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Publication numberUS3313376 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 11, 1967
Filing dateSep 1, 1965
Priority dateSep 1, 1965
Publication numberUS 3313376 A, US 3313376A, US-A-3313376, US3313376 A, US3313376A
InventorsSr Warren L Holland
Original AssigneeSr Warren L Holland
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Lightweight elevator
US 3313376 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

AM H, 1967 w. L. HQLLAND, SR www@ LIGHTWEIGHT ELEVATOR I Filed Sept- 1. 1965 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 INV ENTOR ATTORNEYS W. L. HOLLAND, @R

LIGHTWEIGHT ELEVATOR 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Seplt. l, 1965 pwll M, E67 w. a.. HOLLAND. SR

LIGHTWEIGHT ELEVATOR 5 Sheetsheet 3 Filed Sept. l, 1965 Hllll INVENTOR WQEQQEN L. Mmmm,

Daum we@ BY i? Waso'm, 'EMMQQQJ ATTORNEYS M, W. L. HOLLAND, SR 393397@ LIGHTWEIGHT ELEVATOR Filed Sept. 1. 1965 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTOR WARREN L. oLmNmS.

ATTORNEYS L. HQLLANQ, s@ 3:33337@ LIGHTWEIGHT ELEVATOR Filed Sept. l, 3.965

INVENTOR 3,313,376 LIGHTWEIGHT ELEVATOR Warren L Holland, Sr., 555 Mount Vernon Ave., Portsmouth, Va. 23707 Filed Sept. 1, 1965, Ser. No. 489,782 7 Claims. (Cl. IS7- 2) This invention relates in general to lightweight elevators and more particularly to elevators adapted to be used for lifting building materials up scaffolding at construction sites and is a continuation-impart of my earlier application Ser. No. 438,885, tiled Mar. ll, 1965.

Normally, in the building trades, lightweight elevators have always been extremely difcult to set up due to the multiplicity of nuts, bolts and other small members used in holding the elevator frame work to the scaffolding. There has long been a need in the building industry for an easily erectable lightweight elevator which can be erected in minimum time wherein the cost of the structure and the cost of erection would be low.

Therefore, it is an object of this invention to provide a lightweight building materials elevator which is of low cost and is easily erectable.

Another object of this invention is the provision of a lightweight building materials velevator which is erectable in sections and is comparable With standard scaffolding, so that the sections may be adjustably attached thereto.

Yet another object of this invention is the provision of a sectional lightweight elevator having upright standards with a longitudinal gear rack which is adapted to interconnect with a geared output shaft from a motor attached to the lifting platform whereby when the motor is energized the platform is caused to move along the upright standards.

A still further object of this invention is the provision of a sectional lightweight elevator having a motorized lifting platform ladapted to move along a track by means of a chain drive mechanism.

Further aims, objects and advantages of this invention will appear from a consideration of the following description and the accompanying drawings showing for purely illustrative purposes embodiments of this invention. It is to be understood, however, that the description is not to be taken in a limiting sense, the scope of the invention being defined in the appended claims.

In the drawings:

FIGURE l is a perspective View of the invention used with standard metal scaffolding, and more particularly connected to a main upright standard;

FIGURE 2 is a perspective view similar to that shown in FIGURE l, however, showing the invention connected to the cross bracing of the scaffolding;

FIGURE 3 is a side elevation view of the invention connected to the main upright of the scaffolding;

FIGURE 4 is a side elevation view of the invention similar to FIGURE 3, however, showing the opposite side;

FIGURE 5 is a vertical section view taken along lines 5-5 of FIGURE 3;

FIGURE 6 is a horizontal section view taken along lines 6-6 of FIGURE 3;

FIGURE 7 is a horizontal section view taken along lines 7 7 of FIGURE 5;

FIGURE 8 is a horizontal section view taken along lines 8 8 of FIGURE 3;

FIGURE 9 is a partial vertical section view taken along lines 9--9 of FIGURE 3;

FIGURE 10 is a perspective view of another embodiment of the invention showing the chain drive mechanism for effecting lift of the platform;

FIGURE 11 is a horizontal section View taken along lines 11-11 of FIGURE l0;

nited States Patent FIGURE l2 is a partial side elevation view of the embodiment shown in FIGURE l0;

FIGURE 13 is a vertical section view taken along lines 13--13 of FIGURE l2;

FIGURE 14 is a lvertical section view taken along lines 4-14 of FIGURE 12; and

FIGURE 15 is a partial enlarged view of the driving wheels for the chain drive mechanism.

Referring to the drawings wherein like reference characters designate corresponding parts throughout the several figures, the lightweight elevator of a preferred ernbodiment of the invention is shown by the numeral 19. The elevator generally comprises a plurality of vertically disposed rack support members 11 fitted one on top of the other to a desired height. Adapted to be moved vertically along the rack support members 11 is a building materials platform 12 which comprises a flat horizontally disposed surface upon which any suitable material is to be .placed by lifting to a desired height. Disposed beneath the materials platform 12 is a motor mounting platform 13 upon which is mounted the electrical motor 14 which provides the moving force for the elevator.

A suitable electrical motor for the present invention capable of lifting 300 pounds to a height of 35 to 40 feet, would be one having a rated output of 1A. horsepower, delivering 1750 Ir,p.m. In order to provide the suitable torque the motor output should be reduced to 3() rpm. and the motor should incorporate a magnetic brake of known design which locks the output shaft 15 whenever the current to the motor is cut olf. The motor will be controlled .from the ground by suitable switch means through the current lead 16.

At the free end of the output shaft 15 ofthe motor 14 is a pinion gear 17 whose teeth are adapted to engage teeth 19 of the rack 21. The rack 21 is supported by the inside surface of the short leg 22 of the L shaped rack support member or track means member 11.

Maintaining the pinion 17 in engagement with the rack 21 is a platform support bracket or carrier assembly 23 which comprises rear support surface wheel carrie-r 24, rack surface wheel carrier 25 and the side support surface wheel carrier 25. Mounted for rotative movement on the wheel carrier 24 are pairs of support wheels 27 and 23. Each pair of wheels are oppositely disposed on opposed sides of the long leg 29 of the L shaped support member. The side support surface wheel carrier eX- tends at right angles to the wheel carrier 25 and mounted thereon for rotative movement is a pair of support Wheels 31 which are adapted to engage the outside surface of the short leg 22. Mounted on the rack surface wheel carrier 25 are pairs of opposed wheels 32 and 33 lying in a parallel plane with wheels 27 and 28 and rotatively engaging the outside surface 34 of the track 21, on the one hand, and the outside surface of the long leg 29 of racksupporting member 11.

The materials platform 12 is interconnected in a xed engagement with the platform support bracket assembly 23 by means of the platform braces 35 which are secured between the platform 12 and the wheel carriers 24, 25. The rack support members 11 are so designed to fit one upon the other in an end-to-end relation that they form a rigid vertical unitary member once they are in place. Each support member 11 is provided with a coupling system affixed to the long leg 29 of the member 11. The coupling system comprises, at each remote end ofthe long leg 29, a coupling half 36 which is elongated and has an aperture therethrough. In order to interconnect the coupling halves 36 there is provided a coupling pin 37 which is threaded at one end to receive a nut 38. The coupling pin 37 would, once the `apertures of the coupling halves are aligned, be placed through the apertures and then 3 drawn tight by the nut 38. This procedure would securely tix the support members 11 to one another.

Since scaffolding comes in only a limited number of stock sizes, it is anticipated by this invention that the present elevator would be adaptable to commonly used scaffolding. The present elevator is so flexible that it may be attached generally any place along a standard scaffolding end frame. In FIGURE 1 the elevator 10 is shown attached to the main upright standard 39 of an end frame 41 while in FIGURE 2 the elevator is illustrated attached to the frame rungs 41. To attach the rack supports 11 to the end frame 41 of the scaffolding there is provided upon the rear surface of the long leg 29 of the support member an upper rack hanger 43 and a lower rack hanger 44.

The upper rack hanger 43 comprises spacer bar 45, preferably welded or otherwise connected to support member 11, a combination vertical and horizontal scaffolding engaging member 46 and a horizontal scaffolding engaging member 47. Each of the scaffolding engagingmembers 46 and 47 are of generally I shaped configuration, however in the construction shown by the figures the bottom of the J is pointed. Combination member 46 is an extension of spacer bar 45 and has an elongated body wherein the short leg of the I is notched as indicated at 48, so that the notch can encircle an upright standard 39 as shown in FIGURE l. In this position the rungs 42 is also encompassed by the member 46 thereby giving to the support member 11 both lateral and vertical support. Obviously the end 49 of member 46 that is remote from spacer bar 45 is open, as shown in FIGURE 9, to allow the rung 42 to be placed therein. Lying transverse to combination engaging member 46, and fixed to end 49 by its longer leg, is the horizontal scaffolding engaging member 47. This member is so positioned that the edge of its shorter leg lies in the same plane as the deepest portion of the I, as is shown in FIGURE 9. This allows a rung 42 to lie in member 46 without being interfered with by member 47. As seen in FIGURE 2, scaffolding engaging member 47 hangs the rack support member 11 from the rungs 42.

The lower rack hanger 44 is spaced vertically downward from hanger 43 and comprises a spacer bar 51 lying in the same plane as bar 45 of the upper hanger 43. Projecting from the spacer bar 51 is a U shaped stabilizer -52 wherein the bottom 53 of the stabilizer is affixed to the spacer bar 51. Each of the legs 54, 55 have at their remote ends a circular notch 56 which is adapted to engage a lower rung 42 in the manner shown by FIGURE 2 when the support `members are hung on the side of the end frame 41. However, when the support members 11 are hung on the front of the end frames as depicted in FIG- URE 1, the stabilizer 52 engages the upright standard 39 at the U bottom 53.

In setting up and operating the elevator of this invention it is merely necessary to take a support member 11 and hang the upper rack hanger 43 in the desired position as shown by either FIGURE l or 2. If it is hung as in FIGURE 1, that is, on standard 39, then the stabilizer 51 is positioned against the same standard 39 at the bottom 53 of the U. However, if the method of approach is used as shown by FIGURE 2, then the horizontal scaffolding engaging member is placed over a rung 42 and the notches 56 of the stabilizer are placed adjacent to, and partially encircling, a lower rung 42. In effect it is easily seen that the stabilizer is merely for controlling the moment arm of the support members 11 once they are hung by upper rack hanger 43.

Once the completed elevator system is assembled, the platform 12 may be run up and down at will. It is anticipated that the motor 12 will be controlled by a switch from the ground which will energize the motor through lead 16 so that pinion 17 is caused to move upwardly or downwardly along rack 21, thereby moving materials platform in the desired manner.

In the second embodiment of the present invention depicted in FIGURES -15, a motor 14a having an output shaft 15a is supported by a platform 13a. The motor is Igenerally the same as the one shown in the previous embodiment. Supporting the motor and the support plat form upon the elevator track 101 is a pair of spaced apart platform support brackets and carrier assemblies 102 and 103. In order that the motor and platform may be raised along the track 101, the platform support brackets 102 and 103 each have a pair of front carrier support wheels 104 and a pair of rear support carrier wheels 105. To prevent lateral movement of the platform assembly, the platform support brackets 102 and 103 have projecting outwardly therefrom side support carrier wheel brackets 106 and 107. These last mentioned brackets each have a pair of side support carrier wheels 108 which operatively engage in rolling relation the edges 109 of the forward support surface 110 of the T shaped track 101. As is readily apparent, the front support carrier wheels engage the broad surface of the forward support surface 110 and the rear support carrier wheels enga-ge the rear surface of the forward support surface 110.

The individual sections of the track 101 are connected together in a manner similar to that of the previous embodiment wherein the ends of the track members each have a coupling half 36a through which the coupling pin 37a is adapted to extend, and to be drawn into tight relation with the coupling halves by a nut 38a. Each T shaped track member 101 has rearwardly extending from the forward support surface 110 a leg 111 which serves to brace the forward support surface 110 and to provide a connecting point for the upper and lower T bars 112 and 113. The T bars 112 and 113 are operatively interconnected with the upper and lower rack hangers 43a and 44a.

The upper rack hanger 43u comprises generally a channeled shaped slidable engagement means 114 which is adapted to interengage the T bar 112 for Vertical sliding movement therealong. Extending at each side of the channel member 114 pairs of lock screws 115 which lock the upper hanger 43a at the desired position with respect to the T bar 112. The hanger 43a is principally of stiff and rigid construction comprising a combination of vertical and horizontal scaffolding engaging member 116 and a horizontal scaffolding engaging member 117. Each of the scaffolding engaging members 116 and 117 is of generally J shaped construction; however, in the construction shown by the gures of this particular ernbodiment, the bottom of the J comes to a vary sharp point. Lying transverse to the member 116 and connected thereto by the longer leg is connecting member 117. This member is so positioned that the edge of the shorter leg lies in the same plane as the deepest portion of the J as was evident in the previous embodiment.

This allows the rung 42 to lie in member 116 without being interferred with by member 117. The shorter leg of the I of member 117 has projecting outwardly in the same plane therewith projecting tabs 119 which are used to affix the track 101 to a wooden type of scaffolding, as opposed to the metal rung type that is shown herein. In such an environment, the tabs 119 would have suitable screw type fasteners placed therethrough in holes y121 to affix the upper rack hanger 43a to the wooden scaffolding.

The lower rack hanger 44a is spaced downwardly from the upper hanger 43a and comprises a channel shaped member 122 lying in the same plane as the channel shaped member 114 of the upper hanger. The channel member 112 is adapted to operatively engage the T bar 113 and slide therealong in the manner described for the upper hanger. Projecting from the channel member 122 is a U shaped stabilizer 123, with the bottom 124 of the stabilizer being affixed to the channel member 122. The stabilizer 123 has a pair of outwardly extending legs `125 and 126, which are notched as indicated by numeral 127, and are adapted to embrace the vertical siderail of the scaffolding 42. The lowermost portion of the legs 125 and 126 have extending outwardly perpendicular to the legs, projecting tabs 128 which, in a manner similar to that described for tab 43a, may suitably affix hanger 44a to wooden scaffolding through the apertures 129.

In the present described embodiment the lightweight elevator is moved along the track 101 by means of a chain drive system which comprises a chain drive lift Wheel 131 attached to the motor drive shaft 15a and having thereon a lift wheel gear 132. In the same plane as wheel 131 is an idler lift wheel 133 having an idler lift wheel gear 134, similar to gear 132, with the gears in mesh with one another. Each of the wheels 131 and 133 are similar in nature, and are of known construction, wherein the lift chain 13S is engaged around the top of idler wheel 133 and then threaded under the drive wheel 131 and thence is attached at the top of the track 101 to a chain hook 136 which is affixed to the chain hook plate 137. The chain hook plate 137 is removably attached to the track 101 so that as each additional track section is added, the chain hook plate 137 may be detached and then reattached at the topmost track section when it has been suitably emplaced.

In operation of the present embodiment the motor 14a is energized, which in turn causes the chain drive lift wheel 131 to rotate thereby driving the chain under this wheel and over the idler lift wheel. As the drive wheel 131 rotates, it causes the idler wheel 133 to rotate by means of the intermeshing gears 132 and 134. Since the lift wheels 131 and 133 rotate in opposite direction, it should be noted that constant tension is maintained upon the chain and no slack develops between the wheels. In order to maintain the chain within the drive sprocket mechanism of the two lift wheels, there is provided a pair of chain guards 138 and 139 functioning with respective lift wheels 131 and 133. These guards prevent the chain from falling, or jumping, out of the link cavities within the lift wheels thereby maintaining a safe condition upon the elevator. If it should be desired at any time to add sections of track 101, it is merely necessary to run the elevator platform to the portion of the track wherein the carriage hold bracket 140 is positioned, and then manually engage therewith the carriage hold pin 141. This pin would then slip into the slot provided between the carriage hold bracket and the base of the track 101. Such an engagement will position the elevator in a constant vertical plane so that the chain hook plate 137 may be removed and a new track section be placed atop the current track section. At this time considerable slack will be introduced to the chain above the lifting platform so that the chain hook -plate 137 can be reattached at the uppermost section. Once the chain hook plate 137 is firmly reattached, the motor operator can merely activate the motor 14a thereby taking up the slack in the chain and once the slack is taken up, the elevator will begin to move upwardly once again, thereby disengaging the carriage hold pin 141 from the bracket 140 and, due to the tension in springs 142, the hold pin 141 will be returned to its disengaged position.

Various modifications may be made in the invention without departing from the spirit and scope thereof, and it is desired, therefore, that only such limitations shall be placed thereon as are imposed by the prior art and are set forth in the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A lightweight easily erectable elevator for use with scaffolding comprising a plurility of vertically disposed sectional track means secured in an end-to-end relation adapted to be secured to the scaffolding, the track means including a plurality of elongated support members, a toothed rack secured to each support member and extending the full length therealong, first and second hanger means fixed to each sectional track means to effect the securing of the track means to the scaffolding, each hanger means having a first and second supporting positions, the first hanger means comprising a spacer bar extending outwardly from the support member and a pair of hooks secured to the spacer bar having a I shaped cross-section, the first hook being notched in the short leg of the I to provide the first supporting position, the second hook lying transverse to the longitudinal axis of the cross-sectional length of the first hook and adapted to provide the second supporting position, lifting means in operative relation with the track means and adapted to move therealong, motive means disposed intimately with the lifting means, the motive means engaging the track means, whereby when the motive means is energized the lifting means is caused to move along the track means.

2. A lightweight easily erectable elevator for use with scaffolding comprising, a plurality of vertically disposed sectional track means secured in an end-to-end relation adapted to be secured to the scaffolding, the track means including a plurality of elongated support members, a toothed rack secured to each support member and extending the full length therealong, first and second hanger means fixed to each sectional track means to effect the securing of the track means to the scaffolding, each hanger means having a first and second supporting positions, the second hanger means comprising a spacer bar extending outwardly from the support member, a U shaped stabilizer member affixed to the last named spacer bar adapted to interconnect with the scaffolding, the bottom of the U providing the first supporting position for the second hanger means, the free end of each leg of the U shaped stabilizer being notched to provide the second supporting position for the second hanger means, lifting means in operative relation with the track means and adapted to move therealong, motive means disposed intimately with the lifting means, the motive means engaging the track means, whereby when the motive means is energized the lifting means is caused to move along the track means.

3. A lightweight easily erectable elevator for use with scaffolding comprising, a plurality of vertically disposed sectional track means secured in an end-to-end relation adapted to be secured to the scaffolding, the track means including a plurality of elongated support members, a toothed rack secured to each support member, and extending the full length therealong, first and second hanger means fixed to each sectional track means to effect the securing of the track means to the scaolding, each hanger means having a first and second supporting positions, the first hanger means comprising a spacer bar extending outwardly from the support member and a pair of hooks secured to the spacer bar having a J shaped cross-section, the rst hook being notched in the short leg of the J to provide the first supporting position, the second hook lying transverse to the longitudinal axis of the cross-sectional length of the first hook and adapted to provide the second-supporting position, the second hanger means corn- Y prising a spacer bar extending outwardly from the support member, a U shaped stabilizer member affixed to the last named spacer bar adapted to interconnect with the scaffolding, the bottom of the U providing the first supporting position for the second hanger means, the free end of each leg of the U shaped stabilizer being notched to provide the second supporting position for the second hanger means, lifting means in operative relation with the track means and adapted to move therealong, motive means disposed intimately with the lifting means, the motive means engaging the track means, whereby when the motive means is energized the lifting means is caused to move along the track means.

4. A lightweight easily erectable elevator for use with scaffolding comprising, a plurality of vertically disposed sectional track means secured in an end-to-end relation adapted to be secured to the scaffolding, the track means including a plurality of elongated support members, a toothed rack secured to each support member and extending the full length therealong, the support members being of L shaped cross-section and the rack being secured to the shorter of the two legs of the support member, coupling means integral with the support members to effect end-to-end securing of the support members, first and second hanger means fixed to each sectional track means to effect the securing of the track means to the scaffolding, each hanger means having a first and second supporting positions, the first hanger means comprising a spacer bar extending outwardly from the support member and a pair of hooks secured to the spacer bar having a I shaped cross-section, the first hook being notched in the short leg of the J to provide the first supporting position, the second hook lying transverse to the longitudinal axis of the cross-sectional length of the first hook and adapted to provide the second supporting position, the second hanger means comprising a spacer bar extending outwardly from the support member, a U shaped stabilizer member affixed to the last named spacer bar adapted to interconnect with the scaffolding, the bottom of the U providing the first supporting position for the second hanger means, the free end of each leg of the U shaped stabilizer being notched to provide the second supporting position for the second hanger means, lifting means in operative relation with the track means and adapted to move therealong, motive means disposed intimately with the lifting means, the motive means engaging the track means, whereby when the rnotive means is energized the lifting means is caused to move along the track means.

5. A lightweight easily erectable elevator and movable platform for use with scaffolding comprising, a plurality of vertically disposed sectional track means secured in an end-to-end relation adapted to be secured to the scaffolding, hanger means movably engaged with the sectional track means to effect the securing of the track means to the scaffolding, lifting means in operative relation with the track means and suspended therefrom at a suspension point, motive means disposed intimately with the lifting means, the motive means engaging the lifting means, the lifting means including a linked chain and a plurality of associated drive wheels interengaged therewith, the motive means adapted to drive the drive wheels to effect movement of the platform along the linked chain, each hanger means having a first and second supporting position, a T shaped bar extending from the track means, each hanger means having a guide member engaging the T bar and adapted for movement therealong, means for fixedly locking the platform to the track means at predetermined times, said locking means including a holding bracket affixed to the track means and a holding pin associated with the platform for selectively engaging the holding bracket, whereby when the platform is locked to the track means the motive means may be operated to provide slack in the linked chain between the motive means and the suspension point.

6. A lightweight easily erectable elevator and movable platform for use with scaffolding comprising, a plurality of vertically disposed sectional track means secured in an end-to-end relation adapted to be secured to the scaffolding, first and second hanger means movably engaged with the sectional track means to effect the securing of the track means to the scaffolding, lifting means in operative relation with the track means and suspended therefrom at a suspension point, motive means disposed intimately with the lifting means, the motive means engaging the lifting means, the lifting means including a linked chain and a plurality of associated drive wheels interengaged therewith, the motive means adapted to drive the drive wheels to effect movement of the platform along the linked chain, each hanger means having a first and second supporting position, the second hanger means comprising a .spacer bar extending outwardly from the support member, a U shaped stabilizer member affixed to the last named spacer bar adapted to interconnect with the scaffolding, the bottom of the U providing the first supporting position for the second hanger means, the free end of each leg of the U shaped stabilizer being notched to provide the second supporting position for the second hanger means, a T shaped bar extending from the track means, each hanger means having a guide member engaging the T bar and adapted for movement therealong, means for fixedly locking the platform to the track means at predetermined times, said locking means including a holding bracket affixed to the track means and a holding pin associated with the platform for selectively engaging the holding bracket, whereby when the platform is locked to the track means the motive means may be operated to provide slack in the linked chain between the motive means and the suspension point.

7. A lightweight easily erectable elevator and movable platform for use with scaffolding comprising, a plurality of vertically disposed sectional track means secured in an end-to-end relation adapted to be secured to the scaffolding, first and second hanger means movably engaged with the sectional track means to effect the securing of the track means to the scaffolding, lifting means in operative relation with the track means and suspended therefrom at a suspension point, motive means disposed intimately with the lifting means, the motive means engaging the lifting means, the lifting means including a linked chain and a plurality of associated drive wheels interengaged therewith, the motive means adapted to drive the drive wheels to effect movement of the platform along the linked chain, each hanger means having a first and second supporting position, the first hanger means comprising a spacer bar extending outwardly from the support member and a pair of hooks secured to the spacer bar having a .l shaped cross-section, the first hook being notched in the short leg of the J to provide the first supporting position, the second hook lying transverse to the longitudinal axis of the cross-sectional length of the first hook and adapted to provide the second supporting position, a T shaped bar extending from the track means, each hanger means having a guide member engaging the T bar and adapted for movement therealong, means for fixedly locking the platform to the track means at predetermined times, said locking means including a holding bracket affixed to the track means and a holding pin associated with the platform for selectively engaging the holding bracket, whereby when the platform is locked to the track means the motive means may be operated to provide slack in the linked chain between the motive means and the suspension point.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 394,781 12/1888 Maurer l87--2 1,701,963 2/1929 Weaver 187-19 2,305,563 12/1942 Vecker 182--115 2,569,653 10/ 1951 Boldecker 187-2 3,088,545 5/1963 Meyer 187--2 3,158,225 11/1964 Almgren 248-235 3,215,227 11/1965 MacChesney 187-95 FOREIGN PATENTS 250,989 1/1961 Australia.

864,960 4/1961 Great Britain.

638,960 4/ 1962 Italy.

EVON C. BLUNK, Primary Examiner.

H. C. HORNSBY, Assistant Examiner.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification187/241, 182/129, 248/214, 187/900, 182/141, 187/270, 187/271, 187/242
International ClassificationB66B9/187, B66B9/02, E04G1/20
Cooperative ClassificationB66B9/187, B66B9/022, Y10S187/90, E04G1/20
European ClassificationB66B9/187, B66B9/02B, E04G1/20