Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3319391 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 16, 1967
Filing dateOct 15, 1964
Priority dateOct 15, 1964
Publication numberUS 3319391 A, US 3319391A, US-A-3319391, US3319391 A, US3319391A
InventorsAnthony Lutch
Original AssigneeAnthony Lutch
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Elevation markers
US 3319391 A
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 15, 1967 A. LUTCH ELEVATION MARKERS Filed Oct. 15, 1964 pagan H H M INVENTOR g Anthony Lutch flaw w United States Patent 3,319,391 ELEVATION MARKERS Anthony Lutch, 284 Glass Run Road, Pittsburgh, Pa. 15207 Filed Oct. 15, 1964, Ser. No. 404,096 7 Claims. (Cl. 52-371) This invention relates to elevation markers and particularly to an elevation marker for foundation anchor bolts.

After a concrete pier is formed, an anchor bolt to receive a steel column or I beam is placed in the pier in an upright position. After the pier hardens, a transit instrument sights an elevation point to the anchor bolt. This elevation point is where the bottom of the I beam is to rest. Generally the elevation point is marked on the anchor bolt. In sighting the elevation point, an elevation rod is lowered until the correct elevation is read on the transit instrument. A nail is driven into the pier and next to the anchor bolt. The rod rests on the nail which is driven into the concrete pier until the correct elevation is read onthe rod. The height of the nail marks the elevation point to which grout is filled from the top of the pier. A wood form is built around the pier to insure that the grout fill is level at the correct elevation. Sometimes a bearing plate is placed on top of the grout while it is still soft and is then tapped around the edges to make it level. Then an I beam is lowered and bolted to the anchor bolt. In most instances a chalk mark is placed on the anchor bolt marking the elevation point. There are a number of disadvantages to this technique. They are as follows:

(i) The nails are hard to drive in the concrete pier;

(ii) The nails may be knocked over;

(iii) The chalk mark on the bolt may wipe off; and

(iv) A wood form must be built between two elevation points to insure that the grout fill is level.

The present invention eliminates these problems and also provides a rigid collar around the anchor bolt upon which the bearing plate may rest, if one is needed.

In using the present invention a correct elevation point using an elevation rod sighted by a transit instrument is easily achieved. An elevation marker that cannot be removed without a wedge records in permanent fashion the elevation point on the anchor bolt. Grout can then be poured flush to the top of the elevation marker in the absence of any wood form. A bearing plate can be lowered on top of the soft grout in a level position without being further tapped around the edges to make it level thereby increasing the accuracy of setting an I beam on a concrete pier.

I provide an elevation marker for a foundation anchor bolt comprising a split resilient collar having projections at the split, the collar having an inside normal diameter smaller than the outside diameter of the anchor bolt, the inside surface of the collar having a plurality'of vertically spaced ribs for gripping the anchor bolt.

I provide an elevation marker for a foundation anchor bolt comprising a split resilient collar having projections at the split, the collar having an inside normal diameter smaller than the outside diameter of the anchor bolt, the inside surface of the collar having a plurality of knife edge projections extending horizontally around the collar for gripping the anchor bolt.

I prefer-ably provide that the projections at the split extend from the collar and have a top cam surface above the planar surface of the collar and that the projections 3 ,3 19,3 9 l Patented May 16, 1967 ice have aligned open ended transverse slots to receive a screed member having a. transverse slot thereby forming a blind halved .lap joint which closes the diameter of the collar under compression.

In the foregoing description I have set outcertain objects, purposes and advantages of my invention. Other objects, purposes and advantages will be apparent from a consideration of the following description of the drawings in which FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of the marker;

FIGURE 2 is a perspective view of the marker;

FIGURE 3 is a perspective view showing two anchor bolts in a concrete pier with twoelevation markers around the anchor bolts;

FIGURE 4 is a perspective view showing two anchor bolts in a concrete pier with two elevation markers around the anchor bolts and a pair of hands smoothing out the grout fill;

FIGURE 5 is a side sectional view taken at line V-V in FIGURE 4 showing bolted I beam resting on a bearing plate;

FIGURE 6 is a perspective view of the marker; and

FIGURE 7 is a side view'of the marker around the anchor bolt.

Referring to FIGURE 1 an anchor bolt elevation marker generally shown as 10 has a collar 12 and a screed 14. The collar 12 has projections 16 and 18 extending from the split 20. The collar 12 is made from steel which is resilient. The top surfaces 22 and 24 of the projections 16 and 18 respectively are on the same plane as the top surface 26 of the collar 12. Space 28 is formed between the projections 16 and 18. The inside surface of the collar 12 has vertically spaced ribs 30. Projections 16 and 18 have open ended transverse slots 32 and 34 which are designed to receive open ended transverse slot 36 in the screed 14. The open ended transverse slots 32 and 34 are aligned to receive the open ended transverse slot 36 of the screed 14. Projections 16 and 18 are pressed together closing the space 28 to enable the screed 14 to engage slots 32 and 34 and form a blind halved lap joint 38 shown in FIGURE-.2. The opposing force of the projections 16 and 18 holds the screed 14 in a perfect horizontal position shown in FIGURE 2. The force at the blind halved joint 38 is caused by the spring action at the projections 16 and '18. Whenever screed 14 is engaged with projections 16 and 18, the space in split 20 is narrowed and the space 28 between projections 16 and 18 is narrowed.

Refer-ring to FIGURE 3 a concrete pier 40 is poured and while it is still soft anchor bolts 42 are vertically inserted and spaced apart. The anchor bolts 42 have threaded portions 44 and a smooth portion 46. An elevation point must be sighted on the anchor bolt which will insure a proper elevation for an I beam designed to rest on the concrete pier 40 and bolted to anchor bolts 42. In order to do this elevation marker 10 is used. The normal inside diameter of collar 12 is smaller than the outside diameter of the foundation anchor bolt 42. In order to get the collar 12 on the bolt 42, a screw driver or the end of the screed 14 used as a wedge can be inserted in the space 28 and twisted enlarging the space 28 and at the same time increasing the inside diameter of the collar 12 allowing it to be inserted over the foundation a'nchor bolt 42. An elevation rod is some? times rested on top of the collar 12 until the correct elevation point is read on a transit instrument or the transit instrument can sight the top of. the collar 12 .directly. Whenever the correct elevation point is read in the transit instrument, the wedge such as the screw driver or the end of screed 14 is removed and the vertical ribs 30 grip the foundation anchor bolt 42 with a spring like action. The ribs 30 work equally well on the threaded portion 44 of the anchor bolt 42 as on the smooth surface 46. The collar cannot be removed or jarred from its position without the insertion of a wedge in space 28.

Projections 16 and 18 are compressed tightly to enable the screed 14 to engage its transverse open ended slot 36 with the two aligned 'open ended transverse slots 32 and 34 forming a blind halved lap joint 38. The inserted screeds 14 on the two anchor bolts 42 are horizontally positioned and kept in place by a force acting on the blind halved lap joint 38. One of the purposes of the screeds 14 is to eliminate the need for a wooden form which is used to hold grout fill 48 between the top surfaces of the collar 12 land the top surface of the concrete pier 40.

Referring to FIGURE 4 screeds 14 eliminate the need for a wooden form and grout 48 is made flush with the top surface of the screed 14 and the collar 12 of the elevation marker 10. A straight edge 50 easily insures a formed level grout 48 fill at the proper elevation.

, Referring to FIGURE while the grout 48 on top of concrete pier 40 is still soft a bearing plate 52 is sometimes lowered on top of screeds 14 and collar 12. Then an I beam 54 is lowered on top of the bearing plate 52 and bolted by anchor nuts 56. The presence of the elevation marker comprising collar 12 having projections 16 and 18 and a screed 14 allows the I beam 54 to be bolted and lowered into place while the grout 48 is still soft.

Referring to FIGURE 6 the elevation marker shown generally as 58 is the same as the elevation marker in FIGURE 1 except the ribs are replaced by knife edges 60 and 62 to provide the gripping surface needed.

Referring to FIGURE 7 an anchor bolt 42 is shown with an elevation marker generally shown as 64 around the anchor bolt 42. The elevation marker 64 has a collar 66 having the same characteristics as the collar in FIGURES 1 through 5. A pair of projections 68 extend from the collar having a cam surface 70 which is raised above the top planar surface 72 of the collar 66. Whenever the anchor bolt 42 is placed into a concrete pier, it is possible that the anchor bolt may tilt slightly off center at an angle 74. The transit instrument always sights the elevation of the marker where the screed engages the open ended slots 76. The cam surface 70 will always be higher than the top surface 72 of the collar 66. Therefore, after the correct elevation is sighted at point 78 at the top of the cam surface 70, there will be no surface higher than the cam surface. This eliminates the possibility of having the top surface 72 of the collars 66 extend higher and above the elevation line 80 and thereby giving an improper elevation when the concrete is laid and a bearing plate is placed on top of the elevation marker 64 by having it rest on the edge of the top surface 72.

While I have shown and described certain preferred methods and embodiments of my invention, it will be understood that this invention may be otherwise embodied within the scope of the following claims.

I claim:

1. An elevation marker for a foundation anchor bolt comprising .a split resilient collar having projections at the split extending from the collar, the projections having a top cam surface extending above the top planar surface of the collar and having aligned transverse slots open ended at the top of the cam surface, the collar having an inside normal diameter smaller than the outside diameter of the anchor bolt.

2. An elevation marker for a foundation anchor bolt comprising:

(a) A split resilient collar having projections at. the. split extending from the collar, the projections having aligned open ended transverse slots, the inside surface of the collar having a plurality of ribs gripping the anchor bolt, the collar under tension urging the split to close; and

(b) A screed member having an open ended transverse slot engaging the slots in the extended projections forming a blind halved lap joint which urges the projections together under compression.

3. An elevation marker for a foundation anchor bolt comprising:

(a) A split resilient collar having projections at the split extending from the collar, the projections hav ing a top cam surface extending above the top planar surface of the collar and having aligned transverse slots open ended at the top of the cam surface, the: collar under tension urging the split to close; and

(b) A screed member having an open ended transverse slot engaging the slots in the extended projections forming .a blind halved lap joint which urges the projections together under compression.

4. An elevation marker for a foundation anchor bolt comprising:

(a) A split resilient collar having spaced apart horizontal projections at the split extending from the collar, the projections having a top cam surface extending above the top planar surface of the collar and having aligned transverse slots open ended at the top of the cam surface, the inside surface of the collar having a plurality of ribs gripping the anchor bolt, the collar under tension urging the split to close; and

(b) A screed member having an open ended. transverse slot engaging the slots in the extended projections forming a blind halved lap joint which urges the projections together under compression, the top of the screed member flush with the top of cam surface of the projections.

5. An elevation marker for a foundation anchor bolt comprising:

(a) A split resilient collar having projections at the split extending from the collar, the projections having aligned open ended transverse slots, the inside surface of the collar having a knife edge gripping the anchor bolt, the collar under tension urging the split to close; and

(b) A screed member having an open ended transverse slot engaging the slots in the extended projections forming a blind halved lap joint which urges the projections together under compression.

6. An elevation marker for a foundation anchor bolt 2 comprising:

(a) A split resilient collar having projections .at the split extending from the collar, the projections having aligned open ended transverse slots, the inside surface of the collar having vertical ribs spaced apart and gripping the anchor bolt, the collar under tension urging the split to close; and

(b) A screed member having an open ended transverse slot engaging the slots in the extended projections forming a blind halved lap joint which urges the projections together under compression.

7. elevation marker for a foundation anchor bolt comprising:

(a) A split resilient collar having projections at the split extending from the collar, the projections having aligned open ended transverse slots, the collar under tension urging the split to close; and

(b) A screed member having .an open ended transverse slot engaging the slots in the extended. projections forming a blind halved lap joint which urges the projections together under compression.

(References on following page) 5 6 References Cited by the Examiner 2,523,785 9/ 1950 Sereno 287-49 X HOItZCHdOI'fi 452,886 5/1891 Lloyd 1687.2

1,527,323 2/1925 Moore 5 FRANK ABBOTT, Primary Examm'er- 1,658,535 2/1928 Neilson 52-638 X A. C. PERHAM, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US452886 *Jul 6, 1890May 26, 1891 Curtain-ring
US1527323 *Jul 10, 1922Feb 24, 1925Lee C Moore & Company IncMetal derrick and the like
US1658535 *Dec 11, 1926Feb 7, 1928Neilson Sr James PDerrick
US2523785 *Aug 20, 1946Sep 26, 1950Paolo SerenoResilient clamping device for framework elements
US3145961 *Sep 4, 1962Aug 25, 1964Clive Holtzendorff LuciauBranch attaching device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3594965 *Oct 1, 1968Jul 27, 1971Saether KolbjornPrecast building construction
US3681484 *Aug 26, 1970Aug 1, 1972Mckie Eugene TMethod for surfacing poured material
US4561617 *Jul 6, 1984Dec 31, 1985Hafner William ESupport device for displaying objects
US4574554 *May 31, 1983Mar 11, 1986Gentry Gary LSurfacing method and apparatus
US5505033 *Apr 19, 1991Apr 9, 1996501 Hitachi Metals Ltd.Column base structure and connection arrangement
US6760974Apr 29, 2003Jul 13, 2004Maxxon CorporationHeight determining instrument for poured floors, and method
US7707782 *Feb 10, 2005May 4, 2010The Babcock & Wilcox Power Generation Group, Inc.Absorber tower metal hood to concrete shell attachment
US20130055670 *Jul 6, 2012Mar 7, 2013Nucor CorporationTruss and rebar reinforced concrete structures
WO2007070636A2 *Dec 13, 2006Jun 21, 2007Cactus Holdings LlcIntegral form panel for concrete form system
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/371, 52/365, 52/295, 248/230.8
International ClassificationE04G21/18
Cooperative ClassificationE04G21/185
European ClassificationE04G21/18C2