Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3323874 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 6, 1967
Filing dateFeb 9, 1965
Priority dateFeb 9, 1965
Publication numberUS 3323874 A, US 3323874A, US-A-3323874, US3323874 A, US3323874A
InventorsEdwin D Phillips
Original AssigneeEdwin D Phillips
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Laboratory accessory equipment
US 3323874 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 6, 1967 E. D. PHILLIPS 3,323,874

LABORATORY ACCES SORY EQUIPMENT Filed Feb. 9, 1965 4 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR EDWIN D. PHILLIPS v WJW ATTORNEYS June 1-967 E. D. PHILLIPS 3,

LABORATORY ACCESSORY EQUIPMENT Filed Feb. 9, 1965 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR EDWIN D. PHILLIPS 13%; M JW ATTORNEYS June 6, 1967 E. D. PHILLIPS LABORATORY ACCESSORY EQUIPMENT 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Feb. 9, 1965 TIGJO INVENTOR EDWIN D. PH ILLIPS WJW ATTORNEYS June 6, 19 4 i E. D. PHILLIPS 3,

LABORATORY ACCESSORY EQUIPMENT Filed Feb. 9, 1965 l 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTOR EDWIN D. PHILLIPS ATTORNEYS United States Patent Ofi ice 3,323,874 Patented June 6, 1967 3,323,874 LABGRATORY ACCESSORY EQUIPMENT Edwin 1). Phillips, 170 Albert St., North Plaiufield, NJ. 07063 Filed Feb. 9, 1965, Ser. No. 431,382 24 Claims. c1. 23-292 The present invention relates broadly to improvements in articles of laboratory equipment or accessory parts for laboratory apparatus.

A primary object of the present invention is to provide improvements in methods and means of joining or coupling together accessory parts and elements of scientific apparatus such as is commonly used in all types of laboratories.

More particularly, the invention has for an important object to provide improved methods and means of joining together or coupling accessory parts in such a way as to obtain positive leakproof contact between the parts.

Another object of the invention is to provide methods and means of joining or coupling accessory parts of laboratory apparatus whereby the contracting surfaces of such parts will be so positively and firmly held together as to remain leakproof under high vacuum when connected in pressure or vacuum lines.

A still further object of the invention is to provide improved accessory units for scientific and laboratory apparatus made entirely or in part of polytetrahaloethylene synthetic resin, polystyrene or other high melting-point synthetic resins highly inert chemically and resistant to the action of corrosive chemicals and which are generally form-retaining but which are capable of yielding slightly under pressure and of returning to original shape when the pressure is relieved. One such polytetrahaloethylene synthetic resin preferred for use in the production of the accessory parts of the present invention is polytetrafluoroethylene known and sold commercially by the E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Company under the name Teflon. This particular resin is known to have a wax-like or soapy feel and to be self-polishing and self-lubricating when parts made therefrom are moved relative to one another under pressure. Such resin is also chemically stable under relatively high temperatures such, for example, as 550 F. and physically stable at temperatures approximating 300 F.

Another object of the invention is to provide methods and means of joining together or coupling accessory parts formed wholly or in part of a synthetic resin such as that referred to, which are designed for quick and easy coupling and uncoupling one with another.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a method and means of joining together and maintaining the accessory parts together Without the use of clamps, threaded elements or conventional tensioning devices to draw or hold the parts together.

Still another, and specific, object is to provide an improved apertured or tubular stopper and seal wherein the seal component is particularly designed for maintaining a tight leakoroof joint between the stopper and a thermometer or other rod-like body extending through the stopper.

Still another object of the invention is to provide an improved valve, stopper and seal formed throughout of Teflon.

A still further object of the invention is to provide an improved valve structure and sealing structure for connection with a glass buret, separatory funnel or similar glass structure.

Another object of the invention is to provide a novel synthetic resin coupling device designated for connecting together adjacent ends of glass tubing and maintaining such tubing ends in coupled relation and sealed against leakage.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a novel synthetic resin plug valve unit designed to fit in a tapered glass valve barrel and comprising a sleeve part to position in the glass barrel and a rotatable plug part positioned in the sleeve part.

Other objects and advantages of the present invention will become apparent as the description of the same proceeds and the invention will be best understood from a consideration of the following detailed description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings forming a part of the specification and wherein:

FIG, 1 is a perspective view of the top of a flask of the three neck type, showing positioned in one neck a plug and seal unit of synthetic resin constructed in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a sectional view, on an enlarged scale, taken substantially on the line 22 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 illustrates in perspective an all synthetic resin combination valve, stopper and seal showing the stopper in a flask neck and wherein the valve plug is in the form of a straight cylinder.

FIG. 4 is a sectional view, on an enlarged scale, taken substantially on the line 44 of FIG. 3.

FIG. 5 is an exploded view showing a seal structure formed throughout of synthetic resin, the parts of the seal structure being in section and also showing an abraded end portion of a glass tube. I

FIG. 6 illustrates in longitudinal section an all-resin or all-Teflon buret valve or stopcock of the refill type, in combination with a seal securing a squared-01f end of a buret body coupled to the stopcock by the seal.

FIG. 7 is a sectional view taken substantially on the line 77 of FIG. 6 and in a plane perpendicular to the length of the valve body.

FIG. 8 is a sectional view generally corresponding to FIG. 6 and illustrating the valve plug turned from the FIG. 7 position.

FIG. 8-A shows a modification of the seal of FIG. 8, in which the end of the buret is beaded.

FIG. 9 illustrates in section a portion of a sealing coupling forming a part of a synthetic resin buret stopcock, and the bottom end of a glass buret altered by removal of the usual of the conventional integral glass stopcock for connection by the illustrated seal with the all-synthetic resin or Teflon stopcock.

FIG. 10 illustrates the all-synthetic resin stopcock structure in longitudinal section together with the coupling structure shown in FIG. 9, with the threaded neck of the buret secured to the stopcock.

FIG. 11 is a perspective view of an all-synthetic resin coupling device for connecting together in fluid tight sealing connection the ends of a pair of glass tubes.

FIG. 12 is a longitudinal section taken substantially on the line 12-12 of FIG. 11.

FIG. 13 is a perspective view of a glass separatory funnel having the conventional glass stopcock plug replaced by the two-part synthetic resin plug of the present invention and showing the discharge tip of the funnel supported in a synthetic resin adapter positioned in the neck of a flask.

FIG. 14 is a vertical longitudinal section taken substantially on line 14-14 of FIG. 13 and on an enlarged scale.

FIG. 15 is a horizontal section taken substantially on the line 15-15 of FIG. 14.

FIG. 16 is an exploded view illustrating the several parts of the synthetic resin stopcock plug unit.

Referring now more particularly to the drawings, it will be noted that there are illustrated a number of laboratory accessory devices each of which embodies two or more individual cooperatively related parts.

Such devices are individually unique and each is formed of a synthetic resin of the type hereinbefore referred to and having the desired characteristics hereinbefore enumerated.

As will be seen from the following description of these accessory parts or devices, while they are structurally different and each is novel or unique in itself, the parts of each of the devices are designed to cooperate in such a manner as to utilize the inherent characteristics of the synthetic resin for effecting in a novel manner a tight join or seal between the parts.

Referring now specifically to FIGS. 1 and 2, the numeral generally designates a conventional type of laboratory flask which is here shown as being of the three neck variety but which may be of the variety having one, two or more necks and this is illustrated merely to' show the use of the plug and seal unit generally designated 12. It will be understood, of course, that this unit may be used in the neck of any other type of receptacle where it may be found suitable.

The plug or stopper portion of the unit 12 is designated 14 and it is formed with the head 16 having formed therein from the top thereof the chamber 18, the wall of which chamber is screw threaded as indicated at 20.

The numeral 22 designates a bore or passage extending axially through the plug body 14 and opening at its upper end into the chamber 18. Externally the body 14 below the head 16 is given the proper taper to fit into the neck portion 24 of the flask.

Threaded into the chamber 18 is a gland nut 26, the lower end portion of which is externally screw threaded as indicated at 28 and through which a bore 30 is formed. The top or head 32 of the gland nut may be of circular configuration and grooved or otherwise formed as indicated at-34 to facilitate grasping the nut.

Also, as illustrated in FIG. 1, the head portion 16 of the plug or stopper is also preferably externally scored or ribbed as indicated at'36 to facilitate grasping the plug for effecting its insertion into or extraction from the flask neck.

Adapted to position in the bottom of the chamber 18 is a gasket or packing Washer 38. This washer is centrally apertured as shown and also it is of dished forma-' tion. Thus, the washer has a top convex side 40 and a bottom concave side 42 and when placed in operative position in the chamber for compression by the gland nut 26 the concave side is directed downwardly so that the gland nut presses, when threaded inwardly, against the top of the convex side.

The entire plug and seal unit generally designated 12 isformed of the desired or selected syntheticresin plastic, preferably Teflon as hereinbefore referred to.

This unit 12 may be employed for supporting a rod-like body in association with a flask or other structure in the manner shown. Such body may be in the form 'of athermometer as here shown and generally designated 40 and in suchcase the bores 22 and 30 and the aperture through the gasket 38 would be of the proper size to permit the thermometer body to slide therethroughuAfter' the thermometer has been set to the proper position for locating the bulb in the flask, the gland nut may be threaded down so as to compress the gland packing orgasket 38, the periphery of the gasket being squeezed against the wall of the chamber 18 while the edge of the opening through the gasket washer will be squeezed tight around the thermometer" body, or other similar body extending therethrough, to form a secure joint and tight seal.

FIGS. 2 and 3 illustrate a combined all-synthetic resin valve or stopcock, seal joint and drip-tip stopper unit which is generally designated 42.

In the construction of this unit a suitable length of Teflon bar or rod is turned on a lathe to form intermediate its ends the substantially spherical valve body 44. One

4 end of the body of material is shaped to form the circular head 46, while the opposite end portion is shaped to form the stopper 48.

The exterior-of the stopper body is turned or shaped to have a suitable taper to fit into a neck of a flask or other piece of glassware, the taper being, of course, in the direction of the free end of the body of material from which the unit is formed and at the tapered or smaller end of the stopper body a terminal portion is turned down exteriorly to a smaller diameter to form the end piece 52 which is cut across obliquely as indicated at 54 to provide a tapered tip 56.

The plug body 48 is hollowed or chambered as indicated at 58 whereby the plug is given a relatively thin wall 60 and the chamber extends, of course, through the end piece 52 providing the outlet or discharge opening 62 at the end of the plug.

The end of the unit opposite from the plug 48 has the gland nut chamber 64 formed in the head portion 46 as shown, which chamber is screw threaded as at 66 to receive the threaded portion of the gland nut 68, which portion is designated 70 while the head of the nut is desig nated 72. This nut construction is the same as that described and mentioned with the description of FIG. 2.

The chamber 64 is designed to receive the packing gland or washer 74 which is the same in construction as the gland 38 and, accordingly, need not be further described.

The numeral 76 designates a bore formed axially through the body of the unit 42, opening at one end into the chamber 64 and at the opposite end into the chambered stopper 48.

Formed transversely through the valve or stopcock body 44 is a plug bore or chamber 78 which intersects the bore 76. This bore is cylindrical and straight from end to end or is of constant diameter throughout its length and is adapted to receive the plug or barrel 80, of the stopcock. The cylindrical plug 80 is formed oversize with respect to the diameter of the bore 78. It is preferably about oversize and accordingly, by reason of the quality of the synthetic resin to yield slightly under pressure the plug can be forced into the bore and will be tightly gripped by the slightly expanded body 44. As shown in FIG. 4, one end of the plug 80 is free or unobstructed, being of constant diameter to such end whereby the said free end can be readily inserted into the bore. At its opposite end the plug 80 is encircled by the collar 82 which limits the extent to which the plug can be forced into the bore and this collar is integral with the head portion 84 which, of course, forms an axial extension of the plug body and the head portion.84 is transversely bored to receive the cross arm 86 which may be of any suitable material but is preferably of a rigid type of synthetic resin to facilitate manually grasping and rotating the plug body V 7 At the proper location from the collar 82 of the plug body, there is formed through the plug body the transverse passage which is adapted to be aligned with the bore 76 to permit free through flow of fluid from a source connected with the head 46 toithe chamber of the stopper 48. p i

The. combination unit 4 2 ,isillustrated in connection with a tubular body 90, an end of which body is secured.

by the seal and coupling in the chamber 60 in alignment withand in communication with the upper end of the bore 76. V

While the illustrated seal will tightly grip the end of the tubular body 9 0,when the gland washer is compressed thereabout, when the end of the body 90 is extended into and through the bore 92 of the gland nut 68 and through the center of the gland washer, an additional means is provided to insure a tight connection which will prevent the tubular body from being pulled out, suchmeans being shown in detail and described in connection with FIG. 5.

The tubular body may be that of a buret from which the conventional stopcock and dispensing tip have been eliminated. In other words, with the present invention in its several forms, one of which is here shown in FIGS. 3 and 4, the buret may be initially formed without a dispensing tip or without a stopcock and dispensing tip as an integral part thereof as it is in conventional laboratory glassware. Such dispensing tips or stopcocks and dispensing tips in conventional laboratory glassware frequently are struck and broken, thus making the buret useless whereas by the provision of the unit 42 here illustrated and other units hereinafter described, a straight buret tube may be employed for performing all of the operations which may be performed with a conventional all glass structure and in the event of the breakage of the buret tube the expense of replacement is relatively minor.

FIG. 5 illustrates, in detail, a joint and seal structure designed to be used in association with a number of different types of unit structures such as that illustrated in FIGS. 1 to 4 inclusive and in the figures hereinafter described. This joint and seal or coupler is particularly well adapted for securing glass tubing or rods of glass to a Teflon valve or stopcock or for securing together the ends of two pieces of glass tubing as particularly illustrated in FIGS. 11 and 12. The seal or coupler is illustrated in association with a chambered body corresponding to the bodies or heads 16 and 46. In this coupler structure the chambered body is designated 94 and has therein the chamber 96 which leads into a passage or bore 98. The packing washer 100 is of the same form as the washer 38 hereinbefore described while the threaded gland nut is generally designated 102 and is of the same construction as the nut 26 and those shown in other figures.

For efiecting a positive non-slipping coupling between the Teflon bodies 100 and 102 and a glass rod or glass tube such as that shown and designated 104, the end of the rod or tube which is to be secured to the coupler is roughened or abraded in a suitable manner as, for example, by the use of a piece of emery cloth so as to form the roughened surface 106. When the end of the tube or rod is gripped in the coupler by the compressed gasket washer 100, it will be seen that the washer will be constricted around the abraded surface 106 and thus the end of the tube or rod cannot be pulled out until the gland nut is loosened.

FIGS. 6 to 8 inclusive illustrate another embodiment of the invention in the form of a re-fill stopcock unit adapted for attachment to a straight buret tube for use in place of those burets having integral glass stopcocks and re-fill tubes. This unit is generally designated 108 and comprises the valve plug body 116 connected with the head 112 and upon the opposite side from the head the body is connected with the relatively long tapered discharge tip 114. The body of this unit 108 is formed from a single rod or bar of the synthetic resin plastic such as Teflon in the same manner as the body of the unit 42. In other words, a single length of the synthetic resin material may be turned on a lathe to form the spherical valve body 110 and the cylindrical head portion 112. The long tapered tip 114 is also formed by a turning operation and may be axially drilled to form the bore 116 which opens at its upper end into the gasket chamber 118.

The numeral 120 designates the plug bore which is straight or of constant diameter throughout and which extends diametrically of the body 110 intersecting the discharge bore or passage 116.

The numeral 122 designates the valve plug, the body portion of which is cylindrical and slightly oversized with respect to the bore 120, as in the case of the plug 89.

The head end of the plug .122 is designated 124 and the end of the plug where it joins the head carries the encircling collar 126 which limits the extent of insertion of the plug into the bore. The opposite or foot end of the plug 122 is extended and tapered OlT to form the connector tip 128 which is exteriorly ribbed as shown to insure firm connection with an end of a flexible tube which may be slipped thereon.

The barrel 122 is provided at the proper location with the transverse through bore 13! for alignment with the passage 115. In addition, the outer or foot end 128 of the barrel is chambered as indicated at 132, which chamber opens through the end of the tip 128 while the opposite end of the chamber communicates with a passage 134 which is offset from the transverse passage and opens through the side of the barrel at 136 as shown whereby it may be put in communication with the passage 116 when the barrel is rotated to set the transverse passage 130 at right angles to the passage 116 as will be readily seen in FIGS. 7 and 8.

The numeral 138 designates a buret tube having a square end, which is coupled to the head 112 of the stopcock of the unit 1&3 in a similar manner to that illustrated in FIG. 4. The same seal and coupler structure is employed as shown and which, accordingly, consists of the gasket 140 and the threaded gland nut 1 42. As shown, the lower end portion of the buret tube 138 is abraded or roughened at 144 and thus when the gland packing or gasket 140 is compressed by the nut 142, the abraided end of the tube will be firmly held.

The unit .108 is formed throughout of the selected synthetic resin plastic, preferably Teflon. Accordingly, it will be apparent that when the same is in use as a part of a buret the usual operations in which a buret is employed, can be readily carried out and due to the fact that the botom end structure, consisting of the unit 108, of the buret is formed throughout of Teflon, the ever present danger of breakage of the stopcock or discharge tip, when these parts are formed of glass, is completely eliminated. As hereinabove pointed out, in the event of breakage of the buret tube itself replacement thereof may be effected easily and quickly and at minimum expense.

FIG. 8-A illustrates another method of modifying the squared off end of a tube, such as a buret tube, whereby to insure its firm connection to a stopcock or other body by the seal or coupler.

In this construction, in FIG. 8A, the body which is chambered to receive the gland nut is designated 94, while the gland nut is designated 192' and the gasket washer is designated 106. The tube 164 here shown has the end edge beaded slightly as indicated at 104" whereby it will be seen that when the gasket is compressed therearound and against the bead, the end of the tube will be firmly held against withdrawal from the coupler.

FIGS. 9 and 10 illustrate another form of the all-synthetic resin, or Teflon, stopcock and means of coupling the same to an end of a tubular glass body.

The glass body here illustrated may be the lower or bottom end of a glass buret which, instead of being formed with the conventional integral glass stopcock or valve structure, has its lower end screw threaded for attachment thereto of the Teflon stopcock unit. In these figures the numeral 146 generally designates the glass tube, which, as stated, may be a buret tube. The lower end of this tube is drawn into a neck portion 148 through which the discharge passage 150 extends and externally the neck is screw threaded as indicated at 152. The bot-tom end of the neck 148 is formed with the concave recess or seat 154.

The numeral 156 generally designates a plastic stopcock unit which like the previously described units 42 and 188, is formed from a single piece of the selected synthetic resin, having the barrel or body 158 to receive the straight oversize valve plug 160 which is transversely bored at 162 to form the necessary passage for communication with or alignment with the outlet passage 164 which in the stopcock structure here shown extends through the relatively long tapered tip 166 corresponding to the tip 114.

The upper end of the unit 156 is formed with the relatively long neck portion 168 through which the passage 166 continues to open through the top end of this portion.

The top end of the neck portion has the dome shaped head 170, the top surface of which is designated 172 and has the same curvature. as the seat 154 in which it is adapted to be positioned.

The head 170 is of materially greater diameter than the neck 168 of the plug body thus providing or forming the under surface or flange surface 174- and adjacent to the neck 168 this surface is cut away to form the annular channel 176 which encircles the neck as shown.

The head 170 together with the flange forming periphery thereof thus forms a type of gasket similar to the gasket 38 and the other gaskets hereinbefore described, to be compressed, in the manner about to be described, by the recess end of the neck 148 which in this construction functions as a gland nut.

The numeral 178 designates a cylindrical receptacle which corresponds to the gland nut receiving head 4-6 of the unit 42 or the head 12 of the unit shown in FIG. 2. This receptacle has the chamber 180 formed therein, the wall of which is screw threaded as indicated at 182 and the diameter of the chamber is such as to receive the threaded neck portion 148.

The receptacle 178 has a bottom which is formed the aperture 136.

Upon the inner side of the bottom 184 the aperture 186 is encircled by the angular rib 188 which is of the proper circumference to enter the channel 180 when the parts are assembled in the manner about to be described.

In assembling the stopcock unit and a buret tube such as that illustrated or another glass tube of corresponding form and having the exteriorly threaded neck 148, it will be seen that the receptacle may be threaded onto the neck 148 after the head 170 of the neck extension 168 of the valve plug body, has been inserted through the opening 186 to the interior of the receptacle. By turning the receptacle in the fashion of a nut, on the buret neck 148 the recessed end of this neck and the convex surface of 184 in the center of the head 170 will be'drawn together and the head flange may be tightly compressed against the inner side of the bottom 184 of the receptacle with the rib 188 tightly pressed into the annular channel 176, thereby forming a strong fiuid tight seal.

In the formation of the receptacle body 178 and the head 170 of the neck portion 168 of the plug body 158,

the diameter of the aperture 186 and the overall diameterof the head 170 are so dimensioned that the head may be forced through the aperture 186 to the assembled position in which it is illustrated.

This may be easily accomplished by reason of the fact that the synthetic resin plastic of which the parts are formed, is of a resilient yielding nature, the aperture expanding sufiiciently under force and the flange of the head 171 being compressed also by force to permit the head to pass through the aperture.

FIGS. 9 and illustrate a coupler unit designed to facilitate the easy and quick connection of ends of glass tubing to provide a firm leakproof joint therebetween. This coupling unit which is generally designated 1% is a twin form of the hereinbefore described seal or coupler such as is illustrated in FIG. 5. In this twin coupler the numeral 192 generally designates an elongate barrel body having each of the ends formed with the gasket chamber 194. These chambers open in opposite directions through the adjacent ends of the body and are connected at their inner ends by the axial passage 196 formed in the middle portion of the body 192.

Each chamber 194 is screw threaded as indicated at 198 to receive the threaded end portion 200 of a gland nut 202. In each of the chambers 194 one or more packing gland washers 204 is positioned. These washers are of the same dished form or concavo-convex form as the washer or gasket 1G0 and each of the gland nuts has an axial passage 296 therethrough which aligns with and coincides with the aperture of the washer 204 at the inner end of the nut and which passage and washer aperture are of the proper diameter to have an end of a tube of glass or the like, designated 2198, extended therethrough.

It will, of course, be apparent that the entire twin coupler unit illustrated in FIGS. 11 and 12 is formed throughout of the selected synthetic resin material.

The passages 266 through the gland nuts 2G2 and the openings in the packing washers 284 are slightly less in diameter than the outside diameter of the tube 208 which is to be extended therethrough. The material, will of course, yield under the proper amount of force to permit the tubes to be inserted as illustrated and after the disposition of the open ends of the tubes in the manner shown, that is, with such ends against the bottom of the chambers, the tube ends may be tightly gripped by threading the gland nuts inwardly to compress the washers 204. If additional assurance is desired of the maintenance of the coupling against separation by the ends of the tubes coming out of the packing glands, the exterior surface of the tube at each end may be abraded or roughened as illustrated at 106 in FIG. 5.

Referring now to FIGS. 13 to 16 inclusive there is illustrated and generally designated 210, a valve or stopcock rotary plug assembly formed of synthetic resin plastic and adapted to be used in glassware made with a tapered plug glass barrel for receiving a tapered ground glass rotary plug of conventional form.

With the rotary plug assembly illustrated, use may be made of the conventional tapered glass barrel which may be internally frosted but wherein a grindingin of a glass rotary plug to fit such barrel is not required since the rotary plug assembly 210 of the present invention is so designed that it may be installed in a glass barrel and the straight cylindrical plug part thereof made to have a tight seating in its carrying outer part.

In the figures illustrating the use of the Teflon stopcock assembly 210 there is shown a conventional type of laboratory glassware which is generally designated 212 and which, as shown, represents a 'separatory funnel. The body of the funnel 212 has the conventional neck portion 214 in which is shown fitted a hollow Teflon stopper 216. The bottom end of the funnel body is formed with the conventional tapered glass barrel 218 for the reception of a rotary glass plug.

Also formed integrally with the funnel body and forming an actual extension of the lower side of the barrel 218 is the conventional dropping tip 220 formed of glass and cut obliquely at its lower end as shown to form the usual tip 222.

The improved synthetic resin plug assembly 210 comprises an outer sleeve part 224 which at its smaller end is extended in the solid exteriorly screw threaded stud 226 designed to receive a nut 228 of resin material.

The sleeve 224 is externally tapered to conform approximately to the taper of the glass barrel interior a shown in FIG. 15 while internally the sleeve is provided with the straight cylindrical plug chamber 230 which opens through the larger end of the tapered sleeve and is closed at its inner end, thereby forming a blind bore.

The wall of the tapered sleeve 224 is provided with the diametrically opposite longitudinally elongated apertures or slots 232 for the passage of fluid therethrough from the funnel body to the tube 220 through the rotary plug 234.

The plug 234 is of solid cylindrical form and is of constant diameter throughout its length and is slightly oversize with respect to the bind bore forming the plug chamber 230. The outer end of the plug 234 is formed with the head portion 236 through which is extended a cross amr 238 which also is of resin material by preference.

At the outer end of the plug body 234 the body is encircled by the collar 240 which limits its extension into the plug chamber 230 as will be seen in FIG. 14 and the plug is provided with the diametrical flow passage 9 236 which aligns with the apertures 232 of the sleeve body when the plug is fully inserted into the chamber.

As will be readily appreciated, the stopcock rotary plug assembly 210 is self-seating or self-conforming in the tapered interior of the glass barrel 218, In installing the assembly, the sleeve 224 is introduced into the glass barrel and a suitable washer 236" of the selected synthetic resin, may then be placed upon the stud 226 after which the nut 228 is threaded onto the stud and when drawn up tightly against the washer which is seated against the small end of the barrel 218, the sleeve 224 will be drawn in and will fit itself or seat itself in the barrel.

As previously stated, the blind bore or chamber 230 of the sleeve will be made of a diameter slightly smaller by about or of an inch, than the rotary plug 234. The rotary plug is then forced into the chamber 230, the material of the sleeve and the plug yielding slightly to permit the two parts to be assembled in this manner, until the collar 240 comes into position against the outer and larger end of the sleeve. Due to the peculiar self-lubricating quality of Teflon and similar synthetic resin mate rials, it will be seen that the plug may be rotated within the barrel sleeve 234, without eflort and will maintain a fluid tight seal.

The drop tube 220 extending from the glass barrel portion of the funnel is extended through the axial passage 242 in the top of an adapter stopper which is generally designated 244. This stopper is of synthetic resin plastic, preferably Teflon, and the lower portion of the stopper is hollow or chambered as indicated at 146 whereby it may be made to fit tightly in the neck 248 of a necked receptacle as shown.

The upper end of the dropping tube 220 may be abraded as indicated at 250 to insure a tight non-slipping connection with the adapter stopper, the bore 242 in this case also being a few thousandths of an inch smaller in diameter than the outside diameter of the tube whereby the tight leakproof joint will be established between the adapter and the tube.

From the foregoing it will be seen that there is provided in the present invention, in association with a number of different forms of laboratory accessory units, formed of synthetic resin plastic of the character stated, new and novel means of effecting tight leakproof joints or couplings between interconnected or interdigitating parts, the joints or connections being in some instances maintained firmly against separation as well as being leakproof and in other instances being maintained to permit interfitting parts to be moved, rotated or shifted one with respect to the other while maintaining the leakproof association desired.

As this invention may be embodied in several forms Without departing from the spirit or essential characteristics thereof, the present embodiment is therefore illustrative and not restrictive, since the scope of the invention is defined by the appended claims rather than by the description preceding them, and all changes that fall Within the metes and bounds of the claims or that form their functional as Well as conjointly cooperative equivalents, are therefore intended to be embraced by those claims.

I claim:

1. An article of laboratory equipment adapted to be coupled to an article of laboratory glassware, said article of equipment comprising an elongate body having a bore formed longitudinally therethrough, said body having a chamber therein at one end thereof, the chamber having an open top and having a bottom and said bore opening into said chamber through said bottom, said chamber being adapted to have a part of an article of laboratory glassware introduced thereinto, separate pressure distortable clamping and sealing within said chamber at the bottom thereof, and means within said chamber for applying pressure to said distortable means to compress and distort the distortable means against the bottom of the chamber and against the said introduced part of the glassware to thereby form a fluid tight seal between said body and the said part of the article of glassware, and said body and said pressure distortable means being formed of a synthetic resin plastic of high melting point and being inert chemically and'resistant to the action of corrosive chemicals.

2. The invention as defined by claim 1, wherein the said synthetic resin plastic is Teflon.

3. The invention according to claim 1, wherein said body is externally tapered through the major portion of the length thereof from adjacent to the chambered end to the opposite end, and said tapered portion being of externally circular cross section and forming a flask stopper.

4. The invention according to claim 1, wherein said body is formed intermediate its ends as a stopcock plug barrel, said plug barrel being cylindrical and of constant diameter throughout its length, and a straight cylindrical transversely bored rotary plug retained under compression in said barrel.

5. An article of laboratory equipment comprising an elongate body of Teflon and having a portion of one end formed as a head, the body tapering from said head forming portion to the opposite end thereof and forming a flask stopper, said head having a chamber therein opening through the adjacent end of the body, the body having an axial bore therethrough opening into said chamber, said chamber being internally screw threaded, a separate annular gasket within the chamber at the bottom thereof and a gland nut threaded into the chamber and having an axial bore therethrough aligned with the first named bore, said bores being designed to have a rod-like body extended therethrough and passing through said gasket, and said gland nut when threaded into said chamber compressing said gasket in the bottom of the chamber for establishing a fluid tight seal with a'body extending through the gland nut and the stopper bore.

6. The invention according to claim 5, wherein the said gasket and the gland nut are also formed of Teflon and said gasket is of concave-convex form.

7. An article of laboratory equipment comprising a stopcock having a body portion, a top head portion, and an oppositely extending bottom portion, said body top portion having a chamber formed therein and opening through the adjacent end of the body, the chamber being internally screw threaded, a separate apertured gasket washer within the bottom portion of the chamber, a gland nut threaded into the chamber through the open top thereof, said gland nut having an axial passage therethrough aligned with said Washer, said body having a longitudinal passage therethrough opening at an upper end into the chamber in alignment with the gland nut passage, the body having a transversely extending bore therethrough of circular cross section and of constant diameter from one end to the other and forming a rotary plug barrel, a cylindrical plug in said barrel having a transverse bore adapted to align with said axial passage in one position of rotation of the plug, and said body, top head portion, bottom portion and rotary plug together with said washer and said gasket nut being formed of Teflon.

8. The invention according to claim 7, wherein said rotary plug has an initial circumferential size slightly larger than said barrel and is maintained under compression in the barrel.

9. A laboratory stopcock comprising an elongate body having a middle portion formed with a plug bore extending transversely therethrough, said bore being of circular cross section and of constant diameter throughout a straight rotary plug in and extending through said bore, said plug having a head on one end and a collar adjacent to the head and of a larger diameter than said bore, said collar limiting the extent of insertion of the plug into said bore, the plug body having a passage extending diametriasaasva cally therethrough, said body having a portion of one end formed to provide a head, said head having a chamber therein opening through the adjacent end of the body, the elongate body having an axial passage therethrough opening into said chamber and adapted for alignment with the said radial bore of the plug, means for securing an end of an elongate body of laboratory glassware in said chamber comprising a separate gland washer positioned in said chamber at the bottom thereof and having an aperture aligned with the axial passage of the body and a gland nut, said chamber lbeing screw threaded and said gland nut being threaded for threaded engagement in said chamber and the gland nut having a passage axially therethrough, and said body, rotary plug, gland nut and gland washer being formed entirely of Teflon.

10. The invention according to claim 9, wherein the said body has its opposite end extended to form a buret type dispensing tip.

11. The invention according to claim 9, wherein the said body has the opposite end from said head extended from said middle portion in the form of a tapered flask stopper.

12. The combination with a buret tube of glass having a square-cut lower end, of a refill stopcock comprising an elongate unit having a head at one end, a middle portion forming a valve plug body and an elongate opposite end portion, said plug body having a plug bore therethrough perpendicular to the length of the unit and of constant diameter throughout, an elongate rotary plug having a head at one end, a middle portion fitting in and under compressed tension in said plug bore for rotation therein and an elongate terminal portion, said unit head having a chamber therein opening through the adjacent end of the unit, the unit having a fluid flow passage extending axially therethrough from and opening into the chamber to the end of said elongate end portion and intersecting said plug bore, said plug middle portion having a transverse passage located to align with said fluid flow passage in one position of rotation of the rotary plug, said rotary plug having another passage therein which opens at one end through the end of said terminal portion and opens at its other end through the side of the plug at a location to align with said flow passage in another rotational position of the rotary plug, said buret tube having said square-cut end positioned in said chamber for discharge into the adjacent end of the flow passage, and gland packing and packing nut means in said chamber sealing said end of the buret tube therein and said unit, the rotary plug, the gland and gland nut being formed throughout of a synthetic resin plastic.

13. The invention according to claim 12, wherein the stated synthetic resin plastic is Teflon.

14. The invention according to claim 12, wherein said square-cut end of the buret tube has an abraded outer surface and said gland packing is in the form of an annular member encircling the abraded end of the tube and said nut is threaded in the chamber and compresses and deforms the washer against the abraded end of the tube and against a surface of the chamber.

15. The combination with a straight buret tube of glass having a square-cut lower end, of a stopcock comprising an elongate unit having a portion of one end forming a head, a middle portion forming a valve plug body and an elongate opposite end portion, said plug body having a plug bore therethrough perpendicular to the length of the unit and of constant diameter throughout, an elongate rotary plug having a head at one end and fitting in and under compressed tension in said plug bore for rotation therein, the plug having an encircling collar of larger diameter than the bore and separating the body of the plug from the head portion thereof, the unit having a fluid flow passage extending axially therethrough from and opening into said chamber to the 'end of said elongate portion and intersecting said plug bore, said plug having a transverse passage located in the bore enclosed portion thereof to align with said fluid flow passage in one posialignment with tion .of rotation of the rotary plug, the said buret tube having the said square-cut. end positioned in said cham* her in alignment with and for discharge into the adjacent end of the flow passage, and gland packing and nut means in said chamber in encircling relation with the adjacent end of said tube and sealing the said end of the buret tube therein, and said unit, said rotary plug, gland and gland nut all being formed throughout of a synthetic resin plastic.

16. The invention according to claim 15, wherein said synthetic resin plastic is Teflon and wherein the said end of the tube is roughened in the area thereof encircled by the gland packing for establishing a non-slipping coupling.

17. The invention according to claim 15, wherein said gland packing is in the form of a concavo-convex washer encircling the said end of the buret tube with the convex side directed downwardly and the said end of the tube is formed with a lip or bead lying between the gland packing and the bottom portion of the chamber.

18. The combination with a glass buret tube having a lower end portion in the form of a reduced exteriorly threaded neck extension, of a stopcock comprising an elongate unit having a middle portion forming a valve plug body, a longitudinal lower end portion and an elongate longitudinal upper end neck portion terminating in a circular head, a rotary plug bore extending through said valve plug body and having a constant diameter throughout its length, a head member having a chamber therein with an open top and having a bottom, said unit, the lower end portion, said neck and head and the head member all being formed of an elastomer type synthetic resin plastic, said bottom of the chamber having an aperture therethrough adapted to have said circular head forcibly passed therethrough to position the said upper end neck portion in said aperture whereby said head member is rotatable on and about said neck portion, said chamber being screw threaded and adapted to threadably receive said threaded neck extension of the buret tube, said portion of the buret tube when threaded into the chamber, compressing the said circular head in the bottom part of the chamber to form a fluid tight seal, the said unit having a fluid flow passage axially therethrough and opening at one end into said chamber and intersecting said rotary valve plug bore and opening at its opposite end through the end of said longitudinal lower end portion of the unit, a cylindrical plug within and under compression in said valve plug bore and having a diametrical passage therethrough for said fluid flow passage in one rotary position of'the plug, and means carried by one end of the rotary plug for facilitating grasping and turning the same.

19. The invention according to claim 18, wherein the synthetic resin plastic is Teflon.

20. The invention according to claim 18, wherein said circular head is of substantially greater diameter than the said aperture in the bottom of the chamber and the head has a domed top surface and the said lower end portion of the buret has a concavity to receive said domed top surface.

21. A coupling and seal unit adapted for connecting together two ends of glass tubing, comprising an elongate body having a middle portion and end portions, a chamber in each end portion, said chambers having contiguous bottoms separated by said middle portion, said middle portion having an axial bore therethrough opening into said chambers through the bottoms of the latter, the chambers having opposite open ends at the adjacent ends of the body, a separate substantially concavo-convex centrally apertured gland washer in each chamber with the concave side facing the bottom of the chamber, an axially bored gland nut introducible into each chamber through the open end of the latter, and means for securing each gland nut in its respective chamber and for drawing the nut inward against and to compress the gland washer therein, the gland nuts and washers being adapted each to have an end portion of a tube extended therethrough to be secured 13 in a chamber in alignment with an end of said axial passage, and said gland washers, gland nuts and elongate body being formed of the synthetic resin Teflon.

22. A synthetic resin plastic rotary valve plug assembly for use in a tapered rotary valve plug barrel of glass; said assembly comprising an elongate sleeve having a threaded solid axial stud extension on one end, the sleeve being tapered from its other end to the locus of joinder with the said stud extension, the sleeve being adapted for extension, small end first, into a tapered plug barrel of glass, the sleeve having a taper substantially conforming to that of a plug barrel into which it is to be fitted for use and having an overall length such that said stud projects beyond the small end of the receptive barrel, the sleeve having therein a blind plug bore of constant diameter extending from the larger end of the sleeve and terminating a substantial distance short of the stud carrying end of the sleeve, a rotary plug extending into said bore, the plug and bore being so relatively dimensioned as to require forcible insertion of the plug into the bore against yielding resilient resistance of the sleeve, the plug and said sleeve having diametral openings alignable by rotation of the plug within the sleeve bore and adapted to be aligned with diametral openings in a tapered glass barrel in which the sleeve is fitted, a nut threaded on said stud and having an overall diameter greater than the adjacent small end of said sleeve whereby axial pressure may be imposed 14 against the adjacent end of a glass barrel enclosing the sleeve to draw the sleeve into a tight fit in the barrel.

23. The invention according to claim 22, wherein the said sleeve, stud, plug and nut are formed entirely of Teflon.

24. The invention according to claim 22, with a washer on the stud and interposed between said nut and the small end of the sleeve and having an overall diameter materially greater than the diameter of the small end of the sleeve and the said sleeve, stud, plug, and nut and washer being formed throughout of the synthetic resin plastic Teflon.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 658,250 9/1900 Erfmann 23292 X 1,725,975 8/1929 Bystricky 285340 2,816,743 12/1957 Kirkland 23292 X 2,988,321 6/1961 Gilmont 23-292 X 3,195,856 7/1965 Arrison 251-368 OTHER REFERENCES Fisher Scientific Co. Catalog #63, Modern Laboratory Appliances, p. 959.

MORRIS O. WOLK, Primary Examiner.

J. H. TAYMAN III, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US658250 *Feb 12, 1900Sep 18, 1900Ferdinand Rudolf Karel ErfmannChemical apparatus.
US1725975 *Jun 21, 1926Aug 27, 1929Joseph BystrickyCoupling device
US2816743 *Apr 29, 1955Dec 17, 1957American Oil CoStirrer bearing and adaptor
US2988321 *Apr 4, 1955Jun 13, 1961Manostat CorpFluid flow control devices
US3195856 *Mar 5, 1963Jul 20, 1965Arrison Frank CTapered plug valve
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3512944 *Sep 13, 1967May 19, 1970Corning Glass WorksBurette with removable stopcock formed of synthetic resin
US3529621 *Oct 4, 1967Sep 22, 1970Young Stephen AIntegral stop construction for plumbing fitting
US3544281 *Dec 14, 1967Dec 1, 1970Edwin D PhillipsLaboratory equipment including novel connector means for tubular glass members
US3695642 *Jan 7, 1970Oct 3, 1972Ace Glass IncFlexible pressure-type joint for rigid tubing
US3777950 *Sep 7, 1972Dec 11, 1973Kiddon DMulti-purpose closure
US3852512 *Jun 15, 1973Dec 3, 1974Amp IncHigh voltage corona-free wire termination
US4098581 *Aug 30, 1976Jul 4, 1978Kraft Jack AGas release device for use with laboratory glassware
US4390500 *Sep 25, 1981Jun 28, 1983Miskinis Robert JA threaded moveable extractor nut for separating ground glass joints
US4391779 *Jul 6, 1981Jul 5, 1983Miskinis Robert JStopper, polymer, glassware
US4669763 *Dec 19, 1984Jun 2, 1987Phillips Edwin DSealing structure for use with laboratory apparatus
US5064059 *Feb 5, 1991Nov 12, 1991Abbott LaboratoriesDual container system with extractor for stopper
US5580528 *Mar 20, 1995Dec 3, 1996Demers; James P.Breakage resistant laboratory glassware article
US6103200 *Jun 17, 1998Aug 15, 2000Babashak; JohnUsed on a vessel having an opening defined by the rim of an externally threaded neck.
US6123317 *Aug 9, 1999Sep 26, 2000Aeroquip CorporationCoupling
US8047222 *Oct 18, 2004Nov 1, 2011Wilden Pump And Engineering LlcAir valve for an air driven reciprocating device
US8312780Jun 25, 2010Nov 20, 2012Mettler-Toledo AgSampling device and method
US8365617Jun 25, 2010Feb 5, 2013Mettler-Toledo AgSampling device
US8789431Nov 19, 2012Jul 29, 2014Mettler-Toledo AgSampling device and method of use thereof
WO1992013776A1 *Feb 5, 1992Aug 6, 1992Abbott LabDual container system with extractor for stopper
WO2006044915A2 *Oct 18, 2005Apr 27, 2006Wilden Pump And Engineering LlAir valve for an air driven reciprocating device
Classifications
U.S. Classification422/538, 251/368, 215/364, 285/340, 285/911, 215/227, 285/423, 422/935, 215/313, 222/563, 285/356, 422/540
International ClassificationB01L3/00
Cooperative ClassificationY10S285/911, B01L3/569
European ClassificationB01L3/569