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Publication numberUS3316559 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 2, 1967
Filing dateJun 10, 1964
Priority dateJun 10, 1964
Publication numberUS 3316559 A, US 3316559A, US-A-3316559, US3316559 A, US3316559A
InventorsBehrends Dale F, Ewing James W
Original AssigneeBehrends Dale F, Ewing James W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Toilet hygienic device
US 3316559 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 2, 7 J. w. EWING ETAL 3,316,559

TOILET HYGIENIC DEVICE Filed June 10, 1964 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 FIG. 3

INVENTORS: JAMES W EWING DALE F BEHRENDS BY g 9 W ATT'YS 33 FIG? 3 v 37 4- .5:. 4 5

[I [III]!!! '0 32 I ,r a 32 a 49 INVENTORS.

DALE F. BEHRENDS y 2, 1967 J. w. EWING ETAL 3,316,559 7 TOILET HYGIENIC DEVICE Filed June 10, 1964 2 Sheets-Sheet 2' ATT YS United States Patent 3,316,559 TOILET HYGIENIC DEVICE James W. Ewing, 130 Howe Terrace, Barrington, Ill.

60010, and Dale F. Behrends, 13024 Fenton Ave., Sylmar, Calif. 91342 Filed June 10, 1964, Ser. No. 373,976 12 Claims. (Cl. 4223) This invention relates to a toilet hygienic device, and, more particularly, to a device for spraying fluid into a toilet bowl for disinfecting, deodorizing, etc., purposes.

The instant invention constitutes an improvement upon our earlier Patenet No. 2,760,209, issued Aug. 28, 1956.

The instant invention follows the teaching of our earlier patent, but incorporates certain advantageous changes therefrom which result in an unexpectedly superior operation. Our earlier patent discloses a generally U-shaped tubular member adapted to be mounted over the rim of a toilet bowl which is compressed by weight on the associated toilet seat for expelling a quantity of fluid from the U-shaped member. Through the instant invention, the U-shaped member can be readily installed on a wide variety of rims in a secure and immobile fashion while at the same time developing a much greater internal compressive force for the expelling of fluid. It is, therefore, a generalized object of the invention to provide an improvement upon the container featured in the earlier patent.

A further and more specific object is to provide an improved dispensing container for mounting on a toilet bowl rim wherein structural features newly added not only develop a superior gripping action relative to the toilet bowl, but at the same time result in advantageously greater internal compression when subjected to the weight stress of the toilet seat.

Another object of the invention is to provide a dispensing container of the type dealt with generally in our earlier patent wherein certain internal rigidification elements are provided to insure foolproof and long life operation. 7

Still another object of the invention is to provide a dispensing container incorporating a novel valve-equipped discharge nozzle to prevent undesirable leakage and develop a rapid-acting, relatively powerful spray.

Other objects and advantages of the invention may be seen in the details of construction and operation set down in the following specification.

The invention is explained in conjunction with an illustrative embodiment in the accompanying drawing, in which:

FIG. 1 is a fragmentary perspective view of a toilet installation and showing the invention applied thereto;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged side elevational view, partially in section, of the portion of FIG. 1 featuring the inventive dispensing device;

FIG. 3 is a view similar to FIG. 2 but showing the same in a diiferent condition of operation, i.e., in the process of dispensing fluid under the weight stress of a toilet seat;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view of the discharge portion of the inventive device of the preceding views;

FIG. 5 is a sectional view taken along the sight line 5-5 applied to FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is an enlarged sectional view taken along the sight line 6-6 applied to FIG. 1;

FIG. 7 is a transverse sectional view taken along the sight line 77 applied to FIG. 2; and

FIG. 8 is an enlarged sectional view of the discharge nozzle portion of the device.

Referring to the drawing and in particular FIG. 1, the numeral 10 designates generally a toilet bowl which is 'ice equipped with the usual rim 11. Aflixed to the bowl in pivotal fashion is a toilet seat 12. Also pivotally mounted on the bowl 10 is the top closure 13, and associated with the bowl 10 is the water chest or reservoir 14.

Installed over the rim 11 is the improved fluid-dispensing device of this invention and which is generally designated 15.

Reference is now made to FIG. 2, wherein the device 15 is seen to be generally U-shaped and hatched in the wall portion to indicate that it is constructed of a resilient plastic material. The tubular U shape includes a first depending leg portion 16 which is adapted to project downwardly interiorly of the bowl 10 and is equipped with a discharge nozzle device generally designated 17. The U shape also includes a second depending leg portion 18 which extends down the outer side of the bowl 10. Interconnecting the two depending leg portions 16 and 18 is a connective portion 19 which is seen to overlie the rim 11. The portions 18, 19 and 16 constitute, therefore, a relatively elongated tubular body, with the leg portion 18 being partially filled with a hygienic fluid as at 20 adapted to be atomized (see FIG. 3) into the interior of the bowl 10 and onto the surface of the water 21 normally carried in the bowl. The water 21 may issue from the integral conduit 22 and discharge ports 23 provided as part of the rim 11.

In the illustrated form of the inventive device 15, we mold the polyethylene in two portions as at 24 and 25 in FIG. 1. After molding and installation of various in ternal parts, the halves 24 and 25 are united along the mating line 26 (see also FIG. 6).

FIG. 6 is a sectional view of the longer, outer leg portion 18, and it is seen that the leg portion 18 is made up of an inside wall 27, an outside wall 28 joined by end walls 29 and 30, to develop a generally rectangular cross section. This same construction is present in the shorter first leg portion 16, while the connective portion 19 is generally elliptical in transverse section, as can be appreciated from a consideration of FIGS. .1 and 7. Thus, the discrete end walls 29 and 30 found in the second leg portion 18 and the corresponding end walls in the shorter first leg portion 16 as seen in FIG. 4, merge into a virtual line as at 32 in FIG. 7the upper and lower walls 33 and 34 respectively of the connective section 19 being essentially spheroidal segments united along longitudinal lines of merger as at 32.

Reference to FIGS. 2 and 4 reveals that the lower wall 34 of the connective section 19 is longitudinally arcuate and convexly related to the upper wall 33. Further, the lower wall 34 defines with the confronting inner walls 27 and 35 of the leg portions 18 and 16, respectively, relatively sharp angles as at 0 in FIG. 4, as of the order of about 20 to about 60.

As can be appreciated from a comparison of FIGS. 2 and 3, the angle 0 enlarges due to the depression of the toilet seat 12. This is due to the upward movement of the lower wall 34 which in certain instances may be reversed in its longitudinal arcuity, constituting in effect a folding action. The folding action is advantageous in keeping the device 15 immobile in its position on the rim 11. The enlargement of the angle 0 results in a substantially greater clamping pressure being exerted on the rim by the depending leg portions 16 and 18. With this greater gripping force, any tendency of the device 15 to move either inwardly of the bowl 10 or laterally along the rim 11 is prevented. As the connective portion 19 is compressed, i.e., the upper wall 33 being depressed under the influence of the seat 12, there is present a hinging action or phenomenon in the two leg portions 16 and 18 which serves to prevent lateral movement of the connective portion 19 so that the leg portions 16 and 18 are forced toward each other.

of the seat contacts most of the ,upperwall 33 of connective portion 19. when this section is completely depressed. As a result of the arched configuration of section 33, the'force transmitted-to each of leg portions 16 and 18 is approximately equal as the seat is depressed. While this corresponding force from upper wall 33 is being transmitted to. the outside walls 16a and 18a of each leg .16 and 18, lower wall 34 provides a related function in pulling the inside walls 16b and 18b of legs 16 and 18 tighter against each side of the rim. The maximum tension on each leg 16 and 18 is reached at the point where connective portion 19 is fully depressed.

As is shown from the comparison of FIGS. 2 and 3, the complete unit moves downward on the rim during compression of connective portion 19. In conjunction with this downward movement, the force from the seat is transmitted first to the side of connective portionv 19 which is nearest to the hinges 1211 on the seat 12. This scissors action from the seat tends to force the complete unit forward on the smooth rim-and out of the best spraying position. This is prevented by the interaction of upper wall 33 and lower wall 34, as described.

This additional clamping action occurson both narrow and wide rims,'regardless of rim cross section. It occurs even if the rim cross section flares or is canted inwardly ternal compression in the unit in order to eject the fluid contents more rapidly and reliably.

, Itwill be'noted that the longitudinal curvature of the bottom wall 34 is sharper than that present in the upper wall 33'of the connective portion.- This results in greater movement of the lower wall 34 to effect the previously mentioned folding action so as to develop parallel relationship between the upper and lower walls 33 and 34,

allowing maximum-compression without restriction. I

The illustrated configuration also solves the .problems implicit in developing suitable compression in toilet arrangements Where the bumpers 12a (see FIG. 1) become worn. When new, the bumpers spacethe seat 12 about one-half inch above the rim 11. As time progresses, the bumpers are worn down, which results in a lesser spacing of the seat relative to the rim 11. In certain instances,

this results in developing a set in the plastic of the'device 15, and this problem is effectively avoided through the introduction of the coil springs 36. To accommodate. the extensive compression resulting fromndepressing the seat 12, we find it advantageous to'provide telescopingtype coil springs which may be of the barrel envelope type illustrated (see particularly FIG. 4), or, alternatively,

of the hourglass shape. Thus, the springs '36 are compressible to a very small height without impeding further movement of the seat 12 so as to ultimately come'to a position of rest by virtue of having the bumpers 12a contactthe rim .11. The degree of compression of the springs 36 can be appreciated from a consideration of FIGS.= 2 and 3, and, further, the initial clamping'action of the leg portions 16 and 18 relative tothe rim 11' can be seen in FIG. 2, where the unstressedposition of the legportions 16 and 18 is represented in chain line as at 16'-and 18.; The extent of relative outward movement is designated by the curved arrows and 6" relative to. thezlegs 16 and 18 in FIG. 2. This initial hinging actionmay be supplementedby further spreading of the legs 16 'and 18 if required by the rim cross section, as can be appreciated from a consideration of FIG. 3.

The inventive structure'illustrated provides an advantage, in that the device 15 touches the rim at only three places, as can be appreciated from FIG. 2. The inside of each of the leg portions 16 and 18 contacts the bowl rim 11 in only one'small area, which allows each leg portion 16 and 18. to slide down each side of the rim 11 with a minimum of friction. This is advantageous in obtaining quick compression and a good sprayif a squeeze bottle is compressed slowly, no effective spray results. Also, the lower wall 34 of the connective portion 19 is enabled to work on a rim 11 having a substantially rounded top section, as contrasted to the flat section shown-due to the flexibility and folding action already referred to.

We find it advantageous to provide two springs 36, one for each portion 24 and 25 of the device 15. These springs are installed on bosses 37 and 38 (compare FIGS. 2 and 4) which are molded integrally with the upper and lower walls 33 and 34-.-at about positions of alignment with the center of the rim 11. a

In developing the compression interiorly of the device 15, we find .it advantageous to provide reinforcing ribs as at 38 inthe larger, outer leg portion 18. The ribs 38 are installed against the end walls 29 and 30, extending between the inner and outer walls 27 and 28 respectively, as can be appreciated from FIG. 6. Referring to FIGS. 2 and 3, it will be seen that a plurality of verticallyspaced ribs are provided, the ribs 38 developing a better spray pattern by preventing the loading of the side walls of the leg portion 18..

Exemplary of a specific commercial structure is a device 15 having wall thicknesses in the walls 27 and 28 at about the mating lines 26 (see FIG. 6) of the order of 0.080". The end walls 29 and 30 are about 0.60", and this arrangement, in conjunction with the ribs 38, develops a suitable rigidity to prevent ballooning when the connective portion 19 is compressed as seen in FIG. 3. The connective portion is constructed of somewhat thinner walls, the longitudinal central portion of the connective portion 19 being of the order of 0.040" and enlarging gradually as the longitudinal sides are approached,

' where the wall thickness is of the order of 0.060.

Itwill also be seen that the leg portions 16 and 18 have relativelysquare corners as at 39 in FIG. 6, serving to rigidify the legs against ballooningand localizing the compression in the connective portion 19.

The springs 36, in addition to controlling the compression ofthe connective portion 19, also serve as a limit or blocking means to prevent the seat 12 from approaching the rim 11 too closely and thereby collapsing thev dip tube 20. The'dip tube 20 is seen to lie generally midway between the longitudinal sides of the device 15 (see FIG. 6), and thus the dip tube 20 extends between the springs 36 which are spaced apart in the fashion seen in FIG. 1. The clip tube, at its inner end, extends to a point 20a fairly --close.to the bottom'of the longer, outer leg portion 18 (see FIGS. 2 and 3) and at the other end is coupledto the nozzle structure generallydesignated 17.

, Interposed in the path of fluid entering the dip tube at 20a and exiting from the nozzle 17 is a check valve generally designated 40 (see FIG. 4). For this purpose, a tapered bushing 41' is pre-fltted within the discharge end 20b of the dip tube 20. The bushing 41 includes a tapered or shouldered portion as at 41a which serves as an annular seat for the ball valve element 42. The ball valve ing due to siphon action which is set up, since the bottom of the dip tube 20a isbelow the height of the nozzle 17 (see FIGS. 2 and 3). Further,'we find it advantageous to make the main length of the liquid discharge path, i.e.,

'the dip tube 20, relatively enlarged as contrasted to the constricted portion of the adapter 44b, so that substantial force is applied against the ball valve element 42 to unseat the same. The compression of the connective portion 19 opens the valve against the urging of the spring 43, allowing the liquid to pass down the stem or constricted portion 4412. In actual practice, the constricted portion 44b has an ID. of the order of 0.024", so that substantial velocity characterizes the liquid flowing in this portion of the fluid discharge path.

The lower portion of the adapter 44 is seated within a cup-shaped annular wall 45 provided as an integral part of the nozzle 17. As can be seen in FIG. 5, the cupshaped portion is equipped with a bore as at 46, having a plurality of longitudinally-extending, circumferentially disposed slots as at 47. Thus, when pressure is released on the connective portion 19, air enters the liquid discharge passage 48 and flows upwardly through the slots 47 to compensate for the liquid discharge from the interior of the device 15.

For the purpose of accommodating the laterally-extending discharge passage 48, which is arranged at about an 8 angle, the bottom face 49 of the nozzle 17 is recessed as at 50 (compare FIGS. 4, 5' and 8). The discharge passage 48 is advantageously 0.040" wide and has a maximum depth of 0.013", this terminating in an orifice 48a which lies in a 45 plane, the orifice being 0.020" square.

We have .found that squeeze bottle operation develops a superior spray if liquid is held in the dip tube practically right at the discharge orifice. In squeezing a squeeze bottle, a good deal of air and compression escapes and is lost before the liquid is pumped up the dip tube and atomized. This disadvantage is avoided through the introduction of a valve as at 40, so that there is not only a better and quicker spray, but it also permits making a squeeze bottle of substantially greater height and still productive of a spraying action.

In the illustration given, the oversized tube 20', as indicated hereinabove, allows greater force against the ball valve element 42 and provides an instantaneous spraying action. The small stem or adapt-er 44 resists the movement of liquid so that it may be atomized properly with the air in the mixing chamber.

In conjunction with the valve arrangement whereby the liquid is suspended throughout the length of the dip tube and adapter, there is provided a small mixing chamber designated 51. This mixing chamber is approximately one-third the size of standard mixing chambers on regular squeeze type bottles. This small size chamber serves to restrict the air flow from the dispenser, thereby providing greater pressure and air velocity at the point where the liquid is introduced into the six air streams at the end of adapter 44. This mixing chamber 51. is defined by three equally-spaced tube stops 51a, 51b, etc. (see FIG. 5 molded on the inside of nozzle 17, as shown in FIGS. 4 and 5. These tube stops have an optimum height of about 0.005". In combination with extending discharge passage 48, the overall effective height of mixing chamber 51 is of the order of .0l0.015.

The six air slots designated 47 have a width of .020" and a depth of .013", which provides the escaping air with considerable velocity to atomize the stream which the adapter ejects with adiameter of .024". The described construction is especially advantageous in conjunction with elongated containers wherein optimum amounts of liquid and air are readily admixed. We have found in this connection that the provision of a mixing chamber having a height of the order of 0.01-0.02" for a dip tube length of the order of 6-12" achieves this advantageous mixing. The air flowing into the chamber is optimally provided by annularly-related passages which may be provided as shown, or alternatively provided as grooves in the outer wall of the dip tube.

While in the foregoing specification a detailed description of the invention has been set down for the purpose 6 of illustration, many variations in the details herein given may be made by those skilled in the art without departin from the spirit and scope of the invention.

We claim:

1. A container for use in introducing a hygienic liquid into a toilet bowl, comprising a unitary, generally elongated, U-shaped, generally tubular body constructed of resilient plastic material, said body being defined by depending leg portions adapted to extend downwardly along the inside and outside of a toilet bowl rim, with one of said leg portions being equipped with a discharge nozzle, and a connective portion for said leg portions, said connective portion having generally longitudinally arcuate upper and lower side walls convexly related to each other, said lower side wall being deformed upwardly toward said upper side wall when the latter is engaged by a lowered toilet seat to urge said leg portions toward each other for immobilizing said container on the bowl rim.

2. The container of claim 1 in which a telescoping spring extends between said upper and lower side walls of said connective portion.

3. The structure of claim 1 in which said body is generally rectangular in transverse section, said one leg portion being shorter than the other leg portion, said other leg portion having outer and inner side walls constituting, respectively, continuations of the upper and lower side walls of said connective portion and connected by generally flat end walls, and a plurality of spaced-apart, generally parallel ribs in said other leg portion connecting said inner and outer side walls adjacent said end walls.

4. The structure of claim 3 in which said connective portion upper and lower side walls are generally spheroidal segments merging together along longitudinal sides thereof, said end walls converging toward the line of merger with said segments.

5. A device for introducing a hygienic liquid into a toilet bowl, comprising a unitary, generally elongated, U-shaped, generally tubular body constructed of resilient plastic material, said body being defined by depending leg portions adapted to extend downwardly along the inside and outside of a toilet bowl rim, with one of said leg portions being equipped with a discharge nozzle, and a connective portion for said leg portions, said connective portion having generally longitudinally arcuate upper and lower side walls convexly related to each other, said lower side wall being deformed upwardly toward said upper side wall when the latter is engaged by a lowered toilet seat to urge said leg portions toward each other for immobilizing said container on the bowl rim, said body being equipped with a dip tube extending into the other leg portion from said nozzle, and a check-valve in said tube adjacent said nozzle.

6. A container for use in introducing hygienic liquid into a toilet bowl, comprising a unitary, elongated, generally U-shaped, generally tubular body constructed of resilient plastic material, said body having first and second depending leg portions united by a connective portion, said first leg portion being shorter than said second leg portion and prior to installation on a toilet bowl rim being in converging relation therewith in proceeding away from said connective portion, said connective portion having a longitudinally arcuate lower side wall convexly related to the remainder of said connective portion and constituting a continuation of the confronting side walls of said leg portions, said remainder of said connective portion including an upper side wall, said lower side wall forming an angle of about 20-60 with each of said leg portion confronting side walls prior to said installation, said lower side wall being deformed upwardly toward said upper side wall when the latter is engaged by a lowered toilet seat to urge said leg portions toward each other for immobilizing said container on the bowl rim.

7. A device for introducing hygienic liquid into a toilet bowl comprising a unitary elongated generally U-shaped tubular body constructed of resilient plastic materiahsaid .side wall convexly'related to the remainder of said connective portion and constituting a continuation of the confronting side walls of said leg portions, said remainder of said connective portion including an upper side wall, said lowerside wall forming an'angle of about 20-60 with each of said leg portion confronting side Walls prior to said installation, said lower side Wall being deformed upwardly toward said upper side Wall when the latter is engaged by a lowered toilet seat to urge said leg portions toward each other for immobilizing said container onthe bowl rim, said first leg portion at its lower end, being equipped with a discharge nozzle, a dip tube extending generally throughout the length of said body and connected at one end to said nozzle and terminating at the other end adjacent the bottom of said second leg portion,

; and a check-valve mounted in said tube adjacent said nozzle.

8. The structure of claim 7 in whichsaid nozzle includes a cup-shaped member equipped with an axiallyextending circular flange, said flange being equipped in the interior Wallsurface thereof with'a plurality of circumferentially disposed, longitudinally-extending grooves,

a portion of said tube being mounted in said circular flange, and a discharge passage in said nozzle communicating with the interior of said circular flange whereby replacementair is adapted to enter said device by flowing 10. A liquid spray container, comprising an elongated body open at one end and having a dip, tube extending substantially throughout the length thereof and having one end terminating in a nozzle closing said container one end,

through said'passage and circumferentially spaced-apart V 1 grooves.

7 i 9. The structure of claim- 8 ;in which said discharge passage is angularly related relative to the axis of said circular flange.

8 nozzle, and air passage-providing means insaid-nozzle annularly related to said dip tube, said nozzle including .a cup-shaped member equipped with an axially-extending circular flange, said flange being equipped in the interior wall surface thereof with a plurality of circumferentially disposed, longitudinally-extending grooves constituting said passage-providing means, a portion of said tube being mounted in said circular flange, and a discharge passage in said nozzle communicating with the interior of said circular flange whereby replacement air is adapted to enter said device by flowing through said passage and circumferentially spaced-apart grooves.

11. A liquid spray container, comprising an elongated body open at one end and havinga dip tube extending substantially throughout the length thereof and having one end terminating in a nozzle closingsaid container one end, a check-valve mounted in said dip tube adjacent said nozzle, and air-passage-providing means in the nozzle annularly related to said dip tube, said nozzle including a cup-shaped member having an axially disposed perimetric flange extending from the bottom of said cupshaped member and in which said dip tube is received, said flange and tube cooperating to define said passageproviding means, integral spacer means in said nozzle within the perimeter of said flange to space said tube one end from said cup-shaped member bottom so as to provide a mixing chamber for air and liquid.

12. The structure of claim 11 in which said clip tube has a length of from about 6 to about 12" and said chamber has a height of the order of about 0.010.02.

References Cited by the Examiner V UNITED STATES PATENTS 296,435 4/1884 Murdock 222-209 7 595,382 12/1897 Freeman 4223 2,760,209 8/1956 Ewing et al 4223 3,162,333 12/1964 Davidson 222211 X LAVERNE D. GEIGER, Primary Examiner. s. ROTI-IBERG, H. I. GROSS, Assistant Examiners.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No. 3,316,559 May 2, 1967 James W. Ewing et a1.

It is hereby certified that error appears in the above numbered patent requiring correction and that the said Letters Patent should read as corrected below.

Colum 6, line 49, and column 7, line 16, for "container",

each occurrence, read device Signed and sealed this 26th day of December 1967.

(SEAL) Attest:

EDWARD J. BRENNER Edward M. Fletcher, Jr.

Commissioner of Patents Attesting Officer

Patent Citations
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US2760209 *Mar 22, 1954Aug 28, 1956Behrends Dale FContainer for toilet disinfectant and deodorant
US3162333 *Jul 30, 1959Dec 22, 1964Guild MoldersMultiple-part plastic pump for liquids
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3537112 *Aug 18, 1967Nov 3, 1970Goodman Richard EToilet deodorant
US3946448 *Nov 4, 1974Mar 30, 1976Mekopharma Dr. Becker & Cie. K.G.Apparatus for disinfection and chemical purification of toilet bowls
US4745639 *Jun 16, 1986May 24, 1988Wileman Industries, Inc.Toilet apparatus with automatic self-cleaning means
US5307525 *Sep 28, 1992May 3, 1994O'brien John WBathroom odor eliminator
US5319811 *Oct 19, 1990Jun 14, 1994Hauri Peter JCloset seat for a water closet as well as an apparatus for cleaning the posterior on a water closet having a seat
US6178563Feb 15, 2000Jan 30, 2001Leon HelfetToilet deodorizer
US6654971 *Dec 10, 2002Dec 2, 2003Eric MiddletonAir freshening device for toilets
US8359676 *Oct 19, 2009Jan 29, 2013S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Relatively compact non-contact spray toilet bowl cleaning device
US9376794 *Sep 18, 2014Jun 28, 2016James W. PageToilet bowl deodorizer fixture
US9392915 *Jan 24, 2014Jul 19, 2016Emmanuel JonesAir freshening toilet seat device
US20070204387 *Jan 21, 2005Sep 6, 2007Reckitt Benckiser (Uk) LimitedDevice for Dispensing a Fluid
US20110088154 *Oct 19, 2009Apr 21, 2011Jesse RichardRelatively compact non-contact spray toilet bowl cleaning device
US20160024772 *Sep 18, 2014Jan 28, 2016James W. PageToilet Bowl Deodorizer Fixture
US20160024773 *Jul 24, 2014Jan 28, 2016James W. PageToilet Bowl Deodorizer Fixture
Classifications
U.S. Classification4/223
International ClassificationE03D9/02, E03D9/03
Cooperative ClassificationE03D9/032
European ClassificationE03D9/03C