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Publication numberUS3309100 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 14, 1967
Filing dateOct 5, 1964
Priority dateOct 10, 1963
Also published asDE1505838A1
Publication numberUS 3309100 A, US 3309100A, US-A-3309100, US3309100 A, US3309100A
InventorsRenzo Barbuti
Original AssigneeSteiner Spa Karl
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Carriage for the conveyance of goods in bulk, chiefly intended for supermarkets and the like
US 3309100 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Mawh 1957 R. BARBUTI 3,309,100

CARRIAGE FOR THE CONVEYANCE OF GOODS IN BULK, CHIEFLY INTENDED FOR SUPERMARKETS AND THE LIKE Filed Oct. 5, 1964 INVENTOR.

BY @7720 Bard 4 7'7 Uited States Patent 3,309,1(30 CARRIAGE FGR THE CGNVEYANCE OF GGODS IN BULK, CHEFLY INTENDED FQR SUPER- MARKETS AND THE LIKE Renzo Barbuti, Milan, Italy, assignor to Karl Steiner .p.A., Milan, Italy, a company of Italy Filed (let. 5, 1964, Ser. No. 401,355 Claims priority, application lltaly, Oct. 10, 1963, 26,710/63, Patent 7tl6,54t) 6 laims. (Cl. 28033.99)

The present invention has for its object a carriage for the conveyance of goods in bulk chiefly intended for supermarkets and the like.

It is a well-known fact that carriages are now in use for such a purpose, and which include a basket tapering forwardly so as to have a trapezoidal shape in a plan view, while their rear wall is movable so as to allow the carriages to be fitted partly within one another, with a view to reducing their bulk when not in use.

However, carriages of such types show various drawbacks. For example, by reason of the necessity of not substantially reducing the capacity of the baskets, the tapering of the latter cannot be very great. On the other hand, such a tapering should be substantial so as to allow the frames carrying said baskets to be brought closer together when the baskets are interengaged in their inoperative condition.

In practice, such carriages, even when interengaged, require a large space for their storing, which leads to further drawbacks.

The carriage according to the present invention eliminates these and further drawbacks, and is of a practical and unique structure while being simple and, consequently, economical. It has several advantageous features and forms an actual technical improvement over the carriages used hitherto.

The basket of the improved carriage of the present invention has a horizontal cross-section in the shape of a rectangle, and a vertical cross-section substantially in the shape of a trapezoid having a right-angled side. Further the basket of the present invention may be collapsed between the two sin-gle uprights of the carriage fitted respectively on each longitudinal side of the basket which is pivotally secured to said uprights.

The carriage according to the invention will now be described by way of exemplification, reference being made to the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 illustrates diagrammaticaly a carriage according to the invention in elevational side view ready for use, the basket being substantially horizontal.

FIG. 2 illustrates the same carriage in elevational view as seen from the rear end facing away from the person wheeling the carriage.

FIG. 3 is a plan view of the carriage illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2.

FIG. 4 illustrates in solid lines a carriage according to the invention as seen in lateral elevational view in its collapsed position with the basket in a sloping position, the adjacent carn'a e being also illustrated in its collapsed position in interrupted lines as engaging the first-mentioned carriage.

FIG. 5 shows, on a larger scale, the detail of the pivotal connection, in an adjusted position, between the protecting bar forming part of the driving handle and one of the uprights.

FIG. 6 is a cross-section through line VIVI of FIG. 5.

Turning to the above described figures, the carriage according to the invention includes chiefly a supporting frame A, a basket B, a seat for small children C and possibly an auxiliary basket D.

The main frame A includes, according to the invention, the actual body 1 constituted by a cross-member 2 and "ice two parallel depending sections 3 which are advantageously hollow throughout the major part of their length and slope clearly upwardly from the horizontal. The crossmember 2 is rigid with a yoke 4. Said sections 3 and yoke 4 are provided with caster wheels 5. Each of the hollow sections 3 carry an upright 6 having a channelled cross-section and projecting above the corresponding section 3 by an adjustable distance. Each upright 6 is removably secured to its section 3 by means of screws 3', bolts, winged nuts or the like. This allows the raising and lowering of the basket B to bring it into alignment with the cashiers desk, for example. The basket B is, furthermore, pivotally secured between the upper ends 7 and the uprights 6.

The basket B according to the invention has, in contradistinction with the usual baskets, a rectangular crosssection when seen in plan view. It includes a bottom 8, longitudinal outwardly flaring walls 9 and transverse walls 10 and 11, wall 10 flaring outwardly to a considerable extent, while wall 11 flares only slightly. This shape allows a substantial increase in capacity. To the ends of the upper edge 12 of the wall 10 is pivotally secured a yokeshaped handle 13 which extends up to the other side of the carriage. Said handle does not only form the means through which the carriage is controlled by the person using it for pushing or pulling the carriage, and for giving a slope to the basket by urging it upwardly; but, furthermore, it forms, according to the invention, a protection since it defines the maximum bulk of the carriage in use. The basket B is pivotally secured to the frame A solely at the upper ends 6' of the uprights 6. The handle 13 carries a seat C for a small child, which seat, according to the invention, lies outside the basket B without consequently reducing the volume of the latter. When the basket B is in a substantially horizontal position, the handle 13 rests on stops 14 slidingly engaging the uprights 6 and removably secured thereto, for example, by means of screws 15 with heads having a six-sided recess, whereby it is possible to obtain such a horizontal position. Each lateral arm 17 of the handle 13 is provided, for this purpose, with a stud 18 welded to said arm and projecting through the channel provided in the upright 6 to form a small block 19 sliding inside said upright 6 and bearing, for said horizontal position of use of the basket, on the corresponding stop 14.

In order to allow the carriages to be brought into contact with each other within a maximum space when they are not in use, the basket B is caused to turn around the pivots 6 in the direction of the arrow f2 under the action of the handle 13 actuated in the direction of the arrow f. The small blocks 19 then slide within the uprights 6 and move into proximity with the pivots 6'. The basket then assumes the sloping position illustrated in FIG. 4. It is obvious from examination of said figure, which shows a second carriage in interrupted lines, that any carriage according to the invention may be brought into maximum interengagement with the adjacent carriages. In fact, this becomes possible by the slope given to the baskets, and by the particular flaring shape given to them. In practice, the carriages engage one another completely and it may be considered that the minimum distance between the carriages is defined substantially by the bulk of the wheels 5 and 5' carrying them.

It is important to point out that, by reason of the position of the pivots, it is not possible to make the basket assume a slope by acting directly on it, since such an operation is possible only by raising the handle.

The carriage may also be provided with an auxiliary basket D located, according to the invention, in a position which is extremely convenient for the user since the auxiliary basket D is actually located on the side carrying the handle and consequently facing the user.

The carriage of the present invention has the following advantages:

The basket being collapsible and having a highly flaring shape, in contradistinction with conventional baskets, the use of the carriage of the present invention leads to a minimum jamming,

The seat of the small child lying on the outside of the basket does not reduce the capacity of the latter,

By reason of the flaring shape of the basket, the possible line of impact with another oblect is constituted by the upper edge of the basket which is extremely resistant to shocks,

It is possible to raise or to lower the basket so as to set it at a level with the cashiers desk, or the like,

The auxiliary basket provided, if required, at the bottom of the carriage, is more readily accessible, since the goods may be introduced into it through the side facing the user instead of through the opposite side,

The upper perimeter of the basket is rectangular and of a somewhat considerable length when compared with the baskets of the conventional carriages, wherein said perimeter is reduced to a trapezoid with a very small minor base, which leads to a very large capacity for an accumulation of goods or the like piled up to above the actual edge of the basket,

The uninterrupted tube forming, in succession, a part of the edge of the basket, the movable arms and the handle projects beyond the remainder of the carriage, and, consequently, the user may readily enter the intervals separating the carriages without heeding the space occupied by the wheels and the other lower parts of the carriage.

What is claimed is:

1. A carriage for conveying goods in bulk, chiefly in supermarkets, comprising a wheeled body, two rearwardly sloping uprights secured to the body symmetrically of the axis of said body, an upwardly flaring basket having a horizontal cross-section of a rectangular shape and a longitudinal vertical cross-section in the shape of a trapezoid, said basket having a normally vertical rear end and an upwardly sloping forward end, pivots connecting points of the basket near the upper longer base of said trapezoid with the upper ends of the uprights and round which said basket is adapted to be angularly shifted between a substantially horizontal position and a downwardly directed collapsed position, and a yoke-shaped handle controlling the carriage and including two arms pivotally secured to the corresponding ends of the front transverse upper edge of the basket and extending as a guard outside the corresponding longitudinal sides of the basket and a rear section interconnecting said arms clearly to the rear of the basket and adapted to be operated by the user.

2. A carriage for conveying goods in bulk, chiefly in supermarkets, comprising a wheeled body, two rearwardly sloping uprights secured to the body symmetrically of the axis of said body, an upwardly flaring basket having a horizontal cross-section of a rectangular shape and a longitudinal vertical cross-section in the shape of a trapezoid, said basket having a normally vertical rear end and an upwardly sloping forward end, pivots connecting points of the basket near the upper longer base of said trapezoid with the upper ends of the uprights and round which said basket is adapted to be angularly shifted between a substantially horizontal position and a downwardly directed collapsed position, and a yoke-shaped handle controlling the carriage and including two arms pivotally secured to the corresponding ends of the front transverse upper edge of the basket and extending as a guard outside the corresponding longitudinal sides of the basket and a rear section interconnecting said arms chiefly to the rear of the basket and adapted to be operated by the user to move the carriage and to tilt the basket round its pivots out of its normal operative position into its collapsed position for which the handle arms are substantially in registry with the normally upper edge of the basket and with the uprights.

3. A carriage for conveying goods in bulk, chiefly in supermarkets, comprising a wheeled body, two rearwardly sloping uprights secured to the body symmetrically of the axis of said body, an upwardly flaring basket having a horizontal cross-section of a rectangular shape and a longitudinal vertical cross-section in the shape of a trapezoid, said basket having a normally vertical rear end and an upwardly sloping forward end, pivots connecting points of the basket near the upper longer base of said trapezoid with the upper ends of the uprights and round which said basket is adapted to be ang-ularly shifted between a substantially horizontal position and a downwardly directed collapsed position, a yoke-shaped handle controlling the carriage and including two arms pivotally secured to the corresponding ends of the front transverse upper edge of the basket and extending as a guard outside the corresponding longitudinal sides of the basket and a rear section interconnecting said arms clearly to the rear of the basket and adapted to be operated by the user to move the carriage and to tilt the basket round its pivots out of its normal operative position into its collapsed position for which the handle arms are substantially in registry with the normally upper edge of the basket and with the uprights and stops carried by the uprights and stopping the downward movement of the handle arms in a position for which the basket has rocked back into its operative substantially horizontal position.

4. A carriage for conveying goods in bulk chiefly in supermarkets, comprising a wheeled body, two rearwardly sloping uprights secured to the body symmetrically of the axis of said body, an upwardly flaring basket having a horizontal cross-section of a rectangular shape and a longitudinal vertical cross-section in the shape of a trapezoid, said basket having a normally vertical rear end and an up wardly sloping forward end, pivots connecting points of the basket near the upper longer base of said trapezoid with the upper ends of the uprights and round which said basket is adapted to be angularly shifted between a substantially horizontal position and a downwardly directed collapsed position, a yoke shaped handle controlling the carriage and including two arms pivotally secured to the corresponding ends of the front transverse upper edge of the basket and extending as a guard outside the corresponding longitudinal sides of the basket and a rear section interconnecting said arms clearly to the rear of the basket and adapted to be operated by the user to move the carriage and to tilt the basket round its pivots out of its normal operative position into its collapsed position for which the handle arms are substantially in registry with the normally upper edge of the basket and with the uprights and small blocks removably carried by the uprights and stopping the downward movement of the handle arms in a position for which the basket has rocked back into its operative substantially horizontal position.

5. A carriage for conveying goods in bulk chiefly in supermarkets, comprising a wheeled body, two rearwardly sloping uprights secured to the body symmetrically of the axis of said body, an upwardly flaring basket having a horizontal cross-section of a rectangular shape and a longitudinal vertical cross-section in the shape of a trapezoid, said basket having a normally vertical rear end and an upwardly sloping forward end, pivots connecting points of the basket near the upper longer base of said trapezoid with the upper ends of the uprights and round which said basket is adapted to be angularly shifted between a substantially horizontal position and a downwardly directed collapsed position, a yoke-shaped handle controlling the carriage and including two arms pivotally secured to the corresponding ends of the transverse front upper edge of the basket and extending as a guard outside the corresponding longitudinal sides of the basket and a rear section interconnecting said arms clearly to the rear of the basket and adapted to be operated by the user, small blocks secured to the uprights and further blocks each rigid with one arm of the handle and adapted when the handle is raised through its rear section to slide along the corresponding upright between a lower position for which it rests on the small block secured to said upright and an upper position in the vicinity of the pivot connecting said upright with the basket while the handle arm moves the basket correspondingly between its horizontal operative position and its collapsed position.

6. A carriage for conveying goods in bulk chiefly in supermarkets, comprising a wheeled body, two rearwardly sloping uprights secured to the body symmetrically of the axis of said body, an upwardly flaring basket having a horizontal cross-section of a rectangular shape and a longitudinal vertical cross-section in the shape of a trapezoid, said basket having a normally vertical rear end and an upwardly sloping forward end, pivots connecting points of the basket near the upper longer base of said trapezoid with the upper ends of the uprights and round which said basket is adapted to be angularly shifted between a substantially horizontal position and a downwardly directed collapsed position, a yoke-shaped handle controlling the carriage and including two arms pivotally secured to the corresponding ends of the front transverse upper edge of the basket and extending as a guard out- References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,040,134 5/1936 Heller 28034 2,596,686 5/1952 Hess 28033.99 X 2,605,116 7/1952 Alexander 2803399 2,676,026 4/ 1954 Goldman 280--33.99 2,776,843 1/1957 Just et al. 28033.99 3,190,673 6/1965 Olander et al 28033.99 3,212,788 10/1965 Adler 28036 BENJAMIN HERSH, Primary Examiner.

MILTON L. SMITH, Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2040134 *Feb 6, 1935May 12, 1936Heller Frank PHandling attachment for radiators and the like
US2596686 *Apr 24, 1946May 13, 1952Hess George RChecking station for self-service stores
US2605116 *Nov 6, 1950Jul 29, 1952United Steel & Wire CoNesting basket cart
US2676026 *Jan 13, 1949Apr 20, 1954Goldman Sylvan NSwinging basket type of store service carrier
US2776843 *May 7, 1953Jan 8, 1957Grand Union CompanyNesting shopping cart
US3190673 *Nov 7, 1962Jun 22, 1965Heinrich Fischer KgPush cart for self-serving stores
US3212788 *Apr 2, 1963Oct 19, 1965Adler Aliza BCollapsible carrier
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3536283 *Sep 10, 1968Oct 27, 1970Jung Y LoweMaterial carrier
US4335892 *May 2, 1980Jun 22, 1982Roblin Industries, Inc.Cart with improved storage-preventing base
US5915723 *Apr 4, 1997Jun 29, 1999Austin; Gloria E.For transporting laundry and the like in an efficient manner
US6126181 *Jul 9, 1998Oct 3, 2000Ondrasik; V. JohnShopping cart with stepped baskets
US6336414Jan 31, 2001Jan 8, 2002Steelcase Development CorpTable configured for utilities, ganging and storage
US8657304Nov 10, 2011Feb 25, 2014Retail Design Services, LLCShopping cart with child seat
EP0624509A1 *Apr 14, 1994Nov 17, 1994Wanzl GmbH & Co. Entwicklungs-KGHandcarts especially shopping carts
EP1182113A2 *Jul 20, 2001Feb 27, 2002Wanzl Metallwarenfabrik GmbhShopping cart for a person using a wheelchair
Classifications
U.S. Classification280/33.996, 280/47.35
International ClassificationB62B3/14, B62B3/18
Cooperative ClassificationB62B3/14, B62B3/182
European ClassificationB62B3/18S, B62B3/14