of foldable material, opposite edges of said blank forming said walls being joined together forming a container of generally rectangular conguration, a reinforcing liner formed from a single blank of foldable material removably positioned within said container, said liner engaging the interior faces of one pair of said walls and having a top portion extending substantially transversely of said walls and in engagement therewith at a point spaced from the top thereof thereby dividing said container into an upper and lower chamber, the ends of one pair of said walls above said liner top being pinched together and with the ends of said other pair of walls above said liner top being folded inwardly and held between the ends of said one pair, one of said walls of said one pair having an integral extension folded over and secured to the other wall of said one pair, an aligned opening formed in said one pair of walls and said extension, said extension having a tear tab adjacent one end thereof and unsecured to said other wall, whereby upon tearing said tab the ends of said one pair of wails and the end of one of said other pair of walls adjacent said tab can be folded outwardly of said container to form a pouring spout, said liner top portion having an opening therein at the opposite end thereof from said pouring spout.

6. A dry materials container comprising a 'base and two opposed pairs of spaced parallel upstanding walls formed from a single blank of foldable material, opposite edges of sai-d blank forming said walls being joined together forming a container of generally rectangular conliguration, a reinforcing liner formed from a single blank of foldable material removably positioned within said container, said liner engaging the interior faces of one pair of said walls and said base and having a top portion extending substantially transversely of said walls and in engagment therewith at a point spaced from the top thereof thereby dividing said container into an upper and lower chamber, the ends of one pair of said walls above said liner top Ibeing pinched together and with the ends of said other pair of walls above said liner being folded inwardly and held between the ends of said one pair,

7 one of said walls of said one pair having an integral eX- tension folded over and secured to the otherrwall of said one pair, saidtextension having a `tear tab adjacent one end thereof and unsecured to said other wall, whereby upon tearing said tab, the ends,y of said one pairof Walls and the end of one of saidother pair of walls adjacent Y saidtaby can be fol-ded outwardly of said container to forni a pouring spout, said liner top portion having an opening therein at the opposite end thereof from said pouring spout.y

10 RAPHAEL M. LUPO,`

Souther 222-456 Stott 222-456 Bogus-s et al 222-454 Kieckhefer 229--17 Wistrand 222-4456 Robson 222-456 Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
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US1273012 *Jun 9, 1915Jul 16, 1918John G SoutherDispensing device.
US2370820 *Oct 15, 1943Mar 6, 1945Stott Harold RDispensing bottle
US2819000 *Feb 28, 1956Jan 7, 1958Boguss Sidney ADispensing carton
US2987234 *Jan 16, 1953Jun 6, 1961Ex Cell O CorpPouring spout container
US3022924 *Nov 1, 1957Feb 27, 1962Standard Packaging CorpSugar dispenser
US3090532 *Aug 8, 1960May 21, 1963Reynolds Metals CoMetering dispensing carton
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3743165 *May 18, 1971Jul 3, 1973A HopkinsLiquid dispensing container
US4099665 *Feb 22, 1977Jul 11, 1978The Bergstein Packaging TrustReclosable carton with tapered top closure
US4228898 *May 14, 1979Oct 21, 1980Packaging Corporation Of AmericaReclosable carton and blank therefor
US4441613 *Sep 1, 1982Apr 10, 1984Champion International CorporationContainer with resealable closure
US4483445 *Sep 30, 1982Nov 20, 1984Champion International CorporationBag with easy opening closure and handle
US4512479 *Aug 9, 1984Apr 23, 1985Champion International CorporationContainer with easy opening closure
US4564125 *Apr 20, 1984Jan 14, 1986Esslinger James JBB Loader
US5083700 *Jun 15, 1990Jan 28, 1992Bil Mar Foods, Inc.Triangular cross-section package
US6241390Feb 2, 1999Jun 5, 2001Southern Bag Corporation, Ltd.Recloseable easy-open industrial bag and tab for use therewith
US6299355Dec 6, 1999Oct 9, 2001Gene Douglas SchneckRecloseable easy-open industrial bag and tab for use therewith
US6338572Dec 7, 1998Jan 15, 2002Southern Bag CorporationEasy open industrial bag
US8118199Feb 22, 2006Feb 21, 2012Todd WilburDisposable dispenser
US20070194042 *Feb 22, 2006Aug 23, 2007Todd WilburDisposable dispenser
EP1070668A2 *Jul 17, 2000Jan 24, 2001Fres-Co System Usa, Inc.Package with reclosable spout
EP2143648A1 *Jun 24, 2009Jan 13, 2010A&R Carton ABEasy-opening container with inner lining
EP2321187A1 *Jun 24, 2009May 18, 2011A&R Carton ABArrangement for closing a container
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/456, 229/117.18, 229/214, 229/216, 222/532
International ClassificationB65D5/06, B65D5/02
Cooperative ClassificationB65D5/068
European ClassificationB65D5/06D1
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Apr 18, 1984ASAssignment
Owner name: DAISY MANUFACTURING COMPANY, INC., ROGER, AR., A D
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:KIDDE RECREATION PRODUCTS, INC.;REEL/FRAME:004245/0125
Effective date: 19831115
Feb 15, 1984ASAssignment
Owner name: REPUBLICBANK DALLAS, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:DAISY MANUFACTURING COMPANY, INC.;REEL/FRAME:004225/0076
Effective date: 19830128
Feb 13, 1984ASAssignment
Owner name: KIDDE RECREATION PRODUCTS, INC. 3900 NORTH ROCKWEL
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:VICTOR UNITED INC., A DE CORP.;REEL/FRAME:004222/0568
Effective date: 19830715