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Publication numberUS3323558 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 6, 1967
Filing dateDec 7, 1964
Priority dateDec 7, 1964
Publication numberUS 3323558 A, US 3323558A, US-A-3323558, US3323558 A, US3323558A
InventorsCollins Edgar G
Original AssigneeCollins Edgar G
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Wire tying apparatus
US 3323558 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

.Fume 6 i967 E. G. COLLINS 3,323,553

WIRE TYING APPARATUS Filed Dec. 7, 3.964 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 United States Patent O 3,323,558 WIRE TYING APPARATUS Edgar G. Coliins, Rte. 13, Box 214, Birmingham, Ala. 35216 Filed Dec. 7, 1964, Ser. No. 416,410 6 Claims. (Cl. Mii-93.6)

This invention is an improvement on the apparatus disclosed in a co-pending application for Wire Looping and Tying Apparatus, Ser. No. 280,881, filed May 16, 1963, by Edgar G. Collins and William E. Moore, now Patent No. 3,245,434.

This invention relates to apparatus for looping -a length of wire about a member or members and then twisting the wire upon itself whereby the loop is secured -about the member or members. More particularly this invention relates to means to retain the ends of the wire forming the loop in the twisting means for a predetermined number of turns whereby the loop is tied or twisted in positive manner.

An object of my invention is to provide a portable, light-weight, positive-action, entirely efficient machine which may be used for securing members together with wire, such for instance as tying metal lathing to supporting members therefor in buildings and the like.

Another object of my invention is to provide a wire loop forming and tying apparatus in which the loops may be quickly and accurately formed from a length of wire drawn from a roll, spool or the like, the length of the wire necessary to form the loop being automatically cut from the supply thereof, and in which the wire is twisted in a positive manner thus securing the loop, after which the machine is readied automatically for a subsequent cycle.

Another object is to provide apparatus of the `character designated in which the actual loop forming members may be a pair of spaced apart, iinger-like members, having wire channeling grooves in opposite faces thereof, together with means to feed the wire first into the bottom of said groove in one of said members, in an arcuate or curved path, whereby the wire crosses over and enters the second of said wire channeling groovesin the second of said members, then in response to further feeding of the wire, the end tirst fed crosses over the loop at the lower or bottom end thereof, together with means to sever this length of wire from the longer length, and then to hold the ends of the wire forming the loop, and to twist such ends to draw the loop tight about members around which it may be formed.

Another object is to provide apparatus of the character designated in which the several parts `are all operated from a common source of power, which conveniently may be a double-acting fluid pressure cylinder, and so arranged that the timing sequence of the operation is positively maintained, whereby the wire is tirst fed, looped, severed, and then held and twisted. i

Briefly, my improved apparatus comprises essentially six principal parts. First, there is a wire feeding mechanism; second, a loop forming mechanism; third, a wire severing mechanism; fourth, means to twist the wire ends after the length of wire is severed; fth, means operative to retain the ends of the loop forming wire within the twisting means for at least one turn thereof; `and sixth, power means for driving the movable ones of the aforesaid mechanisms. Thus, I propose to use a pair of chucks, one of which seizes the wire for forward pushing of the same and releases upon return movement and the other of which prevents the wire from being withdrawn back into the apparatus as `the tirst chuck returns. The loop forming means may be a pair of linger-like members, as stated, which are small enough to enter between the 3,323,558 Patented June 6, 1967 ICC interstices of metal lathing or the like. The wire severing means may be a stationary anvil and a movable part. The twisting mechanism may be in the form of a coarsely threaded rod-like member with a ratchet nut thereon which rotates the rod when the nut moves in one direction, but permits it to remain stationary when the nut moves in the opposite direction. The retaining means for the ends of the loop comprises essentially a twist pin operatively connected to the coarsely threaded rod-like member, there being a transverse opening through the twist pin adjacent one end thereof, through which the loop forming wire passes, the ends of said wire being retained within the transverse opening by means of a sliding lock pin which passes through a longitudinal opening in the twist pin. The lock pin moves into locking position prior to severing of the wire, and remains in locking position until after -at least one twist has been made in the loop. As a matter of convenience and practical construction, I prefer to use a double-acting air cylinder, the piston and rod thereof being controlled by means of a manually operated four-way valve.

Apparatus illustrating features of my invention is shown in the accompanying drawings, forming a part of this application, in which:

FIG. 1 is a `plan view drawn to a small scale and showing the complete apparatus;

FIG. 2 is a transverse detail sectional view of the forward or `wire tying end and mid portion of the apparatus, drawn to an enlarged scale as compared to FIG. 1;

FIG. 2A is a View taken generally along the same plane as FIG. 2 and showing the rear land adjoining central portion of the apparatus, certain of the parts being broken away and in section, and drawn to the same scale as FIG. 2;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged detail sectional view of the forwardmost portion of the apparatus, showing the twist pin and holding pin mechanism in detaihand also showing the details of the forward wire feed chuck;

FIG. 4 is a detail sectional view taken generally along the line IV--IV of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a detail sectional view taken generally along the line V-V of FIG. 2;

FIG. 6 is a detail sectional View taken generally -along the line VI--VI of FIG. 2A; and, ,v FIG.7 is a typical example of the kind of wire loop and twist thereon which my apparatus accomplishes, and showing a piece of metal lathing attached to a small channel-shaped furring member.

Referring now to the drawings for a better understanding of my invention, and particularly to FIGS. 2 and 2A, it will be seen that my improved apparatus embodies at its rear end a doubleacting fluid pressure cylinder 10 having a piston 11 therein carrying a piston rod 12.

Fuid under pressure, for instance air, may be admitted from a source of supply, not shown, by means of a flexible conduit 13 to the housing of a four-way valve indicated generally at 14. The four-way valve may embody a spool 16 mounted in a ported housing 17, `and may be returned to position by means of a spring 18. A manually operated lever 19, pivoted at 21, may be connected through a stern 22 to the spool 16. As shown in FIG. 2A it will be apparent that with the ports in the position shown fluid under pressure is being supplied from the conduit 13, through the valve port 23, and a passage 24 that leadsV to the forward end of the cylinder whereby the piston 11 is urged to the right as shown in FIG. 2A. Thus, by raising upwardly on the lever 19 fluid may be `admitted to the right-hand end of the `cylinder as viewed in FIG. 2A, it being understood that the exhaust ports for the cyllinder are automatically provided by the porting of the va ve.

The piston rod 12 carries a cross head 26 which may be in the form of a disc. Secured to the disc, as by the threaded section 27, is a length of tube 28 which we will refer to hereafter as the wire feed tube. Secured to the inside of the tube 28 as by soldering or the like is a sleeve 29. The sleeve 29 has an axial bore 31 therein terminating in a shoulder indicated at 32. Also, at its rear end the sleeve 29 has a flared conical opening 33, and a wire passage 34 connects the bore 31 with the ared conical opening 33.

Slidably mounted in the bore 31 of sleeve 29 is a tube 36 having an axial wire receiving opening 37 extending therethrough. The tube 36 is shouldered at 38 and `this shoulder is spaced forwardly of the end 39 of the sleeve 29. Interposed between the shoulder 38 and the end 39 is a compression spring 41, the purpose and function of which will later appear.

Secured inside the tube 28, and with its rear housing portion abutting the forward end of member 36 is a mov able wire feeding chuck 42, the details of which will be described more fully later on.

Forwardly of the housing of the wire feeding chuck 42 is the rear end 43 of a wire guide tube 44. It will be noted that the end 43 of the wire guide tube is fitted against a shoulder 46 provided near the outer end of the wire feed tube 28.

Forwardly of the cylinder is a connecting frame portion 48 having an enlarged shoulder portion 49 formed intergrally thereof. Projecting forwardly of the shoulder or flange 49 is a tubular housing portion 51. Mounted adjacent the forward end of the tubular housing 51 is a figure 8 shaped clamp 52 which is split as indicated at 53, FIG. 5, and which may be drawn together at its center by means of a pair of bolts or the like 54.

Disposed to be clamped in the lower portion of the figure 8 clamp 52 is the rear end of a tube 56. The tube 56 extends forwardly and is threaded as indicated at 57 into a tting or head indicated generally by the numeral 58.

It will be seen that the wire guide tube 44 projects slidably into the bore 59 of a tube 61 having a shoulder 62 on its forward end. The shoulder 62 fits against a shoulder 63 at the forward end of the opening which is threaded at 57 to receive the forwerd end of the tube 56. Mounted in a suitable opening in xed manner in the forward end of the tube 56 is a stationary wire chuck 64 which is similar to chuck 42 and is shown more fully in FIG. 3.

From what has been so far described it will be seen that when the piston rod 12 moves to the left from the position shown in FIG. 2A, the cross head 26 moves to the left as shown in the drawing, carrying with it the tube 28, member 29, chuck 42, and the wire guide feed tube 44. It will further be noted `that the leftward movement imparted to the wire feed tube, by movement of the cross head and tube 28 is through the medium of the compression spring 41, and the purpose and function of this will be later described. Thus, since the chuck 42 will engage the wire W threaded through the apparatus as shown, upon leftward movement as viewed in FIG. 2 and 2A of the chuck, the wire will be fed to the left, or forwardly of the apparatus.

Referring now to FIG. 3 it will be seen that the chucks 42 and 64 may embody a conical seat member 66 which converges to the right as viewed in the drawings, in both instances. Mounted for rolling engagement with the tapered seat are 'balls 67. Forwardly of the balls is a wash* er 68. A spring 6-9 urges the washer and hence the balls to the right as viewed in FIG. 10. Thus, when the wire is threaded through `the chuck as shown, leftward movement of the chuck 42 will cause the balls to seize upon the wire, pushing the wire along. However, the movement of the wire W in chuck 64 causes the balls to compress slightly the spring through the washer 68, and roll freely along the wire W. Upon rightward movement chuck 64 serves to hold the wire against withdrawing into the apparatus while the chuck 42 is returning for a new grip, for a subsequent feeding operation, as will appear.

The fitting S8 is provided with a hardened insert 71 which has a curved wire passage 72 therein as shown. Mounted adjacent the exit end of the opening 72 is a hardened stationary wire shear blade or anvil 73.

Screwed into the cross head 26 as at 74 is the rear end of what we will hereafter refer to as a ratchet nut tube 76. This tube extends slidably into a ratchet nut tube housing 77, also in the form of a tube, and which is clamped at its rear end by the FIGURE 8 clamp 52. Mounted in the outer end of tube 76 is a bushing 78. The bushing 78 is mounted slidably about a coarsely threaded rod-like member 79. Carried by a threaded forward extension 81 of bushing 78 is a ratchet nut indicated generally by the numeral 82.

The coarsely threaded rod-like member or screw 79 is provided with a longitudinal bore 83. A push rod 84 is slidably carried in the bore 83 and bears an outwardly extending flange or head 86 on its rearmost or right-hand end. A pusher sleeve 87 is carried in tube 76 between the head 86 and the cross head 26, and a similar tube or sleeve, which may be called a return sleeve 88, is carried in the tube 76 between the bushing 78 and the head 86 on rod 84. The purpose of the rod 84 and the associated pusher and return sleeves 87 and 88 is to activate a holding pin` mechanism indicated generally at 89.

The holding pin mechanism 89 comprises a housing sleeve 91 which acts as a coupling which rotatably connects the rod 79 to a projecting stem 92 of a wire twist pin indicated generally by the numeral 93.

It will be noted that the forward end of the tube 77 is threaded into the fitting 58 as at 94. Further, the stem 92 of the twist pin 93 carries the enlarged portion 96 which fits in a housing 97 secured by a set screw 98 in the fitting 58. The forward end of the twist pin 93 has a cross opening 99 therein which is located, when the parts are in loop-forming position, in alignment with the exit of the opening 72 in the wire guide member 71.

Mounted in an annular recess 101 in the tting 58 is the rear, flanged end 102 of a cutter sleeve 103. Interposed between the flange 102 of the cutter sleeve and the shoulder 104 of the annular recess 101 is a spring 106.

The enlarged portion 96 of the twist pin is provided with a transversely extending hole 107 which carries a ball detent 108, which is in turn biased outwardly by a spring 109. The ball detent 108 is adapted to seat in a longitudinally extending slot 111 cut into the inner surface of the housing 97.

The holding pin proper 112 slides in a longitudinal bore 113 provided through the twist pin 93. The pin 112 carries a head 114 on its rearmost end. Interposed between the head 114 and the stem 92 of the twist pin 93 and surrounding the lock pin 112 is a compression spring 116 which is adapted to urge the pin 112 rearwardly. Pivotally mounted in the housing 89 is a lock member 117. The head 114 of the lock pin 112 is held in contact with the member 117 by spring 116. The member 117 is notched as at 18 to receive the forward end of the rod 84 when the same is moved forward upon actuation of the apparatus. When the rod 84 engages the member 117 this member is pivoted to the right as viewed in FIG. 3 thereby pushing the lock pin 112 to the right into engagement with the wire W in the opening 99 and twist pin 93. The rearward force of spring 116 presses against member 117, but because of the fact that member 117 is pivoted above the axis of pin 112 and rod 84 it tends to apply a lateral force on rod 84 thus preventing any motion to the rear. The lock pin mechanism is engaged when sleeve 88 contacts the head 86 on the rear portion of rod 84 and pushes the same to the right as viewed in FIG. 2, thus pulling rod 84 out of engagement with the member 117.

Mounted on the forward end of the tting 58 is a pair of linger-like loop forming members 119 and 121. The cross sectional shape of these members is indicated in FIG. 4. Thus, they are small enough to be inserted between the interstices 122 of the usual metal lathing 123. Further, the ringer 119 has an arcuate groove 124 therein while the member 121 has an arcuate groove 126 therein which at its outer end has a tangentialportion 127. It will be noted that these grooves are outwardly flaring as illustrated in FIG. 4 and that they are provided on the facing surfaces of the members 119 and 121.

Various forms of ratchet nuts may be employed, the primary requirement being that as the nut is moved forwardly, or to the left as viewed in the drawings, it slides easily over the coarsely threaded screw 79 without turning same, but when the nut is moved to the right, or rearwardly, it will engage the threads 128 on the screw 79, thereby to rotate screw 79 and the twist pin 93.

From the foregoing the method of constructing and using my invention and the many advantages thereof may now be more fully explained and understood.

With the parts in the position shown in FIGS. 2 and 2A of the drawings, and with the wire W threaded through and stopping where it has previously been cut olf adjacent the stationary anvil member 73, the action is as follows: Upon opening the valve through the handle 19 to let fluid into the rear of the cylinder 10, the piston and rod moves tothe left. This moves the movable chuck 42 to the left, feeding the wire outwardly, causing the end adjacent the member 73 to travel through the opening 99 of the twist pin 93, into the bottom of the groove 124 of the ringer 119, across the member such as a furring strip F, to which the lathing 123 is being applied, into the tangential portion 127 of the curved groove 126 of the member 121, and back through the opening 99. The end of the wire nally comes to rest within the opening 99 of the twist pin 93 in position alongside the portion 129 of the wire which will form the other end of the loop L.

During this same time it will be of course understood that the ratchet nut tube 76 has moved the ratchet nut 82 to the left. Note also that sleeve 87 has contacted the head 86 on rod 84 and moves the same to the left. Iust as the end of the wire comes to rest adjacent the portion 129 of the Wire the rod 84 engages member 117 thus pushing the holding pin 112 to the left and into engagement with the end of the wire and the portion 129 of the wire. At this same time the end 29a of the tube 29 will have come into abutment with the shoulder 61a of the tube 61, it being noted that the tube -29 is drilled out at 29b to slide over the right-hand end of the tube 61. Therefore, with the nut 82 contacting the locking mechanism housing 91 and with 29a and 61a in contact, slight further leftward movement in response to still further leftward movement of the piston rod is permitted by the compression of the spring 41 without overfeeding the wire. Therefore, slight leftward movement moves the screw 79, the locking mechanism 89, and of course the twist pin 93 and the cutter sleeve103 further to the left. The cutter sleeve thus moves into shearing relation with the shear blade or anvil 73 and thus the wire is sheared, with its ends still remaining through the opening 99 in the twist pin 93. Upon releasing the handle 19 the spring 18 pushes the spool valve back into the position shown, whereupon fluid is admitted to the left-hand end of the cylinder, moving all of the mechanism previously mentioned back to the right. During this movement the ratchet nut 82 engages the threads 128, rotatingv the screw 79, in turn rotating the twisting pin 93, thereby twisting the wire as indicated at T in FIG. 7. As the nut 82 moves rearwardly the sleeve 88 comes into contact with the head 86 on the rod 84, thus moving rod 84 to the right out of engagement with the lock member 117, whereupon the spring 116 pressing against head 114 on the holding pin 112 moves pin 112 to the right and out of engagement with the wire at 129. Pin 112 is disengaged after the twist pin 93 has rotated through at least 360. Further turns of the pin 93 serve to further twist the wire and then to throw the ends of the wire back as shown in FIG. 7.

It will be seen that my improved apparatus is fully effective to feed, on each stroke, a predetermined length of wire from a roll, spool or the like, looping about members to be tied, sever the wire, and then twist it. It will further be seen that the actual twisting takes place in that part of the overlapped ends of the severed wire between the lowermost member to be tied and the end of the twist pin 93 outwardly of the opening 99. In other words, the wire is twisted by a member which, in the beginning, lies inside the loop, but when finished lies outside the loop. The ends of the wire outwardly of the twist are thrown by the forces imparted to them by the twisting motion of the pin 93 back and against the lathing or member that is being tied.

In actual operation my invention has proved to be extremely satisfactory. With a tool weighing about six pounds, and being approximately 34 :inches in overall length, using air pressure of between 5l) and 75 pounds per square inch, I have consistently tied between 18 to 30 wires per minute, using 18 gauge wire. This was accomplished in applying metal lathing to the usual channelshaped furring members.

While I have particularly described my invention as useful for tying metal lathing and the like to furring, it will be apparent that it may have other uses. Furthermore, the principles disclosed herein, in my opinion, lend themselves to incorporation in machines for tying heavy wire as well as light or smaller wires.

While I have shown my invention in but one form, it will be obvious to those skilled in the art that it is not so limited, but is susceptible of various changes and modilications without departing from the spirit thereof, and I desire, therefore, that only such limitations shall be placed thereupon as are specifically set forth in the appended claims.

What I claim is:

1. The combination with apparatus for feeding a length of wire and forming a loop from the length of wire having portions of the wire overlapping on one side of the loop, `of means to tie the loop comprising:

( a) a threaded member,

(b) a ratchet nut associated with said member for reciprocal movement relative thereto,

(c) a twist pin operatively connected to said member and having a transverse opening in one end disposed to receive the overlapped portions of the wire,

(d) reciprocable holding means carried by said twist pin and mounted in position to contact the overlapped portions of the wire upon movement in one direction and to release said overlapped portions upon movement in the other direction,

(e) means to move the holding means in said one direction,

(f) means reciprocally to move the ratchet nut and said threaded memberrelative to each other thus to rotate the twist pin and tie the loop, and

(g) means to move said holding means in said other direction after the twist pin has rotated at least 360.

2. In wire loop forming and tying apparatus,

(a) abody,

(b) wire feed means carried by the body and eifective upon actuation to feed a predetermined length of wire from along the length thereof outwardly of the body,

(c) loop for-ming means on the body having portions disposed to be engaged by the length of wire as it is fed from the body and form it into a loop with a portion of the wire adjacent the free end of said length of wire laying alongside the loop and overlapping a portion of wire forming the loop,

(d) means eifective to sever the said loop forming length of wire from the longer length thereof,

(e) a threaded member,

(f) a ratchet nut mounted on said threaded member for reciprocal movement relative thereto,

(g) a twist pin operatively connected to said threaded member and having a transverse opening in one end disposed to receive the overlapping portions of wire forming the loop and having a longitudinal opening intersecting the transverse opening,

(h) reciprocable holding means carried in said longitudinal opening and mounted for movement into and out of Contact with the overlapping portions of wire,

(i) means to move said holding means into contact with the overlapping wire,

(j) means reciprocally to move said ratchet nut relative to said screw member thus to rotate the twist pin, and

(k) =means to move said holding means out of contact with said overlapped portions after the twist pin has rotated through at least 360.

3. In apparatus for looping a length of wire about a member and twisting together the ends thereof,

(a) a loop former embodying oppositely d isposed curved surfaces spaced apart a distance greater than the diameter of the loop to be formed,

(b) means to feed one end to the wire to be looped into contact with one of said curved surfaces whereby said end follows a curved path, moves into engagement with the other of said curved surfaces, completes the loop with the entrance end portion of ther wire lying across another portion of the length thereof,

(c) a threaded member,

(d) a ratchet nut mounted on said threaded member for reciprocal movement relative thereto,

(e) a twist pin operatively connected to said screw member and having portions lying on the inside and Outside `of the loop in the area where said entrance end portion of the wire lies across said another portion of the length thereof,

(f) reciprocable holding means carried by said twist pin and mounted for movement into contact with said area of the wire upon movement in one direction and out of contact with said area upon movement in the other direction,

(g) means to move said Iholding means in said one direction,

(h) means reciprocally to move said ratchet nut relative to said screw member thus to rotate the twist pin, and

(i) means to move said holding means in said other direction after the twist pin has rotated through at least 360.

4. In apparatus for looping a length of wire about a member and then twisting the ends of said length of wire upon each other,

(a) a pair of loop forming members spaced apart a distance to receive between them the member to be looped,

(b) there being a pair of arcuately concave wire threading grooves in facing surfaces of the loop forming members,

(c) means to feed an end of the length of wire into one end of said grooves whereby the said end of wire follows a path defined by the bottom of said groove and, upon continued movement crosses over the member to be looped and into the second groove and thereafter crosses the portion of said length of wire adjacent the wire entrance point of the first of said grooves,

(d) a threaded member,

(e) a ratchet nut mounted on said threaded member for reciprocal movement relative thereto,

(f) rotatable wire twisting means operatively connected to said threaded member and having portions lying on the inside and outside of the loop in the area thereof where the wire is crossed,

(g) holding means carried by said rotatable wire twisting means for reciprocal movement into and out of contact with said loop in the area thereof where the wire is crossed,

(h) means to move said holding means into contact with said loop,

(i) means reciprocally to move said ratchet nut relative to said threaded member thus to rotate the twist pin, and

(j) means t-o move said holding means out of contact with said Aloop after said twisting -means has rotated through at least 360.

5. In apparatus for looping a length of wire about a member and twisting the ends of said length of wire upon itself to form a loop,

(a) an axially elongated body member of a size to be held in the hands of an operator,

(b) means in the body positively to feed axially thereof said length of wire to be looped,

(c) a curved guide carried by the end of the body from which the wire emerges and through which the wire is fed in its path of movement from the end of the body,

(d) a pair of finger-like members on said end of the body from which the wire emerges,

(e) there being arcuate grooves in the facing surfaces of said finger-like members, one of said grooves in one of said members being located to receive the Wire as it is fed from said curved guide,

(f) the second of said grooves being located in position for the wire coming from the first of said grooves to enter thereinto thereby to be forced to continue its circular movement whereby the end of the wire eventually overlaps the wire at thel bottom of the loop,

(g) twisting mechanism having portions between which is located the overlapped portions of the wire thus looped,

(h) holding means carried by said twisting mechanism and effective upon actuation to engage the overlapped portions of the wire thus looped,

(i) means to actuate said holding means,

(j) means to actuate the twisting means thus to twist the wire upon itself and to draw the loop tight about a member located between the finger-like members, and

(k) means to deactivate said holding means after said twisting mechanism has rotated through at least 360.

6. Apparatus as defined in claim 5 in which the fingerlike members are small enough to enter between the interstices of metal lathing and the like.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,245,434 4/1966 Collins et al IL10-93.6

CHARLES W. LANHAM, Prmaly Examiner.

E. M. COMBS, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3245434 *May 16, 1963Apr 12, 1966Collins Edgar GWire looping and tying apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3515178 *Feb 13, 1968Jun 2, 1970Thomas & Betts CorpAutomatic bundling strap installing tool
US3590885 *Jul 31, 1969Jul 6, 1971Ward James ETool for tying wire
US3593759 *Oct 29, 1969Jul 20, 1971Wooge Norman LWire-tying tool
US4094342 *Feb 22, 1977Jun 13, 1978Max Co., Ltd.Automatic binder
US4177842 *Jan 25, 1978Dec 11, 1979Peters Equipment CorporationTying machine
US4614161 *Mar 29, 1985Sep 30, 1986Link Engineering CompanyStator coil lacing cord securing apparatus and method
US4685493 *Dec 31, 1985Aug 11, 1987Sadao YuguchiReinforcing bar binding device
US5217049 *Jul 13, 1992Jun 8, 1993Gateway Construction Company, Inc.Power rebar typing tool
US5431196 *Jan 3, 1994Jul 11, 1995Belcan Specialty Equipment Engineering Division Of Belcan Engineering Groups, Inc.Power rebar tying tool
US5485670 *Aug 30, 1993Jan 23, 1996Alliance Winding Equipment, Inc.Stator coil lacing machine
US5511502 *Feb 25, 1994Apr 30, 1996Alliance Winding Equipment, Inc.Automatic loader for a stator coil lacing machine
US5615472 *Jun 7, 1995Apr 1, 1997Alliance Winding Equipment, Inc.Method of adjusting a stator coil lacing machine
US5694983 *Mar 8, 1996Dec 9, 1997Max Co., Ltd.Reinforcing bar binding machine
US5826629 *Jan 17, 1997Oct 27, 1998John E. BurfordPneumatic wire tying apparatus
WO1995018688A1 *Jan 3, 1995Jul 13, 1995Gateway Constr CoPower rebar tying tool
WO1998031486A1 *Jan 13, 1998Jul 23, 1998Burford John EPneumatic wire tying apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification140/93.6, 140/93.00A, 140/101, 140/93.00R
International ClassificationB21F15/00, B65B13/28, B65B13/18
Cooperative ClassificationB65B13/285, B21F15/00
European ClassificationB65B13/28T, B21F15/00