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Publication numberUS3312339 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 4, 1967
Filing dateJun 19, 1964
Priority dateJun 19, 1964
Publication numberUS 3312339 A, US 3312339A, US-A-3312339, US3312339 A, US3312339A
InventorsMillion Frank R
Original AssigneeSt Regis Paper Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Flexible bags and bagging means
US 3312339 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 4, 1967 F. R. MILLION 3,312,339

FLEXIBLE BAGS AND BAGGING MEANS Filed June 19, 1964 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR FRANK R. MILLION 16 w Fug, M /aw-M April 1967 F. R. MILLION FLEXIBLE BAGS AND BAGGING MEANS 2 SheetsSheet 2 Filed June 19, 1964 United States Patent York Filed June 19, 1964, Ser. No. 376,428

9 Claims. (Cl. 206-57) This invention relates to novel flexible bags, to multiple bag packets thereof for use in filling and bagging operations, and to holder means therefor.

An accepted method used in high speed filling and bagging operations employs packets of flexible bags composed of heat scalable plastic films such as for example polyethylene or polypropylene. These generally consist of from about 50 to about 1000' bags, each of which comprises a front wall, a back wall, a bottom fold or bottom folds commonly called a gusset, and side seals, the back wall of said bags extending beyond the front wall at the mouth of the bags to form a lip. Several methods are used to align, stack, and hold said'bags in a packet form so that they may be easily handled, loaded, and subsequently dispensed singly from a bagging machine.

One such method of securing the bags in packet form comprises two or more heat welds either on the top edges of the lips or through the lips of a .group of not more than about 150 bags. The packet of bags is then placed on a spring-loaded table so that the packet which is retained on said table by a clamp is in the proper position for filling. An air stream is used to open the mouth of the uppermost bag for filling. The lips of the bags are perforated across the width of the bags between the mouth of the bag and said heat welds and clamping means. The product, guided by a funnel arrangement, is manually or automatically pushed into the bag and after filling said bag, is moved forward with a sufficient force to tear the bag from the packet at the line of perforation. The filled bag is then moved on a conveyor to a closing device. I

Another method for securing the bags in packet form employs staples in the lips of the bags in lieu of the heat welds.

Still another method for securing the bags in packet form, described in United States Patent No. 3,126,094, employs a hood about the lips of the packet of bags with metal staples joining the legs of the hood and the lips of the bags.

Packets made by the above-cited methods of stapling a group of bags are utilized in the same manner as those employing the aforesaid heat" weld packets. All of the above-cited packets are deficient in that the packets are generally limited to not more-than about 150 bags. This restriction in packet size is due to the fact that the packet is held by a clamp which retains the top portion of the lip, thus preventing the upward movement of the bags to the proper loading position. Users of said packets generally prefer packets comprising from 50 to 75 bags for bags made from films which are 1 mil to 1 /2 mil in thickness, to insure proper opening and loading of the uppermost bag as the packet is depleted. Thus it becomes necessary to either reload the bagging machine at least about every 150 bags, or if a plurality of packets is mounted on the table, the operation must be interrupted at least about every 150 bags, and the clamping means must be disengaged or the table lowered in order to remove the retained portion of the lips after each packet is depleted.

Another common method of making bag packets employs the same type lipped bags with openings cut or punched in said lips, said openings generally being circular. Fasteners are placed through the openings so that the packet is aligned and held as a unit. Said fasteners 3 ,3 12,339 Patented Apr. 4, 1967 are usually cylindrical. A fastener may have an enlarged base and an enlarged cap which retain the bags. Typical fasteners of this type, hereinafter called post fasteners, are described in United States Patent No. 3,044,263 and United States Patent No. 3,100,569. Another type fastening device comprises a metallic inverted U-shaped cylindrical fastener. The bags are stacked by placing the legs of the fastener through the openings and are retained on said fastener by means of a washer. The ends of the legs are either ball-shaped or cr-imped to retain the washer. Said fasteners are hereinafter referred to as wicket fasteners. In the use of packets of bags employing either a post or wicket type fastener, the perforation across the width of the bag is omitted. The bags are completely removed from the fasteners by tearing the flexible film material between the opening and the top edge of the lip. In some cases lines of weakness, such as perforations or slits, are made in the film between the opening and the top edge of the lip to facilitate tearing of said bags from the fastener.

Since this method permits the complete removal of each bag, the uppermost bag is always in the proper position for filling. Packets of bags utilizing fasteners generally consist of from about 250 to about 1000 bags, thereby substantially reducing the necessary down time and frequency of loading.

Bags having openings in the lips of said bags and fasteners through said openings are deficient in that tearing of said bags from said fasteners results in unsightly stretched and torn areas in the lips.

The user of said packets is thus faced with the alternate of a neat edge on the lip but an inefficient operation or a more eflicient operation but a ragged and torn lip edge.

It is an object of this invention to provide a bag packet which will consist of from about 250 to about 1000 bags.

It is also an object of this invention to provide for a bag packet in which the lips of the bags, when removed from said packet, are not torn and unsightly.

This invention comprises a bag packet containing from about 250 to about 1000 bags, said packet being divided into sub-packets consisting of not more than about bags of conventional thickness, said packet also being retained by fasteners which are passed through openings in the lips of the bags and lateral perforations in the lips of the bag extending across the width of said bags and through said openings.

This invention is further explained in connection with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a plan view of a single bag.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a sub-packet.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of a complete wicket type packet, mounted on a wicket.

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary perspective view of a Wicket type packet as in FIG. 3, showing the details of assembly.

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary side elevational view of a wicket type packet as mounted in a bagging machine.

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of the retained portion of the lips in a sub-packet.

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary plan view of a wicket type packet as mounted in the bagging machine of FIG. 5.

FIG. 8 is a fragmentary elevation of a typical post type packet as mounted in a modified bagging machine.

FIG. 9 is a fragmentary plan view of a typical post type packet as mounted in the bagging machine of FIG. 8.

In FIG. 1, reference numeral 1 indicates the side seals of the bags. Number 2 indicates the bottom fold. The bottom of the bag may be gusseted if desired. Number 3 indicates the mouth of the bag, and 4 the lip of the bag through which holes 5 and perforations 6 are cut.

In FIG. 2, staples 7 join not more than about 15 0 bags per sub-packet.

In'FIG. 3, a number of sub-packets 9 are combined,

aligned and held by wicket 8.

FIG. 4 shows how the washers 11, which retain the sub-packets on the wicket 8, are in themselves retained by the crimping 10 of said wickets.

FIG. demonstrates how packet 18, comprised of subpackets 9, is mounted on table 12, which is elevated by spring 13 acting against a fixed portion of the bagging machine 14. Wicket 8 is pivotally held by the arm or clamp 15, which is attached at its opposed end to another fixed portion of the bagging machine 16 by fasteners 17.

As shown in FIG. 6, the retained portion of the lips 19 of the first sub-packet is shown as it would appear after the bags from said first sub-packet have been dispensed. Number 20 shows the small area of contact of the retained portion of the lips with clamp 15. This portion can be removed easily by hand without requiring removal of the clamp 15 or lowering of the table 12.

FIG. 7 is a plan view of FIG. 5 and illustrates the accessibility of the retained lips 19 for easy removal as each sub-packet is depleted.

In FIG. 8, reference numeral 21 indicates a post with a cap 22, said cap being in abutment with clamp or arm 23.

While holes 5 are depicted as being circular, it is not intended that the openings be restricted to this geometric configuration. Elongated openings with the long axis perpendicular to the line of perforations may be desirable to insure said line of perforations are through said openings, despite normal variations in the positioning of said perforations and openings.

Although a specific type of a wicket and post fastener are depicted in these drawings, it is not intended that this invention be restricted to these fasteners. An obvious improvement such as providing a tab which is fastened to the sub-packet by means of one or more of the staples and extending laterally from the retained portion of the lip can be added. Said tab would facilitate removal of the retained portion of the lip after each packet is depleted.

I claim:

1. An open-mouthed flexible bag of plastic sheet material comprising a front wall, a back wall and a lip extending from said back wall beyond the open defining terminal edge of said front wall, said lip being formed with at least one opening and with a line of perforations extending between the defining side edges of said lip and across said opening therein.

2. A bag sub-packet for use in bagging and filling operations comprising a plurality of superimposed and aligned open-mouthed bags of plastic sheet material, each comprising a front wall, a back wall and a lip extending from said back wall beyond the open defining terminal edge of said front wall, said lip being formed with at least one opening and with a line of perforations extending between the defining side edges of said lip and across said opening therein, and fastening means securing said bags together disposed in said lips between their said line of perforations and the outermost edge of the lips parallel to said line.

3. The sub-packet of claim 2 comprising up to about individual bags.

4. A bag packet composed of a plurality of sub-packets of claim 2 and comprising from about 250 to about 1,000 individual bags.

5. A bag sub-packet for use in bagging and filling means, comprising a plurality of open-mouthed, superimposed, aligned bags of flexible plastic sheet material each comprising a front wall, a back wall, a folded bottom and a lip extending from said back wall beyond the open defining terminal edge of said front wall, said lip being formed with a line of perforations parallel to said front Wall edge and a pair of spaced apertures on said line of perforations, and means securing the lips of said bags together disposed between the line of said perforations and openings and the outer parallel edge of said lips.

6. The sub-packet of claim 5 wherein the securing means are staples.

7. The sub-packet of claim 5 wherein the securing means are heat welds.

8. Bagging and filling means comprising a plurality of superimposed and aligned sub-packets of claimv 5 and holder means therefor comprising cylindrical arms in relatively slidable engagement through said lip apertures.

9. Bagging and filling means comprising a plurality of superimposed and aligned sub-packets of claim 5 and holder means therefor comprising cylindrical arms in relatively slidable engagement through said lip apertures and an integral cross member defining a substantially U-shaped wicket, a supporting base, and a bracket arm fixedly secured at one end to said base and in pivotal engagement at its other end with said cross member.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,112,036 9/ 1914 Stiewe 28125 3,008,569 11/196 1 Murch 20657 3,021,947 2/ 1962 Sylvester et a1. 206-57 3,044,233 7/ 1962 Altman 206-57 3,100,569 8/1963 White 20657 3,145,839 8/1964 Lowry 206-57 3,184,055 5/1965 Davis et al. 206--57 FOREIGN PATENTS 773,341 9/ 1934 France. 171,050 10/ 1934 Switzerland.

THERON E. CONDON, Primary Examiner,

W, T. DIXSON, Assistant Examiner,

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3353661 *Nov 5, 1965Nov 21, 1967Hercules MembrinoPackage of plastic bags
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Classifications
U.S. Classification206/493, 206/526, 53/572, 206/554
International ClassificationB65D33/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65D33/001
European ClassificationB65D33/00B