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Publication numberUS3318224 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 9, 1967
Filing dateOct 18, 1966
Priority dateOct 18, 1966
Publication numberUS 3318224 A, US 3318224A, US-A-3318224, US3318224 A, US3318224A
InventorsBohanon Hoy R
Original AssigneeAcme Engineering And Mfg Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ventilating and circulating air system tube hanger
US 3318224 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 9,

H. R. BOHANON Filed Oct. 18, 1966 w MI, I

INVENTOR HOY R- BOHANON WWW ATTORNEYS VENTILATING AND CIRCULATING AIR SYSTEM TUBE HANGER United States Patent O 3,318,224 VENTILATING AND CIRCULATING AIR SYSTEM TUBE HANGER Roy R. Bohanon, Muskogee, Okla, assignor to Acme Engineering and Manufacturing Corporation, Muskogee, Okla, a corporation of Oklahoma Filed Oct. 18, 1966, Ser. No. 587,603 9 Claims. (CI. 98-33) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE Clip assemblies for suspending flexible material, particularly flexible ducting.

Cross-reference to related application The present application is a continuation-in-part of application Ser. No. 526,562, filed February 10, 1966, and entitled Ventilating and Circulating Air System.

Background of the invention A need exists to enable flexible materials, particularly plastics, to be suspended without depending primarily on friction or the puncturing of material while minimizing stress concentration. In the present environment, it is desired to suspend a plastic air distribution tube from a wire support with the use of a simple clip assembly.

Summary of the invention The present invention relates general-1y to a ventilating and circulating air system permitting small jets of air to be evenly distributed throughout an enclosed space. More particularly, the present invention concerns low cost flexible ducting and novel clip assemblies for suspending same. With the present invention, the flexible plastic ducting material may be suspended without depending primarily on friction or the puncturing of material. Also, stress concentration is minimized. More specifically, the plastic air distribution tube is suspended from a wire support with the use of clip assemblies having components which are capable of being either slid together endwise or snapped in place, while resisting sliding during use.

Description of the drawings FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the ventilating and circulating air system illustrating in particular the flexible ducting and system for suspending same, from wire support;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the components of a first embodiment clip assembly;

FIG. 3 is an end view of assembled first embodiment clip components;

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of the components of a second embodiment clip assembly; and

FIG. 5 is an end view of assembled second embodiment clip components.

Description of the preferred embodiments The ventilating and circulating system of the present invention is illustrated in FIG. 1 and consists generally of a distribution fan mounted inside a building and spaced a predetermined distance from wall 14 which contains air inlet shutter 1. The discharge of distribution fan 10 is connected to a long tube which contains spaced openings 22 along the entire extent thereof. End 24 of tube 20 is closed and, normally, tube 20 extends the entire lentgh of building. A ventilating fan (not shown) is mounted in another wall of the building for discharging air to the outside.

More specifically, motorized shutter 16 contains a plurality of balanced blades 30 operable by motor 32 through actuating rod 34 in conventional manner.

Distribution fan 10 is supported or suspended from the building with any conventional structure which may, for example, include a frame 36 supported by vertical members 38. At the top of frame 36 is located a ring 40 to which wire 42 is attached for supporting tube 20 with clip assembly 60, described in detail hereinafter. Of course, the other end of wire 42 is attached to appropriate building structure.

The actuation of the ventilating fan (not shown) and motor 32 of shutter 16 may, if desired, be controlled by either thermostat of humidistat.

During the ventilating mode of operation, both distribution fan 10 and the ventilating fan are running while shutter 16 is in open position. Thus, the ventilating fan removes air from the building and creates a slight vacuum therein. Outside air, being at a slightly higher pressure, enters into the building through shutter 16. Since distribution fan 10 is located immediately in front of the opening defined by shutter 16, fresh outdoor air is picked up and discharged into tube 20. Subsequently, outdoor fresh air is discharged within the interior of the building through openings 22 in the surface of tube 20 throughout the entire length of building. The resulting small air jets 50 are well mixed with the air inside the building by turbulent mixing and a very uniform condition exists throughout. When the house temperature reaches the maximum desired, usually on a sunny day, automatic control of the ventilating fan and shutter 16 may be achieved by thermostat or humidistat control. The slight vacuum created in the house causes the fresh cool outdoor air to rush in through inlet shutter 16 and jump the gap right into the continuously-running distribution fan 10 and discharge uniformly through openings 22 and thoroughly mix with the warm air. When the desired temperature and/or humidity conditions have been reached, the ventilating fan and shutter 16 may be turned OE and the recirculation and uniform air movement process permitted to continue.

In the circulating mode of operation, the ventilating fan is inoperative and shutter 16 is closed. Only distribution fan 10 is running to pull air from within the building through the space between distribution fan 10 and shutter 16 into the inlet of distribution fan 10. In this manner, indoor air is discharged into distribution tube 20 and blown back into the building through the small openings 22 in the surface of tube 20. The resultant turbulence and mixing will again promote uniform conditions within the building.

Tube 20 can be made of virtually any material, either rigid or flexible. However, cost factors dictate tube 20 be made of thin film plastic. Thus, as tube 20 is nonrigid, the air pressure from distribution fan 10 holds it in its contemplated configuration. Of course, when tube 20 is made of flexible material it hangs limp when not operative.

The number and size of openings 22 along the surface of tube 20 is also important as this determined how far each individual jet 50 will penetrate into the relatively quiet room air and thus how much area each tube will cover. Experimentation indicates that from two to three inches is the proper diameter of opening 22. The spacing between openings 22 must be such that the total or aggregrate area of opening 22 has the proper relationship to cross-section area and length of tube 20 and fan capacity. For tubes which are less than diameters long, the ratio of total area to tube cross-sectional area should range from 1.0 to 1.5 for most fans. The pressure distribution in tube 20 is such that the pressure at the closed end 24 is more than the end adjacent distribupunched openings in tube tion fan 10. If this ratio is too great, there is danger that the pressure at the fan end will go below room pressure causing reverse flow through openings 22 or collapse of tube 20 when made of flexible material. On the other hand, if the total opening area is too small, it will restrict the flow of distribution fan andreduce significantly the performance of the system as a whole. While the location of openings 22 is important, and varies somewhat with each application, for most instances a location within 30 degrees of the horizontal centerline of tube 20 is preferred.

As will now be apparent, when tube 20 is made of flexible plastic, fasteners for supporting the material from wire 42 must be provided which do not depend primarily on either friction or the puncturing of material. That is, friction is not reliable and a puncture within tubing 20 will start a tear reducing the material strength drastically. Finally, it is necessary that a relatively large area of tube material 20 be held in order to distribute the stresses into the material without excessive stress concentration.

The clip assemblies of the present invention meet the aforementioned objectives and hold the flexible material of tube 20 by means of the mechanics of their geometry.

In the first embodiment clip assembly 60 of FIGS. 23, the reference numeral 62 designates an outside piece or holder having a partially-open slot 64 along one edge thereof and an opening 66 -on the other side thereof through which hook 68 passes. Of course, the other end of hook 68 is attached to wire 42. Retainer member 70 is designed to fit within slot 64 of holder 62 with the flexible material of tube 20 wrapped around it (FIG. 3).

The first embodiment clip assembly 60 is assembled together either by sliding holder 62 and retainer 70 together. axially, or by snapping these parts together, this being possible because of the resilient material of which holder 62 and retainer 70 are made. However, the pressure must not be so great as to damage tube material 20 or so small as not to adequately secure it.

For some flexible materials, axial restraint is necessary to prevent the two pieces from sliding apart during use. This can be accomplished by deforming the ends of either holder 62 or retainer 70 to prevent axial movement. Alternatively, as illustrated in the second embodiment clip assembly 60' of FIGS. 4-5, the retainer 70 may include a notch 71 located in the top thereof; In this embodiment, notch 66 is located within the curvilinear walls of holder 62'. As will now be apparent, as retainer 70 is slid or snapped in place within slot 64' of holder 62', and hook 68 inserted within opening 66 of holder 62' and notch 71 of retainer 70', axial movement of the clip components is precluded.

Installation of plastic tube 20 is accomplished by inserting wire snap hooks 68 within openings 66(66') of holders 62(62). Then, the plastic tubing 20 is unrolled and selected portions along top dead center inserted between holders 62 (62') and retainers 70(70'). This is accomplished by inserting retainers 70(70) through the 20 and sliding to selected positions along top dead center. Then, holders 62( 62f) are positioned flush with the ends of retainers 70(70) and the components slid or snapped together. By holding holders 62(62') at a slight angle to retainers 70(70), the components are more easily assembled. Also, by rotating retainers 70(70) one-quarter turn such that their two edges. rest on a flat work surface, holders 62(62) are more easily snapped over retainers 70(70'). Finally, resilient hooks 68 are inserted over wire 42.

Disassembly is accomplished simply by removing hooks 68 from holders 62(62) after which holders 62(62) and retainers 70(70) are separated.

It is recommended that clips 60(60') be spaced approximately ten feet apart for 18 inch diameter tubing 20, eight feet apart for 24 inch diameter tubing 20, and six feet apart for 30 inch diameter tubing 20.

Manifestly, variation and rearrangement of component parts may be envisioned without departing from the spirit and scope of invention, as defined in the subjoined claims.

I claim:

1. In a ventilating and circulating system including a shutter assembly mounted within a wall of a building and a fan having an intake portion located a pre-determined space from said shutter assembly, the combination with said shutter assembly and said fan of a tube assembly connected to the discharge of said fan, said tube assembly being made of non-rigid material permitting air pressure from said fan to hold said tube in its contemplated shape during use, said tube assembly further including a plurality of continually-spaced openings of predetermined size along the extent thereof, a supporting member located above said tube and at least one clip assjembly suspending said tube from said supporting mem- 2. A ventilating and circulating air system as in claim 1, wherein said clip assembly includes a first holding member and a second retaining member between which is located a portion of said tube assembly, the surfaces of said retaining and holding members in contact with said tube assembly being complementary in configuration.

3. A ventilating and circulating air system as in claim 2, wherein said surface of said holding member in contact with said tube is formed as a slot having a lower opening of width less than the width of other portions of said slot permitting said retaining member to be slid within said slot.

4. A ventilating and circulating air system as in claim 3, wherein said clip assembly includes hook means attached at one end to said supporting member and passing at the other end through an opening in the top of said holding member.

5. A ventilating and circulating air system as in claim 4, wherein said clip assembly includes means precluding said retaining member from sliding relative to said holding member after said tube assembly is positioned therebetween.

6. A ventilating and circulating air system as in claim 5 wherein said means precluding relative sliding is a slot located near the top of said retaining member and in juxtaposition with respect to said opening in the top of said holder such that said hook means when passing through said opening in the top of said holding member is wedged within said slot of said retaining member thus precluding sliding of said retaining member within said holding member.

7. A clip assembly for suspending a flexible material from a support, comprising:

(A) a holding member having a slotted portion with a generally concave surface, said holding member being made of a flexible material;

(B) a retaining member having a generally convex surface complementary in configuration with respect to said slotted portion of said holding member such that said retaining member can be snapped in place or slid within said slotted portion of said holding member, the flexible material being located between said concave and convex surfaces;

(C) hook means suspending said holding member from the support; and

(D) means including said hook means for precluding sliding of said retaining member within said slotted portion of said holding member after said flexible material is positioned therebetween.

8. A clip assembly for suspending a'flexible material from a support, comprising:

(A) a holding member having a slotted portion with a generally concave surface and wherein the slotted portion of the holding member terminates downwardly in an opening of width less than the width 5 of other portions of the slot, and the holding member is of flexible material;

(B) a retaining member having a generally convex surface complementary in configuration with respect to said slotted portion of said holding member, the flexible material being located between said concave and convex surfaces, and the retaining member is of flexible material;

(C) hook means suspending said holding member from the support;

(D) means precluding sliding of said retaining member within said slotted portion of said holding member after said flexible material is positioned therebetween; and

(E) wherein said means precluding sliding of said retaining member within said slotted portion of said holding member is a slot located near the top of said retaining member and in juxtaposition with respect to an opening located in the top of said holder such that said hook means when passing through said opening in the top of said holding member is wedged within said slot of said retaining member thus precluding sliding of said retaining member within said holding member.

9. A clip assembly as in claim 7, wherein said means precluding sliding of said retaining member is formed as an integral part of said retaining member and operates in conjunction with said hook means and said holding member to provide mechanical interference.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS Lutz 248-62 Larimer 24-243.1O

Bennett 24243.9

Malone 248-54 Carson 248-54 Carmer 174135 Woodward 174135 Verger 24863 Riekse 24243.9

MEYER PERLIN, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3404618 *Dec 26, 1967Oct 8, 1968Jacobs Bros Textile Co IncCombination heating, ventilating and recirculating system for greenhouses
US3431717 *Sep 12, 1966Mar 11, 1969Bahnson CoSuction flute mounted wiper device for drafting rolls
US3691928 *Jan 21, 1971Sep 19, 1972Berg Vernon R JrBarn ventilator
US4034150 *Feb 20, 1976Jul 5, 1977Southern Weaving CompanyAccordian fold cable with flexible clips over the folds
US5282811 *Apr 16, 1992Feb 1, 1994Cook Pacemaker CorporationTwo part surgical ligating clip, applicator and method of use
US5584455 *Jul 1, 1993Dec 17, 1996Artemi; PaulDevice for holding garment hangers
US5692272 *Dec 16, 1996Dec 2, 1997Woods; Lydia A.Clip for gripping sheet material
US5833459 *Feb 28, 1996Nov 10, 1998Graham; Neil J.For holding and positioning a cotton roll in the mouth for isolating a tooth
US7874762Sep 17, 2009Jan 25, 2011Shaw & Sons, Inc.Dowel device with closed end speed cover
US8007199Dec 16, 2010Aug 30, 2011Shaw & Sons, Inc.Dowel device with closed end speed cover
US8375493Jun 23, 2011Feb 19, 2013Sealy Technology LlcOne piece foam mattress core encasement
US8434178Mar 13, 2012May 7, 2013Nomaco Inc.Mattress side/edge support system
US8561236Nov 10, 2009Oct 22, 2013Nomaco Inc.Stepped-edge and side-support members, assemblies, systems, and related methods, particularly for bedding and seating
US8646136Aug 27, 2010Feb 11, 2014Nomaco Inc.Assemblies, systems, and related methods employing interlocking components to provide at least a portion of an encasement, particularly for bedding and seating applications
USRE42568Jul 1, 1993Jul 26, 2011Paul ArtemiDevice for holding garment hangers
WO1993020756A1 *Apr 16, 1993Oct 28, 1993Asc Ind IncSurgical ligating clip, applicator and method of use
WO1998026940A1 *Nov 21, 1997Jun 25, 1998Lydia A WoodsClip for gripping sheet material
WO2008012564A1 *May 23, 2007Jan 31, 2008Andrew Charles BuxtonAir flow generator
Classifications
U.S. Classification454/228, D08/395, 248/339, D08/396, 24/462
International ClassificationF24F7/06
Cooperative ClassificationF24F7/065
European ClassificationF24F7/06D