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Publication numberUS3310050 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 21, 1967
Filing dateApr 2, 1964
Priority dateApr 2, 1964
Publication numberUS 3310050 A, US 3310050A, US-A-3310050, US3310050 A, US3310050A
InventorsHerman Goldfarb
Original AssigneeHerman Goldfarb
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Massaging garment with vibrators located in back and chest sections
US 3310050 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 21, 1967 H. GOLDFARB MASSAGING GARMENT WITH VIBRATORS LOCATED IN BACK AND CHEST SECTIONS 8\ 7 o o 4 l||l||\ @o mm Tl Illlll... l I l I l I l l I l l Il N lll E o o f V o 5 N O 5 I. ".O .MO 0M. om O O O @o 4 OOO MJ HHdIIIlL. I I l Q l l l l l l I l vu o Filed April 2, 1964 United States Patent 3,310,050 MASSAGING GARMEN'I WITH VIBRA- TGRS LOCATED IN BACK AND CHEST SECTIONS Herman Goldfarb, 1616 160th St., Whitestone, N.Y. 11357 Filed Apr. 2, 1964, Ser. No. 356,832 9 Claims. (Cl. 12S-41) This invention relates to the application of mechanical vibrations to the human body, especially external portions thereof, such as the chest.

One of the objects of the invention is to provide a number of vibrat-ors, especially of the electro-mechanical type, to the chest and to support these vibrators on a vest-like structure or harness-type conguration in adjustable positions.

A more specic object of the invention is to provide a vest or harness adapted to carry a number of electromechanic vibrating means in adjustable positions so as to fit a great number of persons of different physiological structures in a manner readily operable, without much discomfort, and for home use.

A more specic object of the invention is to provide a supporting structure for a number of electro-mechanical vibrators of adjustable positions which, once tted to the patient by his doctor, will apply predetermined mechanical pulsations to predetermined parts of his body, especially the pulmonary lobe with a view of relieving him with a minimum of discomfort from the accumulation of mucus in his bronchial tract.

Still another object of the invention is a device for percussing or vibrating the chest of a patient by means of an electro-mechanical vest or harness supporting a number of electro-mechanical. vibrators in adjustable positions in which simultaneously with the mechanical support or positioning of a vibrator, an electrical connection of the vibrator to one or several sources of pulsating energy is established.

Still anot-her object of the invention is a device to provide the patient with the means of self-administration of such treatments and also to provide therapists and operators with a less tiring means of administering postural treatment.

These and other objects of the invention will be more fully apparent from the drawings annexed hereto, in which FIG. 1 represents in front view a device embodying certain principles of the invention;

FIG. 2 represents a corresponding rear View;

FIGS. 3 and 4 represent in front yand side views, respectively, an electro-rnechanical vibrating unit as applied for the realization of the invention in one form of its embodiment.

FIG. 5 shows part of the device of FIGS. 1 and 2, and more specically a supporting pocket at a large scale and in greater detail;

FIG. 6 shows the wiring connections for the arrangement of FIG. 5.

FIG. 7 shows a modication of the embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2.

As apparent from FIGS. 1 and 2, the device consists of a vest structure schematically indicated at 1, and made of natural or man-made textile material. Vest 1 should be designed to be fairly universal in lit having a front, back and side without sleeves. It is preferably made of soft material such as cotton annel, so as not to be abrasive to the skin and yet be strong enough to support the electromechanical devices mounted thereon.

These devices may consist, as indicated schematically in FIGS. l and 2, at 2 to 11, of electro-mechanical vibrators of the type shown in greater detail in FIGS. 3 and 4, as will be described further below.

Vibrators 2-11 are held in vest 1 in pockets schematically indicated in FIG. 2 at 12, 13 and 14, distributed for example as shown in FIGS. l and 2 in three rows of three vibrators each, with an additional vibrator 8 being placed in an elevated position on the back between the scapular areas.

Vibrating units 2-11 are operated in parallel from a 1l() volt A.C. 60 cycle main source as schematically indicated in FIGS. 5 and 6, where the specific pocket is shown at 15 with electro-mechanical vibrator 16 placed therein and connected by a disconnectable connection device consisting of a miniature plug and socket connection, schematically indicated at 17, 1'7, to a multi-wire cable schematically indicated at 18, and which in turn terminates in a more or less standard plug, schematically indicated at 19.

By this disconnecting connection device 17, 17 and removing vibrator 16 from pocket 15 and placing it into another pocket such as schematically indicated in FIG. 5 at 2i?, connection can be established of vibrator 16 in its new position through another connector part provided in pocket 20 and schematically indicated at 17 which in turn is also lconnected to cable 13 and thereby to power source 19, so `as to cause vibrator 15 in its new position 21 on vest 1 to be operative on a different portion 'of the body carrying vest 1.

In accordance with Va further feature of the invention a cyclic timer switch of otherwise well known structure and remotely situated from the vest itself, as schematically shown in FIG. 5 at 22, will switch power sequentially from the lowest to the middle to the upper row of vibrators 2 8 respectively.

Any other type of switching may be provided in accordance with doctors prescription and the specific conditions underlying a particular case.

1n a preferred application of the invention power is maintained in each row of vibrators for about 30 seconds at a time.

Amplitude of vibration `can be controlled by means of a rheostat schematically indicated at 23 on switch box 24 connected to power source 19.

Frequency of vibration will be controlled by the frequency of the power source in otherwise well known manner. Another means for controlling the frequency of vibration consists of arranging frequency dividers and multipliers in the circuit, as schematically indicated at 25 without departing from the scope of this invention.

A type of vibrator unit used in accordance with the invention is schematically indicated in FIGS. 3 and 4 in front `and side elevations, respectively, in which the cable 18 is shown to supply over -connection device 17, 171 coil 26 which energizes the laminated core 27 so as to operate magnetic armature 28 attached to one side of laminated core 27 in an elastic manner so as to be able to move up 'and down against the face of laminated core 27 in the rhythym of the current applied to coil 26. Armature 28 is provided with a plastic cover 29 to reduce its impact on the human body.

Since the vibrators tend to become warm when in continuous operation, the pocket portion of the vest is designed with a mesh backing schematically indicated in FIIG. 5 at 30 to `allow for air circulation.

A further attachment of the vibrators to the body is effected by a number of parallel belts of webbing, schematically indicated in FIGS. 1 and 2 at 31, 32 and 33 which -are fitted over vest 1 and the pockets attached thereto, as schematically shown in FIG. `6` at 34 in the form of belting or webbing indica-ted at 35.

Ties or closures schematically indicated in FIG. 1 at 36 serve to x lthe position of webbing belts 31, 32 and 33 either in front of the patient if pockets are used to vibrate or percuss the back of the patient `or -to fix the 3 position of belts 31, 32, 33 on the rear of the patient if pockets are used to vibrate or percuss the front of the patient.

Since the pa-tient is to be maintained in a prone headdown position to facilitate removal of the mucus, the front closures are to be at and nontraumatic.

As apparent from the example illustrated in FIGS. l-7, each electro-mechanical vibrator unit is arranged in a position in which the vibrating element proper is caused to vibr-ate in a direction substantially perpendicular to extension of the skin of the human body to which it is attached, and the vibrations thus produced are communicated to the body at their appropriate positions by a coupling constituted by the material of the vest structure and especially by the additional attachment caused by the webbing belts described labove.

I-t is of course possible without departing from the scope of the invention, to provide vibrating elements in other positions and also to provide other couplings from the vibrating element to the -desired portions of the human body.

It is further possible, also without departing from the scope of the invention, to replace the electro-mechanical vibrators shown and described in the examples stated above, by other vibrating means, for example the electromagnetic coil system operating an armature, by an electrodynamic element operating a coil vibrating in an air gap and arranged to pulse directly or indirectly against the human body.

In a modication of the invention as illustrated in FIG. 5, the wiring 18 may be replaced by a bundle of airtubes, the pulsating energy source 19 by a motor-driven compressor and the timer 212 by a timer controlling valves opening and closing the different tubes contained in tube bundle 13 and which control small reciprocating piston devices replacing electro-mechanical vibrators 16, thereby dispensing with the necessity of feeding electrical current to vest 1.

In this way, the transducer elements may be operated as a closed hydraulic system in which a remote located motor-pump system repetitively pulses the hydraulic transducer elements (pistons) located on the vest.

A further modification will consist again of a closed hydraulic pneumatic system in which the actual transducer element rather than being a form of reciprocating piston driven shaft shall be a narrow lumen compartment within the vest fabric itself, This will expand and contract in balloon like fashion under the influence of the hydraulic or pneumatic uid contained within it and pressurized by a 4remote located source.

Alternatively, the vibrating means can consist of a magnetostrictive element operated by an electro-magnetic coil system producing a field to vibrate said element.

Another source of mechanical vibrating is an electrical motor coupled to reciprocating means pushing against the human body directly or against coupling means surrounding or connected to the reciprocating units.

`Such small motors with rotary motion converted to reciprocate motion, or small solenoids giving percussion as well as vibrating action are well known in the art and need not be described in detail.

It is desired, however, that the hammer portion of the vibrating unit is to be covered with a plastic plate, as schematically indicated in FIG. 3 at 29, which will either directly contact the body of the patient or will transmit vibration to the vest material. Examples of such motors are to be found in the eld of electric toothbrushes or electric razors.

'In an alternative embodiment of the invention described in FIG. 7, the vest structure includes the `use of a harnesstype arangement in which horizontal belts schematically indicated at 37, 3S, and carrying vibrators 39, 4th and 41, are themselves held together by vertical belts 42, 43, respectively, and attached thereto at 44, 46 and 47, respectively, by means of prongs or buckles tting into openings provided on vertical belts 42, 43 as well as horizontal belts 37, 33, respectively. This permits adjustment of the entire belt .structure in horizontal spacings as well as vertical spacings and adaption to its various requirements of the body of the patient, as well as to the specific medical effects desired by the doctor.

Vertical belts 42, 43 are extended to both sides of the human body so as to permit displacement of horizontal belts 37, 3S from the front to the back and conversely or, if necessary, arangement of horizontal belts 3'7, 38 on the front as well as on the back of the patient, all supported on vertical straps 42, 43.

In addition, of course, any number of vertical and especially of horizontal straps may be provided without departing from the scope of the invention, and furthermore horizontal straps 37, 38 may be extended over the entire body in the manner indicated in FIGS. 1 and 2, and especially in FIG. 1, and provided with closure devices similar to those shown in FIG. l at 36, or any other appropriate closing means without departing from the scope of this disclosure.

As further apparent from FIG. 7, vibrators 39, 40, 41 may be held directly on belt 37, 38 attached in adjustable position on belt 37, 38.

Simultaneously, electrical connection may be effected by connecting a connecting device consisting of a miniature plug, schematically indicated in FIG. 7 at 49, 5t) and 51, which can be connected to a multi socket connecting device provided on one or both of belts 42 and 43 as schematically indicated at 52, 53. Devices 52, 53 are of the type permitting a number of plugs of the type 49, 50, 51 attached to vibrators 39, 40, 41, respectively, to be connected to the common multiwire cable schematically indicated at 54, 5S leading to a common power supply or to a standard main plug not shown.

The harness type arrangement shown in FIG. 7, in

which the vibrator belts themselves are held together by belts rather than in a fixed vest structure, may be likened to a parachute harness; this means that it permits the position of the vibrator on the belts to be varied by simply fixing the Vibrator in a position on the belt. Such xation may be effected for example by providing on the back of the vibrator press prongs, not shown, and fitting into corresponding press sockets schematically indicated in FIG. 7 on belt 37 at 56, 57.

The fixation may also be accomplished by a buckle attached to the back of the Vibrators and slidable on the upper edges of horizontal belts 37, 38, or some other fastening `means otherwise well known in the art, without departing from the scope of this disclosure.

In this manner it will be possible for the doctor to arrange the vibrators in positions determined by the chest anatomy of the patient and preferably in such a way that the vibrators will act on all lobes.

Percussion of the anterior chest may be accomplished by reversing the harness or vest, or by placing vibrating units on both the anterior and posterior aspects of the harness or vest.

Based on experience, the frequency range for said vibrating means has been found to be of the order of not more than 60 cycles per second, preferably of the order of not more than 1 to 5 cycles per second, and in some tests the power to be exerted by each of said vibrating means on the human body has been established as of the order of approximately 4 ounces.

While the invention has been described and illustrated by way of certain elements, connections of such elements, electrical and mechanical, and arrangements of such elements, the invention is not limited thereto, but may be applied in any appropriate form or manner whatsoever without departing from the scope of this disclosure.

What I claim is:

1. A therapeutic garment for applying predetermined mechanical pulsations to the pulmonary lobes of the body to dislodge accumulations of mucus in the respiratory system,

said garment being dimensioned to overlie the chest and back of a body,

said garment carrying a plurality of means for impacting the body, means for securing said impacting means to said garment at locations adapted to directly and selectively overlie the .chest and back, said impacting means adapted to impact the body at predetermined successive areas by applying pulsating forces thereto directed substantially perpendicular to the underlying skin with said forces having suicient strength to dislodge accumulations of mucus in the underlying respiratory syste-m.

2. A therapeutic garment in accordance with claim 1 wherein said means for impacting the body comprises a coil suprrounding a core and a flat armature reciprocal With respect to said core and against the skin,

said reciprocal armature extending substantially in a plane parallel to the skin and operative to reciprocate in a direction substantially perpendicular to said plane.

3. A therapeutic garment in accordance with claim 1 wherein said impacting means is activated by a source of electrical energy having a frequency in the order of not more than l to 5 cycles per second.

4. A therapeutic garment in accordance with claim 1 wherein the garment comprises a plurality of straps attached to each other,

said straps carrying means for attaching said impacting means at predetermined areas.

5. A therapeutic garment in accordance with claim 4 wherein said impacting -means is capable of exerting a power in the order of approximately 4 ounces.

6. A therapeutic garment in accordance with claim 1 wherein said pulsating means comprises a plurality of sources of pulsating energy, said sources being interconnected by electrical connecting means attached to the structure of said garment.

7. A therapeutic garment in accordance with claim 6 wherein said electrical connecting means comprises a number of outlets and adjustment of said impacting means can be eiected by displacing said impacting means from one outlet to another.

8. A therapeutic garment for applying predetermined mechanical pulsations to the pulmonary lobes of the body to dislodge accumulations of mucus in the respiratory system, said garment being dimensioned to overlie the chest and back of a body,

said garment carrying a plurality of impacting means for impact-ing the body, means for securing said impacting means to said garment at locations adapted to directly and selectively overlie the chest and back, said impacting means adapted to impact the body at predetermined successive areas by applying pulsating forces thereto directed substantially perpendicular to the underlying skin with said forces having suicient strength to dislodge accumulations of mucus in the underlying respiratory system,

said garment comprising a plurality of vertical and horizontally extending straps with said horizontal straps carrying adjustment means for adjusting the location of said impacting means,

said impacting means being capable of exerting perpendicular forces on the skin of a human body in the order of approximately 4 ounces,

said impacting means comprising a ring-shaped electrical coil and an impact element for perpendicular reciprocation towards and away from the skin of the body.

9. A therapeutic garment in accordance with claim 8 and further including an electrical switch for selectively actuating selective ones of said plurality of impacting means with a predetermined pattern.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 761,029 5/ 1904 Brown 12S-32 2,688,960 9/ 1954 Fischer et al 128-36 3,035,571 5/1962 Jones 128-32 3,053,250 `9/1962 Stubbs 12S-41 ROBERT `E. MORGAN, Acting Primary Examiner.

RICHARD A. GAUDET, Examiner.

L. W. TRAPP, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US761029 *Mar 28, 1904May 24, 1904Fred Harvey BrownApparatus for therapeutical purposes.
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US3035571 *Apr 13, 1959May 22, 1962Jones William RTherapeutic brassiere
US3053250 *May 2, 1961Sep 11, 1962Stubbs Doris CVibratory therapeutic treatment applicator
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Classifications
U.S. Classification601/79, 601/107
International ClassificationA61H23/02
Cooperative ClassificationA61H23/0218
European ClassificationA61H23/02F