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Publication numberUS3322363 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 30, 1967
Filing dateFeb 24, 1965
Priority dateFeb 24, 1965
Publication numberUS 3322363 A, US 3322363A, US-A-3322363, US3322363 A, US3322363A
InventorsDavidson Ralph L, Schmidt Stanley A
Original AssigneeCurtis & Marble Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for preparation of textile fabrics for processing
US 3322363 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 30, 1967 R. L. DAVIDSON ETAL 3,322,363

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mm on INVENTORS RALPH L. DAVIDSON BY STANLEY A. SCHMIDT ATTORNEYS United States Patent 3,322,363 APPARATUS FOR PREPARATION 0h TEX'HLE FABRICS FOR PROCESSING Ralph L. Davidson, Southbo-ro, and Stanley A. Schmidt, Northhoro, Mass, assignors to (Turtis d; Marble Co., a corporation of Massachusetts Filed Feb. 24, 1965, Ser. No. 434,855 11 (llaims. (Cl. 242-58.]l)

This invention deals with the processing of textile fabrics, in particular with apparatus useful to enable such processing to proceed continuously and without interruption.

A textile fabric, typically a strip of cloth and hereinafter termed web or fabric as occasion requires, as it is recovered from the loom on which it is woven, is of restricted length and too short, by a considerable margin, to permit of the economical application to it of treatment and processing such as brushing, surface shearing (to remove tag ends of thread) bleaching, dyeing, printing and the like. To the contrary, such processes, and especially the chemical processes, can only be carried out effectively on a continuous basis and without interruption. This requires that the length of the strip of web subjected to the process be many times longer than that of the strip recovered from the loom. It therefore becomes necessary to join the tail end of each short length of web to the lead end of the next one, e.g., by sewing them together. Unless resort be had to apparatus of prohibitive complexity and cost, the sewing operation requires that the two strip ends to be joined remain stationary while it is in progress, even though, to preserve the integrity of the subsequent processing, the latter is carried out without interruption on the long strip constituted of a series of short strips earlier sewn together. This, in turn, requires that a substantial length of the web shall have been placed in storage from which it can be gradually and continuously withdrawn and fed into the continuous processing apparatus. To avoid interruption of the processing, the length of the stored portion of the web must exceed the product of the speed with which the web is advanced through the processing apparatus and the time during which its tail end is halted for execution of the sewing operation.

Apparatus for accumulating intermediate portions of a web in storage, thus to permit continuous advance of its forward portions and intermittent movement of the successive tail ends of the shorter web strips of which it is constituted is termed, in the trade, a scray. A scray may be employed with advantage to facilitate and expedite the joining together of a number of web strips, each of limited length, and arriving at the scray as individual rolls of moderate diameter, each wound on a core, to form a single web strip of much greater length and wind it into a roll of much greater diameter, ready for further continuous processing. Because infrequent interruptions of mechanical processes such as brushing, surface shearing and the like, while they cause delays and loss of time, do not degrade the final product, it is advantageous and economical to follow the action of the scray by such mechanical processes before the composite strip is finally wound into the single, large-diameter roll. The latter, when it leaves the apparatus, is then ready for chemical processing.

Accordingly, a more specific object of the invention is to expedite the strip-joining operations that are performed at the intake of a scray, thus to reduce the amount of web material which the scray is required to store.

These objects are attained, in the scray in which the invention is embodied, by the provision of mechanism which responds automatically to the appearance of the tail end of the advancing web, at a position convenient to a bench on which it is to be sewn to the lead end of the next short strip, and holds it there, preventing web movements both forward and backward. An attendant havingbrought the lead end of the next short strip to the same bench, the sewing operation can be carried out in a few seconds. When it has been completed, he has but to push a start button, and advance of the web into storage is resumed; i.e., before the continuous advance of the long strip into the processing apparatus shall have depleted the stored intermediate portion of the web.

To avoid unnecessary complexities of the storage apparatus, the force of gravity is turned to account by arranging that the stored portions of the web shall advance in a generally downward direction from intake rollers which place the rearward portions of the web in store, while its forward portions are continuously drawn out and, finally, wound into a large roll suitable for chemical processing. Consequently, the intake rollers are located at the top of the apparatus and draw the web vertically upward past the upper parts of the front face of the scray and across the sewing bench. As the web is thus drawn upwardly, a point is reached at which the tail end of the web hangs free like a curtain, and commences to rise. When the lower edge of this curtain reaches a certain preassigned height, a photoelectric cell or electric eye, mounted on one side of the web, is exposed to a beam of light from a lamp mounted on the opposite side of the web. The current output of the photocell then energizes a relay which (a) deenergizes the driving motor, which comes to rest slowly, as determined by the inertia of its load and (b) moves an idler or nip roller out of engagement with the drive roller, thus removing tension from the web. Release of tension abruptly halts the advance of the Web into storage While the drive roller is still revolving as it decelerates. But, especially in the case of a web of heavy fabric, the release of tension permits the depending curtain of web to drop downward under the influence of its own weight, drawing some of the ac cumulated stored length with it. To prevent this even tuality, a brake is applied to the depending web which catches and holds it in the sewing position. The brake is constituted of two rods, the first one fixed slightly to one side of the vertical plane of the web riser, the second, free to rotate about its axis, riding against the other face of the web riser when it is tensed by the pull of the drive rollers. The second rod or roller constitutes the bob of a pendulous bracket that is pivoted in a plane on the first side of the web so that, when the web goes slack due to disengagement of the nip roller from the drive roller, the combined weights of the bracket. and the second rod bring the latter against the first one, and the web is immediately nipped between the two rods and so held in place.

As received from the loom on which it is woven the web is wrapped about a core in the form of a roll of standard, for example twelve inches, diameter. To minimize pauses in the operation of the scray it is provided, at a convenient location below the sewing bench, with a cradle assembly comprising a first, or waiting, cradle and a second or feeding cradle, together with supports for the two cradles and adjustable guides for the web. In operation an attendant, when not otherwise engaged, fetches a new roll from store and places it in the Waiting cradle as soon as it is unoccupied by a prior roll. During this operation, the feeding cradle supports a prior roll from which the web is being unwound and fed into the scray. As soon as the exposure of the photocell to the light beam has stopped the advance of the web and caused its tail edge to come to rest, the attendant lifts it to the sewing bench, places the lead edge of the web of the new roll over or against it and starts the sewing machine, thus to join the two edges together. When the seam has been sewn, he pushes the new roll from the waiting cradle into the feeder cradle and starts the drive motor, thus to resume advance of the web into the scray.

The feeder cradle of the present scray is formed of a number of rollers, their axes lying on a circular arc of diameter such as snugly to embrace a standard roll. As the web is fed into the scray, the roll is unwound. As the roll is unwound, its diameter decreases, it sinks ever lower into its feeder cradle and it revolves ever faster. Eventually, the diameter of the roll becomes so small and its speed of rotation so high, that with other scrays, the roll commences to bounce wildly. This bouncing introduces variations in the tension of the web so such a point that the brake may operate sporadically and the web may even be torn. Indeed, in some cases the roll may bounce so high as to expose the photoelectric cell to the beam of light from the lamp, thus causing disengagement of the idler roller from the drive roller.

With the scray of the invention these eventualities are prevented by proportioning the feeder cradle so that, before the bouncing condition is reached the roll of web with its core drops through the cradle and into a pan below it. From there, unwinding continues as before. Any bouncing that may take place is of negligible effect on the tension of the web which is now maintained by friction between the web and the cradle rollers between which it passes. Moreover, the feeder cradle now operates as a screen to prevent bouncing so high as to risk exposure of the photoelectric cell to the light beam.

To ensure that the web which remains wound on the core when the latter drops through the cradle shall be of a desired length, independent of the thickness of the web, the spacing between the two cradle rollers between which it drops is adjustable.

With a web of light, loosely woven fabric, a single layer may be of insufficient optical density to obstruct the light beam. In the scray of the invention undesired halting of the advance of the web due to spurious actuation of thc photocell is restricted to a comparatively small fraction of the full unwinding time by locating the photocell and the lamp at position such that the path of the light beam passes through the entire roll. With this arrangement, many layers of web are interposed in the path of the light beam until at or just before the moment at which the core drops through the cradle. With web fabric of normal thickness, however, a single layer suffices to obstruct the light beam.

Because of the pauses introduced in the advance of the web into the scray for the sewing operations, the speed of this advance, while it is in progress, must exceed the speed at which the sewn strip of web is withdrawn from storage. Because of unavoidable hazards of the sewing operations due, for example, to a broken thread, a damaged needle, or the like, a sewing pause may occasionally endure for minutes, as compared with the average pause length of a few seconds. To guard against depletion of the stored length of web during such a pause of abnormal length, the margin of the intake advance speed over the withdrawal speed must be substantial. When, therefore, no such undue pauses occur, the length of the stored portion of the web may become excessive, with consequent jamming of the web in the scray which may impede withdrawal.

With the scray embodying the invention this eventuality is prevented by automatically and continuously monitoring the amount of web material currently in storage and when on the occasion of the next sewing interruption, it is found that the scray is filled to capacity, inhibiting resumption of the web-feeding operation, thus to allow the excess of stored web material to be depleted. The attendant, having completed the sewing operation and, by pushing the start button, engaged the idler roller with the drive roller, now waits for a few moments while the stored material is being depleted. When it has been reduced to the proper proportions, the full. scray detector recognizes this fact and permits the drive motor to start once more. Thereupon operations are resumed.

The various features briefly alluded to above and their interrelations will be fully apprehended from the following detailed description of a scray embodying the invention, taken in connection with the appended drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a cross-sectional view of the scray of the invention with web being fed into it, accumulated in it, and withdrawn from it;

FIG. 2 is a front elevation of a roll-supporting cradle assembly;

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view of the support of an end of a cradle roller; and

FIG. 4 is a schematic wiring diagram showing the electrical circuits which control the operation of the scray.

Referring now to the drawings, each side of the supporting structure is a frame 10 constituted of steel beams, welded or bolted together in the form of a rectangle. Within the rectangular frame are placed a sequence of sloped coasting trays 12, 13, 14, here three in number, along which the stored portion 16 of the web, bunched, folded and pleated, advances in a zig-zag and generally downward direction under the influence of its own weight and of the pull due to steady rotation of a final rolling head 18 of the peripheral drive type.

Advantageously, mechanical processing apparatus, e.g., a shearing range may be interposed between the scray and the rolling head.

At the top of the intake and of the frame is a drive roller 30 which is rotated in a clockwise sense by a motor 32. Its surface is smooth and preferably polished so that, until the web 34- is pressed against it, it exerts only a negligible pull on the web. To advance the web 34 and idler roller 36 of which the surface is covered with a material of high friction coeificient such as rubber, mounted on a bracket 38 pivoted to the frame 10, is urged against the drive roller 39 by a spring 4% thus to seize the web 34 between the two rollers. For this reason, the rubber-covered idler roller 36 is termed a nip roller. When the advance of the web 34 into the scray is to be interrupted, the motor 32 is deenergized and a solenoid 42 pulls the nip roller 36 out of engagement with the drive roller 30, whereupon the drive roller continues to rotate, while slowing down, without exerting any sensible amount of pull on the web 34. Indeed, the pull may be so small as to be less than the pull of gravity on the depending portion of the web so that, without more, the riser portion of the web might commence to fall and thus withdraw a considerable length of web from storage in the reverse direction. This is prevented by a pendulous rod or roller 44 which, hanging in a bracket 46 pivoted to the frame on one side of the web 34, normally rides and rolls against its opposite side but, when the idler roller 36 is disengaged and the web 34 goes slack, falls against a bar 48 past which the web, when it advances, passes. When the pendulous roller 44 thus en gages the bar 48 the web 34 is nipped between them, and so prevented from falling.

Stripper fingers 50, which ride in grooves in the surface of the nip roller 36, ensure that the web shall not adhere to its rubber-covered surface but, rather, fall into the upper end of the first coasting tray 12,

The rolls of web of each particular fabric as they are received from the loom on which the fabric is woven are of like standard diameters. At the foot of the front face of the frame ltl is a cradle assembly, shown in elevation in FIG. 2, and comprising a first, or waiting cradle and a second, or feeding cradle, together with supports for both cradles and adjustable guide for the web. The waiting cradle is constituted of a rod 52 and a roller 54, spaced apart by a distance somewhat less than the diameter of a new full roll 56 of web.

The feeder cradle is constructed of a plurality of rollers 59, 60 mounted on a circular arc of diameter slightly greater than the standard roll diameter. The spacing be tween the two lowermost rollers 60 is made manually adjustable as by mounting their axes on bearings which may he slid along slotted ways until they are properly aligned at the desired spacing, whereupon they are seized in position by thumb bolts. The structural details are shown in FIG. 3. In this way, the spacing between these two rollers is normally adjusted to exceed, by a safe margin, the diameter of the core 24!- on which the web roll is wound, being smaller by a wide margin than the diameter of a full roll 56. With such a spacing, the roll with its core drops through the cradle only after the greater part of the strip of which it is constituted has been unwound.

When the web has been completely unwrapped from the core, the latter rolls forward on a sloping tray 61 to a gate 62 against which, along with other empty cores, it comes to rest. When a sufiicient number of empty cores have been thus accumulated at the forward end of the tray 61, the attendant opens the gate 62 to allow of their removal. A fin fixed to the inside face of the gate ensures against simultaneous emergence of an inconveniently large number of cores.

At a height convenient for working a sewing bench 63 is fixed to the front face of the frame 10, A sewing machine 64 of the traveling head type rides on tracks 65 and, when set in operation, advances from side to side of the bench; i.e., in a direction perpendicular to the plane of the drawing. An attendant, having fetched a new full roll from store when not otherwise occupied and placed it in the waiting cradle, and having unwound a few feet of the length of its web, drawing it toward him so that it rolls against the roller 54, waits until the advance of the strip presently being unwound from the prior roll shall have ceased and its tail edge come to rest on a tray 67. He then lifts this tail edge to the sewing bench, places the lead edge 58 of the new strip over or against it, and starts the sewing machine. When the seam has been sewn, which takes but a few seconds, he pushes the new roll from the waiting cradle into the feeder cradle and starts the drive motor 32. The solenoid 42 having been deenergized and the nip roller 36 having been thus reengaged with the drive roller 30, feeding of the web strip into the scray is resumed.

A lamp 6% is mounted on the frame it) to one side of the feeder cradle in position to direct a beam of light toward a photoelectric cell '70 mounted on the other side of the cradle and along a path 72 which passes through a substantial part of the body of a new web roll and so through a large number of layers of web. Advantageously, this path 72 lies below the level of the core 24 of a new full roll, so that the light beam is obstructed by many layers of web until the nearly empty roll with its core drops through the cradle. After this has happened the light beam, except in the case of a Web 56 exceptionally thin or of loosely woven fabric, remains obstructed by the riser portion 34 of the web until the tail edge of the web shall have risen, like a theatre curtain or a window blind, above the path 72 of the light beam. Thereupon, the photocell 79 is subjected to the full strength of the light beam, and delivers a current which, after appropriate amplification, e.g., by an amplifier 71, is of suificient strength to operate a relay 74. Operation of the relay 74 opens the running circuit of the motor 32, and energizes the solenoid 42 which pulls the nip roller 36 out of engagement with the drive roller 30. This relieves the tension on the riser portion 34 of the web. Three events then happen simultaneously: the drive roller 30 slows down and later comes to rest, the advance of the web 34 into the scray ceases abruptly, and the pendulous roller 44 falls into engagement with the bar 48 thus to prevent the stored web In from pouring out of the scray under the influence of the weight of its riser portion 34.

. The relay 74 is of the self-holding variety, and so remains operated throughout the web-joining operation despite accidental obscuration of the light beam 72. It is released, allowing the idler roller 36 to engage the drive roller 30 and causing the drive motor 32 to start, by pushing the St-art button switch 66 which opens the holding circuit of the relay 74.

Convenient speeds of advance of the web 34 into the scray lie in the range 200-500 yards per minute. A speed of advance of 400 yards, or 1200 feet per minute, is equivalent to an advance of 18 inches in each onefifteenth second. The photocell 70 and the amplifier 73 respond essentially instantaneously. Therefore, time delays in the electrical control path are only those of the relay 74 and the solenoid 42. Relays and solenoids which, together, operate in periods of the order of one fifteenth second are readily available commercially. Consequently, with two such devices, it is only necessary, in order that the tail edge of the rising web 34 come to a complete stop at a convenient point below the sewing bench 63, that the lamp 63 and the photocell 70 be so located that the tail edge of the rising web move out of the path of the light beam 72 when it still has 18 inches to go. For this reason, the lamp and the photocell are mounted about thirty inches below the level of the sewing bench 63.

When, due to the hazards of the sewing operation, a number of long pauses have been necessary, or even a single pause of exceptional duration, the fabric stored in the scray may be reduced to the danger point, in which case it becomes necessary to stop the rotation of the rolling head 18. So, too, when exceptional good fortune has been encountered and a long sequence of interruptions have all been very brief, the scray may become filled to capacity with stored fabric, in which case it becomes necessary to introduce an artificial pause in the intake feed, to permit the amount of stored fabric to be reduced. Accordingly, the amount of fabric stored in the scray is continuously monitored by an empty scray detector and a full scray detector. The former comprises a wand which presses gently downward toward the last coasting tray 14 and is held out of contact therewith by the fabric 16. When, due to reduction in thickness of pleated web, the wand falls below its normal position, a microswitch 81 actuates a. relay which stops the rotation of the wind-up motor 20. The full scray detector may likewise comprise a wand 84 of any suitable material, which rides above the pleated fabric 16 stored in the first coasting tray 12 and, when lifted to an abnormal height by pleats, folds and loops of excessive magnitudes, 'actuates a microswitch 86 which opens the starting circuit of the drive motor 32, but leaves its running circuit unaffected. The motor 32 therefore continues to run, and to feed web into the scray until operation has again been interrupted for edge sewing. The motor 32 then coasts to a stop and comes to rest. Additional storage during the short interval between determination that the scray is full and the next interruption is harmless.

When the excess material stored in the scray shall have been sufiiciently depleted by continued rotation of the rolling head 18 the motor 32 is energized and the relay 74. is released, both by the switch 66. Thereupon the roller 30 starts to rotate again, and operation is resumed. In this way, the additional pause required for depletion of the excess stored material is caused to coincide with a sewing interruption and possible damage to the web by starting and stopping the rotation of the drive roller 30 while the web is being fed into the scray is prevented.

FIG. 4 shows the electrical circuits by which the operations described above are instrumented. Power is supplied to the motor 32 through a conventional start-run circuit including a timer relay 90 and a resistor 92 through which starting current flows. After a suitable delay, the delay 90 short-circuits the resistor 92. To start the motor 32, the manual switch 66 and the full scray detector microswitch 86, connected in series, must both be closed. This prevents starting of the motor until any excess material stored in 7 the scray shall have been removed by continued rotation of the rolling head 18.

The relay 74 is provided with three pairs of contacts. Its winding is supplied by the output current of the photocell amplifier 71 through the start switch 66 and this causes the lower contact pair to close, thus to energize the solenoid 4 2, and the second contact pair to open. Since these are in series with the running circuit of the motor 32, this removes power from the motor 32, whereupon it coasts to a stop. The contacts of the third pair are interconnected with the relay winding and with the secondary winding of a transformer 96, in such a way that the solenoid 42 remains energized and the motor 32 remains deenergized despite cessation of the current from the amplifier '71 which may take place accidentally and which, in any event, takes place, while the web is at rest for sewing purposes, as soon as the web strip being unwound from a new roll obscures the light beam 72. To ensure against chattering of the relay 74 a rectifier 98 may be included if desired. The circuit of the holding winding is broken, when operations are to be resumed, by closure of the starting switch 66 and opening of the holding switch 94, coupled together. The light beam 72 having by now been obscured, this allows the lower contacts of the relay 74 to open, thus to deenergize the solenoid 42, and the second contacts to close, thus to enable the motor 32 to run. Impede-d by the inertia of its load, as well as its own, the motor 32 starts revolving gently, and so avoids tearing of the web which might take place if resumption of web-feeding were instrumented by abrupt engagement of the nip roller 36 with a drive roller 39 already revolving at full speed.

The invention having now been described, what is claimed is:

1. In apparatus for expediting the joining of the tail edge of a strip of web fabric of limited length to the lead edge of a similar strip to form a strip of extended length suitable for subsequent processing in order that such processing of the extended strip may proceed without interruption, a feeder cradle for supporting a roll of web, wrapped about a core, a sewing bench above said cradle, a smooth surfaced drive roller above said bench, means for continuously rotating said drive roller, a friction-surfaced idler roller disposed adjacent to said drive roller and normally engaged with said drive roller to nip said web between said rollers and advance it steadily, a photoelectric cell disposed on one side of said web, a light source disposed on the other side of said web and oriented to direct a light beam toward said cell, said beam being normally obstructed by said web, electromagnetic means for with drawing said idler roller from engagement with said drive roller in response to current output of said cell which occurs when the tail edge of said web is lifted above the path of said light beam, thereby to stop the roller-driven advance of said web and to relieve said web of tension, and web-catching means between said bench and said driver roller for preventing fall of said web under the influence of its weight.

2. Apparatus as defined in claim 1 wherein the idler roller withdrawing means is characterized by a particular response time and wherein the source and the cell are located at points such that the path of the light beam lies below the sewing bench by a distance equal to twice the product of said response time by the speed of advance of said web whereby, when said cell is exposed to said light beam by the rise of the tail edge of said web above its path, said tail edge comes to rest half way between said cradle and said bench.

3. Apparatus as defined in claim 1 wherein the webcatching means comprises a pendulous bracket, pivoted in a vertical plane that is laterally displaced from the vertical plane of rise of a web rising from said bench to said drive roller, a friction bar fixed on the same side of said web rise plane and normally out of contact with said web, and a smooth roller fixed to the free end of said pendulous bracket and at a height above said bench such that it bears Til against said fixed bar when not urged out of contact therewith, whereby a web extending from a roll in said feeder cradle to said drive roller, passing between said friction bar and said bracket-supported roller and under tension due to the pull of said drive roller and the friction of said web roll in said cradle moves said bracket-supported roller away from said friction bar, thus to permit free upward movement of said web and whereby, when said tension is relieved by disengagement of said idler roller from said drive roller, a part of said web depending downwardly from said driver roller is seized and held between said friction bar and said bracket-supported roller.

4. In combination with apparatus as defined in claim 1, a motor for revolving said drive roller, means responsive to the signal delivered by said cell for deenergizing said motor, allowing it to coast to a stop, and means for prolonging said deenergized condition of said motor beyond the point at which said cell signal vanishes due to obscuration of said light beam, and manual switch means for terminating said deenergized condition.

5. In apparatus as defined in claim 4, a relay having a first, normally open contacts, second normally closed contacts, third normally open contacts and a winding, the first contacts being connected to said lifting means, the second contacts being connected in series with the source of energy which supplies said motor, connections for supplying said photocell signal to said winding, said third contacts being connected to said winding in a fashion to prolong energization of said winding beyond cessation of said signal.

6. In apparatus for expediting the joining of the tail edge of a strip of Web fabric of limited length to the lead edge of a similar strip to form a strip of extended length suitable for subsequent processing in order that such processing of the extended strip may proceed without interruption, means for supporting a roll of web, a sewing bench above said supporting means, a smoothsurfaced drive roller above said bench, means for continuously rotating said drive roller, a friction-surfaced idler roller above said drive roller and normally engaged with said drive roller to nip said web between said rollers and advance it vertically upward, electromagnetic means for lifting said idler roller out of engagement with said drive roller in response to an electric signal, means responsive to the arrival of the tail edge of said web at a preassigned location for developing said electric signal, thereby to stop the roller-driven advance of said web and to relieve said web of tension, and web-catching means between said bench and said drive roller for preventing fall of said web under the influence of its weight.

7. Apparatus as defined in claim 6 wherein the webcatching means comprises a pendulous bracket, pivoted in a vertical plane that is laterally displaced from the vertical plane of rise of a web rising from said bench to said drive roller, a friction bar fixed on the same side of said web raise plane and normally out of contact with said web, and a smooth roller fixed to the free end of said pendulous bracket and at such a height above said bench as to bear against said fixed bar when not urged out of contact therewith, whereby a web extending from a roll in said cradle to said drive roller, passing between said friction bar and said bracket-supported roller and under tension due to the pull of said drive roller and the friction of said web roll in said support moves said bracketsupported roller away from said friction bar, thus to permit free upward movement of said web and whereby, when said tension is relieved by disengagement of said idler roller from said drive roller, a part of said web depending downwardly from said drive roller is seized and held between said friction bar and said bracket supported roller.

8. In apparatus which advances a strip of web fabric under tension in a vertical plane by seizing it between a revolving driver roller and an idler roller, and in which interruptions of said advance are effected by disengagement of said idler roller from said driver roller, thus relieving said tension, means operative when said tension is relieved, for preventing retrograde movement of said web which comprises a rod disposed on one side of the vertical rise plane of said web, a pendulous bracket swingably pivoted on the same side of said vertical rise plane, said bracket bearing a horizontally disposed roller of substantial weight at its lower end and, when said bracket swings free, in substantially the same horizontal plane as said rod, said web passing between said roller and said rod, whereby the tension of said web normally holds said roller out of engagement with said rod, and whereby, when said tension is relieved by disengagement of said idler roller from said driver roller, the pendulosity of said bracket causes it to fall into engagement with said rod, thereby to seize said web and to prevent retrograde movement thereof.

9. In combination with apparatus for intermittently advancing a strip of web fabric in a vertical direction through the agency of a revolving drive roller and an idler roller that engages the drive roller to nip said strip between said rollers to cause said advance, said idler roller being intermittently disengaged from said drive roller, thereby to interrupt said advance, said interruptions occurring when a substantial length of said strip hangs vertically downward, means for inhibiting retrograde movement of said strip which comprises a pendulous bracket, pivoted in a vertical plane that is laterally displaced from the vertical plane of rise of said strip, a friction bar fixed below said drive roller and on the same side of the rise plane of said strip and normally out of contact with said strip, and a smooth roller fixed to the free end of said pendulous bracket and at such a height as to bear against said fixed bar when not urged out of contact therewith, whereby said strip, passing between said friction bar and said bracket-supported roller and under tension from said drive and idler rollers, moves said bracket-supported roller away from said friction bar, thus to permit free upward movement of said strip, out of contact with said friction bar, said bracket-supported roller meanwhile rolling against a face of said strip and whereby, when said tension is relieved by disengagement of said idler roller from said drive roller, the downwardly hanging length of said strip is seized and held between said friction bar and said bracket-supported roller.

10. In apparatus for expediting the joining of the tail edge of a strip of web fabric of limited length to the lead edge of a similar strip to form a strip of extended length suitable for subsequent processing in order that such processing of the extended strip may proceed without interruption, means for joining the tail edge of one strip to the lead edge of another strip, a storage tray, a drive roller, means for continuously rotating said drive roller including an electric motor, an idler roller normally engaged with said drive roller to nip said web between said rollers and feed it into said storage tray, relay means for opening the circuit to said motor in response to an electric signal, means responsive to depletion of the web stored in said tray for developing said electrical signal, thereby to stop the roller driven advance of said web, and a holding circuit responsive to said. electrical signal maintaining said circuit open and preventing said motor from restarting.

11. In combination with apparatus as defined in claim 10, means for detecting the presence of an oversupply of web stored in said tray, and means under control of said detecting means for preventing reapplication of power to said motor, thereby preventing start up of said apparatus when said storage tray is full.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2/1936 Rainey 242-57 X 1/1952 Roselius 24258.1

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3360209 *Apr 8, 1966Dec 26, 1967Kleinewefers Soehne JWithdrawing device for web material wound on rollers
US4387590 *Jun 2, 1981Jun 14, 1983Alexander Iii William JSwatch remover and method
US4610379 *Mar 19, 1984Sep 9, 1986Institut Textile De FranceDevice for holding a textile article in the course of treatment
US6502779 *May 24, 2001Jan 7, 2003Monterey, Inc.System and method for producing a continuous fabric strip for a use in manufacturing paint roller covers
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Classifications
U.S. Classification242/552, 226/11, 26/1, 242/554.4
International ClassificationD06B17/00, D06B17/02
Cooperative ClassificationD06B17/02
European ClassificationD06B17/02