Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3316986 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 2, 1967
Filing dateMar 22, 1965
Priority dateMar 22, 1965
Publication numberUS 3316986 A, US 3316986A, US-A-3316986, US3316986 A, US3316986A
InventorsOrr Willis P
Original AssigneeExxon Production Research Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rotary jar-type well tool
US 3316986 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

INVENTOR.

WILLIS F. ORR, BY

films AT TQRNEY.

United States Patent 3,316,986 ROTARY JAR-TYPE WELL TOOL Willis P. Orr, Tyler, Tex., assignor, by mesne assignments, to Esso Production Research Company, Houston, Tex., a corporation of Delaware Filed Mar. 22, 1965, Ser. No. 441,752 4 Claims. (Cl. 175-297) This invention relates to well tools for imparting a rotary jar or impact to a pipe string or tool that has become jammed in a well bore so as to free the pipe string or tool so that it can be recovered.

Pipe strings become jammed in wells for a number of reasons, such as differential pressure sticking, cave-ins, and pipe failures through deterioration thereof. Sometimes the torque on the pipe string can be increased to the point where the pipe string or tool can be freed, or a jar can be applied at the earths surface to the same end. Generally speaking, however, it has been found to be more etficacious to connect a rotary jarring device to the stuck pipe string as near thereto as possible in the hole so that the force resulting from the jar or impact will not lower portion of the mandrel.

be absorbed in the relatively long pipe string extending to the earths surface. Rotary jarring devices known to the prior art for the most part make use of vertical reciprocation of the upper pipe string to effect the jar. The impact force produced by such devices is necessarily limited. One object of the present invention is to produce a rotary jar device capable of producing an extremely high impact force.

Objects and features of the invention not apparent from the above discussion will become evident upon consideration of the following description of the invention when taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a side View, partially in cross section, illustrating a preferred embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 2 is a sectional view taken along section 22 of FIG. 1, illustrating the component parts of the apparatus of FIG. 1 in one operative position thereof;

FIG. 3 is a sectional view similar to FIG. 2 illustrating the component parts of the apparatus of FIG. 1 in another operative position thereof; and

FIG. 4 is an enlarged sectional view of a portion of the apparatus.

Briefly described, the present invention comprises a mandrel adapted to be coupled to an upper pipe string section and a sleeve section extending around the lower portion of the mandrel and adapted to be connected to a lower pipe string section. Segmental hammer spline means is provided on the mandrel and radially extends therefrom. An internal cavity or keyway in the sleeve section accommodates the hammer spline means and is considerably larger than the hammer spline means. The cavity is comprised of two portions of different diameters, the first portion having a diameter which is in snug fit with the hammer spline means for permitting only restricted liquid passage therebetween, and another portion of a diameter much greater than the diameter of the spline means and mandrel for permitting substantially unimpeded fluid movement therebetween. The cavity forms an anvil shoulder for reception of blows from the hammer. Means are provided for holding the hammer away from the anvil until large torque can be exerted on the mandrel so that the hammer will strike the anvil shoulder with great force, which will be transmitted to the lower pipe string section.

With reference now to FIG. 1, there is shown an elongated mandrel 1 including an upper coupling member 5 having tapered threads thereon for connection to an upper pipe string section which extends to the earths surface through a borehole. Suitable apparatus for exerting rotary torque on the drill string, such as rotary drilling 3,316,986 Patented May 2, 1 967 "ice apparatus, is connected to the upper end of the drill string. A bore 2 may extend through the mandrel for circulation of drilling fluid if such be desired. An annular bearing member 25 is connected to or is integral with the mandrel near the lower end thereof.

An elongated sleeve member comprising a plurality of sections 3, 9, and 29 is provided with an elongated bore therethrough, at least a portion of which is greater than the outside diameter of the greater portion of the mandrel 1, so that the sleeve section extends around the The lower mandrel section 29 is provided with a screw-threaded projection 37 similar to connecting section 5 for connecting the sleeve sections to a tool or lower pipe string section which is assumed to have been stuck in the well. Manifestly, other constructions for connecting two lower pipe string sections may be used. The lower sleeve section 29 is screwthreadedly connected to the middle sleeve section 3. Bearing members 27 and 23 are respectively positioned below and above the mandrel bearing 25 so as to support the weight of the mandrel and the pipe string sections thereabove so that the mandrel can rotate within the sleeve sections. The upper sleeve section 9 is provided with a sleeve bearing 15 to permit the mandrel to rotate within the sleeve sections without binding.

A spline means or hammer 17 is aflixed to or integral with mandrel 1 between sleeve bearing 15 and bearing 23. The hammer 17 may be described as segmental and is of a suflicient size to strike a hard blow against anvil shoulder 20 without being broken off of mandrel 1. The hammer rotates within a cavity formed within the sleeve section 3, which cavity has a section 22 which is of a radius substantially that of the curved outer surface of hammer 17. Thus, as the hammer rotates within the cavity section 22, only a restricted amount of fluid will pass between the wall of the cavity section 22 and the curved outer surface of the hammer 17. The cavity has a section 18 which is of substantially greater radius than the radius of section 22 so that the hammer can rotate freely therethrough and fluid can flow freely therearound. A passageway comprising sections 19 and 24- extends through the hammer section 17, as shown in FIG. 2. The passageway section 19 is of substantially greater diameter than the diameter of section 24, and the two sections are of substantially circular cross section with a tapered portion interconnecting them so as to form a seat for a ball 26 which is held within the passageway section 19 by one or more small projections 28 that permit liquid to flow around the ball and out of the passageway. Thus, when the mandrel is rotated counterclockwise, as shown by the arrow 30, the ball 26 will seat so as to prevent passage of fluid through the passageway. The ball 26 may be held against the seat by means of a light compression spring, as shown in FIG. 4, or the passageway may be drilled on an incline extending downwardly from the larger opening 19. However, whenthe mandrel is rotated clockwise, the ball will be unseated so that fluid can flow therearound and the mandrel can be freely turned. a

The liquid within the cavity sections 22 and 18 may be water, oil, hydraulic fluid, or other suitable liquid. The liquid is held within the cavity by seals 21, 11, and 13, the seals 11 and 21 being between the sleeve and the mandrel, and the seal 13 being between sleeve sections 3 and 9. Seals 35 and 33 are provided to prevent Well fluid from damaging the bearings 23, 25, and 27.

Let it be assumed that the sleeve section 29 has been connected to a stuck pipe string or tool in the lower end of a well bore. When a large torque is exerted on the upper pipe string section connected to the mandrel 1 by suitable equipment at the earths surface, the mandrel will turn very slowly within the sleeve member as fluid flows between the curved outer surface of hammer 17 and the sleeve section wall defined by cavity section 22. As soon as the hammer passes out of the cavity section 22, the hammer will turn rapidly and strike anvil shoulder 20 with great force. This operation can be repeated as many times as is necessary until the stuck pipe string section or tool has been jarred loose.

Manifestly, by obvious and appropriate design changes, the invention can be used to jar by exerting torque in a clockwise direction.

The invention is not necessarily to be restricted to the specific structural details or arrangement of parts herein set forth, as various modifications thereof may be effected without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. Apparatus for connection to a drill string for imparting a rotary jar to a drill string section in the lower end of a borehole, comprising:

an elongated mandrel;

means for coupling said mandrel to an upper pipe strin section;

a sleeve section extending around the lower portion of said mandrel;

means for connecting said sleeve section to a lower pipe string section;

hammer spline means on said mandrel radially extending therefrom;

an internal cavity in said sleeve section for accommodating said hammer spline means; said cavity having a portion of a first diameter in snug fit with said hammer spline means for permitting restricted liquid passage therebetween, said cavity having a portion of a second diameter greater than said first diameter for permitting substantially unimpeded fluid movement therebetween, and forming an anvil shoulder for reception of blows from said hammer spline means; sealing means between said mandrel and sleeve sections for preventing escape of fluid in said cavity; and

passageway means including check valve means in said hammer spline means for permitting free fluid flow therebetween only when said hammer spline means is turned away from said anvil shoulder.

2. Apparatus for connection to a drill string for imparting a rotary jar to a drill string section in the lower end of a borehole, comprising:

an elongated mandrel;

means for coupling said mandrel to an upper pipe string section;

a sleeve section extending around the lower portion of said mandrel;

means f or connecting said sleeve section to a lower pipe string section;

hammer spline means on said mandrel radially extending therefrom;

an internal cavity in said sleeve section for accommodating said hammer spline means, said cavity forming an anvil shoulder for reception of blows from said hammer spline means; and

means for holding said hammer spline means away from said anvil until large torque is exerted on said mandrel.

3. Apparatus for connection to a drill string for irn parting a rotary jar to a drill string section in the lower end of a borehole, comprising:

an elongated mandrel;

means for coupling said mandrel to an upper pipe string section;

a sleeve section extending around the lower portion of said mandrel;

means for connecting said sleeve section to a lower pipe string section;

hammer spline means on said mandrel radially extending therefrom;

an internal cavity in said sleeve section for accommo dating said hammer spline means, said cavity forming an anvil shoulder for reception of blows from said hammer spline means; and

means for permitting substantially unimpeded movement of said hammer spline means in said cavity away from said shoulder, said cavity having substan tially the same internal diameter as the external diameter of said hammer spline means and mandrel to restrict fluid passage therebetween over an arc of predetermined magnitude to permit torque buildup on said mandrel.

4. Apparatus for connection to a drill string for imparting a rotary jar to a drill string section in the lower end of a borehole, comprising:

an elongated mandrel;

means for coupling said mandrel to an upper pipe string section;

a sleeve section extending around the lower portion of said mandrel;

means for connecting said sleeve section to a lower pipe:

string section;

hammer spline means on said mandrel radially extending therefrom;

an internal cavity in said sleeve section for accommodating said hammer spline means;

said cavity having a portion of a first diameter in snug fit with said hammer spline means for permitting restricted liquid passage therebetween, said cavity having a portion of a second diameter greater than said first diameter for permitting substantially unimpeded fluid movement therebetween, and forming an anvil shoulder for reception of blows from said hammer spline means;

sealing means between said mandrel and sleeve sections for preventing escape of fluid in said cavity;

passageway means including check valve means in said hammer spline means for permitting free fluid flow therebetween only when said hammer spline means is turned away from said anvil shoulder;

an annular bearing affixed to said mandrel below said hammer spline means; and

a sleeve bearing in said sleeve section above said hammer spline means for engaging said mandrel.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,944,481 1/1934 Wells 293 X 2,708,100 5/1955 Sutliif 175-299 X 2,988,147 6/1961 Webb 175--297 X 3,200,895 8/1965 Womack 175306 X CHARLES E. OCONNELL, Primary Examiner.

D. H. BROWN, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1944481 *Dec 10, 1932Jan 23, 1934Wells Walter TSetting tool for setting a liner in an oil well or the like
US2708100 *Jun 1, 1951May 10, 1955Sutliff Wayne NSafety joint for oil well drilling stems
US2988147 *Sep 22, 1958Jun 13, 1961Houston Engineers IncRotary jar type well tool
US3200895 *Nov 6, 1963Aug 17, 1965Drilling Jars IncJar mechanism
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3388755 *May 2, 1966Jun 18, 1968Houston Engineers IncCombination shock absorber and jar
US4715454 *Jun 3, 1986Dec 29, 1987Teng Chuan CMechanical directional drilling jar with swivel means
US5624001 *Jun 7, 1995Apr 29, 1997Dailey Petroleum Services CorpMechanical-hydraulic double-acting drilling jar
US6290004Sep 2, 1999Sep 18, 2001Robert W. EvansHydraulic jar
US6481495Sep 25, 2000Nov 19, 2002Robert W. EvansDownhole tool with electrical conductor
US6742609 *May 11, 2001Jun 1, 2004United Diamond Ltd.Rotational impact drill assembly
US7096980 *Dec 5, 2003Aug 29, 2006Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Rotary impact well drilling system and method
US20020166700 *May 11, 2001Nov 14, 2002Gillis Peter J.Rotational impact drill assembly
US20040222021 *Dec 5, 2003Nov 11, 2004Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Rotary impact well drilling system and method
CN102454364A *Oct 19, 2010May 16, 2012中国石化集团胜利石油管理局钻井工艺研究院Torsional impact drilling tool
CN102454364BOct 19, 2010May 21, 2014中国石油化工集团公司Torsional impact drilling tool
EP1541801A2 *Feb 19, 2002Jun 15, 2005Schlumberger Holdings LimitedMethod and apparatus to vibrate a downhole component
EP1541801A3 *Feb 19, 2002Jan 18, 2006Schlumberger Technology B.V.Method and apparatus to vibrate a downhole component
Classifications
U.S. Classification175/297, 166/178
International ClassificationE21B31/113, E21B31/00
Cooperative ClassificationE21B31/113
European ClassificationE21B31/113