Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3315456 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 25, 1967
Filing dateDec 7, 1965
Priority dateDec 7, 1965
Publication numberUS 3315456 A, US 3315456A, US-A-3315456, US3315456 A, US3315456A
InventorsRalph M Freydberg
Original AssigneeAcme Backing Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Supported metallic yarns
US 3315456 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April25, 1967 M. FREYDBERG 7 3,315,456

SUPPORTED METALLIC YARNS Filed Dec. 7, 1965 INVENTOR. RAL PH M. FREYDBERG BY W14, 64%? A TIER/V5).

United States Patent 3,315,456 SUPPORTED METALLIC YARNS Ralph M. Freydberg, Rye, N .Y., assignor to Acme Backing Corporation, New York, N.Y., a corporation of New York Filed Dec. 7, 1965, Ser. No. 512,061 10 Claims. (Cl. 57144) This invention relates to textile yarns and fabrics formed of such yarns.

Metallic threads either alone or in association with non-metallic threads and yarns, have been used in woven and knitted fabrics to achieve various ornamental effects. However, such fabrics have been limited in garment usage to outer-wear which does not come into direct contact with the skin, since conventional metallic fabrics have a harsh, abrasive action on the human skin.

Accordingly, an object of this invention is to provide an improved metallic thread which can be incorporated into various fabrics for conversion into garments which have direct contact with the human skin; wherein such garments have a soft hand and are devoid of any 0bjectionable harsh abrasive feeling; the garments having selected ornamental and decorative effects accruing from the use of the metallic threads.

Another object of this invention is to provide an improved metallic thread containing textile yarn, which also includes stretch yarns; the resultant composite yarn being convertible into stretch fabrics by knitting or the like, and conventional fabric finishing operations.

Still another object of this invention is to provide an improved textile yarn incorporating bright metal threads; such yarn being economical to manufacture and convertible into various fabric forms by conventional textile operations; the resultant fabrics being useful for various items of wearing apparel including those worn directly against the skin, such as brassieres or the like; the garments having ornamental and decorative effects accruing from the metal threads, yet being of reasonable weight.

Other objects of this invention will in part be obvious and in part hereinafter pointed out.

In the drawing, FIG. 1 is a transverse sectional view of a metallic thread, in enlarged condition; such thread forming an element of the textile yarn embodying the invention;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged elevational view showing a twisted composite yarn embodying the invention.

Essentially, the textile yarn of the instant invention comprises stretch nylon yarns in twisted relation to a single end of metallic thread; the metallic thread being of such a width as to give rise to various desirable properties in fabrics and garments derived from such yarns.

Thus, as shown in FIG. 1, 10 designates a metallic thread forming a corelike element of the textile yarn embodying the invention. Thread 10 comprises an intermediate ply 11 of metal foil of selected thickness, such as aluminum foil or the like; with outer plies 12, 13 of synthetic resin film of selected thickness, respectively adhered to the opposite surfaces of metal ply 11 by adhesive layers 14.

Threads 10 are formed in a conventional manner, as by laminating in a continuous manner, a sheet of aluminum foil having a thickness of about .00045" with foil webs of transparent synthetic resin such as polymerized ethylene glycol terephthalate (Mylar) having a thickness of about .00025", using suitable resin adhesives known in the art, such as thermosetting resins. The resultant laminate is then longitudinally slit in a manner known in the art to form individual threads 10 which have a width of about The threads provide a single end for association with a pair of ends of stretch nylon 66 indicated at 15, 16,

in FIG. 2. Nylon ends 15, 16 are of commercially available stretch nylon 66 which may be of a 30 denier for a 10 filament yarn. The ends 15, 16 are cross twisted about thread 10, as shown in FIG. 2, with a twist of 6 turns to the inch to form the composite yarn 17.

The denier of the nylon ends 15, 16 may range from a 20 denier for a 7 filament yarn to a denier for a 34 filament yarn; a 30 denier for a 10 filament yarn being preferred.

The metal foil from which intermediate ply 11 is derived, may have a thickness ranging from about .00035" to about .00075", with a preferred thickness of about .00045". The synthetic resin films from which plies 12, 13 are derived, may have a thickness ranging from about .00015" to about .00040", with a preferred thickness of about .00025. The plies 12, 13 may be derived from various synthetic resins in transparent foil form, including polyester resins such as Mylar, olefins resins, polystyrene resins, acetates, nylon, polypropylene, and the like. The resin adhesive layers 14 are of minimal thickness and may be of the order of about .00015".

Thus, the metallic thread 10 may have a total thickness of about .001". The width of thread 10 may range from about A to about /100" with a preferred width of about g The yarns 17 are used in a conventional manner to form knit goods of various sorts; the goods being subjected to the conventional finishing operations, particularly those associated with the making of stretch nylon products. Thus, the yarns may be used in making hosiery, shoe fabrics, tricot, sportswear, foundation garments, brassieres and the like, where the same may come in direct contact withthe skin of the wearer.

It has been found that such garments and fabrics do not irritate or abrade the skin, despite the metallic content of the fabric. Thus, the advantages in ornamentation and decoration derived from such metallic threads is gained without the objections usually associated with conventional metallic thread fabrics.

While, thread 10 is shown with a pair of plastic film lies 12, 13 on either side of intermediate metal foil ply 11; it is understood that a single plastic film ply may be adhered to the metail foil ply 11. Also, a single end of nylon may be twisted with thread 10 to form a yarn suitable for the purpose herein described.

The resin film plies 12, 13, as well as the adhesive layers 14 are transparent so that the slivery color of the aluminum foil ply 11 shows through. However, adhesive layers 14 may be colored by incorporating suitable pigments therein to give a gold or other selected color to threads 10.

As various changes might be made in the embodiments of the invention herein described without departing from the spirit of the invention, it is understood that all matter herein shown or described is illustrative and not limiting except as set forth in the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A textile yarn comprising at least one end of multifilament stretch nylon and one end of a laminated metallic thread in twisted relation, said metallic thread comprising a ply of metal film and a ply of transparent synthetic resin film in adhered relation to at least one surface of said ply of metal film, said metallic thread having a Width of from about .01 inch to about .005 inch.

2. A textile yarn as in claim 1 wherein a ply of transparent synthetic resin film is in adhered relation to the opposite surfaces of said ply of metal film.

3. A textile yarn as in claim 1 wherein said metallic thread has a width of about .00833 inch and said ply of metal film has a thickness of from about .00035 inch to about .00075 inch.

4. A textile yarn as in claim 3, wherein said ply of metal film has a thickness of about .00045 inch.

5. A textile yarn as in claim 1 wherein two ends of multifilament stretch nylon are in cross twisted relation to said one end of metallic thread, the twist being at the' rate of 5 to 7 turns per inch of metallic thread.

6. A textile yarn as in claim 5 wherein each of said nylon ends has a denier of from 20 for a 7 filament yarn to 100 for 34 filament yarns.

7. A textile yarn as in claim 6 wherein each of said nylon ends has a denier of 30 for a 10 filament yarn.

8. A textile yarn as in claim 1 wherein said metallic thread has a thickness of about .001 inch.

9. A textile yarn as in claim 1 wherein said ply of synthetic resin film is of a polyester resin.

10. A knitted textile fabric comprising yarns in accordance with claim 1.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,099,066 7/1963 Scharf 57140 3,166,885 1/1965 Bridgeman et a1. 57163 FOREIGN PATENTS 695,945 10/ 1964 Canada.

FRANK I. COHEN, Primary Examiner. A. I. SIDOTI, D. E. WATKINS, Assistant Examiners.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3099066 *Sep 30, 1960Jul 30, 1963Metal Film Company IncMetallized synthetic spun yarn
US3166885 *Jun 20, 1963Jan 26, 1965Deering Milliken Res CorpProduction of composite stretch yarns
CA695945A *Oct 13, 1964Dow Chemical CoSupported metallic threads
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3472289 *Nov 10, 1966Oct 14, 1969Brunswick CorpHeater fabric
US3690057 *Jan 22, 1970Sep 12, 1972Bigelow Sanford IncAnti-static yarn and fabrics
US4384449 *Nov 30, 1979May 24, 1983Robert M. Byrnes, Sr.Protective gloves and the like and a yarn with flexible core wrapped with aramid fiber
US5655358 *May 8, 1995Aug 12, 1997Kolmes; Nathaniel H.Cut resistant support yarn suitable for wrapping with an additional yarn covering
USRE38136Aug 12, 1999Jun 10, 2003Supreme Elastic CorporationCut resistant support yarn suitable for wrapping with an additional yarn covering
CN100432310CMar 19, 2001Nov 12, 2008得力泰克有限会社;丰岛株式会社;大森美千子Yarn having laminated structure
WO1993021367A1 *Apr 20, 1993Oct 28, 1993ProtecmaMetal framework for moulded articles
Classifications
U.S. Classification57/235
International ClassificationD02G3/18, D02G3/02
Cooperative ClassificationD10B2331/04, D02G3/12, D10B2331/02
European ClassificationD02G3/12