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Publication numberUS3319070 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 9, 1967
Filing dateApr 2, 1964
Priority dateApr 2, 1964
Publication numberUS 3319070 A, US 3319070A, US-A-3319070, US3319070 A, US3319070A
InventorsSchneider Luther K
Original AssigneeWestern Electric Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Photoelectric device for distributing strands on a reel
US 3319070 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 9 1967 L. K. SCHNEIDE IHOTOELECTRI-C DEVICE FOR DISTRIBUTING STRANDS ON A REEL 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed April 2, 1964 L IGHT SOURCE PHOTOELECTR/C' L L 5 C MAGNET/C cows r52 m m mN NH m K L ATTORNEY May 9, 1967 1.. K. SCHNEIDER f 3,319,070

PHOTOELECTRIC DEVICE FOR DISTRIBUTING STRANDS ON A REEL Filed April 2, 1964 v 5 Sheets-Sheet 7E [95 u Silk 2/ PHOTOELECTR/C CELL FIG. 4

May 9, 1967 K. SCHNEIDER ,0

PHOTOELECTRIC DEVICE FOR DISTRIBUTING STRANDS ON A REEL Filed April 2, 1964 a v t 5 $heets-$heet 5 Sol/RC5 United States Patent PHOTOELECTRIC DEVHCE FOR DISTRIBUTING STRANDS ON A REEL Luther K. Schneider, Timonium, Md., assignor to Western Electric Company, Incorporated, New York, N.Y a corporation of New York Filed Apr. 2, 1964, 'Ser. No. 356,759 4 Claims. (Cl. 250222) This invention rel-ates to a device for properly distributing a strand on a take-up reel and particularly to a device for photoelectrically controlling the spacing between convolutions of a strand on a reel.

In the manufacture of strands such as electrical cable, it is necessary to take the strand upon a reel preparatory to subsequent stranding operations or shipment. It is essential that the strand be properly distributed on the reel so that it can subsequently be pulled from the reel without damage to .or snagging of the strand.

If the spacing between convolutions of a strand on a reel is too wide, subsequent layers of the strand on the reel will fall down between the convolutions. Thus, the strand will become caught on the reel restricting its subsequent removal. If the spacing between convolutions of the strand on a reel are too close, the strand will rub against adjacent convolutions as it is taken up on and payed oif of the reel causing damage to the strand. It is, therefore, highly desirable to properly distribute a strand on a reel so as to facilitate its removal without damage to the strand.

Additionally, while strand distributors are available in the prior art which will properly distribute a strand of a given diameter on a reel of a given size when rotated at a given speed, the instant invention distributes a strand on a reel independently of such parameters.

It is, therefore, anobject of this invention to control the distribution of a strand on a reel so as to maintain apredetermined spacing between the convolutions.

Another object of the invention is to sense the distance between a strand and its adjacent convolution for controlling a distributor traversing a reel so as to maintain a predetermined spacing between the convolutions on a reel.

With these and other objects in view, the instant inventioncontemplates the utilization of a strand follower which is positioned between a strand and its adjacent convolution, the strand follower supporting a photoelectric'sensing device for sensing the spacing between the strand and the adjacent convolution,,the photoelectric sensing device controlling,,in response to the spacing between the strand and the adjacent convolution, the rate at which a strand distributor traverses a reel so as to maintain a predetermined spacing between the strand and its adjacent convolution.

A more complete understanding of the objects, and advantages of theinstant invention may be obtainedv in the following detailed description, in which:

.FIG. 1 is a partially broken away side view of a take- ;up'reel mechanism utilizing the principles of the instant invention;

FIG. 2 is a sectional view of FIG. 1 taken along the lines ,-22 thereof;

FIG.v 3 is ,a sectional vview of FIG. 1 taken along the lines 3+3 thereof; Y

19 ,077t Patented May 9, 1961 FIG. 4 is a sectional view of FIG. 2 taken along the lines 44, and

FIG. 5 is an electrical schematic showing a contro circuit for the apparatus illustrated in FIG. 1.

In FIG. 1 a strand follower is generally indicated b3 the numeral 10. The strand follower v is positioned between successive sections of a portion of astrand 11 and an adjacent convolution 12 of the strand 11 wound on :2 reel, indicated generally by the numeral 14. A distributor 13 traverses the reel 14 to distribute the strand 11 on the reel. The strand follower 10 is mounted on a horizontal support 15 for free vertical displacement on guides 16-16. Thehorizontal support 15 is mounted on parallel rails 1717 by bearings 1818 so as to permit free displacement of the horizontal support 15 parallel to the longitudinal axis of the reel 14 in response to movement of the strand follower .10.

A solenoid 19 act-uates a plunger 20 for lifting the strand follower 10 on the vertical guides 1616. When the solenoid 19 is tie-energized, the strand follower 10 will drop freely on the guides 16-16 to thereel 14. As seen in FIG. 2, the strand follower 10 is provided with a plurality of cylindrical bearings 2121 which support the strand follower 10 on the convolution 12 of the strand 11.

The distributor 13 is displaced relative to the reel 14 by a traversing screw 25. The direction in which the traversing screw 25 is rotated controls the direction which the distributor 13 is displaced relative to the reel and the speed at which the traversing screw 25 is rotated controls the speed at which the distributor 13 is displaced relative to the reel. The traversing screw 25 is positioned generally parallel to the longitudinal axis of the reel 14 so as to displace the distributor 13 generally parallel to the longitudinal axis of the reel 14 as the traversing screw 25 is rotated. A distributor motor 26 is a reversible motor whose direction and speed can be controlled as disclosed infra to rotate the traversing screw 25 in the desired direction and at the desired speed to displace the distributor 13 relative to the reel 14.

In FIG. 3, wheels 2727 are shown in positions between the last convolution 12 of the strand wound on the reel 14 and the portion of-the strand 11 approaching the reel 14. As the reel 14 turns, the wheels 27- 27 will ride between the approaching portion ofthe strand 11 and convolution 12 of the strand 11 and is supported on the convolution 12 of the strand 11 by the bearings 2121 to advance the strand follower 10 with the strand 11.

In FIG. 4, the wheel 27 is disclosed as being mounted in a housing 28 and spring biased downwardly by a spring 29. As the effective winding diameter of the reel 14incre-ases as additional layers of the strand 11 are placed on the reel, the wheels 27-27 are permitted vertical displacement in the housing 28' by the spring 29 to compensate for such increase in outside diameter.

A photoelectric cell 30 is responsive to light from a light source 31 and the amount of light striking the photocell"30.is determined by the spacing between the'convolution .12 and strand 11.

As seen in FIG. 5, as light from light source 31 strikes a photocell 30, a current will be induced to increase the negative bias of a grid 32 which, in turn, will inhibit the currentflow through a vacuum tube 33. As the current flow through thevacuum tube 33 is decreased, the current to the motor 25 is reduced thus reducing the speed of the distributor motor 26. Conversely, as. the light from the ht source 31 decreases, current flow through the photoll also decreases decreasing in turn the negative bias the grid 32. This permits a greater current flow tough the vacuum tube 33 to increase the current flow the motor 26 and increase the speed of the distributor )tor 26. When no light strikes the photocell 31), no cur 1t will flow to the grid 32 and the maximum current flow the motor 26 will be obtained.

By adjusting a rheostat 35, a desired bias on the grid 32 n be obtained for a given spacing between the approachg section of the strand 11 and its adjacent convolution As the bias on the grid 32 determines the speed of e distributor motor 26 for a given spacing between the proaching port-ion of the strand 11 and its adjacent conlution 12, the proper speed for the distributor motor i to maintain this given spacing can be selected by adjustg the rheostat 35.

As seen in FIG. 2, as the predetermined spacing between e convolution 12 and the strand 11 .is exceeded, it is :cessary to decrease the speed of distributor 13 to com- :nsate therefor. On the other hand, if the spacing beeen the convolution 12 and the strand 11 is less than the 'edetermined spacing, it is necessary to increase the speed i the distributor 13 to compensate therefor. As dislssed supra, the spacing between the strand 11 and the )IlVOllJtlOl'l 12 determines the amount of light which rikes the photocell 30. Therefore, the speed of the disibutor motor 26 is decreased when the spacing between re strand 11 and its adjacent convolution tends to exceed prede-termining distance and the speed of the distributor .otor 26 is increased when the spacing between the strand l and its adjacent convolution tends to be less than a redetermined distance.

As shown in FIG. 5, current is directed to the distributor rotor 26, the light source 31, the photocell 3t and the acuum tube 3-3. As a switch41 is normally closed, the acuum tube 33 receives current and transmits current to 1e distributor motor 26. The amount of light reaching 1e photocell 30 from the light source 31 is determined y the spacing between the strand 11 and the adjacent onvolution 12 and controls the speed of the distributor rotor 26 by varying the current to the motor.

A switch 42 controls the direction of rotation of the rotor 26 and, thus, the direction the distributor 13 is dislaced by reversing the direction of the current flow to coil 34 in the field of the, motor 26. The switch 42 is ont'rolled by a solenoid 43 and the solenoid 43 is enerized and de-energized by a switch 44. As shown, the olenoid 43 is de-energized when the switch 44 is open and sener-gized when the switch 44 is closed. When the soleoid 43 is de-energized, the switch 42 assumes the position hown in FIG. 5; and when the solenoid 43 is energized, he switch 42 is displaced to reverse the direction the curent flows through the coil 34.

If, for example, the switch 44 is open as shown in FIG. i and the distributor 13 is displaced towards the viewer [1 FIG. 1, when the strand follower ltl reaches the end )f its travel, a switch actuator 45 strikes a rim 46 of the eel 14 to close the switch 44 and actuate the solenoid 43 0 reverse the distributor motor 26. The switch 44 renains closed until the strand follower reaches the oppotite end of the reel 14 and the switch actuator 45 strikes he opposite rim, rim 47, of the reel to open the switch 14 and actuate solenoid 43 to reverse the motor 26 to its )riginal direction. The switch actuator 45 may be made :0 any length necessary to reverse the motor 26 at the groper time.

As the strand follower reaches the rim 46 and the switch actuator 45 is actuated, a switch actuator 48 also strikes the rim 46 to close a switch 49. The switch 49 remains closed only as long as the switch actuator 48 is actuated. The switch 49 directs current to a solenoid 50 to energize the solenoid to close switches and 56 and to open switch 41. Switch 55 when closed continues to direct current to solenoid 50 so that upon contact switch 49 being opened, switch 55 will lock solenoid 50 to hold switches 55 and 56 closed and switch 41 open. Switch 55 also directs current to the solenoid 19 to lift the strand follower 10 on the guides 16-16.

The switch 56 directs current to a magnetic counter 57. The rim 46 is provided with a plurality of spaced magnets 58-58. As the reel 14 rotates, the magnetic counter 57 counts the magnets 5858 as they pass by, and after a predetermined number of counts, energizes a solenoid 59 to close a switch 68. Upon the switch 61) being closed, current is directed to the motor 26 to start the distributor 13 moving relative to the reel 14. A rheostat 61 is preset to provide the proper current to the motor 26 so that the distributor 13 will be displaced at the proper speed relative to the reel 14.

As the switch 41 is opened, the vacuum tube 33 is out of the circuit and is not responsive to the photocell 30 to control the speed of the distributor 13. Thus, until the switch 60 is closed, the distributor 13 remains stationary relative to the reel 14. This provides the dwell period necessary for the strand 11 to be laid substantially one full turn against the rim of the reel before the distributor starts back across the reel. By varying the number of counts necessary to actuate the solenoid '59, any desired dwell period may be obtained Also, after a predetermined number of counts, the magnetic counter 57 actuates a solenoid 62 to open a switch 63. The switch 63 cuts off the current to the solenoid 51) thereby opening the switches 55 and 56 and closing the switch 41. As the switch 56 opens, the counter 57 is de-energized and reset, opening the switch 60 and closing the switch 63. Solenoid 19 is also de-energized to permit the strand follower 10 to drop on guides 16. The strand follower 10 is lifted so as to permit the strand 11 to move a sufiicient distance from the rim 46 so that when the strand follower is dropped, it will be placed betweeen the strand 11 and its adjacent convolution. The number of counts at which the magnetic counter will actuate the solenoid 62 is selected so as to properly drop the strand follower between the strand 11 and its adjacent convolution 12. i

As the strand follower 10 travels across the reel to the opposite rim 47, a switch actuator (not shown) which is identical to and directly opposite switch actuator 48, strikes the rim 47 to actuate contact switch 64 thereby directing current to solenoid 50 so as to repeat the se quence described supra.

In operation '55 and 56 and open switch 41. This stops the displacement of the distributor and lifts the strand follower 10.

After a predetermined dwell interval, the solenoid 59 is energized by the magnetic counter 57 to close the switch 60 and start the distributor 13 back across the reel 14. After a predetermined interval, the solenoid 62 is actuated by the magnetic counter 57 to open the switch 63 and de-energize the solenoid 50. This opens switches 55, 56 and 60 and closes switches 41 and 63 to drop the strand follower 10, reset the counter 57 and return the control ofthe speed of the strand distributor 13 to the photocell 30.

When the strand follower 10 reaches the end of its travel in the opposite direction, the switch actuator 45 strikes the rim 47 to open the switch 44 and reverse the direction of the motor 26 to its original direction. An actuator (not shown) also strikes the rim 47 to close the switch 64 so as to energize solenoid 50. Solenoid 50 closes switches 55 and 56 and opens switch 41. This lifts the strand follower 10, energizes the counter 57 and stops the movement of the distributor 13.

After a predetermined dwell interval, the solenoid 59 is actuated by the counter 57 to start the distributor 13 moving in the opposite direction across the reel 14. After a second predetermined interval, the solenoid 62 is actuated by the counter 57 to open switch 63 thereby deenergizing the solenoid 50 to open the switches 55, 56 and 60 and to close the switches 41 and 63. This drops the strand guide 10, de-energizes the counter 57 and returns the control of the speed of the distributor 13 to the photocell 30.

Any suitable, conventional arrangement may be used to support the rails 17 relative to the reel 14 so as to support the horizontal support 15. Further, any conventional facility may be utilized for rotating the reel 14 about its longitudinal axis. Preferably, a conventional torque motor is utilized to rotate the reel in order to maintain a constant tension in the strand 11. In the same manner, the motor 26 and traversing screw 25 may be mounted by any conventional arrangement.

It is to be understood that the above-described arrangement of apparatus and construction of elemental parts is simply illustrative of an application of the principles of the invention and many other modifications may be made without departing from the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. A device for distributing a strand on a reel, comprising:

a strand distributor mounted for reciprocal movement transverse to the reel,

means for displacing the strand distributor,

a light source mounted substantially independently of the strand distributor on one side of the reel for free displacement transverse to the reel with a strand when the strand is distributed on the reel,

a photoelectric sensing element mounted on the opposite side of the reel for free displacement with the light source for receiving light from the light source, the amount of light reaching the photoelectric sensing element from the light source being a function of the distance between the strand and its adjacent convolution, and

means responsive to the amount of light reaching the photoelectric sensing device for controlling the rate at which the strand distributor traverses the reel.

2. A device for distributing a strand on a reel, comprising:

a strand distributor mounted for reciprocal movement transverse to the reel,

means for displacing the strand distributor,

a light source mounted substantially independently of the strand distributor on one side of the reel for free displacement transverse to the reel with a strand when the strand is distributed on the reel, the light from the light source being directed substantially tangentially of the effective winding surface of the reel and between the last convolution of strand wound on the reel and section of the strand approaching the reel,

a photoelectric sensing element mounted on the side of the reel opposite to the light source for free displacement with the light source, the amount of light reaching the photoelectric sensing element from the light source being a function of the distance between the strand and its adjacent convolution, and

means responsive to the amount of light reaching the photoelectric sensing device for controlling the rate at which the strand distributor traverses the reel.

3. A device for distributing a strand on a reel, com

prising:

a strand distributor mounted for reciprocal movement transverse to the reel,

means for displacing the strand distributor,

a carriage mounted for free displacement vertically oi and transverse to the reel with a strand when the strand is distributed on the reel, the carriage having strand follower means depending therefrom which ride between the last convolution wound on the reel and the portion of the strand approaching the reel and cause movement of the carriage substantially parallel to the axis of the reel,

a light source mounted on the carriage substantially independently of the strand distributor and carried by the carriage on one side of the reel, the light from the light source being directed substantially tangentially of the effective winding surface of the reel and between the last convolution of strand wound on the reel and section of the strand approaching the reel,

a photoelectric sensing element mounted on the carriage directly opposite the light source and on the side of the reel opposite to the light source, the amount of light reaching the photoelectric sensing element from the light source being a function of the distance between the strand and its adjacent convolution,

means responsive to the amount of light reaching the photoelectric sensing device for controlling the rate at which the strand distributor traverses the reel,

means actuated upon the carriage reaching either end of the reel for lifting the carriage,

means actuated upon the strand reaching either end of the reel for stopping the displacement of the distributor and for reversing the distributor at each end of the reel, and

means for lowering the carriage after the distributor has moved .a predetermined distance from either end of the reel to permit the section of strand approaching the reel to move to the other side of the strand follower means depending from the carriage,

4. A device for distributing a strand on a reel, comprising:

a reel mounted for rotation about its longitudinal axis and having a plurality of magnetized portions spaced at equal intervals about one flange,

a strand distributor mounted for reciprocal movement transverse to the reel,

means for displacing the strand distributor,

a carriage mounted for free displacement transverse to the reel With a strand when the strand is distributed on the reel,

a light source mounted on the carriage and carried by the carriage on one side of the reel,

a photoelectric sensing element mounted on the carriage directly opposite the light source and on the side of the reel opposite to the light source so that light from the light source passes between the strand and its adjacent convolution to the photoelectric sensing element, the amount of light reaching the photoelectric sensing element from the light source being a function of the distance between the strand and its adjacent convolution,

means responsive to the amount of light reaching the photoelectric sensing device for controlling the rate at which the strand distributor traverses the reel,

means actuated upon the carriage reaching either flange of the reel for lifting the carriage,

means actuated upon the strand reaching either flange of the reel for stopping the displacement of the distributor,

means actuated upon the strand reaching either flange of the reel for detecting and counting each magnetized portion of the reel flange as the magnetized portions are rotated past a predetermined point,

means responsive to the detecting and counting means being actuated after a predetermined number of magnetized portions have passed the predetermined point for actuating the displacing means to displace the distributor across the reel, and

means responsive to the detecting and counting means and actuated after a predetermined number of magnetized portions have passed the predetermined point for lowering the photoelectric sensing means.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,609,159 9/1952 Nye 250219 X 2,900,145 8/1959 Hanson 242158.2 3,039,707 6/1962 Beck et a1 242158.2 X 3,082,968 3/1963 Reichelt et a1. 250-219 WALTER STOLWEIN, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2609159 *Jan 7, 1948Sep 2, 1952Vaughn Machinery CoWire bundling mechanism
US2900145 *Sep 26, 1957Aug 18, 1959Western Electric CoVariable speed distributor
US3039707 *Nov 27, 1959Jun 19, 1962Bell Telephone Labor IncApparatus for winding wire into a helix
US3082968 *Jul 25, 1961Mar 26, 1963Western Electric CoEnd of strand control mechanism
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3833184 *Dec 18, 1972Sep 3, 1974Furukawa Electric Co LtdWinding traverse apparatus
US3889111 *Dec 26, 1973Jun 10, 1975Bendix CorpDevice for positioning stock in a printing mechanism
US3941379 *Sep 9, 1974Mar 2, 1976Helmut Paul PaulePin rope control
US3951355 *Aug 30, 1974Apr 20, 1976Sumitomo Electric Industries, Ltd.Automatic cable winding apparatus
US3997128 *Dec 10, 1975Dec 14, 1976The Furukawa Electric Co., Ltd.Wire take up apparatus
US4150801 *May 23, 1978Apr 24, 1979Kobe Steel, Ltd.Automatic winding machine for wire-like object
US4421284 *Aug 19, 1981Dec 20, 1983Northern Telecom LimitedReeling of cable
US4456199 *Jun 22, 1981Jun 26, 1984Gerhard SeibertWinding machine for winding strand-shaped winding material on a spool
US4535955 *Mar 31, 1983Aug 20, 1985Morgan Construction CompanyMeans for sensing an undesirable approach angle in a level wind coiler
US4568033 *Jul 16, 1984Feb 4, 1986Oconnor LawrenceWinding a package of tape
US4655410 *Dec 23, 1985Apr 7, 1987The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The ArmyDevice for controlling optical fiber lag angle for fiber wound on a bobbin
US4695010 *Jun 12, 1986Sep 22, 1987Beebe International, Inc.Levelwind mechanism
US4838500 *Jun 18, 1987Jun 13, 1989United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The ArmyProcess and apparatus for controlling winding angle
US4920738 *Sep 14, 1989May 1, 1990The Boeing CompanyApparatus for winding optical fiber on a bobbin
US4928904 *Oct 5, 1988May 29, 1990The Boeing CompanyGap, overwind, and lead angle sensor for fiber optic bobbins
US5110065 *Mar 14, 1991May 5, 1992Hughes Aircraft CompanyBobbin winding control
US8141260Feb 9, 2009Mar 27, 2012Lockheed Martin CorporationCable fleet angle sensor
DE3411395A1 *Mar 28, 1984Feb 21, 1985Morgan Construction CoVorrichtung zum wickeln von strangfoermigem gut
DE19726285A1 *Jun 20, 1997Dec 24, 1998Siemens AgVerfahren und Einrichtung zum Aufwickeln von strangförmigen Wickelgut auf eine Spule
Classifications
U.S. Classification250/222.1, 242/478.2, 250/548, 242/482.9
International ClassificationB65H54/28, H01B13/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65H54/2851, H01B13/0036, B65H54/286, B65H54/2875
European ClassificationB65H54/28L10B2, B65H54/28L10C4, H01B13/00T, B65H54/28L2
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Mar 19, 1984ASAssignment
Owner name: AT & T TECHNOLOGIES, INC.,
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:WESTERN ELECTRIC COMPANY, INCORPORATED;REEL/FRAME:004251/0868
Effective date: 19831229