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Publication numberUS3316599 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 2, 1967
Filing dateApr 7, 1964
Priority dateApr 7, 1964
Publication numberUS 3316599 A, US 3316599A, US-A-3316599, US3316599 A, US3316599A
InventorsJoseph R Wagner
Original AssigneeHuyck Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
End fastening construction for drier belts
US 3316599 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

M y 1967 J. R. WAGNER END FASTENING CONSTRUCTION FOR DRIER BELTS Filed April 7, 1964 LJA Fig. 2. 25

Fig.

United States Fatent O 3,316,599 END FASTENING CONSTRUCTION FOR DRIER BELTS Joseph R. Wagner, Greeneville, Tenn, assignor to Huyck Corporation, Rensselaer, N.Y., a corporation of New York Filed Apr. 7, 1964, Ser. No. 357,878 9 Claims. (Cl. 24-31) This invention relates to drier belts and more particularly to an improved fastening construction for the ends of such belts.

Drier belts of the type to which the present invention is directed, while of general application, are particularly well suited for use in connection with the manufacture of non-woven fibrous products such as paper, paperboard, boxboard, etc., in a papermaking machine. As is well known, such machines customarily include a wet section and one or more drying sections. The paper product is formed from a web of water saturated pulp which is transported by one or more papermakers wet felts, often of endless construction, through opposed press rolls and other dewatering devices in the wet section of the machine until the moisture content of the Web is reduced and its fiber structure compacted to such a point that it may become substantially self-supporting. The web is then received by one or more drier belts which are arranged for movement along endless paths to carry the web around a series of rotating drier drums or cans in the drying section of the machine. These drums apply heat to the Web to remove the remaining moisture.

Numerous arrangements have been employed heretofore to fasten the end-s of the drier belts. In some cases the ends are overlapped and sewn, riveted or glued to gether. In other situations the ends are brought together in a butt joint and secured by a strip of material overlapping the joint. For the most part, however, the ends of present day drier belts are joined by a form of flexible hinge which includes a series of interleaved clipper hooks clenched thereto or to a supporting fabric sewn to the belt. An elongated connector, customarily in the form of a cable, extends through the hooks to hold the ends of the belt in place.

In the design of end fastening constructions for drier belts, it is important to present a smooth surface to the fibrous web in order to avoid finish marks on the paper product. Accordingly, the transverse seams between the ends of many types of drier belts previously employed have included a flap of woven material which covered the face of the seam presented to the web. The flap customarily was sewn to one of the ends of the belt in overlapping relationship with the other end to cover the seam therebetween.

The various drier belt flaps used heretofore have exhibited certain disadvantages. As an illustration, in many such flaps the transverse yarns tended to ravel out of the flap material because of the high abrasion conditions customarily encountered in the drying sections of paper machines. Attempts to alleviate this diificulty for the most part involved the use of a tighter weave for the flap to avoid the incidence of raveling. However, the tightly woven flap exhibited a comparatively low permeability or porosity which impaired the elficient escape of moisture from the paper web being dried and frequently produced so-called wet streaks on the finished paper product. Furthermore, and this has been of special moment in cases in which flaps of the type previously employed have been woven in whole or in part from yarns of natural fibers, the flaps often were subject to undesirable heat degradation and shrinkage and exhibited comparatively poor abrasion resistant characteristics.

One general object of this invention, therefore, is to 3,316,599 Patented May 2, 1967 provide a new and improved fastening construction for the ends of a drier belt.

Another object of the invention is to provide a flap for covering the connection between the ends of the belt in which any tendency of the yarns of the flap to ravel out of the flap material is substantially eliminated.

A further object of this invention is to provide a flap of the character indicated which exhibits improved porosity characteristics.

Still another object of the invention is to provide such flap having high resistance to heat degradation, freedom from substantial shrinkage and good abrasion resistance.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a flap for the ends of a drier belt which is economical to manufacture and tho-roughly reliable in operation.

In accordance with the invention, there is provided a drier belt in which the connection between the ends of the belt are covered by a narrow woven tape. The tape includes a set of warp yarns, at least one edge yarn and a filling yarn which is passed back and forth through the shed of warp yarns. Upon the completion of each pass, the filling yarn is led around the edge yarn to firmly interlock it with the main body portion of the tape. With this arrangement, the possibility of the tape unraveling, even on comparatively high-speed paper machines or on machines employed in the manufacture of some of the heavier paper products, is substantially eliminated.

In accordance with certain particularly advantageous embodiments of the invention, the various yarns of the tape are woven from nylon or other synthetic material. The thus woven tape exhibit extremely good durability and abrasion resistance and will not ravel.

In accordance with several good embodiments of the invention, the tape is of multi-layer or multi-ply construction. In some arrangements, the tape is woven in tubular form and includes first and second sets of warp yarns which are held together by stitching yarns. As a result, the durability characteristics of the tape are further enhanced.

The present invention, as well as further objects and features thereof, will be understood more clearly and fully from the following detailed description of certain preferred embodiments, when read with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIGURE 1 is a fragmentary perspective view of the ends of a drier belt having a narrow single-layer tape in accordance with one illustrative embodiment of the invention;

FIGURE 2 is a fragmentary plan view of the tape shown in FIGURE 1, the separation of the various yarns of the tape being exaggerated for clarity of illustration;

FIGURE 3 is a diagrammatic view showing the weave pattern of a multilayer tape in accordance with another illustrative embodiment of the invention;

FIGURE 4 is a diagrammatic view in general similar to FIGURE 3 but showing the weave pattern of a multilayer tape in accordance with a further illustrative embodiment of the invention; and

FIGURE 5 is a fragmentary plan view of a singlelayer tape in accordance with still another embodiment, the separation of the various yarns of the tape being exaggerated for clarity of illustration.

Referring to FIGURE 1 of the drawings, there is shown a drier belt 10 having two end portions 11 and 12. In the illustrated embodiment, the belt 10 advantageously is of open weave construction and is woven from synthetic yarns. In cases in which additional stability, shove resistance, etc., is desired, the woven yarns preferably are treated with resins in a manner similar to that described, for example, in Holden and Schiff US. Patent 2,903,021, granted Sept. 8, 1959, or in Beaumont and Christie U.S.

3 Patent 3,032,441, granted May 1, 1962. One particularly advantageous apparatus for preparing the yarns is (118- closed in Christie and Schiff copending US. application Ser. No. 22,973, filed Apr. 18, 1960, now Patent No. 3,149,003, granted Sept. 15, 1964.

In other arrangements, the drier belt may be of substantially any construction consistent with good drying action, including conventional drier felts woven from yarns of cotton and asbestos or from synthetic yarns, for example, or various perforate or imperforate non-woven belts, such as those of rubber or various synthetic film materials,

etc.

The ends 11 and 12 of the drier belt 10 .are folded back upon themselves to provide a double thickness of material, and the folded end portions are held in place by suitable stitching 13. A plurality of clipper hooks are clenched to the fold for the end portion 11 and are arranged in interleaving relationship with corresponding clipper hooks 16 similarly affixed to the fold for the end portion 12. The hooks 15 and 16 accommodate an elongated cable 17 which extends in a transverse direction and serves to hold the ends of the belt in fixed but flexible relationship with each other. As will be understood, the belt is arranged for movement in the direction of the arrow in FIGURE 1 along an endless path in the drying section of a paper machine to hold a moist web of paper in contact with a series of heated drier cans (not shown) of conventional construction.

A narrow woven tape is fixedly secured to the end portion 12 of the drier belt 10 on the side 24 of the belt which is present-ed to the web of paper (the upper side, as viewed in FIGURE 1). The tape 20 extends across the belt 10 in the transverse or cross-machine direction and includes transverse leading and trailing edges 22 and 23, respectively. The stitching 13 for the end portion 12 serves to hold the half of the tape including the leading edge 22 in facing relationship with the side 24. The remaining portion of the tape overlaps the clipper hooks 15 and 16 and the cable 17 to completely cover the interconnection between the belt ends and thereby provide a smooth continuous surface for the paper web.

The tape 20 is of comparatively open plain weave construction. As best shown in FIGURE 2, the tape includes a set of warp yarns which extend parallel to each other in directions transverse to the longitudinal dimension of the drier belt 10 (FIGURE 1). The outermost yarns comprise edge yarns 26 and 27 which are of a diameter equal to the diameters of the warp yarns and are disposed along the respective edges 22 and 23 of the tape. The spacing of the Warp yarns and edge yarns is uniform throughout the width of the tape.

A continuous weft or filling yarn is passed back and forth through each shed of warp yarns 25 and edge yarns 26 and 27. During the initial pass, the filling yarn 30 extends beneath the edge yarn 27, alternately over and under the successive warp yarns 25 and then over the edge yarn 26. The shed is changed upon the completion of each pass such that, as the shuttle moves in the return direction, the filling yarn passes around the edge yarn 26, then alternately over and under the warp yarns 25 and then around the edge yarn 27. The arrangement is such that the filling yarn forms a series of loops around the edge yarns 26 and 27 to firmly interlock the edge yarns to the main body portion of the tape.

In use, the drier belt 10 is continuously advanced from right to left, as indicated by the arrow in FIGURE 1, to hold the paper web in contact with the heated drier cans. As the belt 10 moves along its endless path, the rearwardly extending portion of the tape 20 covers the clipper hooks 15 and 16 and the cable 17 to avoid marking the web. The trailing edge 23 of the tape is subjected to severe conditions of fiexure as it moves around the drier cans and pocket rolls in the drier section. However, the filling yarn 30 serves to firmly lock the trailing edge yarn 27 to the remaining portion of the tape to prevent any tendency for the edge yarn to ravel out of the flap material. Although the tendency of the leading edge yarns of conventional drier flaps to ravel is not as severe as that of the trailing edge yarns, this tendency nevertheless exists because of the high abrasion conditions to which the leading edge is subjected as it moves around the drier cans. Because of the firm connection of the edge yarn 26 to the tape 20, however, the possibility of the yarn 26 unraveling is substantially eliminated.

Tapes constructed in accordance with the invention may be woven with warps and filling yarns of any of a wide variety of materials, combinations of materials or constructions. In the embodiment of FIGURES l and 2, however, the various yarns of the tape are of synthetic, heat-resistant material. In several advantageous embodiments, the synthetic fabric for the tape is of open-Weave construction and is treated while in an extended or open form with a phenolic-aldehyde resin which is cured with the fabric maintained in its extended condition. The thus treated fabric exhibits extremely good stability, shove resistance and abrasion resistance and is of particular utility in the drier section of the machine. For a more detailed discussion of representative treatments of this type, reference may be had, for example, to the US. patents and application referred to above.

Representative synthetic materials that may be used for the yarns of the tape include monofilament and multifilament yarns of polyamide polymers, such as the nylons designated as Type 6, Type 66 and HT-l, etc., Dacron, Orlon and similar materials, various yarns of fiberglass material, or blends of such synthetic materials. In cases in which the tape is subjected to repeated wetting and drying, Dacron is of particular utility because of its good dimensional stability. Nylon 66 is useful on paper machines in which the tape is subjected to high abrasion, although its resistance to heat degradation is not as good as some of the other synthetic yarns presently available. HT1 nylon has exhibited extremely high resistance to temperature and includes other properties which make it highly desirable for use in the drying section of many types of machines.

Of course, the specific synthetic materials discussed above are but illustrative of a wide variety of materials that may be used for the various yarns of flaps constructed in accordance with the invention.

In several types of drying machines, the thickness or bulk of the tape preferably is maintained at a minimum, thereby further improving its drainage characteristics. In these situations, tapes of single-layer construction, such as the plain weave tape 20 of FIGURES 1 and 2, are of particular utility. Other single-layer weaves which may be employed include twill weaves, basket weaves and many other conventional weaves currently in use.

For certain types of interconnections between the ends of the drier belt, it often is desirable to employ a multilayer tape, to improve the durability characteristics of the tape and to further reduce the possibility of transmitting an impression of the interconnection therethrough to the web of paper. As an illustration, in FIGURE 3 there is shown a schematic representation of a two-layer tape 35 of plain weave construction which is woven in the form of an endless tube. The tape 35 includes an upper set of warp yarns 36 and a lower set of warp yarns 37 which are arranged parallel to each other and transverse to the direction of movement of the drier belt. The leading edge 39 of the tape 35 includes a plurality of edge yarns 40, while the trailing edge 42 similarly includes a plurality of edge yarns 43. These edge yarns are of a diameter equal to the diameters of the warp yarns and extend in parallel relationship with each other and with the warps in directions transverse to the longitudinal dimension of the belt.

One or more filling yarns 45 are passed to and fro through the upper and lower sheds of warp yarns 36 and 37 along generally helical paths. These filling yarns are inserted in a counterclockwise direction, as viewed in FIGURE 3. In the event a single shuttle is employed, the filling yarn is first projected through the upper shed of warp yarns 36, passing alternately under and over the successive warps. The filling yarn is then returned, without cutting, through the lower shed of warp yarns 37 in the next beat of the loom. During each change in direction of the shuttle, the filling yarn forms a loop around the corresponding edge yarn to weave the edge yarn into the main body portion of the tape. The edge yarns are thus firmly interlocked with the filling yarns.

The upper and lower layers of the tape 35 are held together by a series of warp stitching yarns shown schematically at 47. The stitching yarns 47 change or alternate from the upper layer to the lower layer and from the lower layer to the upper layer to stitch these layers together. In practice, the layers are stitched together during the weaving operation through the insertion of two or more additional picks of the filling yarn for each complete cycle.

FIGURE 4 is illustrative of a multi-layer tape 50 which is Woven in tubular form in a manner that is in some respects similar to the tape 35 of FIGURE 3. Thus, the tape 50 includes upper and lower sets of warp yarns 52 and 53, respectively, a plurality of leading edge yarns 55 and trailing edge yarns 56, and a single filling yarn 57 which is inserted in a counterclockwise direction, as viewed in FIGURE 4, and firmly interlocks the edge yarns to the main body portion of the tape. Rather than using a separate system of stitching yarns as in the FIG- URE 3 embodiment, however, each of the warp yarns 52 and 53 of FIGURE 4 is Woven in turn to stitch the opposite layer of the tape. As an illustration, the upper warp yarn 52a adjacent the leading edge of the tape dips below and around the filling yarn 57 in the bottom layer, as shown schematically at point 58. The lower warp yarns 53 are successively brought to positions adjacent the upper layer to wrap around the filling yarn passing therethrough, and the warp yarn 53a, for example, rises to a point 59 adjacent the upper layer and passes around the filling yarn to form the stitching. In a similar manner, the remaining warp yarns take their turn to stitch the two layers together and form the completed tape.

In some embodiments of the invention, the tape is of plain weave, single-layer construction and includes true selvage yarns along its leading and trailing edges which are firmly interlocked with the filling yarn. Referring to FIGURE 5, for example, there is shown a narrow woven tape 60 having a set of warp yarns 61 and a filling yarn 63 interleaved therewith to form a plain weave. The leading edge 65 of the tape 60 includes three selvage yarns 66, while the trailing edge 68 is similarly provided with three selvage yarns 69. These selvages extend in directions parallel to the warp yarns 61 but are of small diameter and closer spacing. As the filling yarn 63 completes each pass through the shed of warp yarns, it is interleaved with the selvage yarns at the adjacent edge of the tape. The shed is changed upon the completion of each pick such that the filling yarn passes around the outermost selvage to firmly interlock it and the other selvages with the main body portion of the tape. The use of true selvages along the edges of the tape is particularly advantageous in cases in which the tape is subjected to extremely high abrasion and flexure conditions as it moves around the drier cans.

In order to more clearly describe the nature of the present invention, the following examples illustrating the invention are disclosed. It should be understood, however, that this is done solely by way of example and is intended neither to delineate the scope of the invention nor limit the ambit of the appended claims.

Example I A single layer tape of the type shown in FIGURES 1 and 2 was woven on -a loom of conventional construction. The warp and edge yarns of the tape were of 440 denier, three ply Dacron construction with Z and S twists to form a balanced structure. The warp and edge yarns had a count of 25 ends per inch. The filling yarn was fabricated from three ply nylon of 840 denier, also with Z and S twists. The filling yarn was inserted to provide 20 picks per inch and was passed back and forth through each shed of warp yarns and around the edge yarns to firmly interlock the edge yarns to the main body portion of the tape.

The thus constructed tape was stitched to one of the folded ends of a papermakers drier belt. This belt was fabricated from synthetic yarns in a manner similar to that described in the patents and application referred to above. The belt was installed in the drying section of a paper machine, and the ends of the belt were interconnected through the use of clipper hooks and a cable in a manner similar to that illustrated in FIGURE 1, with the trailing edge of the tape overlapping the connection. Upon operation of the machine, no signs of any of the yarns of the tape unraveling were observed, even after repeated usage, and the tape exhibited extremely good durability characteristics.

Example I] As another example of an end fastening construction including a narrow woven tape in accordance with the invention, a multi-layer tape of a type similar to that illustrated in FIGURE 3 was prepared on a conventional loom for weaving tubular fabrics. The warp yarns and edge yarns of the tape were all of 220 denier, three ply Dacron with a total count of 70 ends per inch, or 35 ends per inch in the upper layer and 35 ends per inch in the lower layer. The filling yarn was of 240 denier, three ply nylon and was inserted to provide 60 picks per inch total. The filling yarn was passed back and forth through the upper and lower sheds and around the edge yarns to firmly interlock these latter yarns with the remaining portion of the tape. The upper and lower layers were held together by separate stitching yarns of 220 denier three ply Dacron construction. The tape worked satisfactorily to cover the interconnection between the ends of a papermakers drier belt without any signs of unraveling.

Example III As a further example, a single layer tape of plain weave construction was woven with true selvage yarns in a manner similar to that shown in FIGURE 5. The warp yarns were of 440 denier, three ply Dacron and had a count of 25 ends per inch, while the selvages were of 220 denier, three ply Dacron with a count of 35 ends per inch. These selvages extended in directions parallel to the warp yarns and formed the edge yarns of the fabric. The filling yarn was of 840 denier, three ply nylon and was passed through each shed of warp and selvage yarns to provide 20 picks per inch. Upon the completion of each pass, the shed was changed such that the filling yarn passed around the outermost selvage to firmly interlock the selvages with the main body portion of the tape. No instances of any unraveling of the tape were observed during use.

Example IV In any of the foregoing examples, the treatment of the tape with a phenolic-aldehyde resin in a manner similar to that described in the aforementioned patents and application provides a further improvement in stability, shove resistance and abrasion resistance. In cases in which maximum flexibility of the tape is desired, the nylon yarns are inserted in the Warp direction to form the warp, edge, stitching and selvage yarns, while Dacron is employed for the filling yarn.

It will be understood that the specific weight and count of the warp, filling, edge and stitching yarns in the above examples are merely illustrative of a large number of combinations that may be employed in connection with the invention. The selection of any particular combination will of course be determined by the particular type of paper, board or similar felted fibrous product which is to be processed as well as upon the characteristics, dimensions, speed, etc., of the drier belt, and other related factors.

The tapes of the various illustrated embodiments of the invention permit the use of a much wider range of porosities than has been considered practical heretofore. Because of the need for a comparatively tight weave to prevent unraveling, many prior drier flaps exhibited porosity characteristics which were not commensurate with those of the belt with which they were utilized. For flaps woven in tape form, however, the tape may be of sufficiently open weave to provide the desired porosity while at the same time retaining good durability and resistance to abrasion. I

The terms and expressions which have been employed are used as terms of description and not of limitation, and there is no intention in the use of such terms and expressions of excluding any equivalents of the features shown and described or portions thereof, but it is recognized that various modifications are possible within the scope of the invention claimed.

What is claimed is:

1. A drier belt end fastening construction comprising, in combination, a drier belt movable along a predetermined path and having a pair of end portions; joining means for interconnecting said end portions; and a narrow woven tape afiixed adjacent one edge thereof to a surface of said drier belt in position to cover said joining means, said tape including a set of warp yarns, two edge yarns extending along the respective edges of the tape in directions transverse to the predetermined path of said drier belt, and a filling yarn interwoven with said warp yarns, said filling yarn passing around said edge yarns to firmly interlock said edge yarns with the main body portion of said tape.

2. A drier belt end fastening construction comprising,

in combination, a drier belt movable along a predetermined path and having its end portions folded back upon themselves to form folds extending transversely with respect to said path; joining means for interconnecting said folds; and a narrow woven tape affixed adjacent one edge thereof to a surface of said drier belt in position to cover said joining means, said tape including a set of warp yarns, an edge yarn extending along at least the other edge of the tape in a direction transverse to the predetermined path of said drier belt, and a filling yarn interwoven With said warp yarns, said filling yarn passing around said edge yarn to firmly interlock said edge yarn with the main body portion of said tape. 3. A drier belt end fastening construction comprising, 1n combination, a drier belt movable along a predetermmed path and having a pair of end portions; joining means for interconnecting said end portions; and a narrow resm-treated woven tape of synthetic material affixed to a surface of said drier belt in position to cover said oining means, said tape extending in a direction transverse to the direction of movement of said drier belt along said path and having a leading edge affixed to said belt and a trailing edge, said tape including a set of warp yarns, an edge yarn extending along the trailing edge of the tape, and a filling yarn interwoven with said warp yarns, said filling yarn passing around said edge yarn to firmly interlock said edge yarn with the main body portion of said tape.

4. A drier belt end fastening construction comprising, in combination, a drier belt movable along a predetermined path and having its. end portions folded back upon themselves to form folds extending transversely with re-' spect to said path; joining means including a series of interleaved clipper hooks for interconnecting said folds; and a narrow woven tape affixed adjacent one edge thereof to one of the end portions of said drier belt in position to cover said clipper hooks, said tape including a set of warp yarns, a pair of edge yarns defining the respective edges of said tape and extending in directions transverse to the predetermined path of said drier belt, and a filling yarn interwoven with said warp yarns, said filling yarn passing around said edge yarns to firmly interlock the same with the main body portion of said tape.

5. An end fastening construction of the character set forth in claim 4, in which each of the edges of said tape includes a plurality of selvage yarns of a diameter smaller than the diameters of said war-p yarns, said selvage yarns being interlocked by said filling yarn with the main body portion of said tape.

6. In combination, a drier belt arranged for movement along an endless path and having a pair of end portions; joining means for interconnecting said end portions; and a multi-layer Woven tape affixed adjacent one edge thereof to a surface of said drier belt in position to cover said joining means, said tape comprising a first and a second set of warp yarns in facing, substantially parallel relationship with each other, a pair of edge yarns defining the respective edges of said tape and extending in directions parallel to said warp yarns and transverse to the endless path of said drier belt, at least one filling yarn interwoven with said sets of Warp yarns, said filling yarn forming loops around said edge yarns to firmly interlock said edge yarns with the main body portion of said tape, and means for interconnecting selected warp yarns in said first set with selected warp yarns in said second set.

7. In combination, a drier belt arranged for movement along an endless path and having a pair of end portions; joining means for interconnecting said end portions; and a multi-layer woven tape affixed adjacent one edge thereof to a surface of said drier belt in position to cover said joining means, said tape comprising a first and a second set of warp yarns in facing, substantially parallel relationship with each other, a pair of edge yarns defining the respective edges of said tape and extending in directions parallel to said warp yarns and transverse to the endless path of said drier belt, a filling yarn interwoven with the warp yarns in said first set, then passing around one of said edge yarns, then interwoven with the warp yarns in said second set, then passing around the other edge yarn and then back to said first set, to form a tubular construction, said filling yarn firmly interlocking said edge yarns with said warp yarns, and means for interconnecting selected warp yarns in said first set with selected warp yarns in said second set.

8. In combination, a drier belt arranged for movement along an endless path and having a pair of end portions; joining means for interconnecting said end portions; and a multilayer woven tape affixed adjacent one edge thereof to a surface of said drier belt in position to cover said joining means, said tape comprising a first and a second set of Warp yarns in facing, substantially parallel relationship with each other, a pair of edge yarns defining the respective edges of said tape and extending in directions parallel to said warp yarns and transverse to the endless path of said drier belt, a filling yarn interwoven with the warp yarns in said first set, then passing around one of said edge yarns, then interwoven with the warp yarns in said second set, then passing around the other edge yarn and then back to said first set, to form a tubular construction, said filling yarn firmly interlocking said edge yarns with said Warp yarns, and a separate stitching yarn interconnecting selected warp yarns in said first set with selected warp yarns in said second set.

9. In combination, a drier belt arranged for movement along an endless path and having a pair of end'portions;

joining means for interconnecting said end portions; and a multi-layer woven tape of synthetic heat-resistant material afiixed adjacent one edge thereof to a surface of said drier belt in position to cover said joining means, said tape comprising a first and a second set of Warp yarns in facing, substantially parallel relationship with each other, a pair of edge yarns defining the respective edges of said tape and extending in directions parallel to said Warp yarns and transverse to the endless path of said drier belt, and a filling yarn interwoven with the warp yarns in said first and second sets, said filling yarn forming loops around said edge yarns at the edges of said tape to firmly interlock said edge yarns with the main body portion of the tape.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS Schlegel 139-383 Prentice 24-205.1 Cilley 139383 Geddings 139-383 Renaud 139-410 Santos 24-33 10 MERVIN STEIN, Primary Examiner.

DONALD W. PARKER, Examiner. H. S. JAUDON, Assistant Examiner.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3436041 *Mar 31, 1967Apr 1, 1969Appleton Wire Works CorpSeam construction with heat shrinkable loop elements
US3478991 *May 13, 1966Nov 18, 1969J M Voith Gmbh & F OberdorferFabric sleeve and method of making
US4344209 *Oct 22, 1979Aug 17, 1982Scapa Dryers, Inc.In-line clipper seam
US4574435 *Mar 12, 1985Mar 11, 1986Albany International Corp.Seam construction for papermachine clothing
US4791708 *Jun 16, 1986Dec 20, 1988Asten Group, Inc.Abrasion and hydrolysis resistant joining means for fabric seams
US5799709 *Aug 29, 1997Sep 1, 1998Asten, Inc.Papermaking fabric seam with seam flap anchor
US6267150Aug 27, 1999Jul 31, 2001Asten Johnson, Inc.Papermaking fabric seam with additional threads in the seam area
US6273146Aug 27, 1999Aug 14, 2001Astenjohnson, Inc.Papermaking fabric seam with additional threads in the seam area
US6273147Aug 27, 1999Aug 14, 2001Astenjohnson, Inc.Papermaking fabric seam with additional threads in the seam area
US6289940Aug 27, 1999Sep 18, 2001Astenjohnson, Inc.Papermaking fabric seam with additional threads in the seam area
US6318413Aug 27, 1999Nov 20, 2001Astenjohnson, Inc.Papermaking fabric seam with additional threads in the seam area
DE2731754A1 *Jul 14, 1977Jan 18, 1979Fertex Textilmaschinen ServiceEndlos zu montierendes textilband, insbesondere trockenfilz oder -sieb fuer die papier- und zellstoffindustrie, und verfahren zu dessen herstellung
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Classifications
U.S. Classification24/31.00H, 139/383.0AA, 139/383.00A, 474/267, 474/255, 139/383.00R, 24/33.00C, 139/408
International ClassificationD21F7/10
Cooperative ClassificationD21F7/10
European ClassificationD21F7/10
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Nov 5, 1981ASAssignment
Owner name: HUYCK CORPORATION A CORP. OF NY.
Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNOR:HUYCK CORPORATION (MERGED INTO) BTR FABRICS (USA) AND CHANGED INTO;REEL/FRAME:003927/0115
Effective date: 19810630