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Publication numberUS3316015 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 25, 1967
Filing dateFeb 24, 1966
Priority dateMar 18, 1964
Publication numberUS 3316015 A, US 3316015A, US-A-3316015, US3316015 A, US3316015A
InventorsPeter S Fletcher
Original AssigneePeter S Fletcher
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Reclining chair of the multiple movement type
US 3316015 A
Images(4)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 25, 1967 P. s. FLETCHER 3,316,015

RECLIING CHAIR OF THE MULTIPLE MOVEMENT TYPE Original Filed March 18, 1964 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 FIG. I.

Apri 25, 1967 P. s. FLETHER 3,316,015

RECLINING CHAIR OF THE MULTIPLE MOVEMENT TYPE (Jriginal Filed March 18, 1964 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 www April 25, 1967 P. S. FLETCHER 3,316,015

RECLINING CHAIR OF THE MULTIPLE MOVEMENT TYPE Original Filed March 18, 1964 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 FIG. 4.

JNVENTOR. PETER 6. FLERHER BMW P. S. FLETCHER Api-i125, 1967 RECLINING CHAIR OF THE MULTIPLE MOVEMENT TYPE 4 Sheets-Sh eet 4 Original Filed March 18, 1964 United States Patent -Gliice 3,316,015 Patented Apr. 25, 1967 s ciaims. (el. 297-89) The present invention relates generally to reclining chairs and specifically to a lounger-type of -reclining chair which has a built-in, positive, and self-acting tendency for the seat and back-rest to assume its upright sitting position, with the leg-rest completely collapsed, when the seat Iand back-rest are near that position and when the chair is either occupied or unoccupied. This is a division of my c-o-pending application Ser. No. 352,891, entitled, Reclining Chair of the Multiple Movement Type filed on Mar. 18, 1964, now abandoned.

One of the ilaws of many of the commercially available reclining chairs is .the undesirable propensity of the legrest of the chair to assume a less than fully collapsed position and of the body-supporting unit to assume a position slightly rearwardly of the upright sitting position. This results in an unkempt appearance since the leg-rest hangs downwardly from its design positi-on at or lunder the front of the seat of the chair.

This well-defined principle of physics that systems tend to assume a position of equilibrium with their centers of gravity at the lowest possible point is, of course, fully applicable to the reclining chair art. Specifically, where the center of gravity of the moving elements of the reclining chair, that is, Ithe seat an-d the back-rest, is at a point which is rearwardly of the point in space about which the seat and back-rest will have no tendency to rotate forwardly about that pivot point and, therefore, will not have a tendency to assume its upright 'sitting position. In this case, the chair will be relatively easy to operate, bu-t the seat and back-rest will not move to the extreme of the upright sitting position and the weight of the leg-rest and its associated links will have a tendency to cause the legrest to hang downwardly from its fully collapsed position. Conversely, when the center of gravity of the seat and back-rest system is forwardly of the point in space which isthe center of rotation of the system, the system will tend to move forwardly and downwardly to reach the point of least energy. Normally, when the chair is-in the upright position or close thereto, the center of gravity of the moving system with a chair occupant is forwardly of the center of gravity of that same system without the chair occupant. This is clear since most of the chair occupants weight is resting upon the seat rather than the back-rest. Accordingly, in almost all reclining chairs, when the chair occupant gets up, the center of gravity of the seat and back-rest system moves still further rearwardly with respect to the point of rotation of the moving system thus tending to make the seat and back-rest system rotate rearwardly away from the fully closed, upright sitting position.

This tendency may be overcome by a number of corrective devices. Obviously, the provision of a tension spring to bias the seat and back-rest in a forwardly direction could be utilized. However, this expedient is undesirable since the bias force of the spring must be overcome in yorder to move the seat and back-rest system from the upright sitting position into either the intermediate, tilted sitting position or the fully reclined position. A second possibility is to build a sufficient amount of friction into the mounting linkage such that the mere weight of 4the unoccupied seat and back-rest is insufficient to move that system rearwardly. This expedient too has severe disadvantages in that it adds a further force which must be overcome in order -to operate the chair. Furthermore, it provides no positive means to close the chair but merely adds friction to keep the chair from opening. In addition, thereis a basic flaw in any mechanical addition to a system since the additional means provides an additional possible point of malfunction and such additions often provide adverse effects in addition to their desirable effects.

By far the most satisfactory method of solving this problemis the positioning of the center 0f gravity of the seat and back-rest 4system at a point where the natural tendency of t-he unoccupied chair is to assume the upright sitting position rather than the intermediate, tilted sitting position, i.e., where gravity causes the unit to fall into rather than fall out of the upright sitting position. However, this solution of the problem also` has disadvantages. Specifically, if the center of gravity is forwardly of the center of rotation of the seat` and back-rest system when the chair is unoccupied, the center of gravity will automatically move still further forwardly when the chair occupant sits on the seat. Since in the normal reclining chair there is a slight upward movement of the seat as it begins the iirst movement phase, the forward movement of the center of gravity will increase the difficulty of moving the seat and back-rest out of the upright sitting position since more of the occupants Weight will have to be lifted initially. Thus, although such an arrangement solves the problem of the chair moving out of the fully closed, upright sitting position or not assuming that position when the chair occupant gets up, a new problem of hard operation is created. It is desirable in a reclining chair to provide both the features of easy operation and an inherent tendency Vof the chair to assume the upright sitting position with the leg-rest in its fully retracted or folded sta-te.

Accordingly, it is generally the object of the present invention to provide a reclining chair of the lounger type which obviates one or more of the disadvantages existing `in the prior art chair. Specifically, it is an object of the present invention to provide a reclining chair of the lounger type which is both easy to operate and which inherently has a tendency to assume an upright sitting position when the chair is unoccupied.

It is further within the contempla-tion of the present invention to provide a reclining chair wherein the arrangement of the mounting linkage for the seat and back-rest system is such that the chair has an inherent tendency to assume the upright sitting position when that system is close to the uprightsitting position.

In accordance with one illustrative embodiment of the present invention there is provided a reclining chair comprising a frame and body-supporting means including a seat and back-rest mounted on the frame for movement through a first movement phase from an upright sitting position to an intermediate, tilted sitting position. During the rst movement phase, the included angle between the seat and the back-rest remains substantially uniform. The body-supporting unit thereafter moves through a second movement phase from the intermediate, tilted sitting position to a fully reclined position with the angle between the seat and back-rest increasing. Means are provided to mount the seat and back-rest on the frame for guided movement as recited. The mounting means'includes a carrier link pivotally mounted on the frameat a carrier link pivot, a front guide link pivotally connected to the carrier link at a front pivotal mount and pivotally connected to the seat at a front guide link pivot and a back-rest guide link pivotally mounted at one end on the frame at a rear pivotal mount and pivotally connected at its opposite or upper end to the back-rest at a back-rest pivot. The seat and back-rest are pivotally connected together at a point spaced forwardly from the back-rest pivot. The front guide link and the back-rest guide link )oth pivot rearwardly about the front and rear pivotal nounts, respectively, during the first movement phase to xransport the seat and back-rest rearwardly, substantially io change taking place in the included angle therebetween. A first holding link is pivotally connected to the bodympporting means at a point rearwardly of the front guide -ink pivot and forwardly of the seat-back-rest pivot which aolding link moves during the first movement phase to substantially maintain the angle between the seat and the Jack-rest. Second movement links include a bell crank lever which is pivotally connected to the carrier link at a first pivot and is connected at one of its ends to the first holding link at a second pivot. The second movement links also include a second holding link pivotally connected to the other end of the bell crank lever at a third pivot and pivotally mounted on the frame at a second movement holding pivot. The second movement links move with respect to each other and with respect to the frame during the second movement phase to open up the angle between the seat and the back-rest. Appropriate stop means are provided to define the upright sitting position and the fully reclined position. In addition, a leg-rest and leg-rest mounting linkage is provided to mount the leg-rest for movement upwardly and outwardly with respect to the seat in response to initial movement of the seat and back-rest during the first movement phase.

The above brief description, as well as further objects, features and advantages of the present invention, will be best appreciated by reference to the following detailed description of -one presently preferred embodiment, when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a side elevational view, with portions broken away for purposes of illustration, showing one presently preferred embodiment of the present invention with the chair being depicted in the upright sitting position and with the leg-rest shown in its corresponding fully collapsed position;

FIG. y2 is a view similar to that of FIG. l but showing the chair in its intermediate, tilted sitting position;

FIG. 3 is a view similar to FIG. l but showing the chair in its fully reclined position;

FIG. 4 is a side eleva-tional view, with portions broken away for purposes of illustration, of another preferred embodiment of the present invention with the chair being depicted in the upright sitting position and with the legrest shown in its corresponding fully collapsed position, the leg-rest in this embodiment being of the folded type;

FIG. 5 is a view similar to that of FIG. 4 but showing the chair in its intermediate, tilted sitting position; and

FIG. 6 is a view similar to FIG. 5 but showing the chair in its fully reclined position.

In FIGS. l, 2 and 3 of the drawings there is shown a reclining chair, generally designated by the numeral 10, which is illustrative of the present invention. The reclining chair 10 includes a support or frame 12 having conventional arms or side rails, 14, 16 which are structurally joined together by appropriate cross braces 1S. A body-supporting unit, generally designated by the numeral 20, is mounted for movement within the frame 12 and includes a seat 22 and back-rest 24 which are pivotally interconnected as will be described below. A leg-rest 26 is mounted on the chair 10 and has a movement associated with the movement of the body-supporting unit.

The seat 22 and back-rest 24 are supported within the frame 12 by an appropriate mounting linkage 28 for movement through a first movement phase from the upright sitting position illustrated in FIG. 1 to the intermediate, tilted sitting position as illustrated in FIG. 2. During the first-movement phase the seat and back-rest translate and rotate somewhat rearwardly with the angle between the `seat and back-rest remaining substantially fixed. The seat 22 and back-rest 24 may then move through a second movement phase to the fully reclined position as illustrated in FIG. 3 during which the angle between the seat and back-rest is increased to provide a position for more complete relaxation.

The leg-rest 26 is mounted on the chair 10 by means of a leg-rest mounting linkage 30. The leg-rest moves from its position beneath the forward end of the seat 22, as shown in FIG. l, to its extended leg-supporting position, as shown in FIGS. 2 and 3, in response to movement of the seat 22 through the first movement phase. As will be seen by comparing FIGS. 2 and 3, the leg-rest 26 maintains its extended leg-supporting position during the second movement phase.

The mounting means 28 for the body-supporting unit 20 includes a carrier link 32 which is mounted on the frame 12 o-n a carrier link pivot 34 and res-ts on a stop 31 on the frame 12 when the seat 22 and back-rest 24 are in the upright sitting position and the intermediate, tilted sitting position. A front guide link 36 is pivotally mounted at a front pivotal mount 38 on the forward end of the carrier link 32 and is pivotally connected to the seat 22 at a front guide link pivot 40. The front guide link pivot 40 is formed on a mounting strap 22a conveniently secured along the lower edge of the seat 22. The mounting strap 22a extends rearwardly of the seat 22 through an upward extension 22b and terminates at a seat-back.u rest pivot 42, at which location the seat 22 is pivotally joined to the back-rest 24. A back-rest mounting strap 24a is conveniently secured to the back-res-t 24 and the seat-back-rest pivot 42 is formed at the forward end thereof. A back-rest guide link 44 is secured at its lower end to the frame 12 at a rear pivotal mount 46 and is connected to the back-rest 24 at the rear end of the backrest strap 24a at the back-rest -pivot 48.

As may be seen by comparing FIGS. l and 2, the body supporting unit 20 is guided through the first movement phase by the rearward rotation of the front guide link 36 about the front pivotal mount 38 and the back-rest guide link 44 about the rear pivotal mount 46. A stop 50 -on the seat strap 22a engages the front guide link 36 to support the weight of the chair occupant in the upright sitting position and a second stop 52, also on the seat strap 22a, engages one of the links ofthe leg-rest mount-Y ing linkage to halt rotation of the front guide link 36 and to define the intermediate, tilted sitting position.

The angle between the seat 22 and the back-rest 24 is maintained substantially uniform during the first movement phase by the operation of .a first holding link 5-4. The first holding link 54 is pivotally connected to the seat 22 at a pivot point 58 spaced rearwardly of the front guide link pivot 40. The effect of the first holding ii'nls 54 1s to serve as a stop during the first movement phaseto maintain a substantially constant angle between the seat 22 and back-rest 24, as will be described below.

Second movement links are provided which include a bell crank lever 60 and a second holding link `62. The bell crank lever 60 has the normal three pivot points and 1s connected at the first pivot 64 intermediate its ends to the carrier link 32. The -bell crank lever 60 is pivotally connected to the first holding link 54 at a second pivot point 66 and is connected to the second movement link 62 at the third pivot point 68. The second holding link l62 is pivotally mounted on the frame 12 at the second movement holding pivot 70 which is conveniently provided on a mounting plate 70a Secured to the support 12. As will be seen by comparing FIGS. 1 and 2, the bell crank lever 60, the carrier link 32 and the second holding link 62 remain stationary during the first movement phase, thus providing a substantially fixed pivot, the second pivot 66, for the 'first holding link 54 during the first movement phase. Accordingly, during the first movement phase, and as the front guide link 36 and the back-rest guide link 44 pivot rearwardly, the holding link 54 similarly pivots rearwardly about the stationary second pivot 66 and provides support for the rearward portion of the seat 22 to maintain the substantially constant angular relationship between the seat 22 and back-rest 24.

Reference may be made to my co-pending application Ser. No. 303,201 entitled Improved Reclining Chair ofi the Multiple Movement Type for a more generalized description of the utilization of a holding link in reclining chairs. The first holding link 54 essentially functions as a stop between the seat 22 and the back-rest 24 during the first motion phase to substantially prevent movement about the seat-back-rest pivot 42. However, in accordance with the present invention, a small initial movement is provided between the seat 22 and back-rest 24 at the beginning of the first movement phase in order to introduce a lever effect to aid the chair occupant in lifting his weight and the weight of the seat 22 at the beginning of the first movement phase. The front guide link 36 and the holding link 54 are both inclined forwardly and upwardly in the upright sitting position. Accordingly, initial movement of the seat 22 in the first movement phase has a relatively large vertical component thus requiring the chair occupant to work against the force of gravity in order to move the body-supporting means 2t) out of the upright sitting position. The ease of this operation in the chair is enhanced by the utilization of the relatively long lever arm constituted by the back-rest 24. Specifically, the back-rest 24 may be considered as a lever pivoted about the backrest pivot 48 serving as fulcrum, upward force being applied to the seat 22 at the seat-back-rest pivot 42. Due to the paths of motion of the front guide link 36 and the holding link 54 (which define the path of movement of the seat 22) and the path of movement of the back-rest link 44 (which in combination with the movement of the seat 22 defines the path of movement of the back-rest 24), there is a small initial change in the angular relationship between the seat'22 and the backrest 24 at the beginning of the first movement pbase. Although this change is relatively small, it is sufficient to enable the chair occupant to utilize the back-rest 24 as a lever to lift the seat 22 and his own weight upwardly to overcome the gravitational force on the moving system of the seat 22, the back-rest 24 and the chair occupant, which force tends to ke-ep the body supporting unit 2f) in the upright sitting position. Of course, as soon as `the initial movement out of the upright sitting position has been accomplished, the path of movement of the seat 22 is substantially rearwardly such that no further lever- `age action by the back-rest 24 is necessary. Accordingly, the angle between the seat and back-rest may be thereafter maintained or, if desirable, may be returned to its initial angle. As may be appreciated from studying the drawings of the chair 10, only a very slight initial change o-f angle is necessary in order to provide the advantageous function described above.

The leg-rest linkage 36 is actuated during the first movement phase to move from the collapsed position shown in FIG. 1 to the extended, leg-supporting position shown in FIG. 2. The leg-rest linkage 3f) is driven from a downward extension 72 of the first holding link 54 which rotates forwardly about the second pivot 66 during the first movement phase. This forward movement is translated through the pivot 73 to a connecting link 74 to drive the linkage 30. The linkage 3f) includes a first link 76 which is pivotally connected to the seat `22 at the front guide link pivot 4t) and is pivoted intermediate its ends, at pivot 78, to the connecting link 74. At its lower end, the first link 76 is connected to a second link 80 at the pivotal connection 82 which link, in turn, is connected to the leg-rest 26 at the first legrest pivot 84. The forward end of the connecting link 74 is connected to a third leg-rest link 86 at pivot 88. The link 86 is connected at its other ends to the fourth leg-rest link 90 at pivot 92 which link is also connected to the leg-rest 26 at the second leg-rest pivot 94. The

`links 80 and S6 are pivotally interconnected `at their cross over point 96. As may be seen in the drawings, a raised stop 98 is provided on the link 86 to positively define the collapsed position of the leg-rest position 26 (see FIG. 1). The stop 52 engages the link 76 at the end of the first movement phase to define the intermediate, tilted sitting position and halt further extension of the leg-rest linkage 30. The leg-rest linkage 30 provides a slightly rising path of movement to the leg-rest 26 as it initially moves outwardly from its collapsed position. Accordingly, once the leg-rest 26 has approached its fully collapsed position as shown in FIG. 1, it has a natural tendency to fall into and assume its rfully collapsed p0- sition. The path of movement of the leg-rest 26 has been indicated approximately by the dotted line in FIG. l of the drawings. Accordingly, the leg-rest mounting linkage 30 cooperates with the linkage 28 to insure that theelements of the chair 10 assume the fully collapsed, upright sitting position when the chair occupant gets up.

n Movement of the body-supporting unit 20 from the intermediate, tilted sitting position of FIG. 2 to the fully reclined position of FIG. 3 is instituted by the application of rearward pressure on the back-rest 24 by the chair occupant. In response to such movement, the carrier link 32 pivots upwardly from the stop 31 about the carrier link pivot 34 raising the front guide link 36 and the front Vof? the seat 22. As the carrier link 32 rotates upwardly, the bell crank lever 6i) of the second movement links is translated upwardly at `its intermediate pivot 64. The third pivot 68 of the bell crank lever 60 is held downward by the second holding link 62 such that there is a controlled upward movement of the opposite end of the lever 60 at the second pivot 66 which is connected to the first holding link 54. Accordingly, the first holding link 54 is raised upwardly during the second movement phase such that the position of the seat 22 in the fully reclined position is defined by its connections to the front guide link 36 and the first holding link 54. Movement of the seat 22 during the second movement phase may be viewed as being controlled by a four-bar linkage having the support 12 between the pivots 34 and 70 as the stationary link, The second holding link 62, the bell crank lever 60 and the carrier link 32 are the movable links of the four-bar linkage. The seat 22 is directly attached to this four-bar linkage since the front guide link 36 is more or less stationary relative to the seat 22 and the first holding link 54 is blocked relative to the seat 22 by the action of stop 52 on leg-rest link '76 during the second movement phase. The effective connection of the seat 22 to the four-bar linkage is at extensions of the two movable links 32 and 6ft at the front pivotal mount 38 and the second bell crank pivot 66 respectively.

The position of the seat 22, through the pivotal connection 42 of the seat 22 to the back-rest 24, controls the position of the back-rest as supported by the back-rest guide link 44. As may ybe appreciated by inspecting FIGS. 2 and 3, the back-rest link 44 remains more or less stationary during the second movement phase. This is accomplished by the use of the second holding link 62 which has the effect of a stop supporting link 44 in a stationary position. The second holding link 62, by controlling the seat movement in such a Way that the seatback-rest pivot 42 moves in an arc about a fixed point in the vicinity of pivot 48 Von the back-rest when the chair is in the intermediate, tilted sitting position, holds the back-rest link 44 in much the same manner as a stop engaging its rear surface. As will be best appreciated by comparing FIGS. 2 and 3, the angle between the seat 22 and back-rest 24 varies from the intermediate, tilted sitting position to the fully reclined position and specifically, that angle increases to provide a more relaxed position for the chair occupant.

The termination of the second movement phase is defined by a lost motion stop and sequencing mechanism generally designated by the numeral 10i) and speciticaliy iy pin 102 as it engages the upper end of a slot 104 in nk 107. The pin 102 is mounted on the end of extenion 106 of the front guide link 36 and the slot 104 is ormed in the lost motion link 107 which is pivotally .iounted on the support at the pivot 108. The pivot 108 s effectively coaxial with the front pivotal mount 38 on he carrier member 32 when the carrier member 32 is in ,ither the upright sitting position or the intermediate, ilted sitting position. In each of these positions, as will e seen from inspecting FIGS. 1 and 2, the pin 102 is n the inner end of the slot, i.e., the end closest the pivot L08. Those skilled in the art will appreciate that the ost motion mechanism 100 serves as an automatic iequencing means in addition to its stop functions. Spe- :iiically, the reception of the pin 102 in the slot 104, rnd the angular orientation of the lost motion link 107 with respect to the path of travel of the carrier link 32, nakes it impossible for the carrier link 32 to pivot upwardly about the carrier link pivot 34 until the intermediate, tilted sitting position has been achieved. Accordingly, the raising of the carrier link 32 and the start of the second movement phase cannot be accomplished until the intermediate, tilted sitting position has been reached.

A further stop 109 is provided on the frame 12, and specifically on the mounting plate 70a, and is positioned to engage the second holding link 62 at the end of the second movement phase (see dotted line configuration of FIG. 3). This provides further positive stop means to define the fully reclined position of the body-supporting unit 20 and also prevents links 62 and 60 from going past dead center.

The foregoing description of the reclining chair will be more fully understood by considering the following description of a typical sequence of operation:

With the chair 10 in the position shown in FIG. l, and specifically with the seat 22 and back-rest 24 in the upright sitting position, the chair occupant presses rearwardly on the back-rest 24 to initiate movement to the iirst movement phase. Due to the mechanical advantage of the relatively long lever arm of the back-rest 24 about the back-rest pivot 48 as a fulcrum and the seatback-rest pivot 42 as the point of application of pressure, the seat 22 and back-rest 24 are moved slightly upwardly and rearwardly through a tilting motion with the front guide link 36 and the back-rest guide link 44 rotating rearwardly about the respective front and rear pivotal mounts 38, 46. The relative position of the back-rest 24 with respect to the seat 22 during the first movement phase is governed by the iirst holding link 54 which pivots rearwardly about the second pivot 66 of the bell crank lever 60. As the body-supporting unit is moved from the upright sitting position of FIG. 1 to the intermediate tilted sitting position of FIG. 2, the downward extension 72 of the first holding link 54 is effective, through the pivot 73 to the connecting link 74, to extend the leg-rest linkage and to move the leg-rest 26 from its collapsed position below the seat 22 to its extended, leg-supporting position forwardly of the seat 22.

Upon further rearward pressure on the back-rest 24 by the chair occupant, movement of the body-supporting unit 20 through the second movement phase is initiated. The carrier link 32 pivots upwardly about the carrier link pivot 34 to raise and further tilt the seat 22. As the carrier Ilink 32 is rotated upwardly, the second movement links 60 and 62 'begin `operation to guide the rearward end of the seat 22 and the seat-back-rest pivot 42 along an appropriate path such that the 'back-rest 24, supported by the back-rest guide link 44, assumes a position such that the angle .between the seat 22 and the back-rest 24 is substantially increased as compared with the intermediate, tilted sitting position. Upon abutment of the pin 102 with the end of the lost motion slot 104, and upon engagement of the second holding link 62 with the stop 109, the second movement phase is terminated and the fully reclined position is established.

In order to collapse the chair 10 from the ful-ly reclined position of FIG. 3 to the intermediate, tilted sitting position of FIG. 2 and subsequently to the upright sitting position `of FIG. l, the occupant merely moves his weight forwardly in reverse procedure to that recited above.

It will be appreciated that the reclining chair 10 according to the present invention provides a structure wherein the center of gravity of the moving body-supporting unit 20, when it is adjacent the upright sitting position, is forwardly yof the point in space about which that moving system rotates. Accordingly, there is a natural tendency for the unoccupied chair to assume its upright sitting position. Specifically, there is a tendency, under the force of gravity, for the seat 22 and back-rest 24 to fall downwardly into the upright sitting position with the Ifront guide link 36 and the holding link 54 rotating forwardly and downwardly under the inuence of gravity. Furthermore, the leg-rest linkage 30 provided in association with the chair 10 is such that the leg-rest 26 also demonstrates a tendency to fall into its completely collapsed position. Furthermore, due to the mechanical advantage which is achieved Iby the relatively `long lever arm of the back-rest 24 about the backrest pivot 48 and the arrangement yof the point application of the lever for-ce at the seat-back-rest pivot 42, it is relatively easy for a chair occupant to overcome the gravity forces to institute movement of the seat and back-rest unit 20 `out of the upright sitting position and through the first and second movement phases.

Now referring to FIGS. 4, ,5 and 6, there is shown a second embodiment of the present invention, constituting a reclining chair generally designated by the numeral 110, which is similar to the chair 10 described above. The reclining chair includes a support `o1' frame 112 having conventional -arms or side rails 114, 116 which are structurally `joined together by appropriate cross braces 118. The frame 112 is supported above the ground by conventional legs 119 and the chair itself is of the type designated in the trade as a high-leg chair. A bodysupporting unit 120 is mounted for movement Within the frame 112 and includes the seat 122 and fback-rest 124 which are pivotally interconnected as will be described below. A leg-rest 126, including its associated folded extension 126a, is mounted on the lchair 110 and has a movement associated with the movement of the bodysupporting unit 120.

The seat 122 and back-rest 124 are supported within the frame 112 by an appropriate mounting linkage 128 for movement through a first movement phase from lthe upright sitting position illustrated in FIG. 4 to the intermediate, tilted sitting position as illustrated in FIG. I5. During the iirst-movement phase the seat and lback-rest translate and rotate somewhat rearwardly with the angle between the seat and back-rest remaining substantially fixed. The seat 122 and back-rest 124 may then move through a second movement phase to the fully reclined position as illustrated in FIG. 6 during `which the angle between the seat and back-rest is increased to provide a position for more complete relaxation.

The leg-rest 126 and its extension 126a are mounted on the chair 110 by means of a leg-rest mounting linkage 130. The leg-rest moves from its position beneath the forward end of the seat 122, as shown in FIG. 4, to its extended, leg-supporting position, as shown in FIGS. 5 and 6, in response to movement of the seat 122 through the first movement phase. As will be seen by comparing FIGS. 5 and 6, the leg-rest 126 maintains its extended, leg-supporting position during the second movement phase.

The mounting means 128 for the body-supporting unit 120 includes a carrier link 132 which is mounted on the frame 112 on a carrier link pivot 134 and rests on a stop 131 on the frame 112 when the seat 122 and back-rest 124 4are in the upright sitting position and the intermediate, tilted sitting position. A front guide link 136 is pivotally mounted at a front pivotal mount 138 on the forward end of the carrier link 132 and is pivotally connected to the seat 122 at a front guide link pivot 140. The front guide link pivot 140 is formed on a mounting strap 122:1 conveniently secured to -the seat along the lower inside part of the seat frame. The seat 122 is pivotally connected to the back-rest 124 at a seat-back-rest pivot 142. A bracket 123 is rigidly secured to the outside of the seat 122 and a back-rest mounting strap 124a is conveniently secured to the backrest 124 and the seat-back-rest pivot 142 is formed between the upper end of the bracket 123 and the forward end of the strap 12411. A back-rest guide link 144 is secured at its lower end to the frame 112 at a rear pivotal mount 146 and is connected to the back-rest 124 Vat the rear end of the back-rest strap 124g at the back-rest pivot 148. The back-rest guide link 144 is curved as shown in FIGS. and 6 to avoid the rear cross brace 118 during the first .and second movement phases.

As may tbe seen by comparing FIGS. 4 and 5, the bodysupporting unit 120 is guided through the first movement phase by the rearward rotation of the front guide link 136 about the front pivotal mount 138 and the back-rest guide link 144 about the rear pivotal mount 146. A stop 150 on the seat strap 122e engages the front guide link 136 to support the weight of the chair occupant in the upright sitting position and a second stop 152, also on the seat strap 122g, engages the first holding link 154, described below, to halt the first movement phase and to define the intermediate, tilted sitting position.

The angle between the seat 122 and the back-rest 124 is main-tained substantially uniform during the first movement phase by theA operation of a first holding link 154. The rst holding link 154 is pivotally connected to the seat 122 at a pivot point 158 spaced rearwardly of the front guide link pivot 140. The effect of the first holding link 154 is to serve as a stop during the first movement phase to maintain a substantially constant angle between the seat 122 and back-rest 124, as will be described below.

Second movement links are provided which include, a bell crank lever 160 and a second holdingl link 162. The bell-crank lever 160 has the normal three pivot points and is connected at the first pivot point 164 intermediate its ends to the carrier link 132. The bell-crank lever 160` is pivotally connected to the first holding link 154 at a second pivot point 166 and is connected to the second movement link 162 at the third pivot point 168. The second holding link 162 is pivotally mounted on the frame 112 at the second movement holding pivot 176 which is conveniently provided on a mounting plate 171m secured to the support 112. As will be seen by comparing FIGS. 4 and 5, the bell-crank lever 160, the carrier link 132, and the second holding link 162 remain stationary during the first movement phase, thus providing a substantially fixed pivot, the second pivot 166, for the first holding link 154 during the first movement phase. Accordingly, during the first movement phase and as the front guide link 136 and the back-rest guide link 144 pivot rearwardly, the holding link 154 similarly pivots rearwardly about the stationary second pivot 166 and provides support for the rearward portion of the seat 122 to maintain the substantially constant angular relationship between the seat 122 and back-rest 124. The first holding link 154 essentially functions as a stop 'between the seat 122 and the back-rest 124 during the first motion phase to substantially prevent movement about the seat-back-rest pivot 142.` However, in accordance with the present invention, a small initial movement is provided between the seat 122 and the back-rest 124 at the beginning ofthe first movement phase in order to introduce a lever effect to aid the chair occupant in lifting his weight and the weight of the seat 122 at the beginning of the first movement phase. The front guide link 136 and the holding link 154 are both inclined forwardly and upwardly in the upright sitting position. Accordingly, initial movement of the seat 122 in the first movement phase has a relatively large vertical component thus requiring the chair occupant to work against the force of gravity in order to move the body-supporting means 12()l out of the upright sitting position. The ease of this operation in the chair 10 is enhanced by the utilization of the relatively long lever arm constituted by the back-rest 124. Specifically, the back-rest 124 may be considered as a lever pivoted about the back-rest pivot 148 serving as a fu'lcrum, upward force being applied to the seat 122 at the seatback-rest pivot 142. Due to the paths of motion of the front guide link 136 and the holding link 154 (which define the path of movement of the seat 122) and the path of movement of the 'back-rest link 144 (which in combination with the movement of the seat 122 defines the path of movement of the back-rest 124), there is a small initial change in the angular relationship between the seat 122 and the back-rest 124 at the beginning of the first movement phase. Although this change is relatively small, it is suficient to enable the chair occupant to utilize the back-rest 124 as a lever to lift the seat 122 and his own weight upwardly to overcome the gravitational force on the moving system of the seat 122, the back-rest 124 and the chair occupant which force tends to keep the bodysupporting unit in the upright sitting position. Of course, as soon as the initial movement out of the upright sitting position has been accomplished, the path of movement of the seat 122 is no longer upwardly so that no further leverage action by the back-rest 124 is necessary. Accordingly, the angle between the seat and back-rest may be thereafter maintained, or, if desirable, may be returned to its initial angle. As may be appreciated from studying the drawings of the chair 110, only a very slight initial change of angle is necessary in order to provide the advantageous function described above.

The leg-rest linkage is actuated during the first movement phase to move from the collapsed position shown in FIG. 3 to the extended, leg-supporting position shown in FIG. 4. The leg-rest linkage 130 is driven from a downward extension 172 of the first holding link 154 which rotates forwardly about the second pivot 166 during the first movement phase. This forward movement is translated through the pivot 173 to a connecting link 174 to drive the linkage 13?. The linkage 130 includes a first link 176 which is pivotally connected to the seat 122 at the pivot 177 and is pivoted intermediate its ends, at Ipivot 178, to the connecting link 174. At its forward end, the first link 176 is connected to a second link 180 at the intermediate pivotal connection 182 which in turn is connected to the leg-rest 126 at the first leg-rest pivot 184. The third leg-rest link 186 is connected to the second link a pivot 188 and is pivotally connected to the seat 122 at pivot point 189 on the strap 12211 spaced rearwardly from pivot 177. The link 176 is connected intermediate its ends to the fourth leg-rest link 190 at pivot 192 which link is also connected to the leg-rest 1.26 at the second leg-rest pivot 194. An extension 196 of link 190 drives the leg-rest extension 126e through the connecting link 197 and its pivots 198, 199 with the leg-rest extension 126a being mounted on the leg-rest 126 at pivot 184 to operate in the manner well known in the art for folding leg-rests. A stop 186a is mounted on the strap 12211 and provides a positive stop for the leg-rest mounting linkage 130 in the upright sitting position. The leg-rest linkage 130 provides a slight rise in the path of movement to the leg-rest 126 as it moves outwardly from its collapsed position. Accordingly, once the leg-rest 126 has approached its fully collapsed position as shown in FIG. 4, it has a natural tendency to fall into and assume its fully collapsed position. The path of movement of the leg-rest 126 is generally similar to the dotted line path shown in FIG. 1 of the drawings. Accordingly, the legrest mounting linkage 130 cooperates with the linkage 128 to insure that the elements of the chair 110 assume Y past dead center.

the fully collapsed, upright sitting position when the chair occupant gets up.

Movement of the body-supporting unit 120 from the intermediate, tilted sitting position of FIG. to the fully reclined position of FIG. 6 is instituted by the application of rearward pressure on the back-rest 124 by the chair occupant. In response to such movement, the carrier link 132 pivots upwardly from the stop 131 about the carrier link 134 raising the front guide link 136 and the front of the seat 122. As the carrier link 132 rotates upwardly, the bell-crank lever 160 of the second movement links is translated upwardly at its intermediate pivot 164. The third pivot 168 of the bell-crank lever 160 is held downward by the second holding link 162 such that there is a controlled upward movement of the opposite end of the lever 160 at the second pivot 166 which is connected to the first holding link 154. Accordingly, the first holding link 154 is raised upwardly during the second movement phase such that the position of the seat 122 in the fully reclined position is defined -by its connections to the front guide link 136 and the first holding link 154. Movement of the seat 122 during the second movement phase may 'be viewed as being controlled by a four-bar linkage having the support 112 between the pivots 134 and 170 as the stationary link. The second holding link 162, the bell-crank lever 160 and the carrier link 132 are the movable links of the four-bar linkage. The seat 122 is directly attached to this fourbar linkage since the front guide link 136 is more or less stationary relative to the seat 122 and the first holding link 154 is rigid with the seat 122 during the second movement phase. The connection of the seat 122 to the four- -bar linkage is at extensions of the two movable links 132 and 160 at the first pivotal mount 138 and the second bell crank pivot 166 respectively.

The position of the seat 122, through the pivotal connection 142 of the seat 122 to the back-rest 124, similarly controls the position of the back-rest as supported by the back-rest guide link 144. As may be appreciated by inspecting FIGS. 5 and 6, the back-rest link 144 remains more or less stationary during the second movement. This is accomplished by the use of the second holding link 162 which has the effect of a stop supporting link 144 in a stationary position. The second holding link 162, by controlling the seat movement in such a way that the seat-back-rest pivot 142 moves' in an arc about a fixed point in the vicinity of pivot 148 on the back-rest when the chair is in the intermediate tilted sitting position, holds the back-rest link 144 in much the same manner as a stop engaging its rear surface. As will be best appreciated -by comparing FIGS. 5 and 6, the angle between the seat 122 and back-rest 124 varies from the intermediate, tilted sitting position to the fully reclined position and specifically, that angle increases to provide a more relaxed position for the chair occupant.

The termination of the second movement phase is defined by a stop 200* which is provided on the frame 112, and specifically on the mounting plate 170'a, and is positioned to engage the second holding link 162 at the end of the second movement phase (see dotted line configuration of FIG. 6i). This provides positive stop means to define the fully reclined position of the body-supporting unit 120 and also prevents lin-ks 162 and 160` from going A sequencing stop 201 is mounted on the support 112 adjacent the carrier link pivot 134 and is positioned to engage an extension of member 172 thereby providing positive blocking means preventing movement in the second movement phase until the first movement phase has been initiated and the link 154-172 has rotated out of blocking engagement with the sequencing pin 1. Y

The foregoing description of the reclining chair 110 will be more fully understood by considering the following description of a typical sequence of operation:

With the chair 1,10 in the position shown in FIG. 4, and

specifically with the seat 122 and back-rest 124 in the upright sitting position, the chair occupant presses rearwardly on the back-rest 124 to initiate movement to the first movement phase. Due to the mechanical advantage of the relatively long lever arm of the back-rest 124 about the back-rest pivot 148 as a fulcrurn and the seatback-rest pivot 142 as the point of application of pressure, the seat 122 and back-rest 124 are moved upwardly initially and then rearwardly through a tilting motion with the front guide link 136 and the back-rest guide link 144 rotating rearwardly about theV respective front and rear pivotal mounts 138, 144. The relative position of the back-rest 124 with respect to the seat during the first movement phase is governed by the first holding link 154 which pivots rearwardly about the second pivot 166 of the bell crank lever 160. As the body-supporting unit 126 is moved from the upright sitting position of FIG. 4 to the intermediate, tilted sitting position of FIG. 5, the downward extension 172 of the first holding link 154 is effective, through the pivot 173 to the connecting link 174, to extend the leg-rest linkage 130 and to move the leg-rest 126 from its collapsed position below the seat 122 to its extended, leg-supporting position forwardly of the seat 122.

Upon further rearward pressure on the back-rest 124 by the chair occupant, movement of the body-supporting unit 120 through the second movement phase is initiated. The carrier link 132 pivots upwardly about the carrier link pivot to raise and further tilt the seat 122. As the carrier link 132 is rotated upwardly, the second movement links 160 and 162 begin operation to guide the rearward end of the seat 122 and the seat-back-rest pivot 142 along an appropriate path such that the back-rest 124, supported by the back-rest guide link 144, assumes a position such that the angle between the seat 122 and the Iback-rest 124 is substantially increased as compared with the intermediate, tilted sitting position. Upon abutment engagement of the second holding link 162 with the stop 260, the second movement phase is terminated and the fully reclined position is established.

In order to collapse the chair from the fully reclined position of FIG. 6to the intermediate, tilted sitting position of FIG. 5 and .subsequently to the upright sitting position of FIG. 4, the occupant merely moves his weight forwardly in reverse procedure to that recited above.

It .will be appreciated that the reclining chair 110 according to the present invention provides a structure wherein the center of gravity of the moving body-supporting unit 120, when it is adjacent the upright sitting position, is forwardly of the point in space about which that moving system rotates. Accordingly, there is a natural tendency for the unoccupied chair to assume its upright sitting position. Specifically, there is a tendency, under the force of gravity, for the seat 122 and back-rest 124 to fall downwardly into the upright sitting position with the front guide link 136 and the holding link 154 rotating forwardly and downwardly under the infiuence of gravity. Furthermore, the leg-rest linkage 130Y provided in association with the chair 110 is such that the leg-rest 126 also demonstrates a tendency to fall into its completely collapsed position. Furthermore, due to the mechanical advantage which is achieved by the relatively long lever arm of the back-rest 124 about the back-rest pivot 14S and the arrangement of the point application of the lever force at the seat-back-rest pivot 142, it is relatively easy for a chair occupant to overcome the gravity forces and to institute movement of the -seat and back-rest unit out of the upright sitting position and through the first and second movement phases.

It should be noted that in both embodiments the action of the first holding link is such that it not only contributes to the upward movement of the seat initially and the consequent tendency of the chair to stay closed, i.e., in the upright sitting position, but it also produces the .desired initial tilting of the back-rest which provides the i 13 lever effect used by the occupant to overcome the aforesaid tendency of the chair to stay closed. Thus, the arrangement of the holding link produces both of the desired results, results which appear at first to be the antithesis of each other, i.e., the tendency of the body-supporting unit to always move into the closed position and ease to chair occupant to move the body-supporting unit out of the closed position.

Likewise, it should be noted that the arrangement of the leg-rest mounting linkages in each of the two embodiments produces the tendency of the leg-rests to assume their retracted positions. It will be seen in FlG. 1 that the leg-rest link 76 is lifted by the seat as the link 76 swings forwardly. At the same time the first holding link 54 swings in such a manner that pivot 73 at the lower end of extension 72 swings downwardly and forwardly initially. Thus, the connecting link 74 acts to lift the leg-rest as the latter swings forwardly.

In la similar manner the leg-rest links `176 and 186 of chair 110 in FIGS. 4, 5 and 6 act to guide link 180 in such a manner that the leg-rest 1.26 is moved upwardly initially as it is actuated. Because pivots 188 and 189 on link 186 are more or less in line with pivot 177 between link 176 `and the seat strap 122e, pivo-t 188 (which is also on link 180) moves downward faster than the middle pivot 182 on link 180. Thus, the front pivot 184 on link 180 is lifted slightly to produce 4the desired effect on the leg-rest 126 `during its initial movement out of its retracted position.

Although only two embodiments of the present invention have been specifically described above and illustrated in the drawings, numbers of design changes may be made which do not depart from the basic teachings of the present invention. Therefore, the following claims should be construed broadly and in a manner consistent with the scope of the teachings of the invention.

What I claim is:

1. In a reclining chair having an arm frame, a bodysupporting unit including a pivotally interconnected seat and back-rest, a mounting linkage mounting said =body supporting unit for movemen-t through a `first movement phase from an upright sitting position to an intermediate, tilted sitting position with the angle between said seat and back-rest lremaining substantially constant and then through a second movement phase to a fully reclined position with the angle between said seat and back-rest increasing, said mounting linkage including a carrier link pivotally mounted on said arm frame and stationary during said first movement phase and pivoting upwardly during said second movement phase, the improvement comprising a sequencing link for blocking movement of said carrier link and maintaining the angle between said seat and back-rest substantially constant during said first movement phase, said sequencing link comprising a link secured to said arm frame at a sequencing pivot, lost motion means interconnecting said sequencing link and said carrier link, said sequencing link blocking movement of said pivotal interconnection out of its position coaxial with sad sequencing pivot until the completion of said first movement phase.

2. In a reclining ch-air having an arm frame, a bodysupporting unit including a pivotally interconnected seat and back-rest, a mounting linkage mounting said bodysupporting -unit for movement through a first movement phase from an upright sitting position to an intermediate, tilted sitting position with the angle between said seat and back-rest remaining substantially constant and then through la second movement phase to a fully reclined position with the angle between said seat and back-rest increasing, a leg-rest and leg-rest mounting and guiding linkage for moving said leg-rest in response to movement of said seat and back-rest, said mounting linkage including a carrier link pivotally mounted on said arm frame and stationary during said first movement phase and pivoting upwardly during said second movement phase, and a guide link pivoted to said carrier link and to said body-supporting means guiding said body-supporting means for movement relative to said carrier link during said first movement phase and movable upwardly with said] carrier means during said second movement phase, the improvement cornprising a sequencing link for blocking movement of said carrier link and maintaining the angle between said seat and back-rest substantially constant during said first movement phase, said sequencing link comprising a link secured to said arm frame at a sequencing pivot, said sequencing pivot being substantially coaxial with the pivotal interconnection of said carrier link and said guide link durng said first movement phase, and lost motion means interconnecting said sequencing link and said guide link oper-able during said second movement phase and inoperable during said first movement phase for blocking movement of said pivotal interconnection out of its position coaxial with said sequencing pivot until the cornpletion of said first movement phase.

3. In a reclining cha-ir having an arm frame, la bodysupporting unit including a pivotally interconnected seat and back-rest, a mounting linkage mounting said bodysupporting unit for movement through a 'first movement phase from an upright sitting position to an intermediate,-

tilted sitting position with the angle between said seat and back-rest remaining swbstantially constant and then through a second movement phase to a` fully reclined position with the angle between said seat and back-rest increasing, a leg-rest anld leg-rest mounting and guiding linkage for moving said leg-rest in response to movement of said seat and back-rest, said mounting linkage including a carrier link pivotally-mounted on said arm frame and stationary during said first movement phase and pivoting upwardly during said second movement phase, and a .guide link pivoted to said carrier link and to said bodysupporting means guiding said body-supporting means for movement relative to said carrier link during said first movement phase :and movable upwardly with said carrier means dur-ing said second movement phase, the improvement comprising a sequencing link for blocking movement of said carrier link and maintaining the angle between said seat and back-rest substantially constant during said first movement phase, said sequencing link comprising a link secured to said arm frame at a sequencing pivot and having formed therein an elongated slot, said sequencing pivot being substantially coaxial with the pivotal interconnection of said carrier link and said guide link during said first movement phase, said guide link having a fixeid pin therein engaged within said slot of said sequencing link at the end of said slot closest to said sequencing pivot, said sequencing link blocking movement of said pivotal interconnection out of its position coaxial with `said sequencing pivot until the completion of said first movement phase.

4. In a reclining chair having an arm frame, a bodysupporting unit including a pivotally interconnected seat and back-rest, a control linkage mounting said body-supporting unit for movement through a first movement phase from an upright sitting position to an intermediate, tilted sitting position with the angle lbetween said seat and backrest remaining substantially constant and then through a second movement phase to a fully reclined position with the angle between said seat and back-rest increasing, a leg-rest and leg-rest mounting and guiding linkage for moving said leg-rest in response to movement of said seat and back-rest, said control linkage including a carrier link pivotally mounted on said :arm frame and having a stationary position relative to said arm frame and being movable out of said stationary position about its pivotal mount, a guide link pivoted to said carrier link and to said body-supporting means for guiding said body-supporting means for movement relative to saidcarrier link, a pin on said guide link of said control linkage having a first motion along one path when said body-supporting mit is moved in said tirst movement phase and a second notion along a different path when sai'd body-supporting lnit is moved in said second movement phase, a sequencng vl-ink pivotally connected to said guide link at said )in land to said support at a sequencing pivot to guide .aid pin in an arc of said first path, and a lost motion neans in one of said sequencing link pivotal connections vo allow said pin to move in said second path, said se- ]uencing link blocking movement of said carrier link and naintaining the angle between said seat and back-rest substantially constant during said first movement phase, said sequencing pivot being substantially coaxial with the pivotal interconnection of said carrier link and said guide link when said carrier link is in its stationary position.

5. In a reclining chair hav-ing an arm frame, a bodysupporting unit including a pivotally interconnected seat and back-rest, a mounting linkage mounting said bodysupporting unit fior movement through a first movement phase from an upright sitting position to an intermediate, tilted sitting position with the angle between said seat and back-rest remaining substantially constant, the-n through a second movement phase to a fully reclined position with the angle between said seat and back-rest increasing, a leg-rest and leg-rest mounting and guiding linkage for moving said leg-rest in response to movement of said seat and back-rest, said mounting linkage including a carrier l-ink pivotally mounted at its rear end on s-aid arm frame, means for supporting said carrier link in a stationary position relative on said arm frame, said carrier link being pivotable out of said stationary position about its pivotal mount, a guide link pivoted to the forward end of said carrier link and -to said body-supporting means for .guiding said body-supporting means for movement relative to said carrier link, the improvement comprising a sequencing link for blocking movement of said carrier link and 35 maintaining the angle between said seat and back-rest substantially constant during said first movement phase,

when said chair is in its upright sitting position, said sequencing link being secured at its upper end to said arm frarne at a sequencing pivot, the other end of said sequencing link having formed therein an elongated slot, said guide link having a downward extension, a pin mounted at the lower end of said downward extension, said pin being engaged in said elongated slot, said pin on said guide link having a first path of motion along onev path for guiding said chair in said first movement phase, said pin on said guilde link having a second path of motion for guiding said chair in said second movement phase, said slot in said sequencing link allowing said pivot to move in said second path during said second movement phase, said sequencing pivot lbeing substantially coaxial with the pivotal interconnection of said carrier link and said guide link when said carrier link is in its stationary position, said pin being engaged in the end of said slot closest to said sequencing pivot during said first movement phase, said sequencing link blocking movement of said pivotal interconnection between said carrier link and said guide link out of its position coaxial with said sequencing pivot until the completion of said first movement phase.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,039,815 6/1962 Fletcher 297-322 X 3,043,621 7/ 1962 Fletcher 297-85 3,044,827 7/ 1962 Belisle 297-316 X 3,056,629 10/1962 Fletcher 297-316 3,069,201 12/1962 Belisle et al 297-316 X 3,096,119 7/1963 Fletcher 297-85 3,115,363 12/1963 Schl-iephacke 297-89 3,162,482 12/1964 Katz 297-85 FRANK B. SHERRY, Primary Examiner.

JAMES T. MCCALL, Examineri

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3039815 *Aug 31, 1959Jun 19, 1962Anton LorenzReclining chair of the multiple type
US3043621 *Apr 22, 1960Jul 10, 1962Anton LorenzReclining chair of the multiple movement type
US3044827 *Apr 25, 1960Jul 17, 1962Belisle Adelard JReclining article of furniture having movable leg rest
US3056629 *Sep 10, 1959Oct 2, 1962Anton LorenzReclining chair of the multiple position type
US3069201 *Mar 30, 1961Dec 18, 1962Dual Mfg & Engineering IncReclining chair
US3096119 *Jul 14, 1959Jul 2, 1963Anton LorenzReclining chair of the multiple position lounger type
US3115363 *Apr 7, 1960Dec 24, 1963Anton LorenzLeg-rest control means for multiple position reclining chair
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3492049 *Apr 14, 1967Jan 27, 1970Peter S FletcherReclining chair of the multiple movement type
US4155672 *May 1, 1978May 22, 1979Deep Oil Technology, Inc.Protective guide cage construction for subsea well operations
US4247146 *Jul 5, 1979Jan 27, 1981Mohasco Corp.Recliner chair which moves forwardly relative to a wall as the body supporting means of the chair moves from upright to reclined positions
Classifications
U.S. Classification297/89, 297/322
International ClassificationA47C1/0355
Cooperative ClassificationA47C1/0355
European ClassificationA47C1/0355