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Publication numberUS3324447 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 6, 1967
Filing dateMay 28, 1965
Priority dateMay 28, 1965
Publication numberUS 3324447 A, US 3324447A, US-A-3324447, US3324447 A, US3324447A
InventorsPistey John M
Original AssigneeGen Electric
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electrical connector
US 3324447 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 6, 1967 J. M. P ISTEY 3,324,447

ELECTRICAL CONNECTOR Filed May 28, 1965 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 J/WEA/TOR Jbkn M. P/s Z195,

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June 6, 167 J. M. PISTEY 3,324,447

ELECTRICAL CONNECTOR Filed May 28. 1965 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 June 6, 1%? J. M. PISTEY 3,324,447

ELECTRICAL CONNECTOR Filed May 28. 1965 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 F1010 PL J/vm/we J01? M P/lstey,

June 6, 1967 m nv 3,324,447

ELECTRICAL CONNECTOR Filed May 28, 1965 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 I95 196 20'] 20 TI AW M 9 JN VENTOR Jo/m M P s bay,

Attorney.

This invention relates to an electrical connector for wires, and particularly to such an electrical connector that is simple to manufacture and easy to use.

In the past, one device that has been used to connect electrical conductors or wires together is a wire nut. The wire nut has a metallic internal thread and external insulation. The internal thread is placed over the bare ends of two or more electrical wires in side-by-side relationship, after which the wire nut is screwed onto the wires, twisting the wires into secure electrical relationship with one another. Another device that has been employed to connect electrical wires together is a metal ferrule or tube covered by flexible insulating material. Two or more electrical wires are inserted into the ferrule and the ferrule is mechanically deformed to crimp the wires into electrical engagement within the ferrule.

Where each group or pair of wires of a plurality of such groups must be respectively connected, one prior art device such as described is required for each group of wires. But, in some electrical systems, it may be desirable to have a single connector that respectively connects each group of wires of a plurality of such groups. With such a connector, groups of wires of different voltages or groups of wires of distinct circuits can be independently electrically connected within a single connector. Generally, a single connector is simple and inexpensive to manufacture. And in any connector, it may be desirable that one wire or that groups of wires can be quickly and easily connected and disconnected.

Accordingly, a general object of this invention is to provide an improved electrical connector.

Another object of the present invention is to provide an electrical connector with which a plurality of groups of conductors can be respectively connected.

Another object of the invention is to provide an electrical connector in which two or more wires can be connected in various combinations, and that permits any connected wire to be easily disconnected.

Another object of my invention is to provide an electrical connector that is simple in construction, and that can respectively connect a plurality of pairs of electrical wires.

In carrying out my invention in one form, I have provided an improved electrical connector having two substantially similar housing members. Each housing member has a plurality of terminal receiving cavities formed in a facing surface. And each cavity connects to a wire opening that extends through the remainder of the housing member to the outside surface opposite the facing surface. The two housing members are constructed so that when they are assembled, each terminal receiving cavity in one housing member is aligned with a respective terminal receiving cavity in the other housing member to form a pair of aligned cavities. An interconnecting wire openings associated with a given interconnecting terminal, the respective wires are electrically connected 3,324,447 Patented June 6, 1967 by the given interconnecting terminal. Thus, in one embodiment of the invention, there is only a single interconnecting terminal in each pair of aligned cavities to connect the respective wires. In another embodiment of the invention, an interconnecting terminal is positioned in each terminal receiving cavity of each of the two housing members so that when the two housing members are assembled, the two interconnecting terminals engage and are joined. Each set of joined interconnecting terminals may engage, hold, and electrically connect wires in the same manner as the single interconnecting terminals.

Further aspects of my invention will become apparent hereinafter, and the specification concludes with claims particularly pointing out and distinctly claiming the subject matter which I regard as my invention. The invention, however, as to organization and method of operation, together with further objects and advantages thereof, may best be understood by reference to the following description when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of an electrical connector embodying my invention;

FIGURE 2 is a plan view of the electrical connector of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is an elevational view of one end of the electrical connector of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 4 is an exploded perspective view of the electrical connector of FIGURE 1 with a portion of one housing member broken away to show certain details;

FIGURE 5 is a sectional view taken along line 55 of FIGURE 2;

FIGURE 6 is a perspective view of another form of interconnecting terminals having a unitary assembly;

FIGURE 7 is a side elevational view of one end of a second form of my electrical connector employing another arrangement for holding the housing members together;

FIGURE 8 is a plan view of another embodiment of my electrical connector;

FIGURE 9 is a sectional view taken along line 9-9 of FIGURE 8;

FIGURES 10 and 11 are respective views of the left and right portions of the connector of FIGURE 8 when disconnected;

FIGURE 12 shows an inner, side view of ahousing member shown in FIGURES ,8-11;

FIGURE 13 shows an exploded perspective .viewvof a housing of FIGURES 8l0 with a portion of one housing member broken away to show certain details; and 7 FIGURE 14 shows a perspective view of an interconnecting terminal used in the embodiment of FIGURES 8-13.

With reference to FIGURES 1-4 of the drawings, there is shown an electrical connector 20 constructed in accordance with one embodiment of my invention. The electrical connector 20 has a housing 2 1 comprised of two identical insulating housing members 22, 23 made of a suitable material such as plastic. I have chosen to mold my housing members 22, 23 with a thermosetting plastic material such as phenolic although other materials such as certain thermoplastics which do not creep with age and stress would also be suitable. The members 22, 23 are held together by two spring clips 24, 25 that fit over external lugs or projections on the ends 30. Since the two housing members 22, 23 are identical, the same reference numerals have been used on their corresponding parts. As shown in FIGURE 4, the upperhousing member 22 has been rotated degrees about an imaginary axis between its ends 30 from the position of the lower housing member 23. Thus, the exterior surface or wall 26 and other parts of the housing member 22 can be seen, and interior parts of the housing member 23 can be seen. When the two housing members 22, 23 are assembled, they "are positioned so that a first side 31. of the housing member 22 is adjacent a second side 32 of the housing member 23. The second side 32 of each of the housing members 22, 23 has a recess 33 partially bounded by an inwardly located recess wall 34 extending longitudinally along the length of the housing members 22, 23. A small gap 39 is provided at each end of the recess wall 34. The first side 31 has a projection 35 that fits into or mates with the recess 33 in the second side 32. The projection 35 extends longitudinally along the length of the housing members 22, 23. End projections 36 extend halfway along each end 30 of the housing members 22, 23 so as to fit into or mate with the gaps 39. Inwardly of the projection 35 is a shelf 37 which mates or interfits with the recess wall 34. Thus, when the housin members 22, 23 are assembled, the projections 35, 36 are respectively located in the recesses 33 and gaps 39 and hold the housing members 22, 23 in the proper relation. The sides 31, 32 of the housing members 22, 23 may also be provided with projections 85, 84 respectively to provide a greater top wall area that can be engaged by knock-out pins in the mold (not shown) to aid in removing the housing members from the mold cavities.

Each of the ends 30 of each of the housing members 22, 23 has a center projecting stud 44 and two outer projecting studs 46, 47. A groove 45 is formed in an edge of the center stud 44, and respective grooves 50, 51 are formed in the edges of the outer studs 46, 47. These grooves 45, 50, 51 are located remotely from facing or mating surfaces of the housing members 22, 23 for receiving a spring-like clip member 24. Channels 48, 49 separate the center stud 44 from the outer studs 46, 47. These channels 48, 49 also receive the clip member 24. FIGURE 3 shows how the clip member 24 fits and holds the housing members 22, 23 together. A center 62 of the clip member 24 fits in the groove 45, the legs 63, 64 fit in the channels 48, 49, and the feet 65, 66 fit in the grooves 51, 50. The clip member 24 is snapped into position, and fits so that the feet 65, 66 and center 62 are sprung and pull the center stud 44 of one housing member and the outer studs 46, 47 of the other housing member toward each other. A key slot 52 is provided in each center stud 44 to facilitate insertion and removal of the clip member 24.

Each of the exterior walls 26 of the housing members 22, 23 has a plurality of generally keyhole shaped aligned wire openings 67, 68, 69. In the embodiments shown, there are three wire openings 67, 68, 69, but more or less Wire openings can be provided, depending on the number of connections the housing 21 is to provide. As shown in FIGURE 2, the wire opening 67 has a large bore portion 70 which extends into the housing member, and which is dimensioned to receive a wire with its outer in sulation intact. The wire opening 67 also has a small bore portion 71 which extends from the large bore portion 70 into the interior of the housing 21, and which is preferably dimensioned to receive the bare wire but to block the portion of the wire with insulation. Normally, the insulation is stripped from the wire before the wire is inserted into the opening 67. A release slot or groove 72 is formed in one side of the opening 67 to permit the insertion of a wire release tool against a terminal inside the housing 21 so as to release a wire held by the terminal in a manner to be described later. A sloping or beveled surface 73 leads from the exterior wall 26 into the slot 72 to guide the wire release tool into the slot 72. The wire openings 68, 69 are similar to the opening 67, and have large bore portions 74, 80, small bore portions 75, 81, release slots 76, 82, and sloping surfaces 77, 83, respectively.

Three metallic, generally Z shaped, interconnecting terminals 86, 87, 90 are provided for the housing 21. These terminals 86, 87, 90 are made from flat strips of a resilient metallic material such as silver plated Phosphor bronze.

The terminal 86 has a wire engaging portion 92 at one end, a connecting portion 92 intermediate its ends, and a second wire engaging portion 93 at the other end. The other terminals 87, are similar with respective wire engaging portions 95, 97, 100, 102 and connecting portions 96, 101. Each of the wire engaging portions is bent about its longitudinal axis for a short distance to form a V-shaped edge 94 (preferably an obtuse angle) at its outer end, this V-shape tapering to a fiat surface about midway along the length of the wire engaging portion. This V-shaped edge 94 helps to guide a wire to be connected into the proper position for being held.

Each of the housing members 22, 23 has three terminal receiving cavities 103, 104, 105 formed therein. These cavities 103, 104, 105 are formed in the interior of the housing members 22, 23 by two inside walls 107, 110. The cavities 103, 104, 105 have respective bottom walls 117, 123, 111 which are substantially similar. More of the bottom wall 111 of the cavity 105 may be seen in FIGURE 4 where port-ions of the recess wall 32 of the housing member 23 have been broken away. This bottom wall 111 has a lower, fiat base portion 114, an intermediate sloping portion 113, and a higher or offset, fiat portion 112 through which the small bore portion 81 of the wire opening 69 enters. In FIGURES 4 and 5, the sloping portion 113 is shown as a plane surface that conforms with the connecting portion 101 of the terminal 90. However, the sloping portion 113 may be stepped, or curved, or some other shape depending on manufacturing conditions or preferences. The bottom walls 117, 123 of the cavities 103, 104 are similar to the bottom wall 111 of the cavity 105. But in FIGURE 4, only parts of their fiat base portions and parts of their sloping portions are visible.

When the housing 21 is assembled, the three terminals 86, 87, 90 are respectively positioned in the cavities 103, 104, 105 of the housing member 23 with their wire engaging portions 93, 97, 102 resting on the bottom walls 117, 123, 111. The V-shaped edge of each of the outer ends of the terminals 86, 87, 90 is near or adjacent the respective small bore portions 71, 75, 81 of the wire openings in the housing member 23. The other housing member 22 is positioned over the housing member 23 so that its three cavities respectively fit over the wire engaging portions 91, 95, of the terminals 86, 87, 90 and so that the projections 35, 36 of each housing member respectively fit in and mate with the recess 33 and the gaps 39 of the other housing member. When the housing members 22, 23 are so fitted, their respective cavities register to form completed cavities, each of which contains a terminal. Thus, respective pairs of cavities are mated or joined together. Also, the recess wall 34 of each housing member is located adjacent the projection 35 and shelf 37 of the other housing member. The two housing members 22, 23 are fastened and held together by the clip members 24, 25. In placing a clip member, such as shown in FIGURE 3, the two feet 65, 66 of the clip member 24 are placed in the grooves 51, 50 and the center 62 of the clip member 24 is pushed upwardly over the center stud 44 into the groove 45. The clip member 24 is resilient and as it passes over the outer edges of the center stud 44, it snaps into the groove 45 and holds the housing members 22, 23 together tightly. The legs 63, 64 fit in the chanels 48, 49 to help hold the housing members 22, 23 in alignment.

FIGURE 5 shows a cross-sectional view of the terminal 90 in the completed cavity (formed by the terminal receiving cavity of the housing member 23 and the terminal receiving cavity 103: of the housing member 22 when the housing members 22, 23 are assembled). The bent portions (i.e., the portions between the wire engaging portions 100', 102 and the connecting portion 101) of the terminal 90 rest against the base portions (114 in the cavity 105), and the wire engaging portions 100, 102 rest against the sloping portions (113 in the cavity 105). The ends of the wire engaging portions 100,

102 are positioned so that they are bent inward when, for example, a bare wire 130 of an insulated conductor 125 is inserted through the small bore portion 81, and so that their resiliency causes the V-shaped end to dig into the bare wire 130 and prevent the wire 130 from being withdrawn. Thus, the conductor 125 is electrically and mechanically connected to one end of the terminal 90. As shown in FIGURE 5, the insulation 131 of the conductor 125 fits in the large bore portion 80, but preferably will not fit in the small bore portion 81 so a sto determine the distance that the bare wire 130 can be inserted into the cavity 105.

When the conductor 125 is first inserted into the wire opening 69, the bare wire 130 is inserted through the large bore portion 80 and the small bore portion 81 until it engages the outer surface of the wire engaging portion 102. As the conductor 125 is pushed farther into the housing, the end of the bare wire 130 bends slightly under the resilient pressure of the terminal 90 and the slope of the wire engaging portion 102. But, the end of the wire 130 can slide along under the V shaped end 94. As the conductor 125 is pushed farther into the housing, the bare wire 130 pushes the wire engaging portion 102 away from the adjacent wall of the housing until the bare wire 130 extends beyond the outer end 127 of the wire engaging portion 102. Enough of the insulation 131 should be removed so that when the insulation 131 is stopped by the small bore portion 81, the bare wire 130 extends beyond the outer end 127 far enough to be securely held but not so far as to contact other metallic elements in the housing and cause a short circuit or improper connection. With the end 127 of the terminal 90 resting against the bare wire 130 as shown in FIGURE 5, a force on the conductor 125 tending to pull it from the housing will cause the end 127 to tend to dig into the bare wire 130 so that as the force on the conductor 125 is increased, the end 127 (supported by the wire engaging portion 102 resting on the sloping portion 113) digs deeper into the conductor 125 and holds the bare wire 130 more securely. With respect to FIGURE 5, a conductor can be inserted into the wire opening 69 and electrically connected to the conductor 125. Similar connection can be provided by the other terminals. It is to be understood that in this embodiment, each terminal and its respective conductors are electrically insulated from the other terminals and their respective conductors.

If the conductor 125 is to be removed, a wire release tool 139 can be inserted into the slot 82 so as to push the wire engaging portion 102 out of contact with the bare wire 130. With the wire engaging portion 102 so displaced, the conductor 125 can be easily pulled out.

From the foregoing, it can be seen that my invention provides a desirable and improved electrical connector that is constructed of only three different parts, namely: two similar housing members, three (or a plurality of) similar interconnecting terminals, and two similar clip members. Thus, the invention permits a relatively small inventory of different parts to be stocked, and simplifies the assembly of the electrical connector because fewer different parts are required at the assembly stations.

FIGURE 6 shows a unitary terminal 132 which can be used with the housing 21 described above to connect siX conductors together. The terminal 132 comprises three Z shaped portions 137, 140, 141 mechanically spaced to fit into the cavities and electrically connected by intermediate portions 133, 134 between their connecting portions 143, 146, 151. These intermediate portions 133, 134 can fit in openings 135, 136 in the inside walls 107, 110. The openings 135, 136 are preferably just large enough to clear the intermediate portions 133, 134 of the terminals so that if the housing is used with separate terminals, the chances of a short circuit, caused by a metallic piece passing through the openings 135, 136, are reduced. The terminal 132 operates and is assembled similarly to the embodiment of FIGURES 1-5.

FIGURE 7 shows another embodiment of a clip member and stud arrangement for connecting two housing members 153, 154 together to form a housing 155. Except for the clip member and arrangement of FIGURE 7, the housing 155 may be identical to the housing 21 of FIGURES 1-5. Each of the housing members 153, 154 has a stud 156 on its end. Each of the studs 156 has a groove 160 formed in its edge or wall remote from the seam 161 where the two housing members 153, 154 meet. A clip member 163, made from a flat sheet of resilient spring metal, has a central aperture cut from it and has a plurality of fingers 164, 16-5, 166, 167 on two opposed sides of the aperture that snap over the studs 156 and fit in the grooves 160 as shown in FIGURE 7. The other two opposed inside edges 168, 169 of the aperture in the clip member 163 engage the other two sides of each of the studs 156 to hold them in alignment.

Another connector in accordance with my invention is shown in FIGURES 8-14. This connector includes a male connector 172 and a female connector 173 which are electrically and mechanically connected together as shown in a plan view in FIGURE 8 and in a cross-sectional view in FIGURE 9. The view of FIGURE 9 is taken along the lines 9-9 in FIGURE 8. FIGURES 10 and 11 respectively show the two connectors 172, 173 when separated. The connector 172 comprises two mating housing members 174, 175 and the connector 173 comprises mating two housing members 177, 170. The housing members 174, 178 may be identical to the previously described housing members 22, 23. The housing members 175, 177 are identical to one another and have respective walls 180, 181 which respectively mate with the housing members 174, 178 in a manner similar to that described in connection with FIGURES 15. Thus, the housing members 175 177, may have recesses, gaps, and projections that mate with the housing members 174, 178 to provide an arrangement that holds the members in alignment. An inner side view of the housing member 175 is shown in FIGURE 12, and an outside perspective view is shown in FIGURE 13. The housing member 175 comprises four side walls 182, 183, 184, 185 and a top wall 186. Inside the housing member 175 is divided into three cavities 193, 200, 205 by divider walls 285, 286. The cavities 193, 200, 205, respectively, include ear receiving slots 195, 196, 202, 203, 207, 208 which extend laterally (as seen in FIGURE 12) slightly beyond the cavities, and blade apertures 194, 201, 206 which extend through the top wall 106. As shown in FIGURES 9, 10 and 11, the blade apertures are preferably beveled where they emerge from the top wall 186 so that it is easier to insert a connecting blade into the apertures of the female connector 173 in FIGURE 11.

Three male interconnecting terminals 210, 211, 212 are shown in FIGURE 13. Since the terminals are identical, only one terminal 210 will be described. This terminal 210 comprises an elongated blade 213 which has a relatively small outer embossment 214 and a longer inner embossment 215. The embossments 214, 215 serve to strengthen the blade 213, and the space between the two embossments 214, 215 serves as an engaging surface or contact 222. The blade 213 has two oppositely disposed ears 216, 217 which fit in or against the ear receiving slots 195, 196, 202, 203, 207, 208. Behind the ears 216, 217 is a connecting bar portion 220 which is bent to form a wire engaging portion 221 similar in configuration and function to the wire engaging portion of the terminals 86, 87, 90 in FIGURE 4.

In the assembly of the male connector 172, the connecting bar portion 220 and the wire engaging portion 221 of each terminal 210 are positioned in a respective cavity in the housing member 174. The housing member 175 is slipped over the blades of the terminals 210 so the blades pass through respective apertures 194, 201, 206 with the blade ears 216, 217 in their respective slots. The housing members 174, 175 are held together by 7 either of the two clip members located in the grooves on the studs of the members 174, 175 as explained previously.

The female connector 173 has three terminals 242 as shown in FIGURE 14. Each terminal 242 has a blade 243 which has a contact 244 formed by bending at its end. Two ears 245, 246 project from opposite sides of the blade 243. Beyond the ears 245, 246 are a connecting bar portion 247 and a wire engaging portion 250 similar to the terminal 210 shown in FIGURE 13.

In the assembly of the female connector 173, the connecting bar portion 247 and the wire engaging portion 250 of each terminal 242 are positioned in a respective cavity of the housing member 178. The housing member 177 is slipped over the blades 243 of the terminals 242 so the blade contacts 244 are in respective apertures with the blade ears 245, 246 in their respective slots. The members 177, 176 may be held together by clip members in the grooves of the studs.

FIGURE 9 shows electrical conductors fastened to the terminals as explained in connection with FIGURE and also shows how the terminals 210 of the male connector 172 engage the terminals 242 of the female connector 173 when the connectors are joined. The parts are dimensioned so that the contact 222 of each male terminal 210 engages the contact 244 of the female terminal 242. This engagement is a secure one because the embossments 214, 215 are on opposite sides of the contact 244 and because the blade apertures in the housing member 177 have a back-up wall 188 (see FIGURE 11) that forces the two terminals together.

It will thus be seen that applicants invention provides improved electrical connectors. These connectors require a minimum number of different parts to allow for practical and economical manufacture of the devices. The parts are easily assembled together in varying combinations to provide a variety of high quality electrical connectors having wide utility. This utility includes solid wire as shown, but may also include stranded wire. In the case of stranded wire, it is preferable that the strands be tightly laid or tinned to provide sufficient strength and coherence to be engaged and held by the interconnecting terminals. The terminals which are shown in FIGURES 4, 5, and 6 which provide the electrical connections between the wires or conductors have been described as being generally Z-shaped but they may be varied from such a shape and still provide interconnections between conductors. For example, the terminals may be more S-shaped. The various terminals can be arranged in any desired quantity. For example, four interconnecting terminals may be provided with two terminals isolated and with two terminals interconnected to provide interconnections for a first pair of conductors, interconnections for a second pair of conductors, and interconnections for two pairs of conductors. Further, different sizes of wire openings may be provided, and a single connector for connecting a large pair of conductors and for connecting a small pair of conductors may be provided in accordance with the invention. Also, the wire openings need not be aligned, but may be arranged in any configuration desired as long as the interconnecting terminals can function. These various modifications can be made to any of the embodiments shown and described. Therefore, while the invention has been described wit-h reference to particular embodiments, it is to be understood that modifications may be made without departing from the spirit of the invention or from the scope of the claims.

I claim:

1. An electrical connector comprising two identical housing members having mating walls around their perimeters that interfit to form a housing; one of said mating walls having a projection and the mating wall opposite said one mating wall having a recess, said projection on one of said housing members fitting into said recess on the other said housing member to maintain said housing members in registration when they are assembled; each of said housing members having at least one terminal receiving cavity therein formed by a bottom and side walls, said bottom wall having an inclined surface including at least two offset portions, said terminal receiving cavities being in registration when said housing members are assembled; each of said housing members further having a conductor wire opening between said bottom wall and an exterior surface; and a terminal having a connecting bar with resilient wire engaging portions at each end thereof positioned in the cavity formed by said registered receiving cavities, said connector bar being supported by one of said offset portions of each housing member and said wire engaging portions being respectively supported within the housing adjacent said conductor wire openings for resiliently engaging a conductor wire inserted therethrough.

2. An electrical connector comprising two identical housing members having mating walls around their perimeters that interfit to form a housing; one of said mating walls having a projection and the mating wall opposite said one mating wall having a recess, said projection on one of said housing members fitting into said recess on the other said housing member to maintain said housing members in registration when they are assembled; each of said housing members having at least one terminal receiving cavity therein formed by a bottom wall having a sloping surface, said terminal receiving cavities being in registration when said housing members are assembled; each of said housing members further having a wire opening between said bottom wall and an exterior surface; and a Z-shaped terminal having a connecting bar with wire engaging portions at each end thereof positioned in the cavity formed by said registered receiving cavities, said wire engaging portions being respectively adjacent said wire openings for engaging a wire inserted therethrough.

3. An electrical connector comprising two identical housing members having mating walls around their perimeters that interfit to form a housing; one of said mating walls having a projection and the mating wall opposite said one mating wall having a recess, said projection on one of said housing members fitting into said recess on the other said housing member to maintain said housing members in registration when they are assembled; each of said housing members having a plurality of terminal receiving cavities therein, each of said cavities having a bottom wall having an intermediate sloping surface, said terminal receiving cavities being in paired registration when said housing members are assembled; each of said housing members further having a wire opening between said bottom wall and an exterior surface; and a Z-shaped terminal having a connecting bar with wire engaging portions at each end thereof positioned in the cavity formed by each of said pair of registered receiving cavities, said wire engaging portions being respectively adjacent said wire openings for engaging a wire inserted therethrough.

4. An electrical connector comprising two similar housing members having mating walls that interfit to form a housing; each of said housing members having a projection and a recess oppositely disposed in its mating wall so that said projection on each of said housing members fits into said recess on the other of said housing members to maintain said housing members in registration; each of said housing members having at least one terminal receiving cavity therein, each terminal receiving cavity having a bottom wall formed by a flat base portion, a sloping portion, and a second fiat portion, said terminal receiving cavities of said housing members being arranged to form a completed cavity when said housing members are assembled; each of said housing members having openings from said second fiat portion through a wall of said cavity; and a metallic terminal having a connecting bar with an engaging portion at each end, each of said engaging portions being positioned on a respective one of said sloping portions in the vicinity of a respective one of said openings.

5. An electrical connector comprising two similar housing members having mating walls that interfit to form a housing; each of said housing members having a projection and a recess oppositely disposed in its mating wall so that said projection on each of said housing members fits into said recess on the other of said housing members to maintain said housing members in registration; each of said housing members having a plurality of terminal receiving cavities therein; each of said terminal receiving cavities having a bottom wall formed by a flat base portion, a sloping portion, and a second flat portion; said terminal receiving cavities of said hous1ng members being arranged to form a plurality of cOmpleted cavities when said housing members are assembled; each of said housing members having an opening from each of said second flat portions through a Wall of said cavity; and a generally Z-shaped terminal positioned in each of said completed cavities, each of said terminals having a connecting bar with a wire engaging portion at each end, each of said wire engaging portions being positioned on a respective one of said sloping portions in the vicinity of a respective one of said apertures.

6. An electrical connector for electrically connecting two conductors together, said connector comprising a housing having at least one cavity therein; said cavity having a pair of oppositely disposed and substantially parallel walls therein; said housing having a wire opening between each of said cavity walls and an exterior surface of said housing; and a Z-shaped terminal having a connecting bar with a wire engaging portion at each end thereof, said wire engaging portions lying in substantially parallel and spaced planes; each of said wire engaging portions being located adjacent a respective one of said wire openings and terminating adjacent a Wall of said cavity, whereby a first lead wire inserted through one of said wire openings will be wedged between a wire engaging portion of said terminal and its respective adjacent wall and thereby mechanically and electrically connected to said terminal, and whereby another lead inserted through the other of said wire openings will be similarly connected to the other of said wire engaging portions and electrically connected to said first lead wire.

7. An electrical connector for electrically connecting two conductors together, said connector comprising a housing having a plurality of cavities therein; each of said cavities having a pair of oppositely disposed and substantially parallel walls therein, said housing having a wire opening between each of said cavity walls and an exterior surface of said housing; and a plurality of Z- shaped terminals each having a connecting bar with a wire engaging portion at each end thereof, said wire engaging portions extending from said bar in substantially parallel and spaced planes; a respective terminal being positioned in each of said cavities with each of said Wire engaging portions being located adjacent a respective one of said wire openings and terminating adjacent a wall of said cavity, whereby a lead wire inserted through one of said wire openings will be wedged between a wire engaging portion of said terminal and its respective adjacent wall and thereby mechanically and electrically connected to said terminal.

8. An electrical connector comprising two similar housing members having mating walls that interfit to form a housing, each of said housing members having at least one terminal receiving cavity therein, each said terminal receiving cavity having a wall formed by two offset portions, said terminal receiving cavity of said housing members being arranged to form a completed cavity once said housing members are assembled, means for removably holding together said housing members, each said housing member having a conductor wire opening through its wall formed by two offset portions, said openings extending between outer surfaces of said housing members and said terminal receiving cavities; and an electrically conductive terminal having a connecting bar portion with a resiilent portion at each end, said resilient portions respectively engaging said offset portions in the vicinity of a respective one of said conductor wire openings for establishing a resilient electrical contact with a conductor wire inserted therethrough.

9. The electrical connector of claim 8 wherein each said housing member wall formed by two offset portions includes a first flat portion, an intermediate portion, and a second flat portion offset from said first flat portion, and said resilient portions of said electrically conductive terminals being supported by said intermediate portions in the vicinity of said conductor wire openings.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,326,327 8/ 1943 Brewer 339198 2,810,115 10/1957 Abbott 339-97 2,988,724 6/1961 Larkin 339 MARVIN A. CHAMPION, Primary Examiner. J. MCGLYNN, Assistant Examiner,

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Classifications
U.S. Classification439/441
International ClassificationH01R13/502, H01R4/48, H01R13/508
Cooperative ClassificationH01R13/508, H01R4/4827
European ClassificationH01R13/508, H01R4/48B2B