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Publication numberUS3318057 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 9, 1967
Filing dateMar 24, 1964
Priority dateMar 24, 1964
Publication numberUS 3318057 A, US 3318057A, US-A-3318057, US3318057 A, US3318057A
InventorsNorsworthy George R
Original AssigneeRobertson Co H H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pedestal floor construction
US 3318057 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 9, 1967 G. R. NoRswoRTHY 3,318,057

PEDES TAL FLOOR CONSTRUCTION Filed March 24, 1964 5 Sheets-5heet l BY /Q/147 ATTORNEY May 9, 1967 G. R. NoRswoRTl-w PEDESTAL FLOOR CONSTRUCTION 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed March 24. 1964 INVENTOR. afa/P654? /vosWaIPA/V BY /Qj ATTORNEY May 9, 1967 G, R. NORSWORTHY 3,318,057

PEDESTAI.. FLOOR CONSTRUCTI ON Filed March 24, 1964 5 Sheets-5heet 3 ATTORNEY United States Patent Office 3,318,057 Patented May 9, 1967 3,318,057 PEDESTAL FLOR CONSTRUCTION George R. Norsworthy, Little Sutton, Wirral, Cheshire,

England, assignor to H. H. Robertson Company, Pittsburgh, Pa., a corporation of Pennsylvania Filed Mar. 24, 1964, Ser. No. 354,276 17 Claims. (Cl. 52-126) This invention relates to improvements in the construction of pedestal floors, and more particularly to an improved pedestal assembly for use in a pedestal floor construction.

Pedestal floors, also called elevated floors, are of especial interest in buildings housing extensive electrical and electronic apparatus such as computing machines. Such machines require large cables for interconnection and for receiving and delivering electrical impulses. A large unobstructed chamber is desirable directly beneath the door of rooms containing these machines for freedom of cable distribution. Similarly, delivery of cooling air to and removal of heated air from such rooms and apparatus also is desirable. The pedestal floor construction has answered these needs.

Pedestal floors comprise a plurality of pedestals which are uniformly distributed over a previously completed flooring surface which usually comprises a concrete pad or Slab. These pedestals cooperate in supporting floor panels which are preferably individually removable to provide access to the chamber therebeneath. The door panels, as a group, provide a relatively flat, high-strength floor which sustains walking and standing of personnel, supports the apparatus and furnishings of the room, and supports moving loads as apparatus and furnishings are introduced into the room or are altered and replaced.

The primary objects of the present invention include:

To provide any efficient pedestal assembly for use in heavy, intermediate or light-duty pedestal flooring;

To provide a pedestal assembly which facilitates the leveling of the resulting pedestal flooring;

To provide a pedestal assembly which electrically insulates the pedestal ooring from the structural sub-floor and electrical cables extending therebeneath;

To provide a pedestal assembly employing means for dust-proofing the chamber underlying the pedestal flooring; and

To provide a pedestal door construction utilizing the present pedestal assembly.

According to the invention, a pedestal assembly is provided comprising a base adapted to be mounted on a generally horizontal surface such as a previously-completed concrete floor of a building. The base supports a head member, a leveling pad and a cap member which has a dat upper surface. These elements cooperate to provide vertical, lateral and angular adjustment, with respect to the base, of the flat upper surface of the cap member. Thus, in a pedestal floor constructed in accordance with the principles of the present invention, all of the flat upper surfaces of all of the cap members will reside in a common horizontal plane. This may be accomplished despite customary surface irregularities of the generally horizontal surface. Each cap member is provided with linear beads on the dat upper surface thereof which cooperate with similar linear beads of adjacent pedestal assemblies to detine contiguous panel receiving zones or modules which are horizontal.

According to one embodiment of the present pedestal assembly, the base comprises a pillar or tubular member which is secured to a base plate which overlies the generally horizontal surface. The base plate preferably is secured to the horizontal surface by means of an adhesive. The universal adjustability of the flat upper surface of each cap member readily compensates for any divergence of the pillar from the true vertical.

According to an alternative embodiment of the present pedestal assembly, the base comprises a pillar or tubular member which is externally threaded throughout its length. The pillar is adapted to be secured directly beneath the generally horizontal surface. Again the universal adjustability of the flat upper surface of each cap member readily compensates for any divergence of the pillar from the vertical.

The above and other objects and advantages of the present invention will become apparent from the following detailed description by reference to the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIGURE 1 is a fragmentary perspective illustration of a room having a pedestal oor with several of the floor panels removed for illustrative purposes;

FlG. 2 is a cross-section illustration of a preferred embodiment of the improved pedestal assembly of this invention;

FIGS. 3, 7, 12 and 14 areperspective illustrations of alternative embodiments of a cap member of the present invention;

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view, taken .along the line IV-IV of FIG. l, showin g the normal sidel-by-side alignment of the floor panels with respect to a pedestal assembly of the present invention.

FIG. 5 is a cross-sectional view, taken along the line V-V of FIG. 1, showing the normal side-by-side alignment of the floor panels and further illustrating alternative constructions of the floor panels;

FlG. 6 is a fragmentary illustration of an alternative embodiment of the pedestal flooring arrangement showing fragments of four adjacent floor panels and four adjacent f' pedestals utilizing interconnecting marginal strips;

FIGS. 8 and 9 are perspective illustrations of alternative embodiments of the marginal strips shown in FIG. 6;

FlG. l0 is a perspective illustration of a length of sealing strip useful with the marginal strips of FIGS. 6, 8 and 9;

FlG. 11 is a cross-sectional illustration, similar to FIG. 5 but taken along the line Xl-XI of FIG. 6, showing the relation of the marginal strips, the sealant strip and the floor panels;

FIG. 13 is a fragmentary perspective illustration, similar to FIG. 1, showing a pedestal floor having triangular floor panels and utilizing the pedestal cap member of FIG. 12;

FlG. 15 is a fragmentary perspective view, similar to FIG. 1, showing a pedestal floor having hexagonal door panels and utilizing the pedestal cap member of FIG. 14; and

FIG. 16 is a cross-sectional illustration, similar to FIG. 2, showing an alternative embodiment of the improved pedestal assembly of the present invention.

Reference is now directed to FIG. 1 wherein there is illustrated fragmentary perspective view of a room 20 having walls 212 and a conc-rete floor 24. The room 2l) is provided with a pedestal floor 26 which is vertically spaced from the concrete door 24 by a predetermined distance and cooperates therewith to define a chamber 2li through which extend electrical cables, air-conditioning conduits and the like.

The pedestal floor 26 comprises a plurality of square floor panels 30 which cooperate to define a level supporting surface. Each of the floor panels 30* is supported at each of its corners by means of a pedestal assembly 32. The pedestal assemblies 32 are mounted on a generally horizontal upper surface 34 of the concrete floor 24 and are distributed thereover in a uniform geometric pattern which corresponds with the shape of the floor panels. Each `of the floor panels rests on the vadjacent ones of the pedestal assemblies, the arrangement being such that the Hoor panels 30 are individually removable to gain access to the chamber 28.

Pedestal assembly 3 2 Reference is now directed to FIG. 2 wherein there is illustrated an exploded, cross-sectional view of a preferred embodiment of the pedestal assemblies 32. In general, the pedestal assembly 32 comprises a base 36, a head member 38, a plate-like, preferably disc-like, leveling pad 40 and a plate-like, preferably disc-like cap member 42.

In this embodiment, the base 36 comprises a pillar or tubular member 44 having an externally threaded upper end portion 46 and la plain, Unthreaded lower end portion 48. A base plate 50 is secured, as by welding, to the lower end portion 48 and may be circular, square, rectangular or any desired shape. The base plate 50 preferably is positioned substantially perpendicul-ar to the central axis 52, represented by the dash dot line, of the pillar 44. During the installation of the base 36, an adhesive 54 is applied to the lower face of the base plate 58 for securing the base 36 to the generally horizontal upper surface 34. The adhesive preferably is of the slow-setting type to permit slight readjustments of the base plate location prior to permanent set. Epoxy adhesives and polyurethane adhesives have been found satisfactory. The time required for the adhesive 54 to harden is sufficient to permit alignment of the 'base 36 with respect to predetermined site lines or lthe previously-installed pedestal assemblies.

The head member 38 has a central internally threaded bore 56 in which `the pillar 44 is threaded and which communicates with a cavity 58 formed in the upper portion of the head member 38. Hence, the head member 38 is vertically adjustable with respect to the base 36 to position it at any desired elevation above the upper surface 34 of the floor 24. This is accomplished simply by rotating the head member 38 in the appropriate direction. A lock nut 60 provided on the threaded portion 46 of the pillar 44, secures the head member 38 in its final position. As a further means for securing the head member 38 in its iinal position, a set screw 62 is provided in the head member 38 which seats on the threaded upper end portion 46. The head member 38 also is provided with a convex spherical upper surface 64.

The disc-like leveling pad 40 preferably is formed from electrically insulating materials such as suitable plastics or hard rubbers. The leveling pad 40 has a generally flat upper surface 66 and opposed thereto, a concave spherical surface 68 corresponding to the spherical surface 64 of the head member 38. The concave spherical surface 68 is adapted to overlie the convex spherical surface 64 and is slideable thereover. The cooperative action of the spherical surfaces 64, 68 is such that the leveling pad 40` may be angularly adjusted with respect to the base 36 and the generally horizontal upper surface 34, the arrangement being such that the flat upper surface 66 of the leveling pad 40 may be positioned in a horizontal plane, i.e., leveled, without regard to the levelness of the generally horizontal upper surface 34 of the concrete floor 24. Furthermore, the angular adjustability also compensates for any divergence of the pillar 44 from the true vertical. During installation of the leveling pad 40, a slow-setting adhesive 70 is applied to the convex spherical surface 64 for the purpose of securing the leveling pad 40 to the head member 38. The time required for the adhesive 70 to harden preferably is suicient to permit leveling -of the pad 40 prior to development of a permanent adhesive bond.

Up to this point, the pedestal assembly 32 provides vertical and angular adjustments to be made relative to the base 36 and the upper surface 34 of the concrete iioor 24, As is known, it is difficult, if not impossible, to pour a concrete floor wherein all portions of the upper surface thereof reside in a common plane and, further, in a common horizontal plane. Hence, most all concrete floors vary in levelness and to further aggravate the problem, some portions of the upper surface thereof will be at different elevations than the remaining portions of the upper surface. The pedestal assembly 32 provides a mechanism for r-apidly and efciently compensating for these variations in order 'to provide a pedestal floor which is level.

A further available adjustment of the pedestal assembly 32 is the lateral adjustment of the cap member 42. This lateral adjustment permits alignment of the cap member 42 with the cap members of the previously-installed pedestal assemblies 32. The cap member 42 preferably is formed from electrically insulating material such as suitable plastics or rubbers. The cap member 42 has a disclike central portion 72 having opposed at upper and lower surfaces 74, 76. The cap member 42 corresponds in horizontal cross section with the leveling pad 40, i.e., the cap member 42 and the leveling pad 48 are both circular, square, rectangular or any desired shape. The cap member 42 also is largerin perimeter than the leveling pad 40 and includes a peripheral tiange 78 which depends below the flat lower surface 76 of the central portion 72. The cap member 42 is adapted to rest on the leveling pad 40 and is slideable thereover. The peripheral iiange 74 depends below the flat upper surface 66 and, hence, limits the lateral movement of the cap member 42 with respect to the leveling pad 48 by engagement with the periphery of the leveling pad 40.

Referring now to FIGS. 2 and 3, the fiat upper surface 74- is provided with a plurality of line-ar beads 80 which project thereabove and which extend along radial lines 82 (FIG. 3) which extend from a reference point or center point 84 of the cap me-mber 42. The center point 84 of the cap member 42 is defined by the intersection of the radial lines 82. The linear beads may extend from the center point 84 to the periphery of the cap member 42 land are four in number. Hence, the linear beads 80 divide the flat upper surface 74 into quadrant portions 86 each adapted to receive -a corner of one of the floor panels 30. The lateral adjustability of the cap member 42 will be -employed to align each linea-r bead 80 with a similar linear bead of an 'adjacent pedestal assembly 32. At the completion of the installation of the pedestal assemblies 32, there will be provided a plurality of panel receiving zones, indicated generally in FIG. l by the letter Z, the cor-ners of which are defined by the quadrant portions 86 of four adjacent cap members 42. Each of lthe zones Z is capable of receiving one of the Hoor panels 3G.

As a result of sliding movement of the cap member 42 relative to the leveling pad 40, the center point 84 is laterally adjustable with respect to the base 36. Angular adjustability of the leveling pad 4i) relative to the head member 38 permits angular adjustment of the center point 84 relative to the base 36. Threaded adjustability of the head member 38 relative to the base 36 permits vertical -adjustment of the center point 84 yrelative to the base 36. Thus the center point 84 is adjustable vertically, angularly and horizontally yrelative to the base 36.

Floor panels 30 Referring now to FIG. 4, each of the oor panels 30 `has a peripheral upper wall portion 88 each engageable with the upper wall portion 88 of an adjacent oor panel 38 and a peripheral lower wall 90 which is inwardly spaced from the upper wall portion 88 and is adapted to define a -recess 92 in which the linear beads 80 reside. Each of the oor panels 30 has a corner 94 resting on one of the quadrant portions 86 of the cap member 42.

Illustrated in FIG. 5 are two floor panels 30A and 38B `of alternative constructions. The floor panel 30A, for example, is formed from a sheet of plywood 95 of suitable strength. If desired, a decorative iioor covering 96 may be applied across the upper surface of the sheet of plywood 95.

Alternatively, the floor panel 30B, for example, is formed from a suitable load-supporting member 98 having the decorative floor covering 96 applied to the upper surface thereof. The load-supporting member 98, for example, may comprise a sheet of wood other than plywood, a preformed, reinforced metal pan, or the like.

Dustproof pedestal floor Referring now to FIG. 6, there is illustrated a portion of a pedestal oor 100 comprising, in general, pedestal assemblies `32 and dloor panels 30. The pedestal oor 100 is similar in many respects to the pedestal floor 26 and, hence, corresponding numerals will be employed to identify cor-responding parts already described.

Each of the pedestal assemblies 32' includes a cap member 102 adapted to receive marginal strips 104 extending between adjacent pairs of the pedestal assemblies 32. The marginal strips 104 define the sides of the panel receiving zones Z.

As can be seen in FIG/7, th-e cap member 102 has generally U-shaped slots 105 cut therein which extend inwardly from the periphery thereof. Each of the slots 106 is aligned with one of the linear beads 80 and is adapted to receive `an end portion of one of th-e marginal strips 104. As can be seen in FIG. 8, each of the marginal strips 104 comprises an inverted T-shaped member having a vertical stem 108 and horizontal arms 110, one each extending from the lower end of the vertical stern 108. The height of the vertical stem 108 is such that the vertical stem 108 will not project above the linear beads 80 and preferably is substantially even therewith. Thus, when the marginal strips 104 are installed between adjacent ones of the pedestal assemblies 32', the vertical stems 108 form extensions of the linear beads 80, as can be seen in FIG. 6.

The marginal strip 104 preferably comprises an extruded aluminum element. Alternatively, as shown in FIG. 9, the marginal strip 104 may be roll formed from galvanized sheet metal to include a vertical stern 108 and horizontal arms 110.

The marginal strips 104 and 104 are not load-supporting elements. As can be seen in FIG. l1, for example, the marginal strip 104 has its horizontal arms 110 positioned beneath the marginal lower edge portions of the adjacent floor panels 30 and spaced apart therefrom. Hence, each of the horizontal arms 110 may receive a sealant strip 112 which is compressed between the horizontal arms 110 and the lower marginal edge of the floor panel 30 for the purpose of preventing the ingress of dust, liquids and debris to the chamber 28 therebelow.

As can be seen in FIG. 10, the sealant strip 112 may comprise a compressible strip 114 preferably formed from foamed polyurethane or foamed rubber having a pressureeensitive adhesive coating 116 applied over one surface. The coating 116 serve-s to secure the sealant strip 112 t-o the horizontal arm 110.

T ypicnl dimensions The following typical dimensions are included solely for the purpose of illustrating the relative sizes of the above-described elements employed in the present pedestal floor.

Typical tloor panels are one to two inches thick, depending upon the load they are to support, and are twenty-four inches square. The base of each pedestal assembly has a base plate which is seven inches square and one-quarter of an inch thick, and a pipe or pillar which is one and one-quarter inches in diameter and from two and one-half inches to twenty inches long. The head member is tive and one-quarter inches in diameter and has an overall thickness of one and seven-eighths inches. The leveling pad is four and seven-eighths inches in diameter and has a minimum central thickness of oneeighth of an inch. The corresponding spherical surfaces of the head member and the leveling pad have a radius of curvature of six inches. The cap member is ve and three-quarter inches in diameter with a one-eighth inch thick central plate-like portion. .The peripheral flange of the cap member depends below the central portion for a distance of one-eighth of an inch. The linear beads of the cap member each are one-eighth of an inch wide and are tive-sixteenths of an inch high. The marginal strips, employed in dustproong the pedestal floor, are twenty and fve-eighths inches long, one and nine-sixteenths wide and have a central, vertical stem which is one-half inch high. The sealant strips are twenty and tive-eighths inches long, three-eighths of an inch wide and three-sixteenths of an inch thick. The stated lengths of the marginal strips and the sealant strips correspond to that length used with the twenty-four inch square floor panels.

Cap member-Alternative embodiments Further alternative embodiments of cap members which cooperate to dene panel receiving zones having perimeter shapes other than square are illustrated in FIGS. 12 to 15 inclusive. Corresponding numerals will be employed to identify corresponding parts already described.

Illustrated in FIG. l2 is a cap member 120 provided with a plurality of the linear beads which beads extend along the radial lines 82. In this instance, the linear beads 80 divide the fiat upper surface 74 into sector portions 124 each of which is adapted to receive a corner of a floor panel 126 illustrated in FIG. 11 which panels 1265 are triangular in shape. The cap member is disposed on a leveling pad 40 of a floor pedestal 32 and is laterally adjustable in the same manner as the cap member 42.

Illustrated in FIG. 14 is a cap member 130 provided with a plurality of the linear beads 80 which extend along the radial lines 82. In this instance, the linear beads 80 divide the flat upper surface 74 into three sector portions 132, each of which is adapted to receive the corner of a iloor panel 134 illustrated in FIG. l5 which lioor panel is hexagonal in shape. The cap member 130 is disposed on a leveling pad 40 of a pedestal assembly 32 and is laterally adjustable in the same manner as the cap member 42.

It should be evident then that the floor panels employed with the pedestal assemblies of the present invention may have any one of a plurality of different shapes. Therefore, the resulting pedestal fioor is not only a functional and etiicient pedestal door for supporting the various loads enumerated above, but also may be pleasing in appearance.

Pedestal assembly-Alternnlive embodiment An alternative embodiment of the present pedestal assembly is illustrated in FIG. 16 and is generally designated therein by the numeral 140. Corresponding numerals will be employed to identify corresponding parts already described. In general, the pedestal assembly comprises a base 142, a head member 144, a discslike leveling pad 146 and a cap member 42.

In this embodiment, base 142 comprises a pillar 148 which is externally threaded along its entire length and which is adapted to be secured directly in the concrete iioor 24 by means of an anchoring element 150 embedded in the door 24. The anchoring element 150 comprises a tubular member 152 residing in an opening 154 formed in the hoor 24 and having a split lower end portion 156 which is expanded by a conical plug 158 disposed in the bottom of the opening 154. The tubular member 152 is internally threaded at least at its upper end and therefore is adapted to receive the pillar 148 in threaded engagement. A pillar locking nut 160 serves to secure the pillar 148 to the anchoring element 150.

Rotation of the pillar 148 will cause the pillar 148 to be raised or lowered, thereby providing a first means for positioning the upper end of the pillar 14S at a desired distance above the upper surface 34- of the concrete oor 24.

The head member 144 has the internally threaded bore 56 in which the upper end of the pillar 148 is threaded and which communicates with the cavity 58 formed in the head member 144. The head member 144 may be rotated in the appropriate direction to raise or lower it, thereby providing a second means for positioning the head member 144 at a predetermined level above the upper surface 34 of the concrete floor 24. Lock nut 60 and set screw 52 serve to secure the head member 144 in its final position. The head member 144 has a concave spherical upper surface 162.

The leveling pad 146 has the at upper surface 66 and opposed thereto, a convex spherical surface 164 corresponding with the concave spherical surface 162. The spherical surfaces 162, 164 are engaged whereby the leveling pad 146 is angularly adjustable with respect to the pillar 142.

The cap member 42 is shown overlying the flat upper surface 66 of the leveling pad 145. It should be understood, however, that any of the cap members 42, 162, 120 or 130 may ybe employed with the pedestal assembly 141). Furthermore, the marginal strips 104 also may be employed with the cap members 102 as described above.

Although the invention has been shown in connection with certain specific embodiments, it will Ibe readily apparent to those skilled in the art that various changes in form and arrangement of parts may be made to suit requirements without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

I claim as my invention:

1. A Hoor supporting pedestal comprising:

a base adapted to be mounted on a generally horizontal surface;

a head member secured to said base and being vertically adjustable relative thereto, said head member having a spherical upper surface;

a plate-like leveling pad having a generally dat surface and opposed thereto, a generally spherical surface corresponding to the spherical upper surface of said head member;

the spherical surfaces of said head member and said leveling pad being abutted whereby said flat surface of said leveling pad is angularly adjustable with respect to .said base to position said at surface sub stantially horizontal; and

a plate-like cap member having opposed upper and lower iiat surfaces corresponding in horizontal cross section with said leveling pad and being larger in perimeter than said leveling pad, said lower at surface of said cap member resting on said flat surface of said leveling pad and :being slideable thereover, whereby said upper iiat surface of said cap member provides a supporting surface for panel portions which supporting surf-ace is vertically, angularly and laterally adjustable fwith respect t'o said base.

2. The floor supporting pedestal of claim 1 wherein the spherical surface of said head member is convex and the spherical surface of said leveling pad is correspondingly concave.

3. The iloor supporting pedestal of claim 1 wherein the spherical surface of said head member is concave and the spherical surface of said leveling pad is correspondingly convex.

4. The floor supporting pedestal of claim 1 wherein said cap member includes a peripheral flange depending `below the at surface of said leveling pad.

5. The floor supporting pedestal of claim 1'including adhesive coatings for securing said leveling pad to said head member and said cap member to said leveling pad during angular and lateral adjustments thereof.

6. The floor supporting pedestal of claim 1 wherein said cap member is formed from electrical-ly insulating material.

7. The door supporting pedestal of claim 1 wherein said leveling pad is formed from electrically insulating material.

8. The iloor supporting pedestal of claim 1 wherein said base comprises a pillar provided with a base plate adapted to overlie said generally horizontal surface.

9. The floor supporting pedestal of claim 1 wherein said base comprises a pillar the lower end of which is secured directly in a receiving means secured beneath said generally horizontal surface.

10. A oor supporting pedestal comprising:

a base adapted to be mounted on a generally horizontal surface;

a head member secured to said base and being vertically adjustable relative thereto, said head member having a spherical upper surface;

a plate-like leveling pad having a generally ilat surface and opposed thereto, a generally spherical surface corresponding to the spherical surface of said head member;

the spherical surfaces of said head member and said leveling pad being abutted whereby said flat surface of said leveling pad is angularly adjustable with respect to said base to position said flat surface substantially horizontal;

a plate-like cap member having opposed upper and lower flat surfaces corresponding in horizontal cross section with said leveling pad and being larger in perimeter than said leveling pad, said lower flat surface of said cap member resting on said dat surface of said leveling pad and being slideable thereover; and

said cap member having said upper flat surface disposed in a horizontal plane and having a plurality of :linear beads each extending over said upper flat surface, each of said linear tbeads =being disposed along radial lines extending from a center point of said cap meinber, which center point is laterally adjustable in all directions with respect to said base, whereby said upper flat surface of said cap member provides a supporting .surface for panel corners 'which supporting surface is vertically, laterally and angularly adjustable with respect to said base.

11. The floor supporting pedestal of claim 10 wherein said linear `beads intersect at said center point and extend therefrom to the periphery of said cap member.

12. A oor supporting pedestal comprising:

a base adapted to be mounted on a generally horizontal surface;

a head member secured to said base and being vertically adjustable relative thereto, said head member having a convex spherical upper surface;

a disc-like leveling pad having a generally flat surface and opposed thereto, a concave spherical surface corresponding to said convex spherical surface of said head member;

said concave spherical surface resting on said convex spherical sur-face of said head member with said flat surface of said leveling pad being substantially horizontal, said leveling pad being angularly adjustable with respect to said base;

a disc-like cap member having upper and lower opposed fiat surfaces corresponding in horizontal cross section with said leveling pad and beinU larger in perimeter than said leveling pad, said lower flat surface of said cap member resting on said flat surface of said leveling pad and ibeing slideable the eover; and

said cap member having a plurality of elevated linear beads, each extending radially over said upper flat sur- -face of said cap member along at least a position of radial lines in said upper fiat surface, said cap member having said upper flat surface disposed in a horizontal plane and having a center defined by the intersection of said radial lines, which center 1S laterally adjustable with respect to said base, whereby said lupper flat surface of said cap member p rovides a supporting surface for panel corners whlch supporting surface is vertically, laterally and angularly adjustable with respect to said base.

13. A floor supporting pedestal comprising:

a base adapted to -be mounted lon a generally horizontal surface;

a head member secured to said base and being 'vertlcally adjustable relative thereto, said head member having a convex spherical upper surface;

a disc-like leveling pad having a generally flat surface and opposed thereto, a concave spherical surface corresponding to said convex spherical surface of said head member;

said concave spherical surface resting on said convex spherical surface of said head member with said `flat surface of said leveling pad being substantially horizontal, said leveling pad being angularly adjustable with respect to said base;

a disc-like cap member having upper and lower opposed `flat surfaces corresponding in horizontal cross section with said leveling pad and being larger in perimeter than said leveling pad, said cap member having a peripheral flange depending below the ilat surface of said leveling pad, said lower flat surface of said cap member resting on said -flat surface of said levelin-g pad and being laterally slideable thereover; and

said cap member having a plurality of elevated linear beads, each extending radially over said Iupper flat sur- Aface of said cap member along at least a portion of radial lines in said upper flat surface, said ca-p member havin-g said flat upper surface disposed in a horizontal plane and having a center point defined by the intersection of said radial lines, which center point is laterally adjustable with respect to said base, whereby said upper flat surface of said cap member provides a supporting surface for panel corners which supporting surface is vertically, laterally and angularly adjustable with respect to said base.

1-4. A pedestal floor comprising:

a plurality of individual pedestals and a plurality of floor panels, said pedestals being disposed in a uniform geometric pattern over a generally horizontal surface, each of said pedestals having a base supporting a cap member, said cap member having a generally Hat upper surface which is adjustable relative to said base vertically, laterally and angularly whereby the flat upper surfaces of all of said pedestals are disposed substantially in a common horizontal plane;

each said cap member having radially extending linear tical stem of each said strip beads extending above said -llat surface along radial lines extending from a center point of said cap member, each ofsai-d beads being align-ed with at least one similar Ibead of an adjacent one of said pedestals, whereby an adjacent pair of said beads of one such pedestal cooperates with an adjacent pair of said beads from at least two adjacent pedestals to define a -floorpanel supporting surface which is horizontal.

15. A pedestal floor comprising:

a plurality of individual pedestals and a plurality o-f floors panels, said pedestals being disposed in a uniform geometric pattern over a generally horizontal surface, each of said pedestals having a base and a cap member, said cap member being supported by said base and having a flat upper surface which is adjustable relative to said base lvertically, laterally and angularly whereby all of said flat upper surfaces are positioned substantially in a common horizontal plane;

each said cap member having a center point on its flat upper surface and having linear .beads extending thereabove and along radial lines extending from said center point, each of said linear beads being aligned with at least one similar bead of an adjacent one of said pedestals whereby an adjacent pair of said linear beads of one such pedestal cooperates with an adjacent pair of said linear beads from at least two adjacent pedestals to define a floor panel supporting surface which is horizontal;

marginal strips extending "between adjacent ones of said pedestals in alignment with one of said beads of each of said adjacent ones of said pedestals; and

said marginal strips defining sides of floor panel receiving zones, and being positioned to underlie adjacent floor panels.

16. The pedestal floor of claim 15 wherein said marginal strips have an inverted-T cross section including a vertical stem and horizontal arms, whereby the said veris disposed between the said zones and the said horizontal arms `underlie the adjacent oor panels.

17. The pedestal floor of claim 15 including a sealant strip interposed .between each of said marginal strips and each of said panels.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,794,217 6/1957 Croft 248-354 2,956,652 10/1960 Liskey 52-126 3,065,506 11/1962 fTreIner 52-126 3,067,843 12/1962 Rushtoh 52-126 3,087,206 4/1963 Delf 52-126 REINALDO P. MACHADO, Primary Examiner.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification52/126.6, 52/480
International ClassificationE04F15/024
Cooperative ClassificationE04F15/02452, E04F15/02482
European ClassificationE04F15/024D2, E04F15/024D6B4