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Publication numberUS3319268 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 16, 1967
Filing dateMar 18, 1965
Priority dateMar 18, 1965
Publication numberUS 3319268 A, US 3319268A, US-A-3319268, US3319268 A, US3319268A
InventorsBlumenkranz James J
Original AssigneeAtlantic Res Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Water closet coupling
US 3319268 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 1967 J. J. BLUMENKRANZ 3,319,268

WATER CLOSET COUPLING Filed March 18, 1965 INVENTOR JAMES J. BL UMENK/PANZ BY m frfv4l ATTORNEY United States Patent 3,319,268 WATER CLOSET COUPLING James J. Blumenlrranz, Hollywood, Calif., assignor to Atlantic Research Corporation, Fairfax County, Va., a corporation of Virginia Filed Mar. 18, 1965, Ser. No. 440,865 15 Claims. (Cl. 4252) This invention relates to plumbing fittings and, more particularly, to a coupling for mounting a water closet to a floor and a waste drainage system, both physically and operatively. The water closet coupling is referred to in the plumbing trade as a closet ring.

Plastic pipe, fittings and couplings have been rapidly replacing corresponding metal components in the plumbing industry because of the many advantages inherent in plastics. Major problems of metal piping systems, such as corrosion, scale build-up, pinholes, and cavitation, are virtually eliminated in plastic systems. Because of the smooth finish of plastic systems, there is little danger of stoppage which is another major problem with metal systems. Furthermore, plastic components are much lighter than corresponding metal components and immeasurably easier and faster to install. Installation merely requires cutting the pipe to the proper length, brushing a solvent on the pipe and in the fitting and slipping the fitting onto the pipe. Because of the resultant solvent welding, the joints are leak-proof without the need for extra precautions usually employed in metal systems. Additionally, because of their light weight and simplicity of installation, it is possible to prefabricate the plastic system in a convenient work area and carry the system to its place of installation.

In the past, water closets have been mounted in place on the floor by using four bolts. Two bolts were used to locate and attach the water closet to the water closet coupling, while the remaining two bolts served to attach the front end of the water closet to the floor. Recently, water closet manufacturers have eliminated the front two bolts leaving only two bolts to perform both functions of connecting the water closet to the coupling and to the floor. This change necessitates a water closet coupling of considerable strength because the entire load of the water closet is now being transmitted through the water closet coupling. Because of the relatively low strength and the greater flexibility of plastic, conventional Water closet coupling designs are inadequate when the couplings are manufactured of plastic. Conventional coupling designs include a hub or connector portion for physical and operative connection to a drain waste conduit and a flange on the upper surface thereof which is integrally formed with the connector. Because of the abovereferred-to strength problems involved in plastics, the plastic flange proved inadequate for handling the applied loads. Furthermore, in the case of solvent weldable waste piping systems, the set-up time of the solvent cement is extremely short, frequently making it impossible to correctly orient the conventional flange in order to properly align the bolt holes in the flange and in the water closet.

Accordingly, it is one of the objects of this invention to provide a water closet coupling fabricated from plastic and metal and having the necessary strength in the coupling flange to perform the functions required.

It is another object of this invention to provide a coupling usable in a solvent weldable waste piping system which permits orientation of the flange bolt holes subsequent to the setting of the solvent cement.

It is another object of this invention to provide a water closet coupling which is corrosive-resistant, light in weight, and permits easy and rapid installation.

3,319,268 Patented May 16, 1967 Further objects and attendant advantages will be obvious from the following description.

Briefly stated, this invention in one form provides a water closet coupling comprising, in combination, a plastic annular connector or hub and an annular metal ring rotatably mounted about the inlet end of the connector. The connector comprises a cylindrical outlet end adapted to receive and be physically connected to one end of a drain waste conduit. The connection can be by conventional threading means or by solvent welding. The upper or inlet end of the connector includes a substantially radially outwardly extending flange flush and integral with the uppermost end of the connector and a substantially radially outwardly extending projection spaced from the flange but adjacent thereto to provide, in combination with the flange, a groove on the outer surface of the connector. The groove is located on the connector such that when the connector 'is mounted in place on the drain waste conduit, the groove is approximately flush with the floor surrounding the drain waste conduit.

An annular metal ring is mounted for rotation about the inlet end of the connector. The ring is U-shaped in cross section and has a radially inwardly extending lip which is received within the groove in the outer surface of the connector to provide for rotatably mounting the ring on the connector. Two arcuate slots are provided through the ring to receive bolts for mounting the Water closet to the ring. The ring also includes a plurality of apertures through which screws are inserted for fixedly attaching the ring to the floor.

The water closet coupling of this invention permits fixedly attaching the plastic connector to the drain waste conduit and then rotating the metal ring in order to align the slots with the bolt holes of the water closet. Furthermore, the metal ring provides the necessary strength and rigidity to satisfactorily hold the water closet in place. The load of the water closetis transmitted through the metal ring to the floor by means of the bolts and the screws which connect the ring to the floor and, therefore, the plastic connector is not subjected to this load.

This invention permits the enjoyment of all the advantages of plastic fittings and eliminates'the major disadvantages inherent in the rapid solvent cement setting used with plastic fittings and also overcomes the strength limitations of plastic water closet couplings.

In the accompanying drawings, in which identical parts are denoted by identical reference numerals,

FIGURE 1 is a front elevation view illustrating the physical and operative connectionof a water closet to a floor and drain waste system in which the connection is accomplished by means of a water closet coupling formed in accordance with a first embodiment of this invention;

FIGURE 2 is a quarter section elevation view of a plastic connector formed in accordance with the first embodiment of this invention;

FIGURE 3 is a plan view of the metal ring portion of the coupling illustrated in FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 4 is a section taken along lines 4-4 of FIG- URE 3;

FIGURE 5 is a quarter section view of a plastic connector formed in accordance with a second embodiment of this invention; and

FIGURE 6 is a section similar to FIGURE 4 of a modified ring.

With reference to the drawings, and more particularly FIGURE 1, there is shown a water closet 10 mounted in place on a floor structure 12 immediately above an installed drain waste conduit 14. The floor structure 12 comprises a wood substructure 16 with a finished surface 18, such as a tiled surface, having a drainage hole 20 extending entirely therethrough in which the drain waste s,319,2ee

3 conduit 14 is located. The water closet includes a base portion 22 having two diametrically opposed bolt holes 24, 26 and a horn 27 with a drainage outlet 28 therethrough. In the embodiment illustrated in FIGURE 1, the diameter of the drainage outlet 28 is larger than the diameter of the drain waste conduit 14.

To eflect physical and operative connection of the water closet 10 to the floor 12 and drain Waste conduit 14, a water closet coupling 30, which is the subject of this invention, is employed. The coupling, illustrated in FIG- URES 1 through 4, includes, in combination, a plastic annular connector 32 and an annular metal ring 34 rotatably mounted on the upper portion of the connector 32. The connector 32 is formed with a cylindrical outlet end 36 which is internally threaded as shown at 38 to receive and engage with an externally threaded drain waste conduit 14. As is standard in the plumbing industry, the threaded portion of the connector 32 is tapered such that pitch diameter at the lowermost end 39 of the connector is slightly larger than the pitch diameter at the uppermost end 40 of the outlet end 36. The threaded portion of the connector 32 is tapered to force a tight, fluid-sealing fit between the connector 32 and the conduit 14. As shown in FIGURES l and 2, the inside diameter at the uppermost surface 42 of the upper or inlet end 44 of the connector 32 is larger than the inside diameter of the outlet end 36. To permit the connector 32 to serve =additionally as a reducer, the inner surface of the inlet end 44 is caused to converge until its inside diameter is equal to the inside diameter of the conduit 14. The reducer function is needed in the installation illustrated in FIGURE 1 because the water closet drainage outlet 28 has a larger diameter than the drain waste conduit 14 as indicated above.

The connector 32 is formed with an integral, substantially radially outwardly extending flange 46 which is flush with the uppermost surface 42 of the inlet end 44. Spaced axially downwardly from the flange 46, but adjacent thereto, is a substantially radially outwardly extending projection 50 which extends from the outer surface 52 of the connector 32. The flange 46, cooperatively with the projection 50, forms an annular groove 54 on the outer surface 52.

The connector 32 is installed by threading it onto the drain waste conduit 14 such that the projection 56 is contiguous to the floor surface. Depending upon the particular plumbing code in the locality in which the installation is made, the floor surface to which the projection is contiguous may be the subfloor 16 or the finished floor 18, the latter being illustrated in FIGURE 1. Locating the connector 32 with the projection 50 approximately flush with the floor surface also locates the groove 54 approximately flush with the floor surface.

The plastic connector may be fabricated from many plastics such as high impact polystyrene, polyethylene and polypropylene, however, it is preferably fabricated from acrylonitrile butadiene (ABS) or polyvinyl chloride (PVC). The latter two plastics are commonly used at present in plastic piping systems and provide the required strength, flexibility and corrosion resistance that is required in this application. Because these plastics are thermoplastics and because the connector design is particularly well suited for injection molding, such a method of manufacture is preferable. Injection molding produces an extremely smooth surface as is required in a water closet coupling to avoid flow stoppage.

Rotatably mounted about the upper or inlet end 44 of the connector 32 is an annular metal ring 34 illustrated in FIGURES l, 3, and 4. The metal ring 34 is formed with an upper wall 56 and radially spaced-apart inner and outer walls 58 and 60, respectively, depending from the upper wall 56. This provides a ring having an inverted U-sh-aped or cup-like cross section clearly shown in FIG- URES 1 and 4. Integrally formed with the radially inner wall 58 is an annular lip 62 which extends radially inwardly towards the center of the ring 34. The inside diameter 64 of the annular lip 62 is larger than the outside diameters 66 and 68 of the projection 50 and flange 46, respectively. The lip inside diameter 64 is sufficiently large so as not to bind or press upon the outer surface 52. The ring 34 is thereby retained on the inlet end 44 of the connector 32 by the lip 62 residing in the groove 54. This method of mounting the ring 34 permits relative rotational motion between the ring 34 and the connector 32.

A pair of diametrically opposed arcuate slots 70, 72 extend axially through the upper wall 56. Both slots 70, '72 are formed with an enlarged portion 74, 76, respectively, at one end thereof, the ends having the enlarged portions being the corresponding ends of each slot, as shown in FIGURE 3.

The enlarged portion 74, 76 permits a bolt head to be easily inserted and removed therethrough. The a'rcuate portion of the slots 70, 72 is sufliciently narrow to prevent the bolt head from slipping through that portion of the slot such that once the bolt is inserted through the enlarged portions 74, 76, and moved in order to place the bolt shaft through the narrow portion of the slot 70, 72, the bolts are restrained from vertically upward motion. The slots 70, 72 are angularly spaced because that is the conventional angular spacing of the bolt holes 24, 26 provided in standard water closet bases 22. It should be noted that the location of the slots is solely dependent upon the location of the bolt holes provided in the Water closet base 22. Accordingly, if a water closet is designed with the bolt holes less than 180 apart, the slots 70, 72 would similarly be located less than 180 apart. Because of the cup-like cross section of the ring 34, space is provided on the underside of the ring to receive the bolt head and elevate the bolt head from the floor surface (see FIGURE 1).

The ring 34 is also provided with a plurality of counter-sunk apertures 78 extending axially through the upper wall 56. The apertures 78 receive fastening members such as screws (not shown) for fixedly attaching the ring 34 to the floor. As shown in FIGURE 3, an aperture 78 is spaced from but closely adjacent to each end of the slots 70, 72. Location of the apertures 78 close to the ends of the slots 70, 72 provides maximum beam strength in the area in which maximum load is placed upon the ring, i.e., where the bolts interconnect the water closet 10 and the ring 34.

While the four apertures 78 located adjacent the ends of the slots 70, 72 are sufficient to fixedly attach the ring 34 to the floor 12, additional apertures 79 located intermediate the slots 70, 72 may be used to more firmly aflix the ring 34 to the floor 12.

The ring 34 is made by any conventional means, for example, by stamping it fromsheet metal or by casting. The ring may be cast from relatively corrosion-resistant metals such as gray cast iron or cast brass, or it may be stamped of stainless steel. Alternatively, if a metal is used which is not corrosion-resistant, it may be coated with a corrosion-resistant material such as a vinyl plastisol, enamel, or a fused powdered thermoplastic.

Installation of the water closet 10 by means of the coupling 30 formed in accordance with this invention, is performed as follows. The drain waste conduit 14, which has an inside diameter less than the diameter of the water closet drainage outlet 28, as shown in FIGURE 1, is installed with its uppermost end 41 below the upper surface of the subflooring 16. Such restriction of the height of the drain waste conduit permits the reducer or concave portion of the inlet end 44 to direct and converge the flow of waste products from the drainage outlet 28 to the drain waste conduit 14. The connector 32 is threaded onto the upper end of the drain waste conduit 14 until a tight fit is effected by the tapered threads. A lubricant may be employed to facilitate the mounting, but such is not necessary. The resilience of the plastic ensures a leak-proof joint. The height of'the conduit 14 is calculated such that when the connector 32 is mountedthereon, the lower ends of the ring walls 58 and 60 are approximately flush with the surface of the floor 12. The ring 34 is then rotated in order to align the slots 70, 72 with the water closet bolt holes 24, 26. The ring 34 is then firmly aflixed to the floor by means of fastening members or screws (not shown) inserted through the apertures 78, 79. Bolts 82, 84 are then inserted through the enlarged portions 74, 76 of the slots 70, 72, respectively, and then slit into the narrower portion thereof in order that the bolt heads 86, 88 are restrained from vertical upward movement. Because of the U-shaped cross section of the ring 34, there is sufficient space provided between the upper wall 56 of the ring and the surface of the floor to receive the bolt heads 86, 88. At this time a suitable packing material 90, for example, a mixture of beeswax and paraffin, is spread on the upper surface of the ring 34 and connector 32. The water closet is then fitted on top of the closet coupling 30 with the bolts 82, 84 extending through the bolt holes 24, 26. Washers 92, 94 and nuts 96, 98 are placed on the bolts 82, 84, respectively, to maintain the water closet 10 in fixed relation to the closet coupling 30. Bolt covers 100, 102 are then placed over the bolts to protect them and esthetically improve the appearance of the base.

Reverting now to FIGURE 5, there is shown a second embodiment with a modified plastic connector 110. The connector 110 does not serve as a reducer and is used when the inside diameter of the drain waste conduit 14 is larger than the water closet drainage outlet 28 and outside diameter of horn 27. Additionally, the connector 110 has a smooth interior surface 112 throughout its entire length to provide a slip socket for use with a plastic drain waste conduit having a smooth exterior surface. Because a slip fit will 'be employed with the connector 110, the inside lowermost corner 114 is provided with a radius of curvature to facilitate receiving the drain waste conduit and to prevent damage to that portion of the connector 110. A flange 116, identical to that described with reference to connector 32 illustrated in FIGURE 2, surrounds the inlet end 118 of the connector 110. However,

because the projection (FIGURE 2) is not absolutely essential since, when the connector 110 is located in place with respect to the floor 12, a groove will be formed by the cooperative action of the floor surface and the flange 116, it has been eliminated from connector 110.

Installation of a water closet 10 using a coupling employing the connector 110 is substantially the same as described above with reference to installation employing the connector 32. The primary differences are as follows. The uppermost end 41 of drain waste conduit 14 is cut flush with the uppermost surface 120 of the connector 110 to provide additional sealing area for the packing 90. The drain waste conduit 14 and the connector 110 are coated on their mating surfaces with a suitable solvent cement and then the connector is slipped over the drain waste conduit 14, thus solvent-welding the connector 110 to the conduit 14 and providing a leak-proof joint. In order to permit use of the solvent welding technique, the conduit 14 must be of a plastic attackable b this solvent cement. Examples of such plastics are acrylonitrile butadiene (ABS) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and high impact polystyrene. The solvent cement required depends upon the specific plastic used since the cement is the plastic dissolved in a suitable solvent, for example, an appropriate cement for acrylonitrile butadiene is acrylonitrile butadiene dissolved in methyl ethyl ketone. The remainder of the installation is identical to that described above with reference to the installation illustrated in FIGURE 1. While much of the above discussion pertains to solvent-welding the connector 110 to the conduit 14, it should be noted that thermal fusion may also be used for the joining.

A modified ring 122 is illustrated in FIGURE 6. The ring 122 is shown as a solid metal casting having a recess 6 124 in the lower surface thereof to accommodate the bolt heads 86, 88. The remainder of the ring 122 is identical to ring 34 of FIGURE 4 in that it includes an annular lip 126 and has similarly designed slots 128 extending therethrough.

The several modifications described with reference to the connector and illustrated in FIGURE 5 may similarly he employed on the reducer connector 32, illustrated in FIGURE 2. For example, the threads 38 of the outlet end 36 can be eliminated and connector 32 can be provided with a smooth interior surface for slip-fitting. Where a slip-fit is employed on a reducer connector, a pipe stop on the interior surface of the connector is necessary to prevent the conduit 14 from extending .too far up into the connector and to facilitate properly vertically locating the connector on the conduit. Another modification of connector 32 could be the elimination of the projection 50.

It can be seen that the Water closet coupling 30 of this invention permits the use of a plastic connector with all the attendant advantages thereof without sacrifice of strength and simplicity of alignment. Accordingly, a light-weight, corrosion-resistant, rapidly-assembled water closet coupling is provided by the subject invention.

What is claimed as new and desired to be secured by Letters Patent of the United States is:

1. A water closet coupling for physically and operatively connecting a water closet having a drainage outlet to a floor and to an installed drain waste conduit, said coupling comprising, in combination (a) a plastic annular connector having an outlet end adapted to receive one end of said drain waste conduit, an inlet end adapted for flow communication with said drainage outlet and in flow communication with said outlet end, said inlet end including a substantially radially outwardly extending flange to provide an annular groove between said flange and said floor when said connector is connected to said drain waste conduit system, and

(b) an annular ring having an annular lip extending radially inwardly, said ring being rotatably mounted on said. connector contiguous to said inlet end such that said lip is received within said groove when said connector is connected to said drain waste conduit, said lip having an inside diameter less than the outside diameter of said outwardly extending flange, said inside diameter being large enough to permit rotation of said ring relative to said connector, said ring having a plurality of angularly spaced slots therethrough adapted to receive fastening members for mounting said water closet to said ring.

2. A water closet coupling as defined in claim 1 wherein said ring includes a plurality of apertures therethrough adapted to receive second fastening members for fixedly attaching said ring to said. floor.

3. A water closet coupling for physically and operatively connecting a water closet having a drainage outlet to a floor and to an installed drain waste conduit, said coupling comprising, in combination,

(a) a plastic annular connector having an outlet end adapted to receive one end of said drain waste conduit, an inlet end adapted for flow communication with said drainage outlet and in flow communication with said outlet end, said inlet end including, a substantially radially outwardly extending flange to provide an annular groove between said flange and said floor when said connector is connected to said drain waste conduit system, and

(b) an annular metal ring having an upper wall, radially spaced-apart inner and outer walls depending from said upper wall, and an annular lip extending radially inwardly from said inner wall, said ring being rotatably mounted on said connector contiguous to said inlet end such that said lip is received within said groove when said connector is connected to said drain waste conduit, said lip having an inside diameter less than the outside diameter of said outwardly extending flange, said inside diameter being large enough to permit rotation of said ring relative to said connector, said ring having (i) a plurality of angularly spaced slots axially through said upper wall, said slots being adapted to receive first fastening members for mounting said water closet to said ring, and

(ii) a plurality of apertures axially through said upper wall, said apertures being adapted to receive second fastening members for fixedly attaching said ring to said floor.

4. A water closet coupling as defined in claim 3 wherein each of said slots includes an enlarged portion at one end thereof, said one end of each slot corresponding to said one end of the remaining slots.

5. A water closet coupling as defined in claim 3 wherein said ring includes two slots, said. slots being angularly spaced apart 180.

6. A water closet coupling as defined in claim 3 wherein said ring includes at least four apertures and two slots, each of said slots having an aperture spaced from but adjacent to each end thereof.

7. A water closet coupling as defined in claim 3 wherein said connector outlet end is internally threaded.

8. A water closet coupling as defined in claim 3 wherein said plastic is thermoplastic.

9. A water closet coupling as defined in claim 3 wherein the inside diameter of said inlet end at said uppermost surface is greater than the inside diameter of said outlet end and wherein the inside surface of said inlet end converges until the inside diameter of the lowermost portion of said inlet end is less than said inside diameter of said outlet end.

10. A water closet coupling for physically and operatively connecting a water closet having a drainage outlet to a floor and to an installed drain waste conduit, said coupling comprising, in combination,

(a) a plastic annular connector having an outlet end adapted to receive one end of said drain waste conduit, an inlet end adapted for flow communication with said drainage outlet and in flow communication with said outlet end, said inlet end including integrally therewith,

(i) a substantially radially outwardly extending flange flush with the uppermost surface of said inlet end of said connector, and

(ii) a substantially radially outwardly extending projection extending from the outer surface of said connector and spaced from but adjacent to said flange forming, cooperatively with said flange, a groove, and

(b) an annular ring having an annular lip extending radially inwardly, said ring being rotatably mounted on said connector with said lip being received within said groove, said lip having an inside diameter less than the outside diameter of said flange and said projection, respectively, said inside diameter being large enough to permit rotation of said. ring relative to said connector, said ring having a plurality of spaced slots therethrough, said slots being adapted to receive fastening members for mountmg said water closet to said ring.

11. A water closet coupling for physically and operatively connecting a water closet having a drainage outlet to a floor and to an installed drain waste conduit, said coupling comprising, in combination,

(a) a plastic annular connector having an outlet end adapted to receive one end of said drain waste conduit, an inlet end adapted for flow communication with said drainage outlet and in flow communication with said outlet end, said inlet end including integrally therewith,

(i) a substantially radially outwardly extending flange flush with the uppermost surface of said inlet end of said connector, and

(ii) a substantially radially outwardly extending projection extending from the outer surface of said connector and spaced from but adjacent to said flange forming, cooperatively with said flange, a groove, and

(b) an annular metal ring having an upper wall, radially spaced-apart inner and outer walls depending from said upper wall and an annular lip extending radially inwardly from said inner wall, said ring being rotatably mounted on said connector with said lip being received within said groove, said lip having an inside diameter less than the outside diameter of said flange and said projection, respectively, said inside diameter being large enough to permit rotation of said ring relative to said connector, said ring having (i) a plurality of angularly spaced slots axially through said upper wall, said slots being adapted to receive first fastening members for mounting said water closet to said ring, and

(ii) a plurality of apertures axially through said upper wall, said apertures being adapted to receive second fastening members for fixedly attaching said ring to said floor.

12. A water closet coupling .as defined in claim 11 wherein said slots number two and wherein each of said slots includes an enlarged portion at one end thereof, said one end of one slot corresponding to said one end of the remaining slot.

13. A water closet coupling as defined in claim 11 wherein said apertures number at least four and wherein each of said slots has an aperture spaced from but adjacent to each end thereof.

14. In a water closet floor mounting and drainage system, a drain waste conduit mounted within a hole in a floor, a closet coupling fixedly attached to said conduit, said coupling comprising, in combination,

(a) a plastic annular connector having an outlet end, said outlet end being mounted within said hole and receiving one end of said conduit, an inlet end adapted for flow communication with said water closet and in flow communication with said outlet end, said inlet end including a substantially radially outwardly extending flange, said flange being vertically spaced from and overlying the portion of the floor circumscribing said hole thus providing an annular groove between said flange and said floor, and

(b) an annular metal ring having an upper wall, radially spaced-apart inner and outer walls depending from said upper Wall, and an annular lip extending radially inwardly from said inner wall, said ring being rotatably mounted on said connector circumscribing said inlet end such that said lip is rotatably received within said groove and the lower end of said inner and said outer walls are contiguous to the upper surface of said floor, said lip having an inside diameter less than the outside diameter of said flange, said inside diameter being large enough to permit rotation of said ring relative to said connector, said ring having (i) a plurality of angularly spaced slots axially through said upper wall,

(ii) a plurality of angularly spaced apertures axially through said upper wall, and

(iii) a plurality of first fastening members extending downwardly through said apertures fixedly attaching said ring to said floor, and

a water closet having a drainage outlet and a base circumscribing said drainage outlet, said base having a plurality of bolts holes therethrough corresponding in number and angular spacing to said plurality of slots, second fastening means extending through said bolt holes and said slots fixedly mounting said water closet to said ring such that said drainage outlet is in flow communication with said inlet end.

15. In a water closet floor mounting and drainage waste system, a drain waste conduit mounted within a hole in a floor, a closet coupling fixedly attached to said conduit, said coupling comprising, in combination,

(a) a plastic annular connector having an outlet end, said outlet end being mounted within said hole and receiving one end of said conduit, an inlet end adapted for flow communication with said water closet and in flow communication with said outlet end, said inlet end including a substantially radially outwardly extending flange and a substantially radially outwardly extending projection extending from the outer surface of said connector and spaced from but adjacent to said flange forming, cooperatively with said flange, a groove, said projection overlying the portion of the floor circumscribing said hole, and

(b) an annular metal ring having an upper wall, radially spaced-apart inner and outer walls depending from said upper wall, and an annular lip extending radially inwardly from said inner wall, said ring being rotatably mounted on said connector circumscribing said inlet end such that said lip is rotatably received within said groove and the lower end of said inner and said outer walls are contiguous to the upper surface of said floor, said lip having an inside diameter less than the outside diameter of said flange, said inside diameter being large enough to 1 permit rotation of said ring relative to said connector,

said ring having (i) a plurality of angularly spaced slots axially through said upper wall, (ii) a plurality of angularly spaced apertures axially through said upper wall, and (iii) -a plurality of first fastening members extending downwardly through said apertures fixedly attaching said ring to said floor, and a water closet having a drainage outlet and a base circumscribing said drainage outlet, said base having a plurality of bolt holes therethrough corresponding in number and angular spacing to said plurality of slots, second fastening means extending through said bolt holes and said slots fixedly mounting said water closet to said ring such that said drainage outlet is in flow communication with said inlet end.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 939,001 11/1909 Forster et al. 285-59 1,333,368 3/1920 Aver 285-59 1,505,683 8/1924 Wyatt et al 285-58 3,108,818 10/1963 Furstenburg 277l89 References Cited by the Applicant UNITED STATES PATENTS 903,280 11/ 1908 Farrell.

990,646 4/1911 Fisher. 1,031,531 7/1912 Crame-r. 3,140,104 7/ 1964 Cosper.

LAVERNE D. GEIGER, Primary Examiner.

H. J. GROSS, Assistant Examiner.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3421551 *May 21, 1965Jan 14, 1969Currier Gerald FDestructible article for reserving a recess in concrete
US3775780 *Jul 17, 1972Dec 4, 1973Multi Fittings LtdWater closet coupling
US3952340 *Nov 25, 1974Apr 27, 1976Casper CuscheraToilet drain
US4207632 *Oct 2, 1978Jun 17, 1980Coffey Jess RDrain means
US4406480 *May 11, 1981Sep 27, 1983Plastic Oddities, Inc.Water closet coupling
US4780915 *Nov 27, 1987Nov 1, 1988Casper CuscheraToilet floor flange
US4873730 *Oct 15, 1985Oct 17, 1989Casper CuscheraDisengagable ring fitting for a toilet
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US5623971 *Sep 12, 1995Apr 29, 1997Foernzler; William E.Drain and cleanout spacer
US6026521 *Nov 23, 1998Feb 22, 2000Atkins; Gary B.Two-piece water closet ring
US6085362 *Jul 9, 1999Jul 11, 2000Huber; Donald G.Water closet fitting installation assembly
US6085363 *Jul 9, 1999Jul 11, 2000Huber; Donald G.Water closet fitting with test baffle
US6115852 *Jul 23, 1999Sep 12, 2000Dora ToAdjustable replacement ring for a toilet flange and method
US6155606 *Jan 8, 1998Dec 5, 2000Gpj LimitedMounting ring for water closet coupling and method of installation
US6416084Aug 3, 2000Jul 9, 2002Canplas Industries Ltd.Replacement flange
US6435563Mar 16, 2001Aug 20, 2002Gpj LimitedMounting ring for water closet coupling and method of installation
US6442769Jun 7, 2000Sep 3, 2002Erie Advanced Manufacturing, Inc.Mounting ring for water closet coupling
US8043497 *Jun 9, 2008Oct 25, 2011California Faucets, Inc.Aesthetic conduit end cap structure having concealed anchor attachments
Classifications
U.S. Classification4/252.4, 285/58
International ClassificationE03D11/00, E03D11/16, F16L5/02
Cooperative ClassificationF16L5/02, E03D11/16
European ClassificationF16L5/02, E03D11/16