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Publication numberUS3310875 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 28, 1967
Filing dateJul 15, 1964
Priority dateJul 15, 1964
Publication numberUS 3310875 A, US 3310875A, US-A-3310875, US3310875 A, US3310875A
InventorsRobert J Kowalski
Original AssigneeRobert J Kowalski
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Archery bow sight
US 3310875 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

28, 1967 R. J. KOWALSKI ARCHERY BOW SIGHT Filed July 15, 1964 ROBERT 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 9.? INVENTOR.

. KOWALSKI ATTORNEY March 1967 R. J. KOWALSKI ARCHERY BOW SIGHT Filed July 15, 1964 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 ROBERT J. KOWALSKI fiM I f INVENTOR ATTORNEY United States Patent 3,310,875 ARCHERY BOW SIGHT Robert J. Kowalski, 512 Berner St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 15215 Filed July 15, 1964, Ser. No. 382,917 11 Claims. (Cl. 3346) This invention relates to archery bow sights, and more particularly to a sight device having a plurality of sighting elements normally disposed out of the line of sighting and each of which is movable into the line of sighting.

As is known, bows are available today in various forms which are useful in tournaments, general shooting as well as for hunting. A professional archer employs a good quality bow and trains himself to shoot the bow by the application of a rigid pattern of events so that extreme accuracy may be accomplished. The professional archer always will nock an arrow at the same point on the bow string, draw the string back so that a particular portion of the hand contacts a particular portion of the head. For example, some archers draw the string back so that the tip of the index finger touches the corner of their month. In this manner, the feathered end of the arrow is always at substantially the same distance from the eye and there only remains the action of elevating or lowering the head of the arrow to correspond to the distance at which the target is placed. Some archers aim the bow by intuition while professional archers employ bow sights of various types.

Bow sights are employed to facilitate the sighting or aiming of the bow at difierent ranges. The most common of these sight devices employs a single sighting element which is slideable along a track extending substantially parallel to the string of the bow. The track extends above the arrow receiving portion of the bow and the sight element is elevated or lowered to a position corresponding to the range or distance over which the arrow is to be shot. Normally the track member has indicated thereon various positions which correspond to the difierent ranges through which the arrow is to be shot. An example of this type of bow sight will be found in US. Patent No. 2,998,652. This type of bow sight has proved satisfactory for use during practice and in tournaments. However, this type of bow sight has not proved satisfactory for the hunter. As is known, the hunter upon sighting the target which may, for example, be a deer, must estimate the distance of the target, nock his arrow, aim and then release the arrow. This series of actions must be accomplished as quickly as possible in order that he not lose sight of the target. When the above-described bow sight is employed, a considerable amount of time is lost in loosening the sighting element, sliding it to a new position corresponding to the estimated distance and then retightening the sighting element.

Frictional connecting means have been employed to hold the sighting element in the adjusted position. The bow sight of the above cited US. Patent No. 2,998,652 employs this type of frictional connecting means.

Another common type of how sight employs a plurality of sighting elements each of which is spaced above the arrow receiving portion of the bow, by a difierent distance. In this arrangement, each sighting element corresponds to a particular range or distance from the bow,

3,31,875 Patented Mar. 28, 1967 at which the released arrow will hit the target. The highest sighting element corresponds to a short range while the lowest sighting element corresponds to the longest range. These sighting elements are prepositioned by experimentation with the bow to which the sight is mounted. Normally each sighting element is marked to indicate its range. An example of this type of bow sight will be found in US. Patent No. 2,332,080. This type of bow sight, also has proved unsatisfactory inasmuch as during the aiming of the bow it is extremely confusing to have a plurality of sighting elements in the field of view. To avoid complete confusion, a lesser number of sighting elements may be used. For example, three sighting elements may be used. However, the hunter is handicapped in that targets seen at distances between or beyond the ranges of the three sighting elements cannot be shot with any degree of accuracy.

With the foregoing in mind, the primary object of the present invention is to provide a bow sight having a plurality of sighting elements each of which is movable into the line of sight for aiming the bow.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a bow sight which may be quickly and easily made operable for aiming the bow at various ranges.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide a bow sight having a plurality of sighting elements which are positioned so as not to confuse the archer during aiming of the bow.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a bow sight having novel means for compensating for the wind blowing transversely of the trajectory of the arrow.

In accordance with the present invention there is provided a bow sight having a plurality of sighting elements disposed above the arrow receiving portion of a bow and spaced therefrom at different distances. The sighting elements normally are disposed in an out position wherein they are out of the line of sighting. Each of the sighting elements normally is disposed in an out position and is movable between the out position and a sight position wherein they extend transversely of the body of the bow and are employed in aiming the bow. Each of the sighting elements is prepositioned upon the carrier member by experimentation. That is to say, one of the sighting elements is secured at a known position along the carrier member and is used in sighting a target which is at a predetermined distance away from the bow. That sight member is then repositioned in accordance with whether the arrow strikes the ground ahead of the target or beyond the target. Means is provided for marking each of the sighting elements with the distance at which the arrow will strike a target.

In accordance with one embodiment of the present invention, each of the sighting elements includes an L- shaped arm which is pivotally mounted to a block member which is releasably secured to the carrier member. The L-shaped arm is pivotal at the juncture of the oppositely extending arm portions. Secured to one of the arm portions is a pin member having a ball sight at its free end. The L-shaped arm thus may be pivoted so that the ball sight is brought into the line of sight and then pivoted in the opposite direction to place the ball sight out of the line of sight. Means is provided to limit the pivotal movement of the L-shaped arm to the first position and the second position. Means also is provided for maintaining the ball sight in the first and second positions.

In accordance with an alternative embodiment of the present invention, each sighting element comprises an arm releasably secured directly to the carrier member and pivotal thereabout. The arm member includes a pin member with a ball sight disposed at its free end. The pin member, again, is pivotal from the out position wherein the ball sight is out of the line of sight to the sighting position wherein the arm member extends laterally of the body of the bow and is in the line of sighting. Again, means is provided for limiting the pivotal movement of the arm member at the out position and at the sighting position.

According to a further alternative embodiment of the present invention, each sight member includes an arm carrying a pin member with a ball sight at its free end. The arm member is slideable to the right or to the left of the body of the how so that the ball sight may be projected or moved into the line of sight for aiming of the bow and then displaced laterally out of the line of sighting.

The present invention also contemplates the provision of a novel ball sight which is carried on an elongated pin member and slideable therealong. Indicated on the pin member is a center position which corresponds to a zero velocity, a first plurality of positions to the right of the center position which corresponds to increased velocities of the wind blowing from the left side of the archer; and a second plurality of positions to the left of the center position which corresponds to increased velocities of the wind blowing from the right of the archer. Since the ball sight is slideable along the elongated member, the archer need only estimate the wind velocity and thereafter slide the ball sight to the appropriate position.

The above and other objects and advantages of the present invention will become apparent from the following detailed description by reference to the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIGURE 1 is an elevation view of a conventional bow provided with the bow sight of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary isometric view of the present bow sight;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary side view illustrating a bracket and a carrier member employed in the present bow sight;

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view taken along the line IV-IV of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is an isometric view of a sight supporting arm of the present bow sight;

FIGS. 6A, 6B and 6C are plan views of a sighting element illustrating a sight position, an intermediate position and an out position at which the sight supporting arm of FIG. 5 may be placed;

FIG. 7 is a plan view, similar to FIGS. 6A-6C, illustrating a means for maintaining the sight supporting arm of FIG. 5 in the sight position of FIG. 6A or the out position of FIG. 6C;

FIG. 8 is an isometric view, sirnliar to FIG. 2, illustrating an alternative embodiment of the present bow sight;

FIG. 9 is a cross-sectional view, taken along the line IXIX of FIG. 8;

FIG. 9A is a cross-sectional view, similar to FIG. 9, illustrating a means for maintaining the sight supporting arm of FIG. 9, in the sight position or in the out position;

FIG. 10 is a cross-sectional view, taken along the line X-X of FIG. 8, illustrating the construction of the embodiment of FIG. 8;

FIG. 11 is an isometric view, similar to FIG. 8, illustrating a further alternative embodiment of the present bow sight;

FIG. 12 is a cross-sectional view taken. along the line XII-XII of FIG. 11;

FIG. 13 is a cross-sectional view illustrating the use of magnet means for maintaining the sight supporting arm of FIG. 11 in the sight position or in the out position; and

FIG. 14 is a fragmentary side view of a ball sight illustrating means for compensating for the wind.

Referring now to the drawings and in particular to FIG. 1, there is illustrated a conventional bow 20 comprising a central body portion 22, a gripping portion 24 beneath the central body portion 22 and a pair of oppositely extending bendable arms 26a, 26b. In the lower region of the central body portion 22 there is provided an arrow receiving portion 28 for receiving an arrow 30. Extending between the bendable arms 26a, 26bis a string 32 which when pulled apart from the central body portion 22 serves to bend the bendable arms 26a, 26b to provide the force for propelling the arrow 30. Secured to the rear face of the central body portion 22 is a bow sight 34 of the present invention.

The bow sight 34 will be described and is illustrated as being mounted to the rear face of the central body portion 22, as shown in FIG. 1, for example. It should be understood, however, that it is within the scope of the present invention that the bow sight 34 may be mounted on the front face of the central body portion 22 and still be operable for aiming the bow 20.

Reference is now directed to FIGS. 2-4 inclusive for a detailed description of one embodiment of the bow sight 34 of the present invention. The bow sight 34 comprises a bracket 36 having an elongated web portion 38 and flanges 40, 42 extending outwardly from each end of the web portion 38. Extending between the flanges 40, 42 is a carrier member 44 which preferably is of square configuration, as illustrated. Alternatively, the carrier member 44 may have other polygon shapes. Depending from the lower end portion of the carrier member 44 is a key member 46, of square configuration, which fits into a square opening 48 (see FIG. 4). The key member 46 cooperates with the square opening 48 to prevent rotation of the carrier member 44. At the upper end of the carrier member 44 there is provided a threaded extension 50 which extends through an opening (not shown) provided in the flange 40. A bolt 52 is threaded on the extension 50 and is disposed beneath the flange 40 While a wing nut 54 also is threaded on the extension 50 and is disposed above the flange 40. The bolt 52 and wing nut 54 serve to secure the upper end of the carrier member 44 to the flange 40. i

As can best be seen in FIG. 2 a plurality of sighting elements 56 are mounted on the carrier member 44 and disposed along the length thereof at predetermined distances above the arrow receiving portion 28.

Referring now to FIGS. 3, 5 and 6A, each of the sighting elements 56 comprises a carrier block 58 having an opening 60 (FIG. 6A) at one end thereof whose shape corresponds to the shape of the carrier member 44. The carrier block 58 is slideable along the length of the carrier member 44 and is secured in position, for example, by means of a set screw 62. A groove 64 is provided in the forward end of the carrier block 58. A sight supporting arm 66 is provided which in this embodiment is L- shaped and includes an elongated arm portion 68 and a second arm portion 70 which extends perpendicularly from the elongated arm portion 68. The sight supporting. arm 66 is received within the groove 64 of the carrier block 58 and is pivotally secured thereto by means of a suitable fastener 72. The fastener 72 extends through the carrier block 58 and through the sight supporting arm 66 at the juncture of the elongated arm portion 68 and the second arm portion 70. Extending from the free end of the elongated arm portion 68 is a conventional pin member 74 carrying a ball sight 76. The pin member 74 preferably is threadedly engaged in the elongated arm portion 68 whereby it may be moved axially toward and away from the fastener 72 thereby providing a means for compensating for the wind.

In the present bow sight 34 each of the ball sights 76 is positionable in a sighting position, indicated generally by S in FIG. 2 and in an out position, indicated generally by 0. When in the sighting position S, the ball sight will be in the line of sight of the archerthe line of sighting being illustrated in FIG. 2 by the dash-dot line numbered 78.

Reference is now directed to FIGS. 6A, 6B and 6C. In FIG. 6A, the ball sight 76 is in a sighting position S and is disposed in the line of sight 78 of the archer. The elongated arm portion 68 of the sight supporting arm 66 extends transversely of the body portion 22. The sight supporting arm 66 may be pivoted into the out position by means, for example, of the thumb as illustrated in dotted outline in FIG. 6A. In FIG. 6B the sight supporting arm 66 is in an intermediate position generally indicated by I. In FIG. 6C the sight supporting arm 66 has been pivoted into the out position 0. In the out position 0 the elongated ar m portion 68 extends rearwardly of the central body portion 22, toward the string of the bow. In the out position, the ball sight 76 is out of the line of sight 78 of the archer. As can be seen in FIG. 6A the elongated arm portion 68 abuts an inner wall 80 of the groove 64, while in FIG. 6C the second arm portion 70 abuts the inner wall 80. Hence, the inner wall 80 of the groove 64 serves as a stop means for stopping the movement of the sight supporting arm 66 at either the sighting position S or the out position 0.

As stated above, a plurality of the sighting elements 56 are mounted on the carrier member 44 and are positioned therealong at predetermined distances from the arrow receiving portion 28 of the bow 20. The positioning of the sighting elements 56 is determined by experimentation. For example, the uppermost one of the sighting elements 56 in FIG. 2 is initially secured at a point along the carrier member 44. The archers stand a predetermined distance, for example, thirty yards from a target. The sight supporting arm 66 is then pivoted in a clockwise direction so that the ball sight 76 thereof is in a sighting position. The archer then sights through the ball sight 76 and releases the arrow. If the position of the sighting element 56 is accurate, the arrow will strike that region of the target at which it was aimed. However, if the arrow falls short or goes beyond the target, then the sighting element must be repositioned to correct for the improper trajectory of the arrow. This operation is repeated until all of the sighting elements have been properly positioned. To aid in the calibration of the bow sight 34, a plurality of uniformly spaced, parallel guide lines (not shown) may be provided on the outer face of the web 38 along its entire length. These guide lines would provide reference points which would aid in the repositioning of the sighting elements 56 during calibration of the bow sight 34.

In the present bow sight 34, it is desirable that the range of each one of the sighting elements be indicated thereon. For example, as illustrated in FIG. 5 the range is indicated on each of the mutually perpendicular faces of the elongated arm portion 68 and the second arm portion 70 whereby the range indication will be visible to the archer regardless of whether the sight supporting arm 66 is in the sighting position or in the out position. Preferably, the surfaces 82, 84 of the elongated arm portion 68 and the second arm portion 70, respectively, are roughened whereby the archer may print the range directly thereon.

It should be evident, that the archer may quickly and easily place the selected one of the 'ball sights 76 into the sighting position preparatory to aiming at a target. For example, when hunting, the archer may carry the bow in a ready position wherein the arrow is nocked and ready to shoot. The arrow may be maintained in this position by the index finger, as is conventional. Upon sighting a deer, for example, the archer merely estimates the range and pivots the appropriate one of the 6 sight supporting arms 66 so that the ball sight 76 thereof is in a sighting position. at the target and releases the arrow.

Reference is now directed to FIG. 7 wherein there is illustrated a means for maintaining the sight supporting arm 66 in the sight position or the out position. The carrier block 58 and sight supporting arm 66 are conveniently formed from plastic materials, although other materials may be used. In FIG. 7 magnet means 86, 88 are .imbedded in the inner wall 80' of the carrier block 58. Rigidly secured at appropriate positions on the elongated arm portion 68 and the second arm portion 70 are plate means 90, 92, respectively, formed from magnetically susceptible material. Alternatively, the positions of the cooperating magnets 86, 88 and the plates 90, 92 could be interchanged. The strength of the magnet means 86, 88 preferably is sufficient to maintain the sight supporting arm 66 in the desired position but is weak enough so that the sight supporting arm 66 may be moved rather easily. Thus, when the sight supporting arm 66 is pivoted in a clockwise direction, the plate means 90 will be attracted by the magnet means 86 to maintain the elongated arm portion 68 engaged with the inner wall 80. Conversely, if the sight supporting arm 66 is pivoted in a counterclockwise direction, the plate means 92 will be attracted by the magnet means 88 whereby the second arm portion 70 is maintained in engagement with the inner wall 80.

Reference is now directed to FIGS. 8, 9 and 10 inclusive wherein an alternative embodiment of the present bow sight is illustrated. Corresponding numerals will be employed to identify corresponding parts already described. In this embodiment, a bracket 36- is provided having an elongated web portion 38' secured to the inboard face of the central body portion 22. The elongated web portion is provided at one side thereof with an outwardly extending flange 94 which, as will be described, serves as a stop means. A rod 96 is secured to the bracket 36' in the same manner in which the carrier member 44 is secured to the bracket 36' (see FIG. 3). Fitted over the rod 96 is a plurality of washer-like bearing elements 98. The bearing elements 98 rest one upon the other to define a cylindrical surface 100 having a plurality of peripheral surfaces 102 each of which is freely rotatable about the rod 96. A sight supporting arm 104 is provided with an opening 106 whose diameter is substantially equal to the outer diameter of the bearing elements 98 thereby being freely slideable along the cylindrical surface 100 defined by the bearing elements 98. The opening 106 is provided adjacent to a first end portion 108 of the sight supporting arm 104. Secured to the transverse face of a second end portion 1100f the sight supporting arm 104 is the pin member 74 which supports the ball sight 76.

As can be seen in FIGS. 8 and 10, a set screw 112 is threadedly engaged in the sight supporting arm i104 and engages one or more of the washer-like bearing elements 98. The set screw 112 serves to maintain the sight supporting arm 104 at a predetermined position along the length of the cylindrical surface 100. It should be noted, however, that although the sight supporting arm 104 is secured to one or more of the washer-like bearing elements 98, it is still free for pivotal movement about the rod 96 by virtue of the sliding action between the bearing elements 98 and the rod 96.

In FIGS. 8 and 9, the sight supporting arm 104 is illustrated in full lines in the sight position indicated by S, and is illustrated in dash-dot outline in the out position 0. As best seen in FIG. 9, the second end portion of the sight supporting arm 104 is engaged with the outboard face .114 of the flange 94 thereby positioning the sight supporting arm 104 in the sight position S. As illustrated in dash-dot outline, the first end portion 108 will engage the inner face 116 of the flange 94 to position the sight supporting arm 104 in the out position 0.

In FIG. 9A there is illustrated a means for maintain- Thereafter the archer sights 7' ing the sight supporting arm 104 in either the sight position or the out position. To accomplish this magnet means 118, 120 are imbedded in the inner face of the first end portion 108 and the second end portion 110, respectively. In this embodiment, at least the flange 94 is formed from magnetically susceptible material. The magnet means 118, 120 are positioned in the first and second end portions 108, 110 so that, for example, when the sight supporting arm 104 is disposed in the out positionO, as indicated in dash-dot outline, the magnet means 118 will be attracted to the flange 94. Conversely, when the sight supporting arm 104 is disposed in the sight position, as illustrated in full lines, the magnet means 120 will be attracted to and engage the outer face 114 of the flange 94. The strength of the magnet means 118, 120 preferably is sufi'icient to maintain the sight supporting arm 104 in the sight position or the out position. However, the strength of the magnet means 118, 120 preferably is such that the archer may easily pivot the sight supporting arm 104.

As in the sight supporting arm 66 of FIG. 5, the sight supporting arm 104 of this embodiment preferably is pro vided with means for indicating the range associated with the position of the sight supporting arm 104 with respect to the arrow receiving portion (not shown in FIG. 8). The second end portion 110 has oppositely disposed surfaces 122, 124 which preferably are roughened whereby the archer may print the range directly thereon. The range, thus, may be read by the archer regardless of whether the sight supporting arm 104 is in the sight position or in the out position.

Reference is now directed to FIGS. 11 and 12 wherein there is illustrated a further alternative embodiment of the present bow sight. Corresponding numerals will be employed to identify corresponding parts already described. In this embodiment, a carrier block 128 is provided with an opening 130 corresponding in shape with the carrier member 44. The carrier block is fitted over the carrier member 44 and is secured in position by means of a set screw (not shown) in the same manner as the carrier block 58 of FIG. 6A. At the inward end of the carrier block 128 there is provided a passageway 132, preferably of square cross section, which is adapted to receive a sight supporting arm 134 having a corresponding square cross section. The pin member 74 and associated ball sight 76 project from the transverse face 136 of the sight supporting arm 134.

In this embodiment, the sight supporting arm 134 is slideable within the passageway 132 whereby the ball sight 76 may be positioned in the sight position or in an out position. To accomplish this, the sight supporting arm 134 is provided with an elongated slot 138 which extends longtiudinally of the sight supporting arm 134. A fastener 140 extends through the carrier block 128 and through the slot 138. The overall arrangement is such that the sight supporting arm 134 may be pushed to the left of the carrier member 44 until the end wall of the slot 138 engages the pin 140. In this position, the ball sight will be disposed along the line of sight of the archer. Conversely, the sight supporting arm 134 may be pushed to the right of the carrier member 44 until the other end wall of the slot 138 engages the fastener 140. In this position, the ball sight 76 will be out of the line of sight of the archer.

The embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 11 and 12 can be provided with magnet means for maintaining the ball sight 76 in a sighting position or in an out position. Referring to FIG. 13, the sight supporting arm 134 is provided with magnets 142, one each disposed at the extreme ends of the elongated 138. Each magnet means 142 will be attracted to the pin 140 which preferably is formed from magnetically susceptible material. Alternatively, the pin 140 could comprise a magnet which will attract magnetically susceptible plates disposed in the positions of the magnet means 142 of. FIG. 3.

The present invention also contemplates a novel means for compensating for the wind encountered by the hunters in the field. Referring to FIG. 14, a sight supporting arm 144 is provided with a pin member 146 which projects from the transverse face 148 thereof. The sight supporting arm 14-4 may comprise any of the sight supporting arm 66, 104 or 134 described above. Slideable along the pin member 146 is a ball sight 148. The pin member 146 has indicated thereon, for example, by means of scribed lines, a center position at which the ball sight 148 is presently positioned. To the right of the center position 150 there is indicated by means of a plurality of spaced scribed lines 152 a plurality of alternative positions; while to the left of the center position 150 there is indicated by means of a second plurality of scribed lines 154 a second set of alternative positions. Each of the successive scribed lines 152 define positions at which the ball sight 148 will be disposed to compensate for a wind blowing from the left and correspond to increased wind velocities. Each of the successive scribed lines 154 define positions at which the ball sight 148 may be disposed to compensate for a wind blowing from the right of the archer and correspond to increased wind velocities. For example, the ball sight 148 is shown in dotted outline as being positioned with its right face superimposed over the third of the scribed lines 152. In this position, the ball sight will compensate for a wind blowing from the left of the archer and correspond to a wind velocity, for example, of twelve miles per hour.

Although the invention has been shown in connection with certain specific embodiments, it will be readily apparent to those skilled in the art that various changes-in form and arrangement of parts may be made to suit requirements without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. For example, the bow sight 34 may be mounted on the front face of the central body portion 22 of the bow of FIG. 1. In this instance, the embodiments described and illustrated herein would require inverting, from top-to-bottom, whereby the sighting elements would be viewable from the left-hand side of the central body portion. Furthermore, for left-handed archers, inverting the bow sight 34 when applied to the rear face of the central body portion 22, as in FIG. 1, would permit movement of the sighting elements 56 so that they project from the right-hand side of the central body portion 22.

I claim as my invention:

1. A sight for aiming a bow, comprising in combination: an elongated carrier member mounted on the body of said bow above the arrow receiving portion thereof, said carrier member extending substantially parallel with the string of said how; a plurality of sighting elements mounted on said carrier member at a plurality of locations along the length thereof, each of said sighting elements being spaced from the arrow receiving portion of said bow by a predetermined distance whereby said sighting elements may be employed for aiming said bow at different elevations to strike targets disposed at various distances from said bow; means pivotally mounting each of said sighting elements to said carrier for movement in a plane extending transversely of the body of said how, between a first position wherein the selected one of said sighting elements extends laterally of the body of said bow and is disposed in a sighting position, to a second position wherein the selected one of said sighting elements extends toward the string of said bow and is out of the line of sighting.

2. A sight for aiming a bow, comprising in combination: a bracket mounted on the body of said bow above the arrow receiving portion thereof, said bracket having rearwardly extending flange members, one each at each end thereof; an elongated carrier member supported on said bracket and disposed between said flange members; a plurality of sighting elements mounted on said carrier member at a plurality of locations along the length thereof, each of said sighting elements being spaced above the arrow receiving portion of said bow by a predetermined distance whereby said sighting elements may be employed for aiming said bow at different elevations to strike targets at various distances from said bow, each of said sighting elements comprising a carrier block releasably secured to said carrier member and a sight supporting arm including a pin member with a ball sight at the free end thereof, said sight supporting arm being pivotally supported on said carrier block for movement between a first position wherein said arm extends laterally of the body of sad bow with said ball sight in the line of sighting, to a second position wherein said ball sight is out of the line of sighting; and stop means for stopping the movement of said arm member in said first position and said second position.

3. The combination of claim 2 wherein said carrier block includes a groove formed in the rear wall thereof and extending transversely of said carrier member, said sight supporting arm having one end disposed within said groove and pivotally mounted to said carrier block, the pivotally connected end portion of said arm member having a second arm portion extending perpendicularly therefrom, said stop means comprising the inner wall portions of said groove, one of which is engaged by said sight supporting arm when in said first position and the other of which is engaged by said second arm portion when said sighting supporting arm is in said second position.

4. The combination of claim 3 including cooperating magnet and plate means, one secured to each of said inner wall portions of said groove, and one secured to said sight supporting arm and said second arm portion; said magnet and plate means cooperating to maintain said sight supporting arm in said first position and said second position.

5. A sight for aiming a bow, comprising in combination: a bracket mounted on the body of said bow above the arrow receiving portion thereof, said bracket having an elongated web portion extending substantially parallel with the string of said bow, said web portion having an end flange at each end thereof projecting outwardly from said web and an elongated projecting flange on that side of said web portion which is adjacent to the arrow receiving portion of said bow; an elongated carrier member extending between and secured to said end flanges; a plurality of sighting elements each comprising a sight supporting arm having one end thereof mounted on said carrier member; first means mounting each of said sighting elements to said carrier for movement axially along said carrier member whereby said sight may be calibrated with respect to the bow upon which it is attached, by positioning each of said sighting elements at predetermined points along the length of said carrier member, said sighting elements being employed for aiming said how; second means mounting each of said sighting elements for pivotal movement transversely of said carrier member between a sighting position wherein the selected one of said sighting elements is in the line of sight of the archer, to an out position wherein the selected one of said sighting elements is out of the line of sighting of the archer; each of said sighting elements having portions thereof which are engageable with said elongated flange when in said sighting position and said out position.

6. The combination of claim 5 including magnet means, one each disposed on each of said portions of said sighting elements which are engageable with said elongated flange, at least said elongated flange of said bracket being formed from magnetically susceptible material; said flange cooperating with said magnet means for main taining said portions engaged with said elongated flange when said sighting elements are disposed in said sighting position and said out position.

7. A sight for aiming a bow, comprising in combination: a shaft secured in spaced-apart relation to the body of said bow above the arrow receiving portion thereof;

a plurality of members rotatably carried by said shaft and providing a plurality of identical peripheral surfaces; and a plurality of sighting elements secured at predetermined locations along the length of said shaft, each of said sighting elements being secured to at least one of said members; said sighting elements being adapted for aiming said bow at different elevations to strike targets at various distances from said bow; each of said sighting elements being pivotal about said shaft from a sighting position wherein a selected one of said sighting elements is in the line of sighting of an archer, to an out position wherein said sighting elements are out of the line of sighting of an archer.

8. The combination of claim 7 wherein said members comprise washer-like bearing elements fitted over said shaft in stacked relation; said bearing elements being individually rotatable about said shaft.

9. A sight for aiming a bow, comprising in combination: an elongated carrier member mounted on the body of said bow above the arrow receiving portion thereof, said carrier member extending substantially parallel with the string of said bow; a plurality of sighting elements mounted on said carrier member at a plurality of locations along the length thereof, each of said sighting elements being spaced from the arrow receiving portion of said bow by a predetermined distance whereby said sighting elements may be employed for aiming said bow at different elevations to strike targets disposed at various distances from said bow; each of said sighting elements including a pin member having indicated thereon a center position corresponding to a zero wind velocity, a first plurality of positions on one side of said center position each successive position corresponding to an increased velocity of a wind blowing from the other side of said center position, and a second plurality of positions on the other side of said center position each successive position corresponding to an increased velocity of the wind blowing from said one side of said center position, and a ball sight slideably supported on said pin member and positionable at a selected one of said positions in accordance with the direction and velocity of the wind; and means movably mounting each of said sighting elements to said carrier member for movement between a sighting position wherein the selected one of said sighting elements is in the line of sighting, to an out position wherein the selected one of said sighting elements is out of the line of sighting.

10. A sight for aiming a bow, comprising in combination: an elongated carrier member mounted on the body of said bow above the arrow receiving portion thereof, said carrier member extending substantially parallel with the string of said how; a plurality of sighting elements mounted on said carrier member at a plurality of locations along the length thereof, each of said sighting elements being spaced from the arrow receiving portion of said bow by a predetermined distance whereby said sighting elements may be employed for aiming said how at different elevations to strike targets disposed at various distances from said bow; means movably mounting each of said sighting elements to said carrier member for movement between a sighting position wherein the selected one of said sighting elements is in the line of sighting, to an out position wherein the selected one of said sighting elements is out of the line of sighting; first magnet means for maintaining said sighting elements in said sighting position; and second magnet means which is spaced from said first magnet means for maintaining said sighting elements in said out position.

11. A sight for aiming a bow, comprising in combina tion: an elongated carrier member mounted on the body of said bow above the arrow receiving portion of said bow, said carrier member extending substantially parallel with the string of said bow; a plurality of sighting elements mounted on said carrier member at a plurality of locations along the length thereof, each of said sighting elements being spaced from the arrow receiving portion of said bow by a predetermined distance whereby said sighting elements may be employed for aiming said bow at different elevations to strike targets at various distances from said bow; means supporting each of said sighting elements to the carrier member for sliding movement transversely of said carrier member from a first position wherein the selected one of said sighting elements projects laterally of the body of said how and is in the line of sighting, to a second position which is laterally spaced from said first position and wherein the selected one of said sighting elements is out of the line of sighting; stop means for stopping the movement of References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 7/1951 Hamm 3346.4 2/1966 Rivers 3346 LEONARD FORMAN, Primary Examiner.

I. M. FREED, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2562187 *Jun 26, 1947Jul 31, 1951Hamm Hilton CBow sight
US3234651 *Sep 24, 1963Feb 15, 1966Rivers Russell CBow sight
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3579839 *Nov 5, 1968May 25, 1971Kowalski Robert JArchery bow sight
US3844268 *Nov 21, 1972Oct 29, 1974Nippon Musical Instruments MfgArchery bow having integrally molded features
US3915112 *Nov 25, 1974Oct 28, 1975Forester StanleyMeter position indicator
US4414751 *Jul 24, 1981Nov 15, 1983Mathews Nicholas ABow sight
US4635374 *Oct 11, 1985Jan 13, 1987Bradshaw John FBow sight bar
US5174269 *Feb 3, 1992Dec 29, 1992Toxonic, Inc.Archery bow sighting device
US5379746 *Jul 16, 1993Jan 10, 1995Toxorics Manufacturing, Inc.Device for mounting a sight on an archery bow
US5406712 *Apr 26, 1994Apr 18, 1995Toxonics Manufacturing, Inc.Bow hunting sight
US5509401 *Mar 3, 1994Apr 23, 1996Trubic; Donald R.Rotary bow sight
US5657740 *Feb 12, 1996Aug 19, 1997Toxonics Manufacturing, Inc.Archery bow pin sight and mount
US6000141 *Dec 19, 1997Dec 14, 1999Scout Mountain Equipment, Inc.Archery bow sight
US6508005 *Jan 25, 2001Jan 21, 2003Copper John CorporationSolo plane pin head bow sight
US6560884 *Nov 20, 2001May 13, 2003Abbas Ben AfshariFixed pin bow sight
US6732727Aug 25, 2000May 11, 2004Bear Archery, LlcArchery bow with bow speed specific sight pin block
US6938349May 12, 2003Sep 6, 2005Abbas Ben AfshariBow sight with vertically aligned pins
US7100291 *May 12, 2003Sep 5, 2006Abbas Ben AfshariFixed pin bow sight
US7124512 *Jan 14, 2005Oct 24, 2006Richard ForrestArchery bow sight
US7328515Mar 24, 2006Feb 12, 2008H-T Archery Products LlcArchery bow sights and archery bows including same
Classifications
U.S. Classification33/265, 33/DIG.100
International ClassificationF41G1/467
Cooperative ClassificationY10S33/01, F41G1/467
European ClassificationF41G1/467