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Publication numberUS3319307 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 16, 1967
Filing dateOct 12, 1964
Priority dateOct 16, 1963
Also published asDE1435800A1
Publication numberUS 3319307 A, US 3319307A, US-A-3319307, US3319307 A, US3319307A
InventorsItalo Marforio
Original AssigneeItalo Marforio
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fabric fastening assembly
US 3319307 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 16, 1967- l. MARFORIO FABRIC FASTENING ASSEMBLY 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Oct. 12, 1964 May 16, 1967 ITALO MARFORIO INVENTOR United States Patent 3,319,307 FABRIC FASTENENG ASSEMBLY Italo Marforio, Via Umberto I, 49, Seregno, Italy Filed Oct. 12, 1964, Ser. No. 403,056 Claims priority, application Italy, Oct, 16, 1963, 21,302/63, Patent 706,990 3 Claims. (Cl. 24-204) The present invention is concerned with pressure fastening assemblies through the superimposition and coupling of two fabrics provided with suitable fastening means.

According to the prior art, pressure fastening assemblies are obtained by coupling two fabrics or bodies, one provided with suitable hooks and the other with loops protruding from a surface of a respective fabric. Such loops are obtained, for instance, by weaving a looped or terry pile type velvet, or by a raising type brushing operation such that the yarns or the filaments forming the pile are not broken, thus obtaining uneven loops destined to be hooked by the hooks; this fabric is treated with suitable adhesive substances in order to stabilize the effect so obtained.

According to the present invention the hooks engage a looped or terry pile velvet type fabric obtained from a fabric in which the warp (or the weft) threads consist partly of shrinkable threads and partly of non-shrinkable or only little shrinkable threads.

Said fabrics undergo a heat treatment causing shrinkage of the shrinkable threads (for example synthetic fibers): during this operation the other threads that compose the same fabric and that are non shrinkable or only little shrinkable, keep their original length substantially unchanged; consequently the floating lengths intercurrent between two successive bindings bend out of the plane of the shrunk fabric forming protruding arch-shaped eyelets or loops. The threads that undergo no shrinkage are called pile.

A fabric like that above mentioned can also be obtained by using threads endowed with a natural elastic compliance or elasticized through twisting process; these threads can be used in substitution of the threads which shrink in consequence of heat treatments: in this case the threads that do not form loops in the fabric are elastic threads that have been left to shrink after having been weaved under condition of elastic elongation.

The fastener assembly according to the present invention is characterized in that it comprises a fabric provided with warp threads protruding therefrom in the form of arch-shaped loops each extending above a plurality of weft threads and all lying in planes parallel to each other.

In this way the hooks protruding from the surface of the fabric forecast in contraposition to the above mentioned fabric with loops can easily hook the loops themselves which lie in equally inclined planes (that in case are orthogonal to the planes in which the hooks are lying) and which show a sufficiently wide aperture to allow hooking to be carried out much more easily than possible according to the prior art.

The possibility of variously spreading the more or less long warp (or weft) floats (floating lengths) of the threads destined to form the eyelets or loops in a fabric ice is unlimited; loops of different size, according to need, can also be obtained in the same fabric.

Owing to the consequent better utilization of the hooking elements and to the easiness of the hooking operation, it is possible to obtain a notable reduction in the number of the hooking elements, with a better fastening and with notable economic advantages. Moreover, the eveness of the fabric, no more raised, confers a pleasanter look to the fastener assembly and also reduces notably the thickness of the two superimposed (coupled) fabrics or bodies.

Another advantage of the assembly according to the invention stands in that the sizes of Said eyelets or loops can be accurately predetermined and adapted to the sizes of the hooks provided in the complementary fabric, so that the same hooks can be of a count and of a size greater than those acceptable in the prior art.

In order to make more fully clear how the invention can be embodied, an example of embodiment thereof is hereinafter described with reference to the accompanying drawings in which:

FIGURE 1 shows, in section, a fabric destined to be provided with loops and not yet subjected to a heat treatment,

FIGURE 2 shows the fabric of FIGURE 1 after a heat treatment,

FIGURE 3 shows diagrammatically a fabric provided with hooking elements superimposed to the fabric of FIG- URE 2, the two fabrics being laid over each other so as to interengage and to adhere to each other, and

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of the fabric of FIGURE 2 being engaged by the hooking elements.

As it may be seen from FIGURE 1 the fabric has an even look without the unevennesses that are peculiar to the brushed or raised loops of the fabrics of known type.

The fabric shown in FIG. 1 comprises a ground constituted by a weft 1 and a warp 2; said ground, moreover, incorporates warp threads 3 that form the floats forming the pile, i.e. that are destined to become eyelets or loops.

The lower fabric shown in FIG. 1, after having undergone a heat treatment, assumes the shape shown in FIGS. 2 and 4. As seen, portions of the warp threads 2 of the lower fabric which did not shrink are substantially arch shaped and form a plurality of loops extending upward from the plane defined by the remaining threads of the lower fabric, the uppermost portions of said arch-shaped threads defining a plane parallel to the plane of the remaining threads in the lower fabric. Also, these loops span such a distance that four weft threads 1 pass under each loop.

In FIGURE 3 the two fabrics forming the fastener assembly according to the present invention are shown superimposed to each other in such a way that the hooks 5 provided in the fabric or body 4 engage the loops of the other fabric.

It is clear that fabrics with eyelets or loops of different sizes (even in the same fabric) can be used together with fabrics or other bodies provided with books where the hooks themselves (even in the same fabric or body are of different sizes).

I claim:

1. An assembly for fastening a first fabric over a second fabric, at least the second fabric having a plurality of interwoven warp and weft yarns; said assembly comprising a plurality of hooks extending downward from said first fabric, a portion of the warp threads of said second fabric being of a longer length than the remaining threads thereof, a portion of said longer warp threads being substantially arch shaped to form a plurality of loops extending upward from the plane defined by the remaining threads of said second fabric with a plurality of weft threads of said second fabric passing under each of said loops, the uppermost portions of said arch shaped threads defining a plane parallel to the plane of the remaining threads in said second fabric, said hooks adapted 15 to engage said loops to effect said fastening.

2. The assembly of claim 1 wherein said arch shaped threads are of a nonshrinkable synthetic material and said remaining threads of said second fabric are of a shrinkable material.

3. The assembly of claim 1 wherein said remaining threads of said second fabric are of an elastic material.

References (Iited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 10 2,703,774 3/1955 Morrison.

2,717,437 9/1955 De Mestral. 2,789,340 4/1957 Cresswell. 3,009,235 11/1961 De Mestral 24-205.13 X 3,017,847 1/1962 Keen 28-72 X BERNARD A. GELAK, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2703774 *Nov 18, 1949Mar 8, 1955Owens Corning Fiberglass CorpGlass fabric structure and method
US2717437 *Oct 15, 1952Sep 13, 1955Velcro Sa SoulieVelvet type fabric and method of producing same
US2789340 *Nov 14, 1955Apr 23, 1957American Cyanamid CoBulky fabrics
US3009235 *May 9, 1958Nov 21, 1961Internat Velcro CompanySeparable fastening device
US3017847 *Mar 13, 1956Jan 23, 1962Collins & Aikman CorpTufted fabrics and methods of making same
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3387345 *Mar 23, 1967Jun 11, 1968Velcro Sa SoulieSeparable fastening device
US3405430 *Jul 29, 1966Oct 15, 1968Goodman & Sons Inc HClosures
US3577607 *Jun 13, 1968May 4, 1971Ikoma Orimono Co LtdSeparable fastening fabric
US3694867 *Aug 5, 1970Oct 3, 1972Kimberly Clark CoSeparable clasp containing high-loft, non woven fabric
US3708837 *May 13, 1970Jan 9, 1973Kanebo LtdAn improved fabric fastener
US3748701 *Apr 8, 1971Jul 31, 1973Velcro Sa SoulieAdhesive element in cloth form
US3943981 *Mar 25, 1974Mar 16, 1976Velcro S.A.Hooking-up device
US5133112 *Apr 25, 1991Jul 28, 1992Gomez Acevedo Hector HClosure device
US5326612 *May 20, 1991Jul 5, 1994The Procter & Gamble CompanyNonwoven female component for refastenable fastening device and method of making the same
US5407439 *Jun 1, 1994Apr 18, 1995The Procter & Gamble CompanyMulti-layer female component for refastenable fastening device and method of making the same
US5517737 *Jun 6, 1994May 21, 1996The Procter & Gamble CompanyApparatus for continuously stretching or continuously releasing stretching forces from a web using two pairs of opposing non-planar belts
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US5595567 *Aug 9, 1994Jan 21, 1997The Procter & Gamble CompanyNonwoven female component for refastenable fastening device
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Classifications
U.S. Classification24/445, 28/161, 24/450
International ClassificationA44B18/00
Cooperative ClassificationA44B18/0034
European ClassificationA44B18/00D6