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Publication numberUS3309832 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 21, 1967
Filing dateMay 19, 1964
Priority dateMay 19, 1964
Publication numberUS 3309832 A, US 3309832A, US-A-3309832, US3309832 A, US3309832A
InventorsFilsinger Elmer J
Original AssigneeInternat Pipe And Ceramics Cor
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Edge trim element for ceramic wall construction
US 3309832 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 21', 1967 l 5,1. FILSINGER 3,30%32 EDGE TRIM ELEMENT FOR CERAMIC WALL CONSTRUCTION Filed May 19, 1964 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 I NVENTOR. ELM/5,? A S/NG EQ March 231, 1967 E. J. FILSINGER EDGE TRIM ELEMENT FOR CERAMIC WALL CONSTRUCTION Filed May l9, 1964 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 ELMEQ INVENTOR.

/. Sm/GEQ United States Patent 3,309,832 EDGE TRIMI ELEMENT FOR CERAMIC WALL CONSTRUCTHON Elmer J. Filsinger, Glendale, Califi, assignor to International Pipe and Ceramics Corporation, Los Angeles, Caiif., a corporation of Delaware Filed May 19, 1964, Ser. No. 368,564 3 Claims. (Cl. 5261tl) The present invention generally relates to ceramic wall construction and more particularly to a multipurpose tile trim element capable of being selectively positioned to provide a finished edge of different appearances for various installations, such as wainscots, drainboards, counters, window sills, and the like.

Prior proposed trim shapes, caps, or elements have had various shapes and configurations, such as a generally quarter round section, a bull-nosed section and other sections which provided desired finished edges but were characterized by being limited to a finished edge having one and the same appearance. In general, such prior proposed trim elements were designed to be in stalled in one position with respect to an edge row of adjacent tile. While a trim cap of quarter round section could be installed on a Wainscot or a drainboard, the finished edge was always limited to the same style and appearance in each such installation. Moreover, only a single arrangement of the prior proposed trim caps or elements was available to the installer or architect.

The present invention contemplates a novel ceramic trim element of a particular designed cross-section and shape which enables the trim element to be utilized to provide a finished edge construction at the edge row of an assembly of ceramic tile arranged in a selected pattern on a supporting surface, such as a wall, counter, table, window sill, or the like. The tile trim element of the present invention is so designed as to be capable of being positioned in various ways with respect to such an edge row of tile and its supporting surface in order to provide a desired finished edge construction for the tile assembly. One of the important features of the present invention is the combination of the tile trim element with a Wainscot or the like so that the trim element can be adjusted to different heights relative to the top edge row of tile to meet different job conditions which might occur, such as providing a suitable joint line with a wallpaper type surfacing, a paint line, or to cover a change in the supporting wall surface as from cement plaster to gypsum plaster. In such instance, the tile trim element of this invention may be bonded to the outer surface of the adjacent edge row of tile by suitable bonding means. To provide further flexibility in the use of the tile trim element of this invention, the outer surfaces and the edge faces of the trim element are glazed so that the finished appearance is provided regardless of the manner in which the trim element is used.

The present invention also contemplates a novel tile trim element capable of use on a counter or drainboard to provide a flush top edge surface, if desired, or to proprovide a top edge surface with a lip or rise at the finished edge.

The primary object of the present invention, therefore, is to disclose and provide a tile trim element which obviates many of the disadvantages of prior proposed tile trim caps, shapes or elements and which includes a novel construction and shape adapting the trim element for use in a variety of installations and for providing different design appearances as selected 'for such installations.

An object of the invention is to disclose and provide a tile trim element having a shape and design which perrnits the trim element to be used with conventionally installed tile, tile installed by the several so-called thin- "ice set methods, and tile installed with adhesive or bonding means directly over a wood surface.

Another object of the invention is to disclose andprovide a ceramic tile trim element capable of use to provide a finished edge in a wide variety of installation conditions.

A further object of the invention is to disclose and provide a tile trim element of generally L-shape and having glazed surfaces on outer faces of the trim element and on two parallel edge faces of the tile element.

Various other objects and advantages of the present invention will be readily apparent from the following description of the drawings which illustrate an exemplary embodiment of the invention.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a fragmentary elevational view of a ceramic wall construction embodying the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary section taken in the plane indicated by line 11-11 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a front perspective view of a tile trim element embodying this invention.

FIG. 4 is a back perspective view of the trim element shown in FIG. 3.

FIG. 5 is a sectional view taken in a plane similar to that of FIG. 2 illustrating a modified installation employing the novel tile trim element.

FIG. 6 is a vertical sectional view of the edge portion of a counter or drainboard illustrating another installation of my novel tile trim element.

FIG. 7 is a further modified installation of a counter or drainboard employing said tile trim element.

PEG. 8 is a fragmentary vertical section view through a window sill construction illustrating a different installation of said trim element.

FIG. 9 is an exploded perspective view illustrating a corner construction embodying said novel trim element.

In FIG. 1, a ceramic wall construction embodying the present invention is fragmentarily shown and is generally indicated at 10. The wall construction 10 comprises a planar wall support surface 11 upon which are assembled in a selected pattern a plurality of ceramic tile elements 12. Such tile elements 12 may he square or rectangular and may be laid in horizontal rows or courses with uniform joint lines in accordance with well-known practice. The top row 14 of tile 12 has a top edge margin 15 with which a plurality of ceramic tile trim elements 16 may be suitably arranged. The tile trim elements 16 provide a finished edge of the top of the assembly of tile 12.

It will be understood that the planar support surface 11 may include a vertical wall surface or a horizontal surface. The support surface 11 may be formed on a wall of any desired construction such as a wall made of cementitious material, a plaster wall, a wood wall, or any other suitable construction material which will provide a planar surface upon which ceramic tile may be mounted. The ceramic tile 12 are bonded to support surface 11 by well-known bonding means, such as mortar of selected composition, or waterproof adhesives of wellknown manufacture. The joints between tile 12 may be filled with joint cement in well-known manner.

The tile trim elements 16 may be made of well-known ceramic compositions which may be the same as that of tile 12. Trim elements 16 may have any selected length. In this example, the length of trim elements 16 correspond to the dimensions of the square tile 12' and may be arranged with trim element joint lines offset from the vertical joint lines of the tile 12.

Each tile trim element 16 comprises a ceramic body member including a main body portion 18 of uniform width. The main body portion 13 is integral with a leg portion 19 disposed normal or perpendicular to the main body portion 18 so that said trim element is generally L-shaped in cross-section. The main body portion has a section relatively thick as compared to the standard thickness of tile 12. Longitudinal edge face 20 is formed on a reduced longitudinal edge section 22 which merges with a tapered section 21. The tapered and reduced edge sections 21, 22 provide a longitudinally extending front surface recess 23 which is continuous with the front surface 24 of the main body portion.

Leg portion 19 has a tapered reduced section 26 which terminates in an edge face 27 spaced at distance D from the back surface 28 of the main body portion slightly greater than the thickness of a tile 12. The distance D is suflicient so that a desired thickness of tile bonding material may be interposed between surface 11 and the back face 28 of tile 12 and also between the front face of tile 12 and the back face 28 of the main body portion.

The outer face 30 of the leg portion 19 may be formed at approximately right angles to the outer face 24 of the main body portion. To provide versatility in installation of trim element 16, the outer surfaces 24 and 30 are glazed and edge faces 20 and 27 of the main body portion and leg portion, respectively, are glazed, Thus, as later shown and described, a glazed, finished surface is presented in each of several types of installations.

The back surface 28 of the main body portion is 'parallel to front surface 24 and may be provided with a plurality of longitudinally extending ribs 32 defining grooves therebetween to facilitate retention of the trim element on a surface to which it is bonded. While parallel longitudinally extending grooves are shown, it will be understood that various other configurations may be used for this purpose. The back surface 28 terminates at a back longitudinally extending recess 33 providing a back rabbetted edge adjacent edge face 20. The back recess 33 is formed during a pressing operation, edge section 34 being compacted to provide greater density of material than the remainder of the body portion 18 so that edge section 34 will develop and have a greater resistance to chipping or breaking after the pressed or molded trim element is fired. The thickness of edge section 22 indicated by T is approximately that of the thickness of a tile 12.

The leg portion 19 has a sloping back face 36 which has a selected angle to the plane of edge face 27 so as to facilitate withdrawal of the trim element from the pressure mold.

While the exemplary embodiment of this invention is illustrated as having relatively sharp edge corners between the edge faces 20 and 27 and the adjacent surfaces 23 and 39, it will be understood that such edge corners of the trim element may be slightly beveled or curved in accordance with the well-known cushion edge configuration.

To illustrate the flexibility and versatility of trim element 16, reference is again made to FIG. 2 wherein trim element 16 is arranged with respect to a top row of tile 14 which have been bonded and secured to support surface 11 by suitable bonding material indicated at 38. The top edge margin of tile 12 provides a supporting surface for the back face 28 of trim element 16. Between the surface of margin 15 and back face 28 suitable water-proof adhesive material such as epoxy adhesives may be used to secure trim element 16 to tile 12. The bonding material 38 may extend into the space between the top edge of tile 12 and the back sloping face 36 of leg portion 19. It will be apparent that, depending upon the condition of the support surface 11 above the top edge of tile 12 and the space requirements thereabove, trim element 16 may be adjusted vertically with respect to the top row 14 of tile 12 so as to locate the finished edge of the wainscot at a desirable selected height. Edge face 27 of leg portion 19 seats against support surface 11 in spaced relation to the top edge face of tile 12. Since downwardly directed edge face is glazed and trim element 16 is provided with a front surface recess 23, it will be apparent that an attractive finished edge may be provided for a tile wainscot while providing a finished joint line with the support surface 11. If desired the space between leg portion 19 and the top edge face of tile 12 may be filled with the bonding material 38.

In FIG. 5 a slightly difierent installation of a trim element 16 on a tile wainscot is shown. In FIG. 5 wall construction 40 is somewhat different than that shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 and may include a stud and plastered wall structure wherein a bed of relatively thick cementitious setting mortar 41 is supported from the stud by metal lath 42 and above such mortar setting bed may be provided a well-known gypsum plaster and lath board construction 43. In this example, a top row of tile 12 bonded by bonding material 38 to the mortar bed is located with its top edge spaced from the bottom edge of the plaster wall a distance less than the Width of trim element 16. Trim element 16 may be bonded to the mortar setting bed by bonding material 38 and positioned so that edge face 20 of trim element 16 provides a flush joint with the top tile 12. The front surface recess 23 lies in the same plane as the front face of tile 12 and main body portion 16 with its front face 24 provides a slight rise or lip which finishes the top edge of the ceramic wainscot wall construction. Leg portion 19 of trim element 16 bears against front face 44 of the plaster Wall and the location of the area of contact of edge face 27 with surface 44 need not be precisely determined. In other words, the location of the top edges of the top row of tile 12 with respect to the top edge of the mortar setting bed 41 need not be held to precise preset tolerances since the width of the main body portion 18 permits sufiicient vertical tolerance so that the trim element 16 may be readily installed.

In FIG. 6 trim element 16 is installed to provide a front edge or lip on a counter or drainboard. In this example, counter surface 59 supports tile 12 in a horizontal plane and suitable bonding material 38 may be applied to the counter top for securing tile 12. At the edge of the counter frame 51 trim element 16 may be installed in a manner similar to that in FIG. 5 wherein edge face 20 opposes edge face of the adjacent tile 12 and the front surface recess 23 lies in the same horizontal plane as the top face of tile 12. In this installation leg portion 19 depends over the edge of the frame 51 and the bottom edge face 27 provides a glazed finished undersurface to the edge trim element. Bonding material 38 may be inserted between the back sloping face 36 and the front face of the frame 51. Thus, the main portion 18 provides, through front recess 23, a slight rise at the edge of the counter to retain liquids and the like from dripping or washing over the edge of the counter.

FIG. 7 illustrates a different type of counter installation wherein the top face of tile 12 lies flush with the outer surface 30 of trim element 16. In this example, leg portion 19 is directed toward the edge face of adjacent tile 12 and suitable bonding material 38 may be provided between the back surfaces of the main portion 18 and leg portion 19 and the adjacent surfaces of the counter frame means 61. Main body portion 18 is vertically disposed and extends downwardly along the top front edge face of counter frame means 61. Again, the front surface recess 23 provides an attractive finished edge trim appearance for such a counter.

In FIG. 8 application of a trim element 16 to a window sill construction is shown. In this example, an exemplary window sill generally indicated at may be of well known wood framing construction with an inner sill member 71 providing a slight shoulder 72 at the top of the sill surface and adjacent the bottom rail 73 of a window sash. The inner sill member '71 may cap a plaster wall construction 74. Trim element 16 may be secured to support surface 75 by suitable bonding material as 38 described heretofore and main body portion 18 of element 16 may be disposed so that front surface recess 23 is adjacent the sash rail 73. The glazed edge face 20 may lie in the same plane as shoulder 72 and presents a finished edge to the exterior of the window. Leg portion 19 depends over the corner of the sill member 71 and may form a joint line with a tile member 76 secured by suitable means such as epoxy adhesives to the outer support surface 77 of the plaster wall 74 and the portion of the sill member 71. Thus, trim element 16 provides a decorative finished interior sill surface in a simple and effective manner.

In FIG. 9 is schematically illustrated an arrangement for forming an exterior corner of a counter installation. Tile trim elements 16 forming the finished trim edge of a counter or drainboard as shown in FIG. 7 may be joined at an exterior corner by a trim segment 80 of quarter section and having a cross-sectional configuration similar to the cross-sectional configuration of trim element 16. Segment 80 includes a main portion 18, a leg portion 19', a front surface recess 23' and glazed edge faces and outer surfaces 20, 24', 30' and 27. Thus, segment 80' provides a corner member which extends and carries out the appearance of the tile trim elements 16. An annular segment 81 may be employed to cover the vertical corner of vertical Walls in the event they are covered by an assembly of tile.

It will thus be readily apparent that tile trim element 16 has a novel configuration which is adaptable to many different installations. In certain ceramic wall constructions trim element 16 may be readily positionable and adjustable to facilitate installation and location of a desired finished edge for the Wall construction.

It will be understood that various modifications and changes may be made in the ceramic wall construction and tile trim element described hereinabove which may come within the spirit of this invention, and all such changes and modifications coming within the scope of the appended claims are embraced thereby.

I claim:

1. A ceramic trim element adapted for multi-purpose use in wall structures employing a plurality of ceramic tile assembled in a pattern, comprising: a ceramic body member including: a main body portion of uniform width having a front glazed surface, a glazed edge face, and a back unglazed surface; said main body portion having adjacent said glazed edge face a longitudinal edge section of reduced thickness providing a longitudinally extending front surface recess; and a leg portion projecting from the back surface of the main body portion at the edge opposite the reduced edge section and generally normal thereto, said leg portion having uniform width for the length of the main body portion and having an outer glazed surface merging with the outer glazed surface of the main body portion, a glazed edge face and a sloping unglazed back face merging with the back unglazed surface of the main body portion.

2. A ceramic trim element as stated in claim 1 wherein said longitudinal edge section of said main body portion includes a back edge recess adapted to receive bonding cement.

3. A ceramic trim element as stated in claim 1 wherein said reduced edge section includes an edge portion of a density greater than the density of the material of the main body portion for resisting chipping.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 463,851 11/1891 Bogert 52-300 1,674,725 6/1928 Huebner 52-288 2,887,739 5/1959 Bensman 52287 OTHER REFERENCES Facing Tile Publication by Facing Tile Institute Received in Patent Ofiice Sept. 12, 1944.

FRANK L. ABBOTT, Primary Examiner.

R. S. VERMUT, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US463851 *Jul 27, 1891Nov 24, 1891The JCharles j
US1674725 *Jun 21, 1926Jun 26, 1928Huebner Arthur FBaseboard construction
US2887739 *May 17, 1957May 26, 1959Bensman Oliver WDetachable baseboards
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3869735 *Mar 15, 1974Mar 11, 1975D Amato Nicholas JShower door saddle
US3953268 *Jan 2, 1974Apr 27, 1976Dillon Elmer DMethod of installing tile and tile trim on a cabinet surface
US5348384 *Dec 31, 1992Sep 20, 1994Hull Harold LApparatus for supporting a title counter cap
US5511350 *Feb 13, 1995Apr 30, 1996Nivens; Kirk N.Block wall system
US5592784 *Oct 27, 1994Jan 14, 1997Forma Block, Inc.Trench structure
US5924253 *Dec 23, 1996Jul 20, 1999Walker; Patrick J.Cover attachment apparatus
US6141931 *Nov 17, 1997Nov 7, 2000Simmons; Kenneth R.Floor transition piece and method of installing same
US6755000Nov 22, 2002Jun 29, 2004Richard Duk Wone HahnPlaster molding system
US7370453 *Oct 14, 2003May 13, 2008Raymond PuzioCeramic molding system and method
US7832161Aug 18, 2008Nov 16, 2010Etruria Design S.R.L.Corner joint element for bevel-edge tiles
US7997043 *May 30, 2008Aug 16, 2011Macmillan RobertSystem and method for installation of decorative molding
US8011145May 29, 2007Sep 6, 2011Pacc Systems I.P., LlcSegmented joint for masonry construction
US8904732 *Apr 5, 2010Dec 9, 2014James Hardie Technology LimitedCementitious trim articles
US20100251632 *Apr 5, 2010Oct 7, 2010Hong ChenCementitious Articles, Formulations, Methods Of Making And Uses
EP2042668A1Sep 25, 2007Apr 1, 2009Etruria Design S.r.l.A corner joint element for bevel-edge tiles
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/610, 52/300, 52/604, 52/287.1, 52/718.1, 52/605, 52/603
International ClassificationE04F13/14, E04F19/06, E04F19/02
Cooperative ClassificationE04F13/142, E04F19/061
European ClassificationE04F13/14D, E04F19/06B