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Publication numberUS3315914 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 25, 1967
Filing dateJul 21, 1965
Priority dateJul 21, 1965
Publication numberUS 3315914 A, US 3315914A, US-A-3315914, US3315914 A, US3315914A
InventorsDonald L Turner
Original AssigneeDonald L Turner
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ski rope reel and tow mechanism
US 3315914 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

D. L. TURNER SKI ROPE REEL AND TOW'MECHANISM A ril 25, 1967 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed July 2-1, 1965 DONALD L.TU|RNER INVENTOR ATTORNEY April 25, 1967 D. TURNER SKI ROPE REEL AND TOW MECHANISM 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed July 2l 1965 DONALD L. TURNER INVENTOR. W 56. $1 54 5 BY K AT TO R N EY D. L. TURNER SKI ROPE REEL AND TOW MECHANISM A ril 25, 1967 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed July 1965 95 SWITCH DONALD L. TURNER INVENTOR Wi W BY ATTORNEY April 25, 1967 'D. 1.. TURNER 3,315,914

SKI ROPE REEL AND TOW MECHANISM Filed July 21, 1965 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 DONALD L. TURNE R INVENTOR.

By W%% ATTORNEY April 25, 1967 D TURNER 3,315,914

SKI ROPE REEL AND TOW MECHANISM Filed July 2. 1965 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 FIG. 14

FIG. I5

DONALD L. TURN E R INVENTOR.

ATTORN EY United States Patent 3,315,914 SKI RGPE REEL AND TOW MECHANISM Donald L. Turner, Fort Wayne, Ind. Filed July 21, 1965, Ser. No. 473,793 Claims. (Cl. 24286.5)

This invention relates to an automatic ski rope reel and tow mechanism for winding and storing the ski rope when notin use by a water skier, and more particularly the invention relates to a device adapted for positioning on an inboard or outboard boat where in the rope used to tow a water skier is mechanically wound on a reel, which reel also serves as a connection for the rope to the boat. This application is a continuation-in-part application of Ser. No. 244,979 filed Dec. 17, 1962, now abandoned. The retrieving and storing of a ski rope has always presented a problem for the operator of the boat, and several prior art devices have been designed in an effort to solve this problem. However, the prior art devices as known have not completely solved the problem of pre venting the entangling, knotting or snarling of the line when in operation.

A further defect of prior art devices is that during ski towing operation, they fail to provide a simple, inexpensive means for winding up the ski tow rope so that it is wound in orderly coils on a windup spool or the like and without crisscrossing of the coils to produce damage to the ski tow line. The ski tow line is generally of braided material and is difficult to form in orderl coils on a winding spool.

One of the primary objects of this invention is to provide a Water ski reel which will prevent the knotting, entangling, or snarling of the line during the operation thereof.

A further object of this invention is to provide an automatic shutoff means which will de-energize the drive motor of the reel device when the ski rope has reached a predetermined position.

A further object of the invention is to provide an automatic shutoff device which will de'energize the reel drive motor so that a portion of the rope, having the handles, will remain in the water for the skier to grasp.

A still further object of the invention is to provide an automatic reel device for a line or rope having a stepped, or ofiset spool so that the rope can be wound evenly thereon.

Another salient feature of this invention is to provide a magnetic drive mechanism connected between the electric drive motor and the spool mechanism which is adapted to slip when a predetermined torque is placed on the line or rope to prevent the coils of the electric motor from becoming overloaded and damaged.

A further object of this invention is to provide a ski rope win-ding mechanism having guide means to position the rope evenly on a spool and to provide electrical control means associated with the guide means to de-energize the electric motor when the rope has been wound to a predetermined position.

A further object of this invention is to provide a novel guide means for the ski rope which will slide on the housing to compensate for any angle the ski rope may have with respect to the reel mechanism.

Another object of this invention is to provide a springloaded guide disposed within the housing for positioning the ski rope longitudinally and radially upon the spool.

With the foregoing and other objects in view which will appear as the description proceeds, the invention consists of certain novel details of construction and com binations of parts, herewith more fully described and pointed out in the claims, it being understood that changes may be made in the construction and arrangement of parts without departing from the spirit of the invention as claimed.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the ski rope reel and tow mechanism with the cover removed to illustrate the mechanism disclosed within the housing;

FIGURE 2 is a detailed cross-sectional view of the spring-loaded guide mechanism taken along line 22 in FIGURE 3 which functions to space the rope on the spool;

FIGURE 3 is a top view of the spring-loaded guide mechanism illustrated in FIGURE 2 with a portion of the spool broken away to illustrate the means of securing the rope to the spool;

FIGURE 4 is a detailed view illustrating the control relay mounted on one end of the drive motor;

FIGURE 5 is a detailed cross-sectional view of the magnetic drive mechanism connected to the other end of the drive motor;

FIGURE 6 is a detailed cross-sectional view of the guide disposed on the housing, and the electrical automatic shutoff switch associated therewith;

FIGURE 7 is a top view of the guide mechanism illustrated in FIGURE 6;

FIGURE 8 is a cross-sectional view of the drive gear assembly taken along line 8-8 in FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 9 is an electrical schematic diagram of the circuits used to control the operation of the electric drive motor;

FIGURE 10 is a detailed view of the mounting bracket and rod;

FIGURE 11 is an isometric exploded view of a further embodiment of the present invention;

FIGURE 12 is a sectioned detail view of the guide and reel device taken along line 1212 in FIGURE 13, said guide device being adapted for traversing back and forth during coiling of the ski rope on the spool;

FIGURE 13 is a detail view of the structure illustrated in FIGURE 12, shown partially broken away and viewed from the right hand end of FIGURE 12;

FIGURE 14 is an enlarged detail view of a further guide and automatic shutoff switch associated therewith constituting a further embodiment of the invention over that of FIGURE 6;

FIGURE 15 is a cross-sectional view of a drive gear assembly modified from that in FIGURE 8; and,

FIGURE 16 is a section view taken on line 16-16 of FIGURE 12.

Referring now to FIGURE 1 of the drawings, the reference numeral 11 designates the housing having a removable cover 13. The lower part 14 of the housing is preferably constructed of plastic and is relatively small in size being approximately 8% inches long, 8 inches Wide and 3% inches high. A pair of supports 15 and 17 are carried by the lower part 14 of the housing and are adapted to sup port an electric drive motor 19 therein. A rotating mechanism 21 is mounted adjacent and parallel to the motor 19 and is carried in the lower part 14 of the housing by means of a support 23, and a support identical to the support 23, not shown. The spool 25 of the rotating mechanism 21 is provided with an offset or recess portion 27 so that the ski rope 29 can be evenly positioned longitudinally thereon. One end 31 of the spool (FIGURE 3) is hollow and is provided with an opening 33 so that one end of the ski rope 29 can pass therethrough. The end of the rope is then knotted at 35 so that the rope is secured to the spool.

The end plate 37 is mounted on the portion 27 by a press fit. The end plate 39 is adapted to be snapped onto the spool portion 31 and can be removed when it is desired to tie or unt ie a knot in the end of the rope. The spool 3 rive gear 41 is mounted on a stub shaft 43 and is con- :cted to the plate 39 so that they will rotate together.

The spring-loaded guide mechanism 45, FIGURES 1,

and 3, is disposed between the spool and the electric otor 19 on a shaft 47 provided with left and right hand rreads or grooves 49. The guide housing 51 is carried on re shaft 47 by a holder 53 having a follower 55 provided ith a thin blade 57. The blade 57 which is about as wide ;the groove 49 is provided with an arcuate recess 56 and adapted to be received in the groove or threads 49. The lade will follow the threads 49 as the shaft 47 is rotated nd move the housing 51 longitudinally with respect to the pool 25. The spring 59 maintains the blade 57 in contact 'ith the threads 49. The guide housing 51 is also proided with a recessed portion 61 for receiving a spring 63 nd a guide element 65. The plunger 67 provided with a ore 69 for receiving the guide element is forcibly maintined against the rope 29 by means of the spring 63. The ead 71 of the plunger 67 is provided with a grooved or urved portion 73 which corresponds to the curvature of 1e periphery of the spool and is adapted to receive the ope 29. The gear 75 will rotate the shaft 47 so that the lade 57 will move the guide housing 51 along the longi- Jdinal axis of the shaft 47. When the guide housing caches the end of the shaft 47, it will be reversed and will ollow the opposite thread on the shaft.

The guide housing 51 is provided with a recess 52 which adapted to receive a track 54 mounted on the casing or rousing 14. The track 54 serves to maintain the guide rousing 51 and plunger 67 in radial alignment with the pool 25.

Referring now to FIGURES 1, 6 and 7, the cover 13 s provided with a rectilinear opening 77. A recess 79 is rrovided in the cover and is adapted to receive a flange 83 nounted on the guide member 81 which is disposed in the pening 77. The L-shaped rectilinear plate 85 is mounted )n the cover 13 by bolts 87 and 89. As will be seen in FIGURE 1, the bolts 89 pass through the support 23 and )ut the bottom portion of the housing 14 so that they may 6e secured to the mounting bracket 191 (FIGURE 10). The L-shaped plate 85 and the recess 79 form a track for the guide member 81. The guide member 81 is substantially square in shape and is provided with a round opening 91 having a flared portion at 93 so that the guide member will not fray the ski rope as it passes therethrough. The guide member 81 is provided with four posts disposed at each corner, two of which are illustrated at 103 and 105. A plate 97 having a round opening 99 for receiving a plastic grommet 101 which has a diameter slightly larger than the diameter of the ski rope 29 is mounted on the posts through openings (not shown) in the plate 97. A projection 96 extending from the plate 97 is adapted to contact a copper strip to form a normally closed electrical switch 95. The plate 97 is resiliently mounted on the posts by means of springs as illustrated at 109 and 113. A backing plate 107 is mounted on the posts and is provided with a round opening 117 slightly larger than the opening in the grommet 101. The edges of the opening 117 are rounded so as not to fray the ski rope 29 as it passes therethrough. The opening 117 in the backing plate also serves as a guide to center the ski rope 29 in the plastic grommet 101 as the rope passes therethrough to prevent accidental breaking of the contact between the projection 96 and the plate 115 in the normally closed switch 95. The posts are flared at 118 after the parts described above have been assembled.

A recess 119 is formed in the cover 13 to receive a stiff ribbon 121 which is attached to the guide member 81 at 82 and 84. As illustrated in FIGURE 7, the side of the cover 13 is also provided with a recess 123 which serves to guide the ribbon or cover 121 into the recess 119 and also serves to store the ribbon as the guide member 81 slides back and forth in the opening 77. The ribbon 121 will close the opening 77 to prevent any water from entering the case when the device is in operation. If desired, the ribbon can be omitted from the device, and a drain opening (not shown) can be formed in the bottom of the casing 14.

Referring to FIGURE 4, a relay 125 having a coil 127 is mounted on one end of the motor 19. The relay 125 is provided with a motor contact 129 and a holding contact 131.

As illustrated in FIGURE 5, a magnetic drive 133 is connected to the drive shaft 136 of the motor 19. The magnetic drive 133 is formed by a pair of circular magnetic holders and 137 having a plurality of spaced radial recesses 139 to receive a number of permanent ceramic magnets 141 which are separated by a union or ball bearing 143. The holder 137 is provided with a bore 144 to receive the shaft 136. The holder 135 is provided with a bore 145 to receive one end 147 of a stub shaft 149. The stub shaft 149 is mounted in a bearing 151 which is carried by a Ushaped support 153 formed on the casing 14. The holders 135 and 137 are chamfered at 145 to provide a seat for the bearing 143.

Referring to FIGURE 8, the transfer gear 157 and a transfer gear 159 are mounted on a stub shaft 161. The stub shaft 161 is connected to a square mounting plate 163 which is adapted to be disposed in the bracket 165 on the housing 14. It should be noted that the stub shaft 161 is connected to the mounting plate 163 slightly off center so that the center of the shaft 161 is slightly above the centers of the drive gear 167 and the spool gear 41. This is to provide proper clearance between the teeth of the gear so that they will not bind, and will rotate freely.

As will be seen in FIGURE 1, the drive gear 167 rotates the transfer gear 157 mounted on the stub shaft 161. The transfer gear 159 which also is mounted on shaft 161 will rotate the spool drive gear 41, and the spool gear 41 Will rotate the gear 75 mounted on the shaft 47.

As will be seen in FIGURE 10, the housing or casing 11 can be mounted on a bar 193 by a pair of brackets 191 and 195. The brackets 191 and 195 are provided with recesses 197 and 199 for receiving the bar 193. The bracket 195 is secured to the bracket 191 by a pair of bolts 201 and 203. The bar 193 is mounted on the back of the boat in a conventional manner.

Referring to the electrical schematic diagram illustrated in FIGURE 9, the coil 127 will be energized when the manual switch 169 is closed through line 171, switch 95, line 173 and line 175. The other side of the coil 127 is connected directly to the negative side of the battery through line 177. Upon energization of the coil 127, the relay will close contacts 129 and 131, thereby establishing a holding circuit through line 179, contact 131, line 173, switch 95 and line 171. Upon energization of the coil 127, and the closing of contact 129, the motor is energized through line 181, contacts 129 and line 171. The other side of the motor is connected directly to the negative side of the battery through line 183.

OPERATION Assuming that the rope 29 has been secured to the spool 25 as illustrated in FIGURE 3, and wound completely thereon, the rope may be manually unwound by exerting a small force on the end of the rope. The spool 25 will have a slight drag due to the rotation of the gear train, however, the drag is not suflicient to retard the unwinding of the rope. As a general rule, a ski rope is approximately 75 feet in length and formed of nylon or other suitable plastic. When it is desired to retrieve or wind the rope on the spool, the manual switch 169 is closed thereby energizing the coil 127 which closes con-' tacts 129 and 131 establishing a holding circuit and energizing the electric drive motor 19. The spool 25 is then rotated through the gear train, magnetic drive 133 and shaft 136 of the motor 19.

In the event the rope 29 becomes snagged or caught, the magnetic drive 133 will slip to prevent damage or the burning out of the coils in the motor 19.

The guide member 81 will position the rope 29 perpendicular, or at an angle of approximately 90 with respect to the axis of the spool 25. This will assure that the rope 29 will remain in proper alignment with the guide member 45 which guide member, through the action of the plunger 67, will axially space the rope 29 on the spool 25, thus it will be seen that the entire rope can be wound or stored in a relatively small case.

A small butterfly member in the form of a plastic finger 186, FIGURE 1, is attached to the rope 29 approximately or 12 feet from the end. The butterfly member 186 is flexible and slightly larger than the diameter of the opening in the plastic grommet 101. When the butterfly member contacts the grommet 101, the normally closed switch 95 is opened breaking the holding circuit, and the coil 127 will be de-energized thus breaking the contacts 129 and 131. When the contact 129 is broken, the motor 19 is de-energized. The primary purpose of the butterfly member 186 is to allow a portion of the rope to remain in the water to permit the water skier to grasp the rope without coming too close to the boat where he might be injured by the propeller. Motor inertia draws the butterfly through the grommet so that the motor can be reactivated. At the close of the day or at the conclusion of the water skiing, it is desirable to reel in the entire length of the rope, whereby the remaining 10 or 12 feet is wound by again closing the manual contact switch 169 which will re-energize the motor and the remaining portion will be wound on the spool 25. A knot 187 is disposed adjacent the end of tthe rope, and the knot being larger than the Opening in the grommet 101 will open the normally closed switch 95 when the knot comes in contact with the grommet, thus breaking the holding circuit to the coil 127 which will de-energize the motor 19 as described above.

Referring next to the embodiment shown in FIGURES 11-16, there is illustrated a second embodiment of the invention. In this embodiment, a removable cover 313 is secured by bolts 314 to a housing 311 which is fastened through a mounting bra-cket 391, and a mounting bar (not shown) to the rear of a towing boat. Within the housing 311 is an electric motor 319 which is mounted on spaced supports 315 and its output drives a gear train initiating with a drive gear 467 which is journaled in an opening 453. The drive gear 467 is geared with a transfer gear 457 mounted on a molded arm 459. The transfer gear 457 has a journal pin 460 (FIGURE which is passed through an opening in the arm 459 and gear 457 has integrally formed therewith a second gear 461 which meshes with drive gear 463 driving gear 341 which turns the spool 325. The gear 463 has a shaft 447 journaled within a socket (not shown) of the housing 311 and it rotates shaft 347 having left end,-and right end helically formed threads or grooves 349.

Referring to FIGURE 11, the spool 325 is mounted at its opposite ends on stub axles 343 and the ends of the spool are bounded by the end plates 337 and 339. The tow line 329, which is in the form of nylon woven strands or the like, is wound in coils on the spool 325 and the spool 325 is caused to rotate by the motor and gear train described. The diameter of the coils and the spool are dimensioned in relation to each other (FIGURE 13) so that midway of the spool 325 a reduced diameter section 327 initially receives the coils, and such coils form a winding which becomes of the same diameter as the larger diameter portion (FIGURE 13). The tow line is initially secured by passing an end through opening 333 and forming a knot 335. The knotted end 335 becomes the connection between the tow line 329 and the spool when the line is fully extended and the skier is being towed. This connection is formed about midway of the length of the spool so that the connection is balanced.

One of the important features of the invention is that the coiling of the tow line onto the spool 325 is orderly and each of the coils is formed adjacent to the next until reaching one or the other of the end plates 337 or 339, at which point the coiling direction reverses and the second set of coils is laid over the underset of coils, but again however the coils are formed one adjacent the other and there is no crossover of the coils which might otherwise damage the coils or vary the payout rate of the coils during the initial towing period of the skier at which time the line is being extended until it reaches its end and then draws the skier through the water.

In the present invention, each coil is laid at its designated point and is wrapped securely and tightly without slack and without disored. Such results are obtained by means of a traversing carriage 345 which is received within a track 352 (FIGURES 11, 12) and travels back and forth substantially the length of the spool 325. The traversing carriage 345 is caused to move by means of a blade 357 which is received within the grooves or threads 349 of shaft 347 which is caused to rotate by the gear train as previously described. As the blade 357 rides Within the grooves 349 of the shaft 347, the carriage 345 will be caused to move first in one direction along the track 352 and then as the blade enters the oppositely inclined threads at the end of its extreme travel to the right or left, it will reverse in travel, traversing in the opposite direction within the track 352 relatively to the spool 325. The rate of rotation of shaft 347 is timed and coordinated with the rotation of spool 325 so that a guide arm 371 on the carriage 345 is in contact with the coil as it is being wound. The guide arm 371 has an eyelet 373 and is biased downwardly by a spring 3 63 compressed between a projection 451 and a cross shaped base 365, the base 365 connecting the two resilient legs 369 which are adapted to spring fit into notches 366 of carriage 345. The movement of the eyelet 373 and the engagement of arcuate section 375 with the coil as it is being wound (FIGURE 12) ensures a proper placement of the coil and tension on the coils such that the series of coils will follow a prescribed course at the start of windup for the tow apparatus, as previously described, the coils are wrapped beginning (FIGURE 13) at the midpoint of the spool and coiling proceeds to the right and then reverses overlaying the first set of coils and continuing over the larger diameter section 325. The described coiling operation, both as to its guidance and rate of coiling are coordinated by gearing together the rotation of spool 325 and shaft 347 which has the left and right hand threads or grooves 349. Movement of the carriage 345 is determined by shaft 347 through movement of the blade 357 within the track 352 such traversing being provided through the pin 351 which permits the slight angular movement of the blade 357 providing the necessary change in angularity so that the blade 357 can shift as it reverses direction at the end plates 337 and 339. In all other respects the operation of the motor 319, the magnetic clutch, and the electrical circuit previously described in FIGURES 4, 5 and 9 remains essentially the same.

Referring next to FIGURE 14 the structure has been modified over that of FIGURE 6. In this embodiment, the tow line is passed through a curved portion 393 of a guide member 381 which is biased by springs 409 such that copper ring 415 is in electrical contact with a copper strip 396 which is located on the undersurface of the removable cover 313. The guide member 381 is adapted to traverse back and forth (FIGURE 11) within a guide opening 377 which corresponds in length to the spool 325. The guide member 381 is freely movable and it follows generally the location of the eyelet 373. The tow line 329 thus has two guidance surfaces as it passes out of the water and onto the spool 325. As the tow line 329 reaches its fully wound position, approximately 10 ft. before being fully retracted, a butterfly 486 which is secured to the line 329 comes into contact with the flared portion 393 of the opening 391 causing the guide member 3811 to move toward the cover 313 against the resistnce of the springs 409 and thereby moving the attached opper strip 415 away from the companion switch copper rejection 3% and thereby opening the switch and de- .ctuating the circuit which energizes the motor 319 as escribed in the previous embodiment. Motor coasting lraws the butterfly through the opening 391 as previously lescribed.

If skiing is to be resumed, the pilot does nothing furher; he leaves a section of about ft. whereby the skier :an grab the end of the tow handle and remain a safe disance from the towing boat to resume skiing. If, how- :ver, the skiing is ended the operator reactuates the notor 319 in the manner previously described and the notor 319 is again actuated to effect windup of the renaining 10 ft. of line. At this time the operation is .erminated by bringing the knot 487 into engagement with the portion 393, again interrupting the electrical :ontact 415 with 396 and terminating the windup operation.

Although the present invention has been illustrated and described in connection with a plurality of example embodiments it will be understood that these are illustrative of the invention and are by no means restrictive thereof. It is reasonably to be expected that those skilled in this art can make numerous revisions and adaptations and it is intended that such revisions and adaptations which incorporate the herein disclosed principles will be included within the scope of the following claims as equivalents of the invention.

I claim:

1. A reel and tow for a water ski rope comprising, in combination: an electric motor, a housing having means for supporting said electric motor therein, a rotating mechanism adapted to be disposed in said housing, a magnetic drive means connected between the electric motor and rotating mechanism, and slidable guide means for axially positioning the ski rope on the rotating mechanism including a member adapted to slide back and forth in a rectangular opening in the housing, said member having an opening to permit the ski rope to slide therethrough, electrical control means carried by said member, said electrical means adapted to de-energize the electric motor when the ski rope has been substantially Wound on the rotating mechanism.

2. The combination of claim 1 wherein a slidable cover means is provided to close the rectangular opening in the housing as the member slides back and forth in the opening.

3. A reel for a rope comprising, in combination: a housing having means for supporting a spool therein, a rope adapted to be wound on said spool, said rope having a knot adjacent one end, means including an electric motor for rotating said spool, said housing having slidable guide means for axially positioning said rope on said spool, said guide means including electrical means adapted to be actuated by the knot in the rope to de-energize the electric motor wherein the guide means also includes a cylindrical member, and said electrical means including a normally closed switch disposed within said cylindrical member substantially intermediate its ends, said switch having an eyelet loosely surrounding the rope so that the knot in the rope will not pass therethrough and will open the switch when it comes in contact with the eyelet.

4. The combination of claim 3 wherein the cylindrical member is provided with a radially inwardly projecting flange forming an opening slightly larger than the diameter of the rope, said flange serving to guide the rope so that the eyelet will not be actuated until contacted by the rope, said switch having support means for positioning the eyelet substantially in the center of the cylindrical member, and resilient mounting means for supporting said support means within the cylindrical member.

5. A reel and tow for a water ski rope comprising, in combination: an electric motor, a housing having means for supporting the electric motor therein, a spool mounted adjacent the electric motor, a first guide means carried within the housing, a second guide means carried on the housing and cooperating with the first guide means for maintaining the ski rope in a straight line between the first and second guide means so that the ski rope is in alignment with respect to the spool, and a magnetic drive means connected between the motor and spool for rotating the spool.

6. In a ski tow apparatus, the structure comprising: a windup spool having an operative tow connection with a flexible tow line, a first guide means and a second guide means for slidably directing the line as it traverses back and forth over the outer surface of said spool for coiling thereon, movable carriage means for guiding the movement of said first guide means whereby the coils of line are generated one coil adjacent the next and one coil is laid over the outer surface of the lower set of coils, and gear means for coordinating the movement of said first guide means with the rate of coiling of line over the surface of said spool.

7. In a ski tow apparatus, the structure comprising: a windup spool having an operative tow connection with a flexible tow line, a pair of spaced apart guide means for slidably directing the line as it traverses back and forth over the outer surface of said spool for coiling thereon, movable carriage means for guiding the movement of one of said guide means whereby the coils of line are generated one coil adjacent the next and one coil is laid over the outer surface of the lower set of coils, means for coordinating the movement of said guide means with the rate of ceiling of line over the surface of said spool, and one of said guide means having resilient means for yieldably bearing against the outer periphery of the coil of line to effect an orderly generation of said coils one adjacent the next and without crisscrossing the coils one over the next.

8. In a ski tow apparatus, the structure comprising: a windup spool having an operative tow connection with a flexible tow line, a pair of spaced apart guide means for slidably directing the line as it traverses back and forth over the outer surface of said spool for coiling thereon, carriage means for guiding the movement of one of said guide means whereby the coils of line are generated one coil adjacent the next and one coil is laid over the outer surface of the lower set of coils; a means for coordinating the movement of said guide means with the rate of coiling of line over the surface of said spool, one of said guide means having resilient means for yieldably bearing against the outer periphery of the coil of line to effect an orderly generation of said coils one adjacent the next and without crisscrossing the coils one over the next, switch means for terminating operation of said coiling and operatively combined with one of said guide means, and

switch-operating means combined with said line to effect operation of said switching means when there is a predetermined portion of line remaining for windup.

9. In a ski tow apparatus, a windup motor, a spool operatively driven by said motor and adapted for coordinated operation in combination with said spool and having guide means, said guide means including an eyelet through which the line is passed and a resilient arm which bears against the outer periphery of coils of line generated over the outer periphery of said spool, and a second guide means also adapted for traversing movement in relation to said spool to provide two guiding surfaces directing the back and forth movement of the line as it coils along the length of the spool in a series of closely adjacent coils all of which are in concentric relation.

10. In a ski tow apparatus, a windup motor, a spool operatively driven by said motor and adapted for coordinated operation in combination with said spool and having guide means, said guide means including an eyelet through which the line is passed and a resilient arm which bears against the outer periphery of coils of line generated over the outer periphery of said spool, and a sec- 0nd guide means also adapted for traversing movement in relation to said spool to provide two guiding surfaces directing the back and forth movement of the line as it coils along the length of the spool in a series of close adjacent coils all of which are in concentric relation, and gear means for driving said guide means in coordinated relation, said spool and said guide means whereby the rate of takeup of line and coiling thereof are performed as coordinated operations.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,009,829 11/1911 Clark 24271.9 1,233,106 7/1917 Myette 242-158.3

Dowrelio 24286 Beaumont. Honig, Knoerzer et a1 242-1583 Magnuson 242-158.2 X Child 24286.5 Sadler 242-86.5 X Nicholson 242-86.5

Bey 317-201 X FRANK I. COHEN, Primary Examiner. M. STEIN, STANLEY N. GILREATH, N. L. MINTZ,

Assistant Examiners.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3420466 *Dec 12, 1966Jan 7, 1969Lewis K UhlerWater ski towrope reel
US3456891 *Jun 7, 1967Jul 22, 1969Eddie D ParrSki rope retriever
US4969610 *Dec 12, 1988Nov 13, 1990Jerry TaylorRope rewinding device for a ski boat
US5238200 *Jul 18, 1991Aug 24, 1993Robert RitzenthalerPower driven winding device with spool axially movable to engage a clutch
US5732648 *Jul 31, 1995Mar 31, 1998Aragon; Ernest QuesadaLine-Handling device
US6474588 *Jun 25, 2001Nov 5, 2002Eduardo ValverdeMotorized retractable ski tow rope
US6877687 *Jan 17, 2003Apr 12, 2005Suncast CorporationDirect current powered hose rewinding apparatus
US7316368 *Aug 12, 2004Jan 8, 2008Suncast CorporationDirect current powered hose rewinding apparatus
US7484683 *Jan 15, 2004Feb 3, 2009Kabushiki Kaisha Tokai-Rika-Denki-SeisakushoWebbing retractor
US8220405 *May 18, 2010Jul 17, 2012Global Innovative Sports IncorporatedWinch system safety device controlled by towrope angle
US8651461May 17, 2010Feb 18, 2014Global Innovative Sports IncorporatedTowrope winch safety shutoff switch
US8757079 *Jul 13, 2012Jun 24, 2014Global Innovative Sports IncorporatedWinch system safety device controlled by towrope angle
US8851413Nov 2, 2012Oct 7, 2014Suncast Technologies, LlcReel assembly
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Classifications
U.S. Classification242/390.1, 242/403, 242/904, 242/397.3, 242/390.8
International ClassificationB66D1/28, B66D1/02, B65H75/40, B65H75/42, B61B12/10, B65H75/44
Cooperative ClassificationB66D2700/0125, B65H75/425, B66D1/28, B66D2700/0183, Y10S242/904, B61B12/10, B65H2701/35, B65H75/4486, B66D1/02
European ClassificationB66D1/28, B66D1/02, B65H75/42V, B61B12/10, B65H75/44M2