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Publication numberUS3313467 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 11, 1967
Filing dateApr 27, 1965
Priority dateApr 27, 1965
Publication numberUS 3313467 A, US 3313467A, US-A-3313467, US3313467 A, US3313467A
InventorsAnderskow Juel U, Lewis Frank S
Original AssigneeAnderskow Juel U, Lewis Frank S
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Corrugated carton box
US 3313467 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent O 3,313,467 CORRUGATED CARTON BOX Jael U. Anderskow, 1394 Dennis, Des Plaines, Ill. 60016, and Frank S. Lewis, 3332 Lake Drive, Wilmette, Ill. 66991 Filed Apr. 27, 1965, Ser. No. 451,185 Claims. (Cl. 229-37) ThisI invention relates to a rectangular, cardboard pattern dimensioned, scored and slotted to permit folding into a carton for packaging products of varying heights.

Heretofore there have been times when a producer of products, who had need for cartons of standard lengths and widths, had an urgent need for one with closure ilaps that could be folded into such relationship as to completely close the open top over contents that at times exceeded the normal depth of the carton and at other times were less than such depth. One industry wherein this is especially true is the printing industry. There the problem arises out of the fact that successive mill runs of paper of certain standard weight, are likely to so vary in thickness that the depth of the stacks of the same number of sheets from different mill runs will vary considerably. Such establishments, generally, have stocks of carton patterns structured for packaging a uniform number of sheets of standard length and width. However, because of the above-noted variation in mill runs, Stich standard cartons at one time may have the same predetermined number of sheets extend materially above the plane of the hinged closure flaps. This makes for the problem of properly closing in such varying-height stacks of printed material. At ot 1er times a less quantity of printed sheets, stacked in a carton dimensioned for conventional length, width and depth, require filling in the unused space up to the plane of the hinged ilaps.

The main objects of this invention are: to provide an improved formation of a cardboard pattern for a carton of predetermined length, Width and depth with closure flaps adapted to be folded in to secure in place products of varying heights; to provide an improved pattern of this kind wherein the closure flaps, hinged along One of the pair of longitudinal scores, are of a width, transversely of the pair of longitudinal scores, equal to the transverse spacing of the parallel scores and are multiplely scored parallel to the longitudinal scores to permit the closure flaps to be folded at varying levels, above the plane of their hinged connection along the one longitudinal score, to completely close-in the top of the product; to provide an improved pattern of this kind wherein one pair of closure flaps are medially slotted or clefted transversely to the longitudinal scores to permit portions of one part of each such pair of flaps to be folded in to seat against the top of the contents at a level below the plane of the overlapped other closure llaps; and to provide a carton pattern of this kind of such simple structuring as to make its manufacture and marketing exceedingly economical Iand its use very facile and highly gratifying to users thereof.

In the adaptation shown in the accompanying drawings:

FGURE 1 is a planar view of a carton-forming pattern structured in accordance with this invention;

FlG. 2 is a perspective view of the pattern of FIG. 1 folded into an in-use carton with the top closure flaps overlapped at substantially the plane of their hinged connection to the carton sides and ends;

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view of an in-use carton wherein the end aps have parts folded in under the side flaps to seat against contents less in height than the depth of the carton;

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view of an in-use carton, formed from the pattern of FIG. l, as viewed from the plane of the line 4 4 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of an in-use carton, formed 3,313,467 Patented Apr. 11, 1967 ICC from the pattern of FlG. 1, wherein the closure flaps are folded in to accommodate contents of a height much greater than the depth of the carton between the parallel scores which define the normal sides and ends of the carton:

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary, cross-sectional view taken on the plane of the line 6-6 of FlG. 5; and

FIG 7 is an enlarged, cross-sectional, fragmentary detail of the scoring for the hinge connection of the closure llaps to the carton main body section, as viewed from the plane of the line 7 7 of FIG. 1.

The essential conception of this invention involves a cardboard pattern, preferably of the corrugated type, which in -planar form is die cut and variously scored longitudinally and transversely and slitted transversely to divide the main body portion into foutr rectangular sections each with a pair of oppositely-extending flaps along the respective longitudinal scores, the aps along one `such longitudinal score being of a width transversely of the longitudinal scores substantially equal to the transverse spacing of such scores and multiplely scored parallel with such scores, with two of such flaps being transversely slit into dual parts, whereby the pattern upon being folded into carton form the flaps along the one longitudinal score are adapted for re-lative disposition to completely close the carton over contents that extend either abov'e or below the one longitudinal score.

A carton pattern embodying the foregoing concept comprises a rectangular piece of cardboard having a pair of spaced, longitudinal parallel scores 11 and 12 and three transverse scores 13, 14 and 15 defining the four main body sections 16, 17, 13 and 19 and the respective Ipairs of integrated flaps 21-22, 23-24, 25-25, and 27-28, separated by appropriate transverse slits extending oppositely outward from the longitudinal scores and aligned fwith the transverse scores 13, 14 and 15.

All of these tlaps are rectangular and of lengths parallel with the longitudinal scores substantially equal to that of the respective main body sections 16, 17, 18 and 19 'wherewith these flaps are integrated. The flaps 21, 23, 25 and 27 are of equal width, transversely of the longitudinal scores 11 and 12, substantially half the transverse spacing of these scores 11 and 12. These flaps 21, 23, 25 and 27 constitute the bottom of a carton formed by folding in the pattern, as will be explained presently.

However, the respectively opposite flaps 22, 24, 26 and 28 are of equal widths, transversely of the longitudinal scores 11 and 12, to the spacing of these longitudinal scores 111 and 12. These four flaps 22, 24, 26 and 28 constitute the top closure for a carton formed by folding in the pattern, as will be described presently. These four closure flaps 22, 24, 26 and 28 are formed with series of scores 29 (six in nurnber as shown in FIG. l) uniformly spaced from and parallel with the longitudinal score 11. In addition the alternate flaps 24 and 28 are formed with transverse medial slits 31 and 32, dividing the respective flaps into dual parts a and b.

The aforesaid dimensioning and scoring of these flaps 22, 24, 26 and 28 provide for a carton that will accommodate three diiferent stocks of carton contents; (a) one with the top of the contents substantially level with the score 11 (tFIGS. 2 and 4); (b) another with the top of the contents spaced various distances above the score 11 (FIGS. 5 and 6); and (c) with the top of the carton contents below the score 1,1 (tFIG. 3).

The pattern is converted into a carton in the following manner:

After creasing and folding the pattern along the scores 11, l12, 13, 14 and 415, the main -body sections 16, 17, y1S and 19 would be positioned in rectangular relationship with the free edges of sections 16 and 17 .abutting and secured together by a suitable strip of adhesive tape 3-3 3 (FIGS. 2 and 5). The bottom closure fla-ps 2d, 23, 25 and 27 then would be folded in with the longer flaps 21 and 25 overlapping the shorter flaps 23 and 27.

With the aps 22, 24, 26 and 2S, folded back out of the way, the desired carton would be ready for the placing therein of the desired contents.

:If the top of the carton contents were disposed substantially level with the longitudinal score 1'1, the aps 22, 24, 26 and 28 then are ready to be folded in, with the flaps 22 and 26 overlapping each other (FIG. 2) and superimposed on the aps 24 and 28. The carton then Iwould be ready to be taped up along the exposed edges of the flaps 22 and 26, thus completing the loaded carton for transport or storage.

If the top of the contents were disposed above the longitudinal score 1v1, the aps 22, 24, 26 and 28 would be exed along the appropriate auxiliary scores 29. This would permit disposing the inner portions of these flaps upwardly in the planes of the respective body sections. The other portions of these top closure aps then would be disposed in the usual transverse manner (FIG. 5). The carton then would be ready for taping up along the exposed edges of tiaps 22 and 26, thus completing loaded carton for transport or storage.

In the event the top of the contents in such a carton were disposed below the level of the longitudinal score 11, one part (or both) (a or b) of each of the flaps 24 and 2S would be folded in, as shown in FIG. 3, with the other parts of these flaps 24 and 28 and the aps 22 and 26 folded into overlapping relationship and taped up in the usual manner. The folded-in portions of the aps 24, 28 would be seated against the top of the carton contents. The carton then would be ready for taping up along the exposed edges of the aps 22 and 26, so that the loaded carton would be ready for transport or storage.

Although but one specic embodiment of this invention is herein shown and described, it will be understood that details of the construction shown may be altered or omitted without departing from the spirit of the invention as deiined by the following claims.

We claim:

1. A carton-forming pattern comprising a rectangular piece of cardboard stock divided by longitudinal and transverse scores into four main body sections each with a pair of integrated and oppositely-extending closure aps separated by slits and foldable along the scores to form a completely enclosed carton to accommodate variable cubic contents, each of the closure flaps along one longitudinal score being of a width transversely of the longitudinal scores greater than one-half the transverse spacing thereof, and having a multiple series of scores formed therein parallel with the longitudinal scores.

2. A carton-forming pattern as set forth in claim 1 wherein the transverse width of the four flaps along the one longitudinal score is substantially equal to the transverse spacing of the longitudinal scores.

v3. A carton-forming pattern as set forth in claim 1 wherein one pair of alternate flaps each have a slit eX- tending outwardly from the one longitudinal score the full width of the aps to divide each flap into dual parts.

4. A carton-forming pattern comprising a rectangular piece of cardboard stock divided by longitudinal and transverse scores into four main body sections each with a pair of integrated and oppositely-extending closure aps separated by slits Vand foldable along the scores to form a completely enclosed carton to accommodate variable cubic contents, the closure flaps along one longitudinal score being of a Width transversely of the longitudinal score one-half the distance between the longitudinal scores, the flaps along the other longitudinal score being of a width transversely of the longitudinal score equal to the transverse spacing of the longitudinal scores and having a multiple series of auxiliary scores formed therein parallel with the longitudinal scores, the pattern being foldable along the longitudinal scores to form the four sides of a carton with the first-mentioned flaps folded transversely inward along the one longitudinal score to constitute a carton bottom and the second-mentioned aps being foldable inwardly along the other longitudinal score to form a closure for the carton for contents the top of which is substantially level with the longitudinal score, or foldable inwardly along any of the auxiliary scores to constitute a top closure for the carton wherein the top of the contents extend above the other longitudinal score.

5. A carton-forming pattern as set forth in claim 4 wherein alternate parts of flaps along the other longitudinal score each has a slit extending outwardly from the other longitudinal score the full width of the aps to divide each ap into dual parts, one of which parts of each flap is foldable inwardly to contact the top of carton contents disposed below the level of the other longitudinal score.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,686,834 10/1928 Nickerson 229-14 X 2,037,839 4/ 1936 Wagenseller n 229-33 2,203,084 6/1940 Evans 229-37 2,709,032 5/ 1955 Ritchie 229-14 X 2,847,152 8/1958 Van Artwerpen 229-14 JOSEPH R. LECLAIR, Primary Examiner.

D. F. NORTON, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1686834 *Feb 20, 1925Oct 9, 1928Fort Wayne Corrugated Paper CoShipping carton
US2037839 *Aug 31, 1933Apr 21, 1936Rudolf SeibelBeer clarifier
US2203084 *Mar 17, 1938Jun 4, 1940Fibreboard Products IncFiberboard structure and method of making the same
US2709032 *Jun 13, 1950May 24, 1955Twin Cities Container CorpContainers
US2847152 *Nov 19, 1956Aug 12, 1958Antwerpen Lloyd D VanShipping carton for wrap-around windshields and the like having foldable cushioning flaps
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3672558 *Feb 3, 1970Jun 27, 1972Johnson Bernard GAdjustable corrugated shipping container and/or adjustable cardboard shipping carton
US3727827 *May 25, 1970Apr 17, 1973Hoerner Waldorf CorpVariable size container
US4170297 *Jun 30, 1978Oct 9, 1979Packaging Corporation Of AmericaShipping unit
US4238068 *Oct 4, 1979Dec 9, 1980Container Corporation Of AmericaVariable depth self-locking container
US4469224 *Jul 11, 1983Sep 4, 1984International Paper CompanyCarton blank and carton for a bicycle
US5105950 *Sep 17, 1990Apr 21, 1992Moore Business Forms, Inc.Zip off lid for two piece crushable carton
US5148940 *Apr 3, 1991Sep 22, 1992Microtek Medical, Inc.Apparatus and method for disposing of infectious medical waste
US6119929 *Mar 13, 1998Sep 19, 2000Rose; Harold J.Container having a plurality of selectable volumes
US6138901 *Nov 12, 1998Oct 31, 2000Kim; BobbyMultipurpose adjustable single sheet container
US6364199Aug 4, 2000Apr 2, 2002Harold J. RoseContainer having a plurality of selectable volumes
US6394336 *Mar 1, 2000May 28, 2002Motion Design, Inc.Adjustable container and a method for forming an adjustable container
US6676009Aug 9, 2000Jan 13, 2004Harold J. RoseContainer having a plurality of selectable volumes
US7070089 *Feb 9, 2004Jul 4, 2006Kim Richard HMulti-dimensioned easily adjustable single sheet container formula with indicia
US7823367 *Nov 28, 2007Nov 2, 2010SavoyeMethod and combined machine for cutting and closing boxes with inserted void-filling bags
US8087568 *Apr 30, 2008Jan 3, 2012Lincoln Global, Inc.Collapsible carton
US8714435Aug 26, 2011May 6, 2014Lincoln Global, Inc.Collapsible carton
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DE19954006A1 *Nov 10, 1999May 23, 2001Klingele PapierwerkeCorrugated cardboard packaging for transportation of goods, has support and neighboring lid panels with guiding recess
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WO1993018976A1 *Mar 19, 1993Sep 30, 1993Richard BoothIntegral packing box
Classifications
U.S. Classification229/101
International ClassificationB65D5/50, B65D5/355, B65D5/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65D5/0005, B65D5/5002
European ClassificationB65D5/50A, B65D5/00A