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Publication numberUS3316899 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 2, 1967
Filing dateDec 19, 1963
Priority dateDec 19, 1963
Publication numberUS 3316899 A, US 3316899A, US-A-3316899, US3316899 A, US3316899A
InventorsArthur Raeder
Original AssigneeArthur Raeder
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Anatomical lacing with actuating means for exercising facial muscles
US 3316899 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 2, 1967 A. RAL-:DER 3,316,899 ANATOMICAL LACING WITH ACTUATING MEANS FOR EXERCISING FACIAL MUSCLES Filed Dec. 19, 196.3

United States Patent O 3,316,899 ANATGMHCAL LACING WITH ACTUA'HNG MEANS FOR EXERCISHNG FAClAL MUSCLES Arthur Raeder, 61S Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, N.Y. 11216 Filed Dec. 19, 1963, Ser. No. 331,767 9 Claims. (Cl. 128-63) My invention relates to an anatomical lacing for treating muscular dysfunction and, more particularly, to such a lacing which is constructed to treat the muscles about the head and neck which the associated with malocclusion, mastication, the organ of speech, expression and aesthetics.

It is known that muscular dysfunction -is one of the basic underlying causes of treatment diiculties and unsatisfactory functional and aesthetic results in mechanotherapy. That is, abnormal muscular forms and tonus produce a muscular balance dictating an improper denture form and a faulty tooth positioning. Various exercises have been previously devised for correcting such dysfunction of the masticatory muscles. However, such exercises have been found to be quite tedious and diilicult and have not proved satisfactory in restoring such dysfunctioning muscles to normal tonus.

It has also been suggested that `a continual force be exerted about the facial regions containing these muscular junctions. The exertion of such a continual force has been used for treating other portions of the body, but has failed to provide significant muscular improvement with respect to those muscles associated with the neck and head in conjunction with mechanotherapy treatment.

My invention advantageously applies a lacing of individual coil means in overlying relationship with respect to preselected neuro-muscular junctions about the patients head and neck. These individual lacing members are joined at juncture points bilaterally located at respectively opposite commissure regions of the mouth. A reciprocal linear motion is applied to each of these juncture points such that the individual coil members alternatively expand and' contract to effect :a massaging action about the neuro-muscular junctions. The massaging action preferably is carried out at `a frequency within the range of normal muscular contraction, i.e. 4060 cycles per minute, so as to induce normal muscular movement in a non-fatiguing and non-damaging manner. I have further found that particular advantageous clinical results have been obtained by cooling the lacing members and continuing the treatment for a length of time suflicient to induce numbness about the massaged regions.

As a particularly advantageous aspect of my invention, individual coil lacing members contain an inner extensible member formed of rubber, Teflon or other suitable plastic, peripherally coated by van expandable -braided surface. The braided surface is of a suitable configuration so as not to capture the hair particles of the user. Previously, the suggestion of using conventional coil-type springs as the lacing members, has caused considerable discomfort to the user, resulting from the catching and pulling of individual hair particles thereby.

The linear reciprocal motion of the lacing assembly is preferably provided -by a portable actuating unit which is Icompactly assembled to be secured to the back rest of a conventional dental chair. Cam members are located adjacent opposed sides of the users head with their cam followers being related in phased opposition such that as one cam follower moves upward, the other cam follower moves downward. Hence, by connecting the lacing juncture points to the opposed cam followers, the linear reciprocal movement of the lacing assembly will be provided corresponding to the movement away and towards Vice each other of the reciprocally translated cam followei; arms. Advantageously, the linkage interconnecting the lacing juncture points to the cam follower includes an adjustment to suitably vary the extent of such linear reciprocal movement in accordance with the particular requirements of the patient under treatment.

It is believed that the preferable results `achieved by my invention in restoring normal muscular movement are eifected by suitably modifying the electrical field distribution about the neuroamuscular junctions. More specifically, it is known that the opposed sides of a muscle ber are of opposite polarity. However, the region about the opposed ber ends normally contains an electrical ion distribution tending to equalize the lcharges at the opposed muscle fiber ends and, accordingly, counteract the force of attraction therebetween. The tenso-frictional forces developed about the tissue resulting from the pressurized massaging action of my invention superimpose an electrical eld about the muscle bers in a manner counteracting the above-described neutralizing ions, such that the opposed ends of the normal muscles will attract in their desired manner.

It is, therefore, seen that the basic concept of my invention resides in a novel lacing structure for massaging the neuro-muscular junctions associated with malocclusion, mastication, speech, expression and aesthetics so as to correct muscular dysfunction thereof.

It is, therefore, a primary object of my invention to provide a massaging apparatus for inducing proper muscular tonus in those muscles associated with the maloc* clusion and mechano-therapy, thus assisting in the patients treatment.

An additional object of my invention is to provide an anatomical lacing for treating muscular dysfunction for those muscles associated with malocclusion, mastication, speech and respiration wherein lacing means are provided about preselected neuro-muscular junctions and a reciprocal linear motion is imparted thereto to effect massaging of the neuro-muscular junctions.

An additional object of my invention is to provide an anatomical lacing wherein the reciprocal linear motion is provided by a pair of cams located adjacent opposed sides of the users face, and rotated in phase opposition such that their respective cam followers are moved in opposite directions.

Still another object of my invention is to provide such an anatomical lacing wherein the reciprocal linear motion is at a frequency within the range of normal muscular contraction whereby massaging thereof is effective in a nonfatiguing and nonadamaging manner.

These and other objects of my invention will readily become apparent upon consideration of the following drawings in which:

FIGURE 1 is a front view showing an anatomical lacing in accordance with my invention being secured to the head and neck regions of the patient.

FIGURE 2 is a rear view showing the actuating means for imparting the preferred linear reciprocal motion of my invention.

FIGURE 3 is a side view of the preferred lacing members used in my invention.

FIGURE 4 is an end view of FIGURE 3 shown in cross-section. l

Reference is first made to FIGURE l, wherein the anatomical lacing generally denoted as 10 is shown secured about the lower head and neck regions of the user lili). It is to be noted that according to the particular muscular dysfunction of the individual user 10i), different neuro-muscular junctures will be in particular need of massage, with the assembly shown in FIGURE 1 being merely typical of .numerous lacingr arrangements which may be provided within the general spirit and scope of astaasa s) my invention. Further, the size of the individual lacing members of unit will vary in accordance with the facial dimensions of the particular user.

The individual lacing members overlie preselected neuro-muscular junctions, as will be henceforth described in further detail. These members press against the skin of the user 100 a sufficient amount to prevent slipping while providing a predetermined compression of the facial tissue. For example, I have found that an approximately ls compression of the facial tissue has provided clinically satisfactory results.

Y The individual lacing members 15 are preferably constructed of an extensible spring-like member as shown in FIGURES 3 and 4. The hollow inner core 16 is formed of an elastical member, such as rubber, Teflon or other suitable plastic. The outer surface 17 is of a twisted braided structure typically made of 18-8 stainless steel, the coil construction 15 being typically of the type manufactured by the Aero-Quip Corporation of Bronx, New York.

A first coil arrangement 15-1 is shown overlying and lacing the neuro-muscular junctions at the upper lips, about the base of the nose and cheeks. A second coil arrangement 15-2 similarly overlies the neuro-muscular junctions at the lower lip and chin, and a third coil arrangement 15-3 is located under the chin. The opposed ends of all these coil members meet at juncture points A, B, located at respectively opposed cheeks. Juncture point A is connected to end of a linkage 35, and juncture point B to end of linkage 45. The juncture points A, B are also connected to fixation members 20, 22 by extensible coil members 18, 19, respectively. Relative adjustment of fixation points is provided by a number of apertures, such as 20', 22', within the lacing fixation members 20, 22, respectively, to facilitate adjustment in accordance with the particular user. Fixation members 20, 22 are pivotable about their respective axial supports 21, 23, respectively, within planes substantially parallel to the users face, to provide still further adjustment of the massaging action in conformance with the needs of the particular user.

The linearly reciprocal movement of the juncture points A and B, to promote the desired massaging effect of the anatomical lacing structure above described, is provided by reciprocally movable cam follower or piston members 30, 40, respectively, located about the opposed sides of the users head. These members are moved in opposite directions as by conventional cams 32, 42, rotated by conventional motors 34, 44, respectively. The fixation members 20, 22, as well as the actuating arrangements, 30, 32, 34 and 40, 42, 44, are secured to a common transverse member which is, in turn, adapted to be secured to the rear portion of a conventional dental chair.

To translate the linear reciprocal motion of the cam follower piston members 3f), 40 to the juncture points A and B respectively, an adjustable transverse linkage member 35 is shown interconnected between juncture point A and reciprocating cam follower 30 with its position along the length of piston 30 being adjustable by rotatable knob 37. Similarly, Z-shaped linkage 45 interconnects juncture point B to reciprocating cam follower 4f), with its position thereof being adjustable by screw-type knob members 47 and 49. The provision of the adjustment advantageously permits the varying of the stroke length of the linear reciprocating movement with such stroke length, for example, being variable between l and 5 inches.

It should be understood that although I show a particular mechanical configuration for achieving the advantageous linear reciprocal movement of juncture points A and B, various other actuating arrangements may be practiced without departing from the general spirit and scope of my invention. As, for example, la single drive motor may be located intermediate the phase-opposed cam members 32, 42 and in a common shaft relationship therewith.

Having thus described the preferred structural embodiment of my invention, operation is as follows: Actuation of drive motors 34, 44, as by a convenient A.C. power source, rotates cam members 32, 42 to translate cam follower piston rods 30, 4f) in a linear reciprocal manner. As shown in the figures, piston rod 30 moves downward as piston rod 40 moves upward, such that their juncture points with linkage members 35, 45, respectively, will be reciprocally moved apart and together in accordance with the r.p,m. of the motors 34, 44. This cyclic moving apart and moving together of piston rods 30, 40 linearly reciprocates juncture points A and B such that the individual lacing members 15-1 through 15-3 are cyclically expanded and relieved to effect a massaging action about the neuro-muscular juncture points they overlie. This rhythmic massaging operation has been found to restore norme-tonic state to dysfunctioning muscle fibers and to promote maximal contractions thereof. The frequency of oscillation is preferably within the range of normal muscular contraction, as for example 40-60 cycles per minute, with particular advantageous results having been clinically obtained within the general region of 48 cycles per minute.

Further, it is proposed the massaging effect about the tissues immediately overlying the muscle fibers suitably varies the electrical field thereabout such that the tensofrictional stimulation thereof acts to promote normal muscle contraction. Individual treatment with the anatomical lacing apparatus of my invention is advantageously provided for a period sufficient to promote numbness of the region with cooling of the lacing members serving to improve the effectiveness of the treatment.

In the foregoing specification, my invention has been described in conjunction with preferred embodiments. Many variations and modifications will, however, now become apparent to those skilled in the art, and I prefer, therefore, to be limited not by the specific disclosure contained herein but only by the appended claims.

The embodiments of the invention in which an exclusive privilege or property is claimed are defined as follows.

1. An anatomical lacing for treating muscular dysfunction comprising a plurality of lacing means for securement about the head and neck of the user; individual ones of said lacing means positioned to overlie preselected neuromuscular junctions; first and second juncture points bilaterally located at respectively opposite commissure regions of the mouth; a first portion of said lacing means connecting to said first juncture point, and a second portion of said lacing means connected to said second juncture point; actuating means having a reciprocal linear motion of a predetermined frequency about said first and second juncture points; first means interconnecting said juncture points to said actuating means for imparting reciprocal motion of said predetermined frequency to said juncture points; first and second fixation points located adjacent opposed sides of the users head and spaced away therefrom; second means connecting said first and second juncture points to said first yand second fixation points, respectively; said reciprocal motion alternately expanding and relieving said lacing means; whereby the neuro-muscular junctions of the user are massaged at said operating frequency.

2. An anatomical lacing as set forth in claim 1, wherein said predetermined frequency is within the range 0f lO-6() oscillations per minute.

3. An anatomical lacing, as set forth in claim 1, wherein said lacing means is formed of an extensible member having a braided peripheral configuration.

4. An anatomical lacing, as set forth in claim 1, said actuating means comprising a first and second cam means located -adjacent opposed sides of the users head; first and second cam follower means in respective engagement with said first and second cam means; means rotating said cam means in phase-opposition to provide movement of one of said cam follower means in a first direction while providing movement of the other of said cam follower means in a second direction, opposite to said first direction.

5. An anatomical lacing, as set forth in claim 1, wherein said predetermined frequency is within the range 0f 40-60 oscillations per minute; said actuating means comprising a first and second cam means located adjacent opposed sides of the users head; rst and second cam follower means in respective engagement with said first and second cam means; means rotating said cam means in phase-opposition to provide movement of one of said cam follower means in a iirst direction while providing movement of the other of said cam follower means in a second direction, opposite to said first direction.

6. An anatomical lacing, as set forth in claim 4, said means interconnecting said juncture points to said actuat ing means comprising a linkage member selectively positionafble along the length of said cam follower means, whereby the extent of said reciprocal motion is selectively adjustable.

7. An anatomical lacing, as set forth in claim 4, X- ture means supporting said actuating means to form an integral assembly; means pivoting said cam means and cam follower means about said fixture means to define the location of said cam follower between first and second positions; said lirst position corresponding to movement in said first and second directions being upward and downward, respecively; said second position corresponding to movement in said lirst and second direction being generally horizontal.

8. An anatomical lacing, as set forth in claim 7; said xture means including said first and said second xation points adjacent said first and second cam means, respectively.

9. An anatomical lacing as set forth in claim 1, wherein said lacing means is comprised of stainless steel.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,425,433 8/ 1922 Zook. 2,226,609 12/ 1940 Haprnan 12S-32 2,590,951 4/1952 Farison 272-82 FOREIGN PATENTS 641,710 4/ 1928 France. 1,263,110 4/1961 France.

467,023 10/1928 Germany.

RICHARD A. GAUDET, Primary Examiner. L. W. TRAPP, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1425433 *Mar 2, 1921Aug 8, 1922Thomas L ZookSpinal-vibrating apparatus
US2226609 *Dec 23, 1939Dec 31, 1940Henry W HapmanMassage apparatus
US2590951 *Apr 3, 1950Apr 1, 1952Farison SumnerElastic cord exerciser
DE467023C *Sep 16, 1925Oct 17, 1928Maria GrollMassageapparat, bei dem die beiden Enden eines Massagebands an Pleuelstangen angebracht sind
FR641710A * Title not available
FR1263110A * Title not available
Referenced by
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US5383829 *Aug 13, 1993Jan 24, 1995Miller; LarryStationary exercise device
US6036622 *Oct 9, 1998Mar 14, 2000Gordon; Joel D.Exercise device
US6689019Mar 30, 2001Feb 10, 2004Nautilus, Inc.Exercise machine
US7169088Nov 26, 2003Jan 30, 2007Rodgers Jr Robert ECompact variable path exercise apparatus
US7169089Nov 26, 2003Jan 30, 2007Rodgers Jr Robert ECompact variable path exercise apparatus with a relatively long cam surface
US7172531Nov 26, 2003Feb 6, 2007Rodgers Jr Robert EVariable stride exercise apparatus
US7179201Jun 7, 2004Feb 20, 2007Rodgers Jr Robert EVariable stride exercise apparatus
US7201705Nov 25, 2003Apr 10, 2007Rodgers Jr Robert EExercise apparatus with a variable stride system
US7214168Nov 26, 2003May 8, 2007Rodgers Jr Robert EVariable path exercise apparatus
US7244217Nov 26, 2003Jul 17, 2007Rodgers Jr Robert EExercise apparatus that allows user varied stride length
US7316632Jun 7, 2004Jan 8, 2008Rodgers Jr Robert EVariable stride exercise apparatus
US7341542Dec 19, 2003Mar 11, 2008Nautilus, Inc.Exercise machine
US7645215Aug 10, 2006Jan 12, 2010Gordon Joel DExercise device
US7833134Nov 27, 2009Nov 16, 2010Gordon Joel DExercise device
US8409058Jan 2, 2012Apr 2, 2013Exerciting, LlcVaried gait exercise device with pivot bar transfer system
USRE42698Oct 8, 2004Sep 13, 2011Nautilus, Inc.Treadmill having dual treads for stepping exercises
Classifications
U.S. Classification601/147
International ClassificationA61H1/02
Cooperative ClassificationA61H1/02, A61H2205/026, A61H2205/04
European ClassificationA61H1/02