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Publication numberUS3324492 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 13, 1967
Filing dateAug 5, 1965
Priority dateAug 5, 1965
Publication numberUS 3324492 A, US 3324492A, US-A-3324492, US3324492 A, US3324492A
InventorsRobert R Myers
Original AssigneeRobert R Myers
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Swimming pool cleaning means
US 3324492 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 113, 1967 R. R. MYERS SWIMMING POOL CLEANING MEANS 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Aug. 5, 1965 flwavrap POBBPT A. MV/E'PJ June 13, 1967 R. R. MYERS 13,32,492

SWIMMING POOL CLEANING MEANS Filed Aug. 5, 1965 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 June 13, 1967 R. R. MYERS 3,324,4M2

SWIMMING POOL CLEANING MEANS Filed Aug. 1965 4 Sheets-Sheet :5

June 113, 1967 a. R. MYERS 3,324,492

SWIMMING POOL CLEANING MEANS Filed Aug. 5, 1965 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 A705PT A. MVEIPS 3,324,492 SWMMHNG P1101. CLEANING MEANS Robert R. Myers, 904 NE. 2nd 515., linear Raton, Fla. 33432 Filed Aug. 5, 1965, Ser. No. 477,389 13 Claims. (Cl. 151.7)

This invention relates to a swimming pool cleaning device and more particularly to a cleaning means that is self-propelled over the bottom surface of the swimming pool.

It is a major task to successfully clean the bottom area of a swimming pool of objectionable foreign matter. The most common method is to first drain all the water from the pool and then hand scrub and clean the pool. Obviously this is a waste of a great amount of water, is time consuming, and requires much labor. It is also a difficult task to remove foreign matter from the surface of the water.

Therefore, one of the principal objects of my invention is to provide a mechanical janitor means that has a lower portion that will submerge to the bottom of the water filled pool, and an upper element at the top surface of the water for the removal of undesirable foreign matter therefrom.

A further object of this invention is to provide a pool cleaning means that will self-propel itself over the bottom floor of the pool.

A still further object of this invention is to provide a swimming pool cleaning device that requires little attention from the operator.

A still further object of this invention is to provide a mechanical swimming pool cleaner that may be selectively operated either by electric motor power or by suction.

A still further object of this invention is to provide a swimming pool cleaner that will automatically change its direction of movement when it engages the sides of a pool.

A still further object is to provide a swimming pool cleaner that will travel in substantially a straight path over the pool floor until it meets an obstruction.

A still [further object of this invention is to provide a bottom area and surface area cleaning means for swimming pools that has adjusting means for regulating the relative cleaning efliciency between the pool surface area and the pool bottom area.

A still further object is to provide a swimming pool cleaning means that has a water surface cleaning device that is capable of vertical adjustment.

Still further objects of my invention are to provide a swimming pool cleaning means that is economical in manufacture and durable in use.

These and other objects will be .apparent to those skilled in the art.

This invention consists in the construction, arrangements, and combination of the various parts of the device, whereby the objects contemplated are attained as hereinafter more fully set forth, specifically pointed out in the claims, and illustrated in the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a side perspective view of my device in use;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged side perspective view of the pool janitor;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged top plan view of the lower portion of the device;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged side view of the forward end of the lower unit taken on line 4-4 of FIG. 3 at the moment it engages the upward curve of the side of same type pools;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged top plan view of the forward end of the lower unit;

FIG. 6 is an enlarged side view of the forward end 31 ,324,432 Patented June 13, 1967 of the lower unit when it engages a vertical pool Wall and is taken on line 6-6 of FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is an enlarged side View of the lower unit with sections cut away to more fully illustrate its construction;

FIG. 8 is an enlarged front view of the lower unit with sections cut away and is taken on line 8-8 of FIG. 7;

FIG. 9 is an enlarged back view of the lower unit with sections cut away and is taken on line 9--9 of FIG. 7;

FIG. 10 is an enlarged side view of one of the horizontal wheels with bristles and is taken on line Ill-10 of FIG. 8;

FIG. 11 is an enlarged top plan view of the front wheels assembly of the lower unit;

FIG. 12 is an enlarged top plan view of the front wheels assembly with the wheels in turning positions;

FIG. 13 is an enlarged view of one of the front wheels taken on line 13-13 of FIG. 11;

FIG. 14 is an enlarged top sectional View of the lower unit taken on line 14-44 of FIG. 7;

FIG. 15 is an enlarged top plan view of the upper unit for cleaning the surface area of the water in a pool;

FIG.16 is an enlarged side view of the upper unit; and

FIG. 17 is a vertical sectional view of the upper unit and more fully illustrates its construction.

In the drawings I have used the numeral It) to designate the inverted cup housing of the lower unit. Inside this housing is a frame structure generally designated by the numeral 11. In the rear area of the housing is an elongated horizontal shaft 12, rotatably mounted. in the frame structure complex. The numerals 13 and 14- desigmate the two rear traction wheels on the shaft 12. The numeral 15 designates a worm gear on the shaft 12.

The numerals 16 and 17 designate two spaced apart brackets on the frame and at the forward area of the housing. These two brackets rotatably carry the two Vertical shafts 18 and 19 respectively. On the lower end of the shaft 18 is a caster wheel 20 and on the shaft 19 the caster wheel 21. Secured on each of these shafts is a horizontal disc 22 having a flat edge portion 23. The flat portion 23 of the disc associated with the caster wheel 20 is to its right side and the flat portion 23 of the disc associated with the wheel 21, is to its left side as shown in FIG. 11. At the outer side of each disc 22 is a hinged arm 24. These two arms are yieldingly held toward each other and in engagement with the peripheries of the discs 22 by a coil spring means 25. By this arrangement of parts the caster wheels 20 and 21 may swivel in making a directional turn, as shown in FIG. 12, but when straight forward travel is obtained, as shown in FIG. 11, the Wheels wil be yieldingly held in longitudinal alignment by the arms engaging the flat portions respectively on the discs 22. This yielding caster wheel locking means will hold the travel of the unit in a straight line after a unit turn has been accomplished. Inside the housing 10 is a water tight compartment 26, containing an electric motor 27. The numeral 28 designates an ordinary rotary water pump to the rear of the compartment 26. The shaft 29 of the motor connects to the rotor of the pump and extends therebeyond to carry a worm gear 30 which is in mesh with the gear 15 as shown in FIG. 14. At the outer ends, respectively of the shaft 12 are two pulley wheels 31 and 32. At the forward corners, respectively of the housing 10 are two rotatably mounted vertical shafts 33 and 34. The shaft 33 has a pulley Wheel 35 and the shaft 34 a pulley wheel 36. Fixed on the shaft 33 is a horizontal turning wheel 37 that has its periphery extending beyond the forward end and side of the housing 10. A like horizontal turning wheel 38 is fixed on the shaft 3 34 and it also extends beyond the forward end and other side of the housing as shown in FIG. 14. A belt 39 embraces the pulley wheels 31 and 35 and a belt 40 embracesthe pulley wheels 32 and 36. When these belts are crossed as shown in FIG. 14, the horizontal turning wheel 37 will turn to the right and the horizontal wheel 38 will turn to the left. If desired, the belts may be crossed that both wheels will rotate in the same direction and in either direction. Usually this will be the preferred way and especially if the idler wheel 41 is rearwardly positioned and it is desired that the unit when meeting an obstruction always turns in the same given direction. The idler wheel 41 has its forward end canted downwardly from the horizontal, is rotatably mounted and its bolted shaft 42 is adjustable forwardly and backwardly in the slot 43 of the chassis. By being located between the two wheels 37 and 38 it may be moved to a position more forward than the wheels 37 and 38, as shown in FIG. 3. The numeral 44 designates an enclosed compartment communicating with the inlet of the pump 28. The numeral 45 designates the outlet pipe of the pump 28 and terminates at the outside rear area of the housing 10. A detachable filter bag 46 is secured onto the outlet end of the outlet pipe 45. This bag will pass water through it, but will retain foreign matter. When full of foreign matter it is emptied and then replaced, or a new bag may be installed. Bristles 47 or other pool floor agitating means may be on the under side of the turning wheels 37 and 38 for stirring up foreign matter that has settled on the pool floor. The numeral 48 designates an inlet pipe communicating with the inside of the inlet compartment 44 of the pump. The numeral 49 designates a flexible pipe extending upwardly from the pipe 48. Imposed in the pipe 48 is an ordinary adjustable hand valve 50. The numeral 51 designates an inlet collecting pipe communicating with the inside of the pipe 48 prior to the valve 50. This pipe 51 extends downwardly and has an open foreign matter and water gathering unit 52 terminating above the pool floor as shown in FIG. 8, for conditioning the water at the bottom of the pool. Irnposed in the pipe 51-is an ordinary adjustable hand valve 53. The upper portion of the device is to condition 7 the surface area of the water of the pool. It has a leg constructed hollow float body 54 as shown in FIG. 16. The upper end of the pipe 49 has an upwardly flared mouth member 55 held at or near the surface of the water 56 and to and under the float 54, by braces 57. A

. filler cap 58 extends through the top of the float 57. By

adjustably filling the float with material heavier than air, the float will ride high or low on the water, thus providing height adjustment for the mouth unit 55. The nurneral 59 designates an electric lead line extending to the motor'27 and when in communication with a source of electric energy, the motor will be running. The line 59 may be supported by a float 60. A flexible skirt 61 may be placed on the back and two sides of the housing 10. With the motor running the traction wheels 13 and 14 will be rotated to propel the lower unit over the floor of the pool and drag the upper float unit over the surface of the water in the pool 62. If both valves 50 and 53 are open the pump will create a suction in the pipes 49 and 51 and foreign matter and dirty water will be pulled into the pump from both the floor and surface areas of the pool. This polluted water will be passed into and collected by the filter bag 46. By the control of the hand valves 50 and 53, either partial or total cut-off to the lower unit or the upper float unit may be had. In some instances the water surface area may be clean and only the floor area of the pool dirty. When this is the case the valve 50 will be manually closed. At other times both water areas may be dirty, but one more polluted than the other, and therefore the valve controlling the least dirty area will be partially closed, and with the major suction acting on the more polluted area. When the valves are open the dirt, leaves, scum like at the surface of the water will pass between the separated legs of the float 54 and into the collector cup 55. The collector unit 52 will suck up the foreign matter below the housing 10. With the caster wheels 22 yieldingly locked, the device will travel in a straight line until an obstruction, such as the side of the pool, is encountered. The style of turning as well as the direction of turning will depend on the arrangement of belts 39 and 40, crossings, the position of the horizontal wheel 41, the nature of the obstruction, and to a certain extent the speed of travel of the lower unit. The movement of the lower unit over the floor should be somewhat erratic at the turning moment so that eventually the entire floor area of the pool will be serviced. If the belts are crossed as shown in FIG. 14, the unit might turn in either direction, depending on which turning wheel 37 or 38 struck the obstacle first, and also the position of the idler wheel 41. As herebefore indicated if it is desired that the unit turn in a given direction all the time, the belts are crossed so that the forward peripheries of the wheels 37 and 38 turn in the same direction as shown in FIG. 5. If the idler wheel 41 is in a maximum forward position beyond the turning wheels 37 38, the traction wheels 13 and 14 in conjunction therewith will because by eventual unbalance turn the unit. The idler wheel 41 is particularly good in atfecting the turn when the lower side edge of the pool is curved as shown in FIG. 4. In straight vertical pool side walls, as shown in FIG. '6, the turning wheels 37 and 38 or either of them may engage and accomplish the turning movement. In any case the turn will move the caster wheels 22 to a side angle such as shown in FIG. 12. As soon as the turn has been accomplished and the unit moves again forwardly in some direction, the caster wheels will align with that direction and again be yieldingly locked by the arms 23 as shown in FIG. 11. This will hold the unit to a straight travel direction, until another obstacle is encountered. If desired the valves 50 and 53 may be combined into a two-way hand valve so that as one unit is progressively closed the other unit will be progressively opened. A conduit terminating outside the pool may be substituted for the filter bag 46.

A flexible conduit leading to the area outside the pool may be substituted for the filter bag.

Some changes may be made in the construction and arrangement of my Swimming pool cleaning means without departing from the real spirit and purpose of my invention, and it is my intention to cover by my claims any modified forms of structure or use of mechanical equivalents which may be reasonably included within their scope.

I claim:

1. In a swimming pool cleaning means,

a chassis,

wheels for supporting said chassis on the floor of a swimming pool,

a pump having an inlet and an outlet, said inlet being disposed adjacent said chassis,

an element for receiving matter from said outlet of said pump,

a prime mover for rotating said pump,

a horizontal powered turning wheel rotatably mounted on said chassis and having its forward periphery extending beyond the forward end of said chassis,

and means for moving said chassis over the fioor of a swimming pool.

2. In a swimming pool cleaning means,

a chassis,

wheels for supporting said chassis on the floor of a swimming pool,

a pump having an inlet and an outlet, said inlet being disposed adjacent said chassis,

an element for receiving matter from said outlet of said a prime mover for rotating said pump,

a horizontal downwardly and forwardly tipped wheel rotatably mounted on said chassis and having its forward periphery extending beyond the forward end of said chassis,

and means for moving said chassis over the floor of a swimming pool.

3. In a swimming pool cleaning means,

a chassis,

Wheels for supporting said chassis on the floor of a swimming pool,

a pump having an inlet and an outlet, said inlet being disposed adjacent said chassis,

an element for receiving matter from said outlet of said a prime mover for rotating said pump,

a horizontal powered turning wheel rotatably mounted on said chasis and having its forward periphery extending beyond the forward end of said chassis,

and means for moving said chassis over the floor of a swimming pool;

at least one of said wheels supporting said chassis being a caster wheel.

4. In a swimming pool cleaning means,

a chassis,

wheels for supporting said chassis on the floor of a swimming pool,

a pump having an inlet and an outlet, said inlet being disposed adjacent said chassis,

an element for receiving matter from said outlet of said a prime mover for rotating said pump,

a horizontal idler wheel rotatably secured on the forward end portion of said chassis and being longitudinally adjustable on the forward end portion of said chassis,

and means for moving said chassis over the floor of a swimming pool.

5. In a swimming pool cleaning means,

a chassis,

wheels for supporting said chassis on the floor of a swimming pool,

a pump having an inlet and an outlet, said inlet being disposed adjacent said chassis,

an element for receiving matter from said outlet of said pump,

a prime mover for rotating said pump,

a horizontal powered turning wheel rotatably mounted on said chassis and having its forward periphery extending beyond the forward end of said chassis,

means for moving said chassis over the floor of a swimming pool,

and a matter collection unit communicating with the inlet of said pump.

6. In a swimming pool cleaning means,

a chassis,

wheels for supporting said chassis on the floor of a swimming pool,

a pump having an inlet and an outlet, said inlet being disposed adjacent said chassis,

an element for receiving matter from said outlet of said pump,

a prime mover for rotating said pump,

a horizontal turning wheel rotatably mounted on said chassis and having its forward periphery extending beyond the forward end of said chassis,

and means for moving said chassis over the floor of a swimming pool and rotating said turning wheel.

7. In a swimming pool cleaning means,

a chassis,

wheels for supporting said chassis on the floor of a swimming pool,

a pump having an inlet and an outlet, said inlet being disposed adjacent said chassis,

an element for receiving matter from said outlet of said pump,

a prime mover for rotating said pump,

a horizontal turning wheel rotatably mounted on said chassis and having its forward periphery extending beyond the forward end of said chassis,

and means for moving said chassis over the floor of a swimming pool and rotating said turning wheel in either direction.

8. In a swimming pool cleaning means,

a chassis,

two traction wheels supporting the rear portion of said chassis,

two caster wheels supporting the front portion of said chassis,

two horizontal wheels rotatably mounted in horizontal ly spaced apart relationship on the forward end of said chassis and extending to points beyond the forward end of said chassis,

a pump having an inlet and an outlet, said inlet being disposed adjacent said chassis,

and a prime mover operatively connected to said traction wheels, said two horizontal wheels and said pump.

9. In a swimming pool cleaning means,

a chassis,

two traction wheels supporting the rear portion of said chassis,

two caster wheels supporting the front portion of said chassis,

two horizontal wheels rotatably mounted in horizontally spaced apart relationship on the forward end of said chassis and extending to points beyond the forward end of said chassis,

a pump having an inlet and an outlet, said inlet being disposed adjacent said chassis,

filter means associated with the outlet of said pump,

and a prime mover operatively connected to said traction wheels, said two horizontal wheels and said pump.

10. In a swimming pool cleaning means,

a chassis,

two traction Wheels supporting the rear portion of said chassis,

t-wo caster wheels supporting the front portion of said chassis,

two horizontal wheels rotatably mounted in horizontally spaced apart relationship on the forward end of said chassis and extending to points beyond the forward end of said chassis,

a pump having an inlet and an outlet, said inlet being disposed adjacent said chassis,

a prime mover operatively connected to said traction Wheels,

and means for causing said prime mover to rotate each of said two horizontal wheels in either direction.

11. In a swimming pool cleaning means,

a chassis,

two traction wheels supporting the rear portion of said chassis,

two caster wheels supporting the front portion of said chassis,

two horizontal wheels rotatably mounted in horizontally spaced apart relationship on the forward end of said chassis and extending to points beyond the forward end of said chassis,

a pump having an inlet and an outlet, said inlet being disposed adjacent said chassis,

a prime mover operatively connected to said traction wheels,

and means for yieldingly locking said caster wheels againt castering.

12. In a swimming pool cleaning means,

a chassis,

two traction wheels supporting the rear portion of said chassis,

two caster wheels supporting the front portion of said chassis,

two horizontal wheels rotatably mounted in horizontally spaced apart relationship on the forward end of said chassis and extending to points beyond the forward end of said chassis,

a pump having an inlet and an outlet, said inlet being disposed adjacent said chassis,

a prime mover operatively connected to said traction wheels,

and a horizontal. idler wheel rotatably adjustably mounted on said chassis and between said first two horizontal wheels.

13. In a swimming pool cleaning means,

a chassis,

two traction wheels supporting the rear portion of said chassis,

two caster wheels supporting the front portion of said chassis,

two horizontal wheels rotatably mounted in horizontally spaced apart relationship on the forward end of said chassis and extending to points beyond the forward end of said chassis,

a pump having an inlet and an outlet, said inlet being disposed adjacent said chassis,

a prime mover operatively connected to said traction wheels, said horizontal wheels and said pump,

and floor area scrubbing elements associated with each of said two horizontal wheels.

14. In a swimming pool cleaning means,

a chassis,

wheels for supporting said chassis on the floor of a swimming pool,

a pump having an inlet and an outlet,

an element for receiving matter from said outlet of said pump,

a prime mover for rotating said pump and at least one of said wheels,

a water floatable element,

a conduit having its upper end supported by said floatable element and its other end communicating with the inlet of said pump,

and a second conduit having one end in the vicinity of said chassis and its other end communicating with the inlet of said pump.

15. In a swimming pool cleaning means,

a chassis,

wheels for supporting said chassis on the floor of a swimming pool,

7 a pump having an inlet and an outlet,

an element for receiving matter from said oulet of said pump,

a prime mover for rotating said pump and at least one of said wheels,

a water floatable element having spaced apart leg portions,

a conduit having its upper end supported by said floatable element and its other end communicating with the inlet of said pump,

and a second conduit having one end in the vicinity of said chassis and its other end communicating with the inlet of said pump.

16. In a swimming pool cleaning means,

a chassis,

wheels for supporting said chassis on the floor of a swimming pool,

a pump having an inlet and an outlet,

an element for receiving matter from said outlet of said a prime mover for rotating said pump and at least one of said wheels,

a water floatable element,

a conduit having its upper end supported by said floatable element and its other end communicating with the inlet of said pump,

a second conduit having one end in the vicinity of said chassis and its other end communicating with the inlet of said pump,

and means for controlling the passage of matter through at least one of said mentioned conduits.

17. In a swimming pool cleaning means,

a chassis,

wheels for supporting said chassis on the floor of a swimming pool,

a pump having an inlet and an outlet,

an element for receiving matter from said oulet of said pump,

a prime mover for rotating said pump and at least one of said wheels,

a water floatable element,

a conduit having its upper end supported by said floatable element and its other end communicating with the inlet of said pump,

a second conduit having one end in the vicinity of said chassis and its other end communicating with the inlet of said pump,

and a valve means imposed in said first mentioned conduit, and a valve means imposed in said second mentioned conduit.

18. The structure of claim 1 wherein a second horizontal powered turning wheel is rotatably mounted on said chassis and has its periphery extending beyond the forward end of said chassis, and a substantially horizontal idler wheel is rotatably mounted on said chassis betwen said powered turning wheels and has its forward periphery extending beyond the forward end of said chassis and a straight line extending between the forwardmost points on said powered turning wheels.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,910,325 5/1933 Finnell 1550 X 2,923,954 2/1960 Babcock 151.7 2,969,557 1/ 1961 Petersen 15320 X FOREIGN PATENTS 964,827 10/ 1927 Australia. 758,796 11/1933 France.

OTHER REFERENCES German printed application P6206, April 1956.

CHARLES A. WILLMUTH, Primary Examiner.

E. L. ROBERTS, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1910325 *Jan 21, 1929May 23, 1933Finnell Walter SFloor mopping machine
US2923954 *Jul 5, 1955Feb 9, 1960 babcock
US2969557 *Nov 30, 1956Jan 31, 1961Clarke Floor Machine CompanyPowered floor scrubber
AU964827B * Title not available
FR758796A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3859948 *Feb 28, 1973Jan 14, 1975Buonaprole FerruccioApparatus for cleaning hulls and other submerged surfaces
US3922991 *Jun 25, 1973Dec 2, 1975Woods John WApparatus for cleaning metallic surfaces
US4152802 *Feb 21, 1978May 8, 1979D. J. V. D. ChauvierApparatus for cleaning submerged surfaces
US4156948 *Aug 11, 1977Jun 5, 1979Daniel Jean Valere Denis ChauvierApparatus for cleaning submerged surfaces
US4168557 *Dec 2, 1977Sep 25, 1979Rasch WilhelmPool cleaners
US8307485Aug 19, 2011Nov 13, 2012Hayward Industries, Inc.Apparatus for facilitating maintenance of a pool cleaning device
US8343339Sep 16, 2008Jan 1, 2013Hayward Industries, Inc.Apparatus for facilitating maintenance of a pool cleaning device
US8784652Sep 24, 2010Jul 22, 2014PoolvergnuegenSwimming pool cleaner with a rigid debris canister
US8869337Nov 2, 2010Oct 28, 2014Hayward Industries, Inc.Pool cleaning device with adjustable buoyant element
US8956533Oct 3, 2011Feb 17, 2015Pentair Water Pool And Spa, Inc.Pool cleaner with multi-stage venturi vacuum assembly
US8990990Oct 3, 2011Mar 31, 2015Pentair Water Pool And Spa, Inc.Pool cleaner with hydraulic timer assembly
US20120006244 *Jan 12, 2012Van Rompay Boudewijn GabrielRecuperation system for underwater cleaning operations
DE1920172A1 *Apr 21, 1969Oct 22, 1970Myers Robert RoyMaschine zum Reinigen von Schwimmbecken
EP0199478A1 *Apr 1, 1986Oct 29, 1986Lectrosweep (Pty) LimitedPool cleaner
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/1.7, 15/340.4
International ClassificationA47L11/00, E04H4/16
Cooperative ClassificationE04H4/1654, A47L11/4058, A47L2201/04, A47L11/4061, A47L11/4072, A47L11/00, A47L2201/06, A47L11/4022, A47L11/4066
European ClassificationA47L11/40G4, A47L11/40D2D, A47L11/40K, A47L11/40H, A47L11/40J2, A47L11/00, E04H4/16C
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Apr 8, 1981ASAssignment
Owner name: AQUA-VAC SYSTEMS INC., A CORP. OF FL.
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:MYERS, HELEN (BAST);REEL/FRAME:003847/0098
Effective date: 19810311
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:MYERS, HELEN (BAST);REEL/FRAME:3847/98
Owner name: AQUA-VAC SYSTEMS INC., A CORP. OF,FLORIDA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:MYERS, HELEN (BAST);REEL/FRAME:003847/0098
Owner name: AQUA-VAC SYSTEMS INC., A CORP. OF, FLORIDA