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Publication numberUS3316663 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 2, 1967
Filing dateMar 15, 1963
Priority dateMar 15, 1963
Publication numberUS 3316663 A, US 3316663A, US-A-3316663, US3316663 A, US3316663A
InventorsNeu Johannes
Original AssigneeScholl Mfg Co Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Anti-sliding support for footwear
US 3316663 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 2, 1967 J. NEU

ANTI-SLIDING SUPPORT FOR FOOTWEAR 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed March l5, 1963 INVENTOR. bdfzh QW May 2, J NEU ANTI-SLIDING SUPPORT FOR FOOTWEAR 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed March l5, 1963 NVENTOR ATTRNEYS May 2, 1967 J. NEU

ANTI-SLIDING SUPPORT FOR FOOTWEAR 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed March l5, 1963 INVENTOR.

United States Patent O 3,316,663 ANTI-SLIDING SUPPORT FOR FOOTWEAR Johannes Neu, Frankfurt am Main-Sossenheim, Germany,

This invention relates to improvements in an anti-sliding support for footwear, and more particularly to a device which may be mounted in an article of footwear individually or in conjunction with foot supporting or cushioning devices to prevent the foot from sliding forward in the footwear, although the invention may have other uses and purposes as will be apparent to one skilled in the art.

It is well known that the foot has a tendency to slide forward particularly in ladies high heel shoes, causing congestion of the toes placing an eXtra load upon the congested toes, and such frequently gives rise to serious foot aiiiictions. Such forward sliding of the foot is not limited to ladies high heel shoes, but also occurs generally in shoes where the foot is insufficiently supported, for example shoes which are fastened to the foot only with straps, such as sandals, and also with open-toe or openheel shoes, and with open-toe shoes, sandals, and the like the forward sliding of the foot frequently brings one or more toes beyond the anterior end of the sole and in immediate contact with the ground. Various means have been attempted heretofore in order to prevent the forward sliding of a foot in a shoe or the like, such as roughing of the shoe insole, coating it with a rough material, or utilizing a thin layer of non-skid material within the shoe, but these means have proven ineffective and at the same time caused discomfort such as hot or burning feet to the user.

With the foregoing in mind, it is an important object of the instant invention to provide a device having a comfortable elevation -therein for disposition in an article of footwear beneath the ball area or metatarsal arch region of the foot, so that the elevation may engage the foot in front of the metatarsal heads, and restrain forward motion of the foot.

Another object of this invention is to provide an element for placement in an article of footwear which is molded or otherwise shaped anatomically in keeping with the forward portion or ball area of a human foot and which is provided with a ridge or elevation of curvate shape against which the heads of the metatarsals may rest comfortably and the foot is prevented from slipping forwardly in the footwear.

It is also a feature of this invention to provide an antislipping device for placement in an article of footwear individually or in association with some other foot cushioning or supporting means of substantially any charo acter.

Still a further object of this invention resides in the provision of an element placeable in an article of footwear to prevent forward sliding of the foot and which is also capable of providing healthy exercise for the toes, especially in an open-toed shoe, sandal, or similar footwear.

Still a further desideratum of the instant invention is the provision of means easily located in an article of footwear to prevent forward slipping ofthe foot therein, which means may initially be adjusted to better fit the particular foot.

A further object of the invention is the provision of means readily located in an article of footwear to prevent forward sliding of the foot therein, which means embody an elevation engageable by the metartarsal heads, and

which means are adjustable to vary the height of that elevation as may be desired in any particular instance.

While some of the more salient features, characteristics and advantages of the instant invention have been above pointed out, others will become apparent from the following disclosures, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIGURE l is a top plan view of an anti-slip device embodying principles of the instant invention;

FIGURE 2 is a longitudinal vertical sectional view of the structure of FIGURE l, taken su-bstantially as indicated by the line II-II of FIGURE l, looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIGURE 3 is a top plan View showing the device associated with another foot cushioning or supporting device; v

FIGURE 4 is a view similar in character to FIGURE 2, but indicating an adjustable structure attached to the bottom of the device to vary the height of the elevation on the device;

FIGURE 5 is a fragmentary view illustrating a foot within a shoe in which the device is mounted in operative position, the forward portion of the shoe being broken away to illustrate the parts there inside;

FIGURE 6 is a plan view illustrating the device associated with a foot supporting partial insole;

FIGURE 7 is a fragmentary plan view of a slightly different form of the device arranged to receive the forward end of another foot supporting device within the article of footwear;

FIGURE 8 is a fragmentary enlarged vertical sectional view through the structure of FIGURE 7, taken substantially as indicated by the line VIII-VIII of FIGURE 7;

FIGURE 9 is a view of the device embodying principles of the instant invention of still different form, this being a plan view of the lower part of a two-piece adjustable device;

FIGURE l0 is a vertical sectional view upper portion of the two-piece device;

FIGURE ll is a plan view of a foot cushioning or supporting device with which the structure of FIGURE 9 is associated in reduced form;

FIGURE l2 is a vertical sectional view through the structure of FIGURE 1l taken substantially as indicated by the line XII- XII of FIGURE 1l;

FIGURE 13 is a vertical sectional view through another form of two piece structure embodying principles of the instant invention showing the same in operative position and associated with a foot cushioning device; and

FIGURE 14 is a vertical sectional view through the upper part of the device of FIGURE 13 prior to its association with the lower portlon.

As shown on the drawings:

The first illustrated embodiment of the instant invention as seen in FIGURES 1, 2 and 3 embodies an anti-slip member generally indicated by numeral 1. While the member may be fabricated from separate parts, it is treated as though it were one piece in use. In the illustrated instance this member 1 includes a cuneiform or wedge shaped element 2 which may be of any suitable material such as rubber, foam rubber, thermoplastic foam, cork and wood flour with cement, felt, or any other suitable material which while lending support positively to the foot is preferably somewhat yieldable so as to provide adequate comfort. The member may be cast, molded, cut, or otherwise shaped somewhat anatomically so as to iit beneath the ball of the foot in a comfortable manner. This wedge shaped pad 2 may be utilized with or without a cover 3 of leather, plastic lm, fabric or other suitable material, `and the pad 2 may also be used with or without a bottom cover 4, and most frequently the through the bottom cover will not be used. Where covers are utilized, they are intimately fitted so that the cover assumes the shape of the pad 2. Consequently, the resultant member or device 1 will have the overall shape of the pad 2.

It will be noted that the member is generally concave on its upper surface as indicated at 5 and gradually rises forwardly toward a relatively high ridge or elevation 6 which is generally arcuate transversely of the foot. Anteriorly of the ridge 6, the device has an abrupt and forwardly oblique descent to its bottom surface as indicated at 7. The bottom face of the device is generally what might be termed substantially fiat but is given a slight upwardly concave curvature as indicated at 8 to better t within a shoe.

The concavity 5 provides a bed for the ball of the foot into which the fleshy parts of the foot around the metatarsal heads may comfortably seat. The toes will extend over the ridge or elevation 6 and the elevation is so shaped as to comfortably seat within the rear sulci or furrows of the toes, thereby giving a bearing on the inner side of the ridge against the metatarsal heads to prevent the foot from sliding forward in a shoe. It should also be noted that with the abrupt and oblique drop-off forwardly of the ridge 6, the toes are enabled to readily grip the ridge and therefore, in open-toed or sandal type articles of footwear where the toes have freedom of movement, be effectively exercised by successively gripping the ridge at each step at the same time the foot is prevented from slipping forward in the footwear by that ridge. Such gripping action of the toes helps relieve arch sag, and stiffened joints by reactivating and revitalizing weak muscles and strained ligaments in the feet and legs, thus restoring a weakened foot to normal condition and maintaining a normal foot in a healthy and active condition.

The device may be secured in a shoe in any suitable manner, and it is preferable to provide the device with a spread 9 of pressure sensitive adhesive on the bottom side thereof, which may be covered by a temporary facing sheet 10 that has a release surface and is removed and discarded when the device is put to use. It is a simple expedient to remove that facing sheet 10 and mount the device directly upon the structural insole or sock lining of a shoe as seen in FIGURE 5. In this instance a fairly high heel shoe 11 is shown having la sole 12, and it will be noted that the toes 13 of the user extend comfortably over the elevation 6 of the device, and the foot is prevented from sliding forwardly so that the toes pass beyond the shoe sole 12 even though it may be an open-toed shoe. At each step, the toes will tend to grip the elevation 6 of the device and thus some beneficial foot exercise will occur even though the user is unaware it is happening.

In FIGURE 4 I have illustrated the same form of antislip member as above described, but provided with means for adjusting the height of the ridge or elevation 6. This embodiment includes the structure previously defined, namely the pad 2, the cover 3 and the same shaping. However, in this instance on the bottom of the foreportion ofthe pad beneath the ridge 6 are a plurality of layers 14 each of which may be a piece of adhesive tape, thicker than usual if desired, and each of which will be provided with a release surface on the side opposite the adhesive so that these strips may be individually removed as desired. Overlying the strips 14 and extending down over considerable of the pad 2 is an inner bottom cover 15, and exterior of that is a bottom cover 16 of any suitable material adhesively held in position. One or both these cover pieces may be removed as well to lower the height of the elevation if necessary, while it is equally apparent that the cover pieces may 'be loosened and more strips 14 inserted if it is desired to further heighten the elevation beyond what is indicated in the drawings. This arrangement may adjust the elevation or ridge more comfortably to an individual foot, and may be of value in preventing forward sliding of the foot in `shoes having extremely high heels.

ln FIGURE 6 I have shown how the Amember 1 may be associated with a partial foot supporting insole 17 having a longitudinal arch lift 18 embodied therein. In this instance the anti-slip member 1 is secured to the forward portion of the partial insole, and when put to use the toes of the user will extend forwardly beyond both the anti-slip member and the partial insole.

In FIGURES 7 and 8 I have shown a slightly different form of construction wherein a pad 2a is utilized with a front cover 3a and a rear cover 4a, the shape of the entire structure being similar to that previously described including the elevation or ridge 6 and the abrupt obliquely sloping forward end portion 7. However, in this instance the cover 3a extends readwardly beyond the pad 2a as indicated at 19, and the bottom cover 4a extends beyond the pad as indicated at 20 thereby forming a pocket 21. The device may then be associated with another foot supporting or cushioning member such, for example, as a plastic arch support 22 by placing the anterior end of the support 22 in the pocket 21.

In FIGURES 9 and 10 there is shown a two-part adjustable anti-slip assembly, and in FIGURES 11 and 12 that same assembly is shown associated with an insole. This assembly comprises a bottom member 23 serrated as at 24 with rearwardly sloping teeth. This bottom member may be made of the same material as the pad 2 previously described, and is somewhat cuneiform in shape, being thicker at the anterior end. Associated with this member is a top member including a pad 25 serrated as at 26 with forwardly sloping teeth of a size to engage the teeth on the bottom member. This pad 25 may also be made of the same material as the pad 2 previously described and is also cuneiform in shape being thicker at the anterior end. A cover 27 may be utilized over the pad 25 and the pad and cover provided the above described ridge 6 and the abruptly sloping forward end 7. If so desired, the upper pad 25 may be provided with a portion surfaced with pressure sensitive adhesive as indicated at 28, and a temporary facing sheet 29 disposed thereover, which is removed and discarded when the pads 23 and 25 are connected.

The pad 23 may be adhesively secured directly in an article of footwear if so desired and then the top pad 25 is associated with it as seen best in FIGURE 12 with the teeth on the two pads in mesh with each other.

On the other hand the pad 23 may be secured to the forward portion of an insole 30 or other foot cushioning or supporting device as shown in FIGURE 11, and then the upper pad 25 engaged with the lower pad in the manner shown in FIGURE 12. It will be noted that whether the two pads are used along or associated with an insole they function the same. As shown in FIGURE l2 the forwardmost elevation is provided, but if deemed more comfortable for a particular foot, the upper pad 25 may be slid backward relatively to the pad 23 leaving a tooth or two out of engagement at the forward end of the structure on the bottom pad and a tooth or two out of engagement at the rear end of the structure on the top pad. Such adjustment may be varied at will until the best feeling is obtained by the particular user. It will be further noted that readwardly and forwardly sloping teeth effect an engagement that effectively resists forward pressure of the foot.

In FIGURES 13 and 14 a form of the invention is illustrated which permits ready removal of the molded or anatomically shaped anti-slip portion of the structure from the shoe to effect better adjustment to the individual foot. In this instance, a two-part arrangement is provided with a lower cuneiform part or plate 31 which may be made of the same material as the pad 2 above described or may be leather or any other suitable material since it is not essential that it be resilient, molded, or cushioning, and this piece may be glued or otherwise aixed directly to the inside of the shoe or to a separate insole or supporting device 32 as shown in FIGURE 13. This member 31 is provided with an upstanding rib 33 which extends practically entirely across the member.

The upper piece which is free to be lifted off the member 31 comprises a cuneiform pad 34 which may be of the same material as the pad 2 above described provided with a suitable cover 35 and shaped to provide the previously mentioned elevation or ridge 6 with the abrupt oblique drop 7 at the anterior end. On its underside, this pad 34 has a groove 36 complemental to the rib 33 on the bottom member 31. It is a simple expedient to seat the pad 34 on the bottom member 31 with the groove in the pad receiving the rib 33, and the two members are readily locked together in operative position. However, the upper pad may easily be lifted out of the footwear at any time desired in order to eifect a better adjustment for a particular foot, such as grinding away a portion of the pad to lower the elevation or adding strips to it to increase the elevation.

Pressure sensitive adhesive may be utilized wherever desired on any of the structures shown in the drawings as suggested in FIGURES 2 and 10.

It will be noted that all of the embodiments of the instant invention herein shown and described are highly effective in use and not only prevent the foot from sliding forward within an article of footwear, but also provide a means of consciously or unconsciously exercising the foot by the user, and all modifications of the invention are highly durable and economical to manufacture and use.

It will be understood that modifications and variations may be effected without departing from the scope of the novel concepts of the present invention.

I claim as my invention:

An anti-slip insert for footwear, comprising a longitudinally arcuate and upwardly concave pad formed anatomically to properly underlie the ball of the foot,

a ridge formed in said pad to abut the metatarsal heads and restrain the foot from sliding forward in the footwear,

a foot relieving device disposed along the length of said footwear `tbehind said pad, and

top and bottom covers on said pad,

each of said covers extending rearwardly beyond the pad to form a rearwardly opening pocket therebetween to receive the end of said foot relieving device.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,238,179 8/1917 Mueller 12S- 621 1,730,466 10/1929 Mallott 12S-581 2,381,846 8/1945 Thomas 12S-581 2,403,944 7/ 1946 Muller 128-602 2,405,443 8/1946 Mees 36-76 X 2,623,307 12/1952 Morton 128-581 X FOREIGN PATENTS 59,199 11/ 1941 Denmark. 480,093 2/1938 Great Britain.

JORDAN FRANKLIN, Prinuzm7 Examiner.

FRANK I. COHEN, Examinez'.

H. H. HUNTER, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1238179 *Aug 9, 1915Aug 28, 1917Mueller Ernst KgArch-support.
US1730466 *Dec 31, 1926Oct 8, 1929Joseph A MallottInsole
US2381846 *Apr 10, 1943Aug 7, 1945Elbert F ThomasFoot corrective attachment for shoes
US2403944 *Dec 13, 1944Jul 16, 1946Muller Charles GArch support
US2405443 *Jan 25, 1945Aug 6, 1946Frank S MeesPlatform sole
US2623307 *Jun 14, 1950Dec 30, 1952Dudley J MortonOrthopedic insole
DK59199A * Title not available
GB480093A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3736673 *Oct 1, 1971Jun 5, 1973B DubnerCushion shoe innersole construction
US4227320 *Jan 15, 1979Oct 14, 1980Borgeas Alexander TCushioned sole for footwear
US4631841 *Mar 14, 1985Dec 30, 1986Hickey John LShoe insert device
US4813157 *Nov 10, 1986Mar 21, 1989Michelle BoisvertAdjustable shoe insole
US5253435 *Aug 19, 1991Oct 19, 1993Nike, Inc.Pressure-adjustable shoe bladder assembly
US5257470 *Feb 19, 1991Nov 2, 1993Nike, Inc.Shoe bladder system
US5416988 *Apr 23, 1993May 23, 1995Nike, Inc.Customized fit shoe and bladder therefor
US5765298 *Mar 12, 1993Jun 16, 1998Nike, Inc.Athletic shoe with pressurized ankle collar
US6178557 *Apr 29, 1999Jan 30, 2001Kathryn Bel MonteApparel stain protector
US7847143 *Oct 5, 2007Dec 7, 2010Moramarco Katrina LDancer's protective foot pad
US8523194 *Apr 14, 2010Sep 3, 2013Marie SmirmanForefoot wedge insert for footwear
US20100263231 *Apr 14, 2010Oct 21, 2010Marie SmirmanForefoot wedge insert for footwear
US20110232129 *Jun 6, 2007Sep 29, 2011Johnson & Johnson GmbhCushioning pad for a human foot, an insole and a shoe comprising said pad, and a method for the manufacture of said insole
US20120066815 *Nov 22, 2011Mar 22, 2012Catherine Elizabeth Feeman-FickCushioned sock for high heel footwear
US20130047464 *Jun 29, 2012Feb 28, 2013Tara ShulerToe traction device
US20130318826 *Jun 5, 2012Dec 5, 2013Michele E. NathanielFoot sliding prevention product
US20140068967 *Sep 10, 2012Mar 13, 2014Todd JonesFootwear insert with foot stop
CN101489753BJun 6, 2007Nov 14, 2012强生有限公司A cushioning pad for a human foot, an insole and a shoe comprising the pad, and a method for the manufacture of the insole
EP1864779A1Jun 9, 2006Dec 12, 2007Johnson and Johnson GmbHA cushioning pad for a human foot, an insole and a shoe comprising said pad, and a method for the manufacture of said insole
EP2695539A1 *Aug 1, 2013Feb 12, 2014Nathalie FroidureDevice for high-heeled shoe
WO2007141000A2 *Jun 6, 2007Dec 13, 2007Johnson & Johnson GmbhA cushioning pad for a human foot, an insole and a shoe comprising said pad, and a method for the manufacture of said insole
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/71, 36/159
International ClassificationA43B7/22
Cooperative ClassificationA43B7/1445, A43B7/1425, A43B7/1435, A43B7/145, A43B7/22
European ClassificationA43B7/14A20B, A43B7/14A20M, A43B7/14A20P, A43B7/14A20F, A43B7/22