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Publication numberUS3322546 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 30, 1967
Filing dateApr 27, 1964
Priority dateApr 27, 1964
Publication numberUS 3322546 A, US 3322546A, US-A-3322546, US3322546 A, US3322546A
InventorsRogers Charles E, Tanzman Daniel P
Original AssigneeEutectic Welding Alloys
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Alloy powder for flame spraying
US 3322546 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 0, 1967 D. P. TANZMAN ETAL 3,322,546

ALLOY POWDER FOR FLAME SPRAYING Filed April 27, 1964 INVENTORS Daniel, P. Tc: nzmccn,

Charles E113 ens BY fim g T TOBNEYS United States Patent 3,322,546 ALLCY POWDER F OR FLAPE SPRAYENG Daniel P. Tanzman, Far Rockaway, and Charles E.

Rogers, Bayside, N.Y., assignors to Eutectic Welding Alloys Corporation, Flushing, N.Y., a corporation of New York Filed Apr. 27, 1964, Ser. No. 362,877 11 Claims. (Cl. lilo-l) This invention relates to metal powders for flame spraying and more particularly to iron base alloy powders to be simultaneously flame sprayed and deposited.

Deposits formed by flame spraying, wherein metallic powder is sprayed and fused upon a metal surface are usually applied to metal surfaces to make them hard and wear resistant. Generally the flame spraying process uses an oxy-acetylene flame as a heat source. Iron base alloys are diflicult to flame spray effectively because they readily oxidize severely and then do not adequately wet the base metal.

An object of this invention is to provide an iron base powder which can be used to effectively apply flame sprayed, fused deposits that are resistant to wear and especially to abrasion.

Another object is to provide such an alloy that can be deposited with minimum oxidation and with good wetting action on the base metal to be overlayed.

In accordance with this invention, it has been discovered that when mixtures of high carbon iron powder are used in conjunction with cobalt base alloy powders containing specific amounts of boron, the resulting mixture can be deposited satisfactorily with good wetting and minimal oxidation.

The high carbon iron powder is used in an amount between 15 and 70 percent by weight of the total mixture while the cobalt base alloy powder is used in an amount between 85 and 30 percent. The amount of boron contained in the cobalt base alloy on a weight basis is sufficient so that in the total alloy powder composition a percent is maintained between 0.5 and 3.0 percent by weight.

Usually the high carbon iron powder and cobalt base alloy powder are present in relatively small particle size such as below 150 mesh. Practically speaking, there is no lower limit on the particle size of the constituents; however, it is preferred to maintain the high carbon iron powder between 150 and 200 mesh.

By high carbon iron powder is meant iron powder containing from 2.0 to 4.3 percent by weight carbon and preferably from 3.8 to 4.2 percent. A carbon content of 4 percent has been found particularly useful.

By cobalt base alloy is meant an alloy mesh powder containing cobalt as a major constituent and minor amounts of chromium and carbon and preferably containing minor amounts of both chromium and tungsten in addition to cobalt. The cobalt base alloy further contains boron in amount sufficient to provide from 0.5 to 3 percent by weight of the total cobalt base alloy-high carbon iron composition.

As a suitable cobalt base alloy, there may be mentioned the following constituents in the following percents by weight.

3,322,546 Patented May 30, 1967 Percent by Weight Constituent Broad Range Preferred Example Range Carbon 1 The following examples are illustrative of two of the mixtures which meet the objectives of this invention:

Cobalt Chromium High Carbon Tugnsten Alloy Fe Powder Weight percent 30-50 50-70 Preferred mixture, percent. 40 60 Mesh size 150 150 Preferred mesh size --150 150+200 The finished composition according to this invention has the following ranges of constituents in the stated percentages on a weight basis:

Broad Range, Preferred Preferred Constituent Percent Range I, Range II,

Percent Percent As a particular example there may be mentioned the following formulation:

Constituent: Percent by weight Iron 32.1 Carbon 2.9 Tungsten 11.0 Chromium 21.9 Boron 1.4 Cobalt 30.7

The compositions according to the invention have been found to be surprisingly resistant to oxidation during flame spraying. The compositions further show good Wetting properties and produce a deposit with a high indentation hardness. Additionally, the deposit shows exceptionally high abrasion resistance in the dry sand abrasion test.

The figure is a photomicrograph of a typical deposit according to this invention. The composition used to aazasae deposit this coating corresponds to preferred range II of total chemistry as specified above.

The photomicrograph is characterized by a uniform distribution of chromium carbide in a cobalt-iron matrix 7. The matrix hardness is increased by the presence of secondary complex iron-tungsten and iron-chromium carbides 3.

The above deposit shows an indentation hardness of Rockwell C 64 and the micro hardness of the matrix indicates a high hardness of Rockwell C 60 to 62. The deposit shows particularly high abrasion resistance in the dry sand abrasion test.

What is claimed is:

1. An alloy powder composition for flame spraying comprising between 15 and 70 percent by weight of a high carbon iron powder, said high carbon iron powder containing from 2 to 4.3 percent by weight carbon, and between 85 and 30 percent by weight of a cobalt base alloy powder, said cobalt base alloy powder containing the following constituents in the following percents by weight:

Constituents: Weight percent Cobalt 42 to 75 Chromium 22 to 34 Tungsten 2 to 20 Boron 1 to 4 Carbon l to 3 the amount of boron present in the cobalt base alloy being sufficient to provide from between 0.5 and 3 percent by weight of the alloy powder composition.

2. The alloy power composition according to claim 1 wherein the particle size of the high carbon iron powder and cobalt base alloy powder is below 150 mesh.

3. The alloy powder composition according to claim 1 wherein the high carbon iron powder is present in an amount between 30 and 50 percent by weight and the cobalt base alloy powder is present in an amount between 50 and 70 percent by weight.

4. The alloy powder composition according to claim 1 wherein the high carbon iron powder is present in an amount between 50 and 70 percent by weight and the cobalt base alloy is present in an amount between 30 to 50 percent by weight.

5. The alloy powder composition according to claim I. wherein the cobalt base alloy has the following constituents in the following percent by weight:

Constituents: Weight percent Cobalt 45 to 56 Chromium 28 to 33 Tungsten 15 to 18 Boron 1.5 to 2.5 Carbon 2.25 to 2.75

6. The alloy powder composition according to claim 1 wherein the high carbon iron powder contains from 3.8 to 4.2 percent by weight carbon.

7. An alloy powder composition for flame spraying comprising between 15 and 70 percent by weight of a high carbon iron powder, said high carbon iron powder containing from 3.8 to 4.2 percent by weight carbon and between 85 and 30 percent by weight of a cobalt base alloy powder, said cobalt base alloy powder containing the following constituents in the following percents by Weight:

Constituents: Weight percent Cobalt 45 to 56 Chromium 28 to 33 Tungsten 15 to 18 Boron 1.5 to 2.5 Carbon 2.25 to 2.75

the amount of boron present in the cobalt base alloy being suflicient to provide from between 0.5 and 3 percent by weight of the alloy powder composition, said high carbon iron powder having a particle size between and 200 mesh an-d said cobalt base alloy having a particle size below 150 mesh.

8. An alloy powder composition for flame spraying comprising the following constituents in the following percentages by weight:

Constituent: Percent by weight Iron 15-70 Carbon 1.5-4 Tungsten 0-15 Chromium 5-25 Boron .5-2.5 Cobalt 15-40 9. An alloy powder composition for flame spraying comprising the following constituents in the following percentages by weight:

Constituent: Percent by weight Iron 30-35 Carbon 2.5-3.0 Tungsten 8-12 Chromium 18-24 Boron 1-1.5 Cobalt 25-33 1.0. An alloy powder composition for flame spraying comprising the following constituents in the following percentages by weight:

Constituent: Percent by weight Iron 55-60 Carbon 3-3.5 Tungsten 6-9 Chromium 11-15 Boron 0.75-l.5 Cobalt 17-23 11. An alloy powder composition for flame spraying comprising the following constituents in the following percentages by weight:

ALEXANDER H. BRODME-RKEL, Primary Examiner.

MORRIS LIEBMAN, Examiner.

L. B. HAYES, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3035934 *May 13, 1957May 22, 1962Coast Metals IncApplication of cobalt-base alloys to metal parts
US3238060 *Feb 27, 1964Mar 1, 1966Eutectic Welding AlloysMethod for coating metals
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3419415 *Sep 29, 1964Dec 31, 1968Metco IncComposite carbide flame spray material
US3436512 *Apr 13, 1966Apr 1, 1969Coast Metals IncMethod of spray coating gas seals of gas turbines and the like
US3991240 *Feb 18, 1975Nov 9, 1976Metco, Inc.Composite iron molybdenum boron flame spray powder
US4073639 *Nov 24, 1976Feb 14, 1978United Technologies CorporationMetallic filler material
US4092158 *Nov 28, 1975May 30, 1978Goetzewerke Friedrich Goetze AgIron, molybdenum or tungsten, boron
US4420543 *Nov 3, 1980Dec 13, 1983Toyota Jidosha Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaWith ferrochrome and self-fluxing alloy
US4725512 *Jun 8, 1984Feb 16, 1988Dresser Industries, Inc.Materials transformable from the nonamorphous to the amorphous state under frictional loadings
US7157158Mar 11, 2003Jan 2, 2007Liquidmetal TechnologiesBulk amorphous alloy surrounds and bonds core, improving impact resistance
US7368022Jul 22, 2003May 6, 2008California Institute Of TechnologyBulk amorphous refractory glasses based on the Ni-Nb-Sn ternary alloy system
US7520944Feb 11, 2004Apr 21, 2009Johnson William LTransforming a molten liquid alloy into a crystalline solid solution by cooling, then allowing solid crystalline alloy to remain below the remelting temperature such that metal remelts to form amorphous phase in an undercooled liquid, and cooling the composite alloy; does not use of high-rate quenching
US7560001Jul 17, 2003Jul 14, 2009Liquidmetal Technologies, Inc.Method of making dense composites of bulk-solidifying amorphous alloys and articles thereof
US7582172Dec 22, 2003Sep 1, 2009Jan SchroersIn one exemplary embodiment alloy consists of at least 75% by weight platinum, as well as cobalt, nickel, copper, and phosphorus; low melting and casting temperatures of less than 800 degrees C., large supercooled liquid region of more than 60 degrees C., high fluidity above glass transition temperature
US7591910Dec 4, 2003Sep 22, 2009California Institute Of TechnologyBulk amorphous refractory glasses based on the Ni(-Cu-)-Ti(-Zr)-Al alloy system
US7604876Dec 18, 2006Oct 20, 2009Liquidmetal Technologies, Inc.Encapsulated ceramic armor
US7618499Oct 1, 2004Nov 17, 2009Johnson William LIron, manganese, carbon ternary system of a matrix of one/both nanocrystalline and amorphous phase(s), and a face-centered cubic crystalline phase; transition elements, cobalt, nickel, copper to make large bulk objects and process of microstructure; high flow stress,exceeding 2.0 GPa; high toughness
US7896982Dec 16, 2005Mar 1, 2011Crucible Intellectual Property, LlcBulk solidifying amorphous alloys with improved mechanical properties
US8002911Aug 5, 2003Aug 23, 2011Crucible Intellectual Property, LlcMetallic dental prostheses and objects made of bulk-solidifying amorphhous alloys and method of making such articles
US8828155Feb 22, 2011Sep 9, 2014Crucible Intellectual Property, LlcBulk solidifying amorphous alloys with improved mechanical properties
US20110081540 *Jan 20, 2009Apr 7, 2011Marcus KennedyWear-resistant component
USRE44385 *Feb 11, 2004Jul 23, 2013Crucible Intellectual Property, LlcMethod of making in-situ composites comprising amorphous alloys
Classifications
U.S. Classification75/255, 420/583, 427/446
International ClassificationC23C4/06, C22C19/07
Cooperative ClassificationC23C4/065, C22C19/07
European ClassificationC22C19/07, C23C4/06B