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Publication numberUS3321016 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 23, 1967
Filing dateOct 7, 1964
Priority dateOct 7, 1964
Publication numberUS 3321016 A, US 3321016A, US-A-3321016, US3321016 A, US3321016A
InventorsLance Leonard D
Original AssigneeSchlumberger Technology Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Well tool retrieving apparatus
US 3321016 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

L. D. LANCE WELL TOOL RETRIEVING APPARATUS May 23, 1967 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Oct. 7, 1964 V E W MW m cm H 2 0m m MW r E L A 7 z d. M W

B :M [M e 4 Z 3 5 2 www w w w y; g E\\ C -/l/ May 23, 1967 Filed Oct. 7, 1964 L. D. LANCE WELL TOOL RETRIEVING APPARATUS 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Leona/a 17. lance INVENTOR.

ATTORNEY United States Patent 3,321,016 WELL TOOL RETRHEVHJG APPARATUS Leonard D. Lance, Pauls Valley, Okla, assiguor, by mesne assignments, to Scltlumbergcr Technology Corporation, Houston, Tex., acorporation of Texas Filed Oct. 7, 1964, Ser. No. 402,103 Claims. (Cl. 166-123) This invention relates to apparatus for retrieving well tools within a well bore; and, more particularly, to running-in and retrieving overshots adapted for use with apparatus for packing-oil a well bore.

In conducting such well completion operations as acidizing, cementing, or fracturing, a full-opening well packer dependently coupled from a tubing string is em- .ployed to pack-off the formation interval to be treated from the remainder of the well bore thereabove. Where more than one formation interval is to be completed, it is usually customary to releasably couple beneath the packer a selectively operable, retrievable bridge plug to pack-cit the well bore at the lower limit of the formation interval being treated to prevent treating fluids from flowing into the other formations therebelow. The releasable couplings generally employed for this are comprised of a male coupling or fishing neck on the upper end of the bridge plug mandrel which is selectively connected through cooperatively arranged J-pins and I -slots to a tubular female coupling member or overshot dependently coupled beneath the packer The bridge plug is first set at a particular depth and the packer is disconnected therefrom and moved on up -the well bore and set where desired. Treating iluids are then pumped downwardly at high pressure through the tubing and packer and introduced into the isolated formation through appropriately placed perforations in the casing. After the well-completion operation has been concluded, the packer is unseated and then shifted downwardly and re-coupled to the bridge plug, The bridge plug is then unseated by properly manipulating the mandrel and either moved to a new position or else removed entirely from the well.

It is not at all uncommon, however, for a substantial quantity of heavy loose materials to settle on top of a bridge plug during a treating operation. Subsequently, when it comes time to retrieve the bridge plug, it is often found that so much debris has accumulated that the overshot beneath the packer can not be re-engaged with the fishing neck on the bridge plug. In such instances, it is customary to attempt to wash-over the accumulated debris so that the releasable coupling members may again be re-connected. Such washing-over is typically carried out by circulating fluids through the tubing as it is being rotated so that cutting teeth around the lower end of the overshot can cut away the accumulated debris.

It will be seen, however, that once the J-pins enter the open upper end of the J-slots in the fishing neck, the overshot can no longer be rotated relative thereto. Then, if the overshot can not be forced downwardly through the remaining debris far enough to enable the J-pins to be shifted into the closed portions of the J-slots to allow the bridge plug to be retrieved, the overshot can only be reciprocated or spudded with the hope that it will chip away a suificient amount of debris to enable it to move on downwardly. Where debris has accumulated and hardened around the upper end of the bridge plug, however, it is usually necessary to remove the tubing string, packer and overshot; attach a drilling bit and then relower the tubing string and bit to drill through the debris and bridge plug.

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide new and improved overshots which may be continually rotated to cut away accumulated debris until they are positively r e-engaged with a fishing neck of a bridge plug.

This and other objects of the present invention are accomplished by movably mounting on an upright member of a well tool a second member adapted to be received within an overshot and operatively coupling the two members together in such a manner that after the overshot has become engaged with the second member, the overshot can still be rotated until it has become securely connected to the well tool member. 1

The novel features of the present invention are set forth with particularity in the appended claims. The present invention, both as to its organization and mannor of operation together with objects and advantages thereof, may best be understood by way of illustration and example of certain embodiments when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a cross-sectional view of one embodiment of an overshot and a fishing neck of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional view of an alternate embodiment of an overshot and a fishing neck; and

FIG. 3 illustrates a typical bridge plug as it is being released by an overshot such as depicted in either FIG. 1 or FIG. 2.

Turning now to FIG. 1, a tubular overshot is shown in position on a fishing neck 101 extending from the upper end of an upright body of a well tool such as the mandrel 102 of a conventional bridge plug (not shown). As is customary, lateral ports 103 are provided through the mandrel 102 at the upper end of an axial bore 104 extending through the mandrel. A slidable valve member 105 over these equalizing ports is arranged to be opened whenever the bridge plug is being traversed through a fluid-filled well bore to enable fluids in the well bore to flow freely through the mandrel bore 10% rather than being forced through the constricted annular space between the casing and the retracted packing means (not shown). Inasmuch as the fishing neck and overshot of the present invention may be employed with any conventional retrievable bridge plug, it is believed unnecessary to devote further attention to the details of the bridge plug.

An enlarged diameter portion 106 at the upper end of the fishing neck 101 forms a downwardly directed annular shoulder around which a plurality of downwardly facing rectangular clutch teeth 107 are cut, A rotatable coupling or tubular member 108 is slidably mounted around a reduced-diameter central portion 109 of the fishing neck 101. A plurality of upwardly facing complementary clutch teeth 110 cut around the upper end of the tubular member 108 are arranged to meshingly engage the downwardly directed clutch teeth 107 whenever the tubular member is in the uppermost position.

A compression spring 111 is engaged between an upwardly facing shoulder 112 formed at the lower end of the reduced diameter portion 109 of the fishing neck 101 and a downwardly directed, internal shoulder 113 on the tubular member 108 to bias the tubular member upwardly and keep the teeth 107, 110 normally co-engaged. It will be appreciated, of course, that a downwardly directed force on the tubular member 108 of sufiicient magnitude to overcome the biasing effect of the spring 111 will shift the tubular member downwardly to disengage the clutch teeth 107, 110 and allow the tubular member to freely rotate relative to the fishing neck 101.

J-slots 114 formed on opposite sides of the tubular member 108 are cooperatively arranged to receive J-pins 115 projecting inwardly from the central portion of the overshot 100. A plurality of cutting teeth 116 around the lowermost end of the overshot 100 are suitably arranged for cutting away accumulated debris in the manner previously desscribed.

, Thus, whenever there is debris covering the fishing neck 101, the overshot 100 is slowly rotated as it is lowered so the cutting teeth 116 will cut away the accumulated debris. As the overshot 100 begins telescoping over the fishing neck 101, the J-pins 115 will engage the upwardly diverging surfaces 117 of the J-slots 114 and urge the tubular member 108 downwardly against spring 111 to disengage the clutch teeth 107, 110. So long as the tubular member 108 is held in this downward position, the overshot 100 can be freely rotated around the fishing neck 101 thereby enabling the cutting teeth 116 to continue cutting away the accumulated debris.

Once the debris has been sufiiciently cut away to allow the J-pins 115 to reach the bottom of the J-slots 114, the clutch teeth 107, 110 are then re-engaged whenever the overshot 100 is picked up to bring the l-pins into the closed portion 118 of the J-slots to releasably secure or interlock the tubular member 108 with the overshot 100. Thereafter, torque may be applied to the bridge plug mandrel 102 in either direction through the engaged clutch teeth 107, 110. Moreover, with the ]-pins 115 in the closed portion 118 of the J-slots 114, the mandrel 102 may be shifted longitudinally in either direction by a corresponding movement of the overshot 100. Accordingly, it will be appreciated that regardless of whatever motion is necessary to retract the bridge plug, the overshot 100 may be manipulated as required to transmit either rotative or longitudinal motion to the mandrel 102 of the bridge plug.

The slidable valve member 105 is operatively arranged around the upper end of the mandrel 102 to be shifted upwardly from its position as shown in FIG. 1 to cover the radial ports 103 in the mandrel. O-rings 119 fluidly seal the valve member 105 around the mandrel 102 above and below the radial ports 103 to block fluid communication through the ports whenever the valve member is shifted upwardly to its closed position.

A group of resilient fingers 120 spaced around the lower end portion of the overshot 100 have longitudinally spaced, inwardly projecting shoulders 121 and 122 operatively arranged thereon to shift the slidable valve member 105. As the overshot 100 is shifted upwardly, the lowermost shoulders 122 on the fingers 120 engage the underside of an outwardly projecting shoulder 123 around the upper end of the slidable valve member 105 and carry the valve member upwardly to close the equalizing ports 103. As the overshot 100 is moved further upwardly, the upwardly directed tapered faces of the upper most finger shoulders 121 will engage and be cammed outwardly by an annular shoulder 124 around the outer member 108. This will spread the resilient fingers 120 outwardly a sufi'lcient distance to allow these lowermost finger shoulders 122 to clear the shoulder 123 around the upper end of the slidable valve member 105 as the overshot 100 is being removed.

Similarly, whenever the overshot 100 is re-engaged over the fishing neck 101, the tapered lower faces of the lowermost finger shoulders 122 are cammed outwardly over the upper shoulder 123 of the slidable valve member 105 to allow the fingers 120 to slip over and, upon springing back, re-engage the slidable valve member. As the overshot 100 continues moving downwardly, the lower face of the uppermost finger shoulders 121 then engages the upper shoulder 123 of the slidable valve member 105 to push that member downwardly and reopen the equalizing ports 103.

Turning now to FIG. 2, an alternate embodiment is shown of an overshot 200 arranged to cooperatively receive a fishing neck 201 at the upper end of the mandrel 202 of a conventional bridge plug (not shown). The overshot 200, a species of the present invention, is also described in a concurrently filed application Ser. No.

4 402,101, by David E. Young and claimed therein. An equalizing valve 203, substantially similar to valve member previously described in conjunction with the embodiment shown in FIG. 1, is provided to close radial ports 204 at the upper end of the mandrel 202.

The fishing neck 201 is comprised of a fixed outer member 205 having an upwardly directed axial cavity 206 into which a rotatable coupling member or inner member 207 having a reduced-diameter lower portion 208 is operatively disposed. The lower face of the enclargeddiameter upper portion 209 of the inner member 207 is normally engaged with the upper face of an inwardly projecting annular shoulder 210 at the upper end of the outer member 205.

A selectively operable clutch 211 is operatively arranged in such a manner that normally the inner member 207 is free to rotate relative to the outer member 205 in one direction but is co-rotatively secured thereto in the opposite rotative direction. The clutch 211 is further arranged to co-rotatively secure the outer and inner members 205, 207 to one another in both rotative directions whenever the inner member is shifted longitudinally upwardly with respect to the outer member.

To accomplish these functions, a plurality of stacked, annular clutch rings 212, 213 are disposed within the annular space between the inner wall of the outer member 205 and around the inner member 207. Alternate ones 212 of these clutch rings are co-rotatively secured to the outer member 205 and the remaining ones 213 are corotatively secured to the inner member 207 by appropriately arranged, slidably fitted, splines and grooves. Another clutch ring 214 at the upper end of the stack of clutch rings 212, 213 is co-rotatively secured to the inner member 207 by the same spline securing the clutch rings 213.

Complementary shaped teeth 215 having one face inclined and the other face substantially vertical are spaced around the opposed mating surfaces of each of the clutch rings 212, 213 as well as on the lower surface of the upper clutch ring 214. A compression spring 216 engaged between an upwardly directed shoulder 217 around the lower end of the inner member 207 and the lowermost clutch ring maintains the teeth 215 of the stacked clutch rings 212, 213 and 214 cooperatively engaged and urges the uppermost clutch ring 214 against a downwardly directed shoulder 218 projecting outwardly from the upper end of the inner member. Thus, with the clutch teeth 215 being shaped and held in engagement in this manner, it will be seen that the inner member 207 is free to rotate independently of the outer member 205 in one direction, but is co-rotatively secured thereto whenever it is rotated in the opposite direction.

As previously mentioned, the inner member 207 of the fishing neck 201 is free to shift upwardly a limited distance relative to the outer member 205. In the normal position of the inner member 207, a plurality of upwardly directed, rectangularly formed teeth 219 around the upper face of the uppermost clutch ring 214 are displaced a short distance below a plurality of downwardly directed, complementary teeth 220 formed around the lower face of the annular shoulder 210. Upward shifting of the inner member 207, however, brings the rectangular teeth 219, 220 into meshing engagement with one another. Thus, since the upper clutch ring 214 is co-rotatively secured by splines to the inner member 207, whenever the rectangular clutch teeth 219, 220 are moved into engagement, the outer and inner members 205, 207 will be co-rotatively secured together in both rotative directions.

The tubular overshot 200 has a plurality of cutting teeth 221 around the lower end and is arranged to be disposed over the fishing neck 201. J-slots 222 on opposite sides of the enlarged diameter upper portion 209 of the inner member 207 of the fishing neck 201 are cooperatively arranged to receive J-pins 223 projecting inwardly from the central portion of the overshot 200 to releasably secure or interlock the overshot with the inner member.

Accordingly, it will be appreciated that whenever the overshot 200 is engaged over the fishing neck 201, the clutch teeth 215 will allow the overshot to be freely rotated in one direction relative to the mandrel 202 but prevent its relative rotation in the opposite rotative direction so long as the inner member .207 remains in its normal downward position. Whenever the overshot 200 is picked up to bring the J-pins 223 into the closed portion of the J-slots 222, the inner member 207 is picked up to bring the rectangular teeth 219 on the upper clutch ring 214 into meshing engagement with their mating teeth 220 on the outer member 205 and co-rotatively secures the overshot 200 to the mandrel 202 regardless of rotative direction.

Thus, it will be seen that the clutch 211 will permit the mandrel 202 of the bridge plug to be operatively shifted longitudinally in either direction as well as rotated in either direction by manipulating the overshot 200 in a predetermined manner. Furthermore, the clutch 211 permits the overshot 200 to be rotated freely in one direction around the fishing neck 201 so that the cutting teeth 221 may be efiiciently used to cut away accumulated debris around the upper portion of the bridge plug.

Turning now to FIG. 3, a typical bridge plug 300 is 1 shown set in place within a cased well bore 301. Elastomeric packing cups 302, 303 are oppositely directed so that one or the other will always be sealingly engaged with the casing 304 whenever there is a pressure differential across the bridge plug 300 from either direction.

Similarly, wall-engaging means such as expander and slip means 305, 306 areoppositely directed so that one set or the other will cooperate to prevent the bridge plug 300 from being shifted by such pressure differentials. An equalizing valve 307 is arranged to function as those previously described.

A fixed lug 308 projecting inwardly from the housing 309 is cooperatively confined within a typically arranged T-shaped slot 310 in the mandrel 311. Whenever the mandrel 311 is to be secured from shifting, the lug 308 is confined within a short longitudinal slot portion 312; and, to

free the mandrel for shifting to actuate either the slips 305 or 306, the mandrel 311 is rotated to pass the lug through a horizontal branch slot portion 313 and into alignment with an elongated longitudinal slot portion 314.

Thus, it will be seen that when the bridge plug 300 is i to be retrieved, the mandrel 311 must first be rotated as it is shifted longitudinally to bring the mandrel to a neutral position where the branch slot portion 313 is aligned with the housing lug 308. Then, to resecure the mandrel 311, the mandrel is rotated to shift the elongated slot portion 314 away from the lug 308 and reconfine the lug within the short slot portion 312.

Accordingly, when the overshot 315 and fishing neck 316 depicted in FIG. 3 are arranged as the overshot 100 and fishing neck 101 previously described in conjunction with FIG. 1, the overshot 100 is rotated as it is brought down over the fishing neck 101 to cut away debris therearound. As already described, the tubular member 108 is shifted downwardly to disengage teeth 107, 110 which allows the overshot 100 to rotate freely around the fixed fishing neck 101. Then, once the lugs 115 are well engaged within J-slots 114, the overshot 100 is rotated in a clockwise direction as it is pulled upwardly to reposition the bridge plug mandrel 311 where housing lug 308 is reconfined within the short slot portion 312. Then, once the mandrel 311 is secured, the bridge plug 300 can be retrieved.

In a similar fashion, when the overshot 315 and fishing neck 316 depicted in FIG. 3 are arranged as those previously described in FIG. 2, the overshot 200 is rotated as it is brought over the fishing neck 201. So long as the inner member 207 is in its lowermost position, the overshot 200 is of course, free to rotate in one direction around the fishing neck 201. The clutch discs 212, 213,

however, will transmit torque in the clockwise direction so the mandrel 311 can be rotated to bring the housing lug 308 into the branch slot portion 313 and then into the short slot portion 312. It will be noted that by virtue of the teeth 215 (FIG. 2) clockwise torque will be continuously applied to the mandrel 311 as it is being shifted either upwardly or downwardly. Thus, should it be necessary to hunt for the branch slot portion 313, as the mandrel 311 is torqued the housing lug 308 will be held against that side of the long slot portion 314 which opens into the branch slot portion 313 and ensures that the branch portion will be found quickly.

Accordingly, it will be appreciated that the abovedescribed embodiments illustrate new and improved overshots having various clutching devices provided therewith to enable an overshot to be continually rotated relative to the fishing neck for cutting away accumulated debris above a bridge plug so that the overshot may subsequently be positively re-engaged with the fishing neck on abridge plug. Moreover, these clutching devices allow the overshot to be selectively secured to the fishing neck so that torque may be applied to a bridge plug mandrel as needed for releasing the bridge plug. Furthermore, these clutching devices enable the overshot to be positively coupled to the bridge plug so that the mandrel thereof can be shifted in either longitudinal direction either without or in conjunction with rotation of the mandrel. Thus, it

' has been shown that with these devices, a positive engage ment may be made with a bridge plug without sacrificing the ability to apply positive torque as well as longitudinal forces to the mandrel of the bridge plug.

While a particular embodiment of the present invention has been shown and described, it is apparent that changes and modifications may be made without departing from this invention in its broader aspects; and, therefore, the

connection to a tubing string and having means thereon adapted for removing debris around an upright well-tool body, said tubular member being sized and arranged to receive said cylindrical member; a rotatable coupling member carried by one of said aforementioned two members and arranged for cooperation with the other one of said two members; first means releasably securing said coupling member co-rotatively to said other member; and second means selectively operable by movement of said tubular member for co-rotatively securing said coupling member to said one member when said tubular member is in one position relative to an upright well-tool body and releasable upon movement of said tubular member from said one position relative to an upright Well tool body.

2. In apparatus for retrieving a well tool having an upright body and releasably secured in a well bore: a cylindrical member adapted for connection to an upright well-tool body; a rotatable tubular member adapted for connection to a tubing string and having cutting means thereon adapted for rotatively cutting away debris around an upright well-tool body, said tubular member being sized and arranged to receive said cylindrical member; a rotatable coupling member carried by one of said aforementioned two members and arranged for cooperation with the other one of said two members; first means releasably securing said coupling member co-rotatively to said other member; and second means selectively operable by shifting said tubular member longitudinally relative to an upright well-tool body for co-rotatively securing said coupling member to said one member in one relative position of said tubular member and releasable upon shifting of said tubular body to another relative position.

3. In apparatus for retrieving a Well tool having, an upright body and releasably secured in a well bore: a cylindrical member adapted for connection to an upright well-tool body; a rotatable tubular member adapted for connection to a tubing string and having cutting means thereon adapted for rotatively cutting away debris around "an upright well-tool body; said tubular member being sizecl and arranged to receive said cylindrical member; a Irotatable coupling member slidably mounted on said cylindrical member and arranged for reception by and cooperation with said tubular member; first means releasably securing said coupling member to said tubular member; and second means selectively operable by shifting said tubular member and coupling member longitudinally with respect to said cylindrical member for corotatively securing said coupling member to said cylindrical member in one position thereon and releasable upon shifting said tubular member and coupling member to another position.

4. In apparatus for retrieving a well tool body having an upright body and releasably secured in a well bore: a cylindrical member having a first shoulder and adapted for connection to an upright Well-tool body; a rotatable coupling member slidably mounted on said cylindrical member, said coupling member having a second shoulder opposed to and adapted to engage said first shoulder; a rotatable tubular member adapted for connection to a tubing string and having cutting means thereon adapted for rotatively cutting away debris around an upright welltool body, said tubular member being sized and arranged 'to receive said cylindrical and coupling members; means :releasably securing said tubular member co-rotatively to "said coupling member for shifting said opposed shoulders into and out of engagement; and co-engaging means on said opposed shoulders for co-rotatively securing said coupling member to said cylindrical member whenever said shoulders are engaged. I I

5. In apparatus for retrieving a well-tool having an upright body and releasably secured in a Well bore; a cylindrical member having an offset portion and adapted for connection to an upright well-tool body; a rotatable coupling member slidably and telescopically mounted around said cylindrical member adjacent to said offset portion, said coupling member having a shoulder opposed to and adapted to engage said offset portion in one position of said coupling member; spring means for normally urging said coupling member into said one position; a rotatable tubular member adapted for connection to a tubing string and having cutting means/thereon adapted for rotatively cutting away debris around an upright welltool body, said tubular member being sized and arranged to receive said cylindrical and cupling members; means releasably securing said tubular member co-rotatively to said coupling member for shifting said coupling member out of said one position; and co-engaging means on said offset portion and said shoulder for co-rotatively securing said coupling member to said cylindrical portion whenever said coupling member is in said one position.

6. In apparatus for retrieving a well tool having an upright body and releasably secured in a well bore: a cylindrical member adapted for connection to an upright well-tool body and having an enlarged-diameter portion having first teeth disposed thereon; a rotatable annular coupling member slidably and telescopically mounted around said cylindrical member adjacent to said enlargeddiameter portion, said coupling member having second teeth formed thereon opposed to and adapted to engage and intermesh with said first teeth in one position of said coupling member; spring means operatively engaged between said coupling member and said cylindrical mem ber for normally urging said coupling member into said one position; a rotatable tubular member having an upper end adapted for connection to a tubing string and cutting teeth around its lower end adapted for rotatively cutting away debris a d a upright We l-tool body, said tubular member being sized and arranged to receive said cylindrical and coupling members; and means releasably securing said coupling member within said tubular member for shifting said coupling member into and out of said one position and for rotating said coupling member including a laterally projecting lug on one of said members and an elongated slot in the other of said members arranged and adapted to receive said lug.

7. In apparatus for retrieving a well tool having an upright body and releasably secured in a well bore: a rotatable tubular member having one end adapted for connection to a tubing string and cutting means at its opposite end for rotatively cutting through debris around an upright well-tool body; first and second slidably telescoped and relatively rotatable members having opposed surfaces, said first member being adapted for connection to an upright well-tool body and said second member being sized and adapted for reception within said tubular member, said second member being arranged to shift longitudinally in relation to said first member from one position wherein said opposed surfaces are spaced-apart to another position wherein said opposed surfaces are engaged; means including co-engageable complementary teeth disposed on each of said opposed surfaces for corotatively securing said telescoped members whenever said second member is in said other position and freeing said first member for rotation whenever said first member is in said one position; and means for coupling and co-rotatively securing said second member within said tubular member including a laterally projecting lug on one of said last-mentioned members and an elongated slot in the other of said last-mentioned members arranged and adapted to receive said lug.

8. In apparatus for retrieving a well tool having an upright body and releasably secured in a well bore: a rotatable tubular member having one end adapted for connection to a tubing string and cutting means at its opposite end for rotatively cutting through debris around an upright well-tool body; first and second slidably telescoped and relatively rotatable members having opposed surfaces, said first member being adapted for connection to an upright well-tool body and said second member being sized and adapted for reception Within said tubular member, said second member being arranged to shift longitudinally in relation to said first member from one position wherein said opposed surfaces are spaced-apart to another position wherein 'said opposed surfaces are engaged; means normally biasing said second member into said other position; means including co-engageable complementary teeth dis osed on each of said opposed surfaces for co-rotatively securing said telescoped members whenever said second member is in said other posi tion and freeing said first member for rotation whenever said first member is in said one position; and means for coupling and co-rotatively securing said second member within said tubular member including a laterally projecting lug on one of said members and an elongated slot in the other of said members arranged and adapted to receive said lug.

9. A well packer sized and adapted for reception in a well bore for packing-oi? the well bore comprising: a housing member; a body member movably mounted within said housing member; packing means mounted around one of said members and adapted for expansion into sealing engagement with a well bore; wall-engaging means mounted on said housing; means responsive to longitudinal shifting of said body member for extending said wall-engaging means into engagement with a wall of a well bore; first coupling means releasably securing said body member to said housing member and releasable by rotation of said body member to free said body member for longitudinal shifting, and second coupling means adapted for releasably coupling said body member to a tubing string, said second coupling means including a rotatable tubular member connectable to a tubing string and having cutting means thereon for rotatively cutting away debris around said body member, said tubular member being sized and adapted to receive said body member, a rotatable coupling member slidably mounted on said body member and operatively received Within said tubular member, first means releasably securing said coupling member co-rotatively to said tubular member, and second means selectively operable by shifting said tubular member and coupling member longitudinally with respect to said body member for co-rotatively securing said coupling member to said body member in one position thereon and releasable upon shifting said tubular member and coupling member to another position.

10. A Well packer sized and adapted for reception in a Well bore for packing-off the Well bore comprising: a housing member; a body member having an offset portion proximate its upper end and movably mounted within said housing member; packing means mounted around one of said members and adapted for expansion into sealing engagement with a Well bore; Wall-engaging means mounted on said housing; means responsive to longitudinal shifting of said body member for extending said wall-engaging means into engagement with a Wall of a Well bore; first coupling means releasably securing said body member to said housing member and releasable by rotation of said body member to free said body member for longitudinal shifting; and second coupling means adapted for releasably coupling said body member to a tubing string, said second coupling means including a rotatable tubular member connectable to a tubing string and having cutting means thereon for rotatively cutting away debris around said body member, said tubular member being sized and adapted to receive said body member, a rotatable coupling member slidably and telescopically mounted around said body member adjacent to said ofiset portion, said coupling member having a shoulder opposed to and adapted to engage said offset portion in one position of said coupling member, spring means for normally urging said coupling member into said one position, means releasably securing said coupling member co-rotatively to said tubular member for shifting said coupling member out of said one position, and co-engaging means on said oiTset portion and said shoulder for co-rotatively securing said coupling member to said body member whenever said coupling member is in said one position.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,762,438 9/1956 Naylor 294-86.34 2,879,849 3/1959 Le Bus 29486.34 2,887,162 5/1959 Le Bus 29486.34 2,998,072 8/1961 Crowe 166-123 3,005,506 10/1961 Le Bus 166-99 X 3,070,170 12/1962 Le Bus et a1. 16699 X CHARLES E. OCONNELL, Primary Examiner. DAVID H. BROWN, Examiner.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3465821 *Oct 5, 1967Sep 9, 1969Schlumberger Technology CorpValve system for a well packer apparatus
US3494418 *May 31, 1968Feb 10, 1970Schlumberger Technology CorpWell bore apparatus
US3552492 *Jul 23, 1969Jan 5, 1971Schlumberger Technology CorpWell tool safety joint
US3693296 *Jul 17, 1970Sep 26, 1972Carborundum CoWorkpiece treating apparatus
US3815676 *Oct 16, 1972Jun 11, 1974Dresser IndIndexing equalizing valve for retrievable well packer
US4124245 *Nov 11, 1976Nov 7, 1978Rainer KuenzelWell tool
US4848455 *Nov 27, 1987Jul 18, 1989Janos FenyvesiFlexible drill rod feeding apparatus for quick rotary deep drilling
US4856591 *Mar 23, 1988Aug 15, 1989Baker Hughes IncorporatedMethod and apparatus for completing a non-vertical portion of a subterranean well bore
US4889187 *Apr 25, 1988Dec 26, 1989Jamie Bryant TerrellMulti-run chemical cutter and method
US4915172 *May 25, 1989Apr 10, 1990Baker Hughes IncorporatedMethod for completing a non-vertical portion of a subterranean well bore
US5579840 *Oct 5, 1994Dec 3, 1996Dresser Industries, Inc.For use in running and setting a well packer
US5944103 *Sep 24, 1998Aug 31, 1999Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Retrievable milling guide anchor apparatus and associated methods
Classifications
U.S. Classification166/123, 294/86.34, 166/135, 166/237, 166/99
International ClassificationE21B41/00
Cooperative ClassificationE21B41/00
European ClassificationE21B41/00