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Publication numberUS3324853 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 13, 1967
Filing dateMar 2, 1964
Priority dateMar 2, 1964
Publication numberUS 3324853 A, US 3324853A, US-A-3324853, US3324853 A, US3324853A
InventorsCzorny Vasil P, Pannier Karl A, Ring Wallace H, Sorenson James L
Original AssigneeSorenson Res Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Intravenous catheter protector unit
US 3324853 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jun 3.- 96 v. P. CZORNY ETAL INTRAVENOUS CATHETER PROTECTOR UNIT 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed March 2, 1964 INVENTQR.

ff 1? 12 Z%2/2 9 June 13, 1967 v p czo ETAL 3,324,853

INTRAVENOUS CATHETER PROTECTOR UNIT Filed March 2, 1964 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTUR 1.11 412 1?. 1 01211491911." (fame 45M; 62111 129012 w; g g ATTORNEYS United States Patent poration of Utah Filed Mar. 2, 1964, Ser. No. 348,461 Claims. (Cl. 128214.4)

This invention relates to improvements in a catheter protector, the invention being highly desirable for use with an intravenous catheter after placement in the body of a patient through a cannulated needle for sheathing the needle point and supporting the immediately adjacent portion of the catheter, so that the needle will not cut or otherwise injure the catheter, and the needle will not injure the patient should the patient move while the catheter remains in place, although the invention may have other uses and purposes as will be apparent to one skilled in the art.

In the past, attempts have been made to entirely remove a cannulated needle through which a catheter had been placed in the body of a patient by withdrawing the needle off the catheter, and thereafter connecting the catheter to an infusion system. That procedure, however, proved objectionably messy, irksome, tedious, and presented the danger of discomfort and injury to the patient by way of maladjustment of the catheter or the puncturing of a vein wall by the catheter. It has now become desirable to place the catheter while infusion takes place, and accordingly the catheter must be connected to the infusion system before penetration by the cannulated needle is accomplished. It is virtually impossible thereafter to remove a needle with no slot therein, and many surgeons prefer such a needle to a slotted one. The needle must therefore remain around the catheter adjacent the patients body as long as the catheter remains in place, and measures must be taken to prevent the needle from puncturing the patients skin or cutting the catheter when the patient moves ,while the catheter remains in place. Heretofore it has been necessary in most cases to wrap the needle point with adhesive tape, gauze padding, or the like but such is at most a rather makeshift operation.

Frequently, the attending surgeon'or other skilled Operator desires to loop the catheter adjacent its point of entry to better position the same in accord with the in fusion system or to better anchor the catheter to the body of the patient. Such looping of the catheter is coupled with the danger of the catheter kinking sufficiently tightly to preclude or greatly interfere with the flow of infusion liquid therethrough and, insofar as we are aware, there were no really satisfactory means available to eliminate the possibility of kinking.

With the foregoing in mind, it is an important object of the instant invention to provide a simple form of protector that may be simply and easily engaged around the pointed end portion of a cannulated needle and also with the adjacent part of a catheter extending through that needle, and hold both the catheter and needle relatively immovable, while at the same time eliminating the possibility of the needle puncturing the skin of the patient.

Also an important object of this invention is the provision of an easily attachable protector having a curvate groove therein for the reception of the pointed end portion of a cannulated needle and the adjacent part of the catheter extending through that needle, the groove permitting the ready formation and the ultimate retention of a loop in the catheter without danger of kinking.

It is also an object of this invention to provide a form of catheter protector having a groove therein for the reception of a needle and the adjacent portion of a catheter extending through the needle in a looped condition and 3,324,853 Patented June 13, 1967 maintain the parts against relative movement, the protector being so adjusted that the loop may readily be made either to the left or the right of that portion of the Catheter extending into a patients body.

Still another desideratum of this invention is the provision of a simple form of protector readily applied over the pointed end portion of a cannulated needle and the adjacent part of a catheter extending through the needle to firmly hold those parts against relative movement, the application being readily accomplished while infusion is taking place.

It is also a feature of this invention to provide a protector or sheath for the pointed end portion of a cannulated needle and the adjacent part of a catheter extending through the needle to hold the parts against relative movement and wherein the needle is supported at a higher level than the catheter permitting the device to be attached to the body of a patient immediately adjacent the point of entry of the catheter.

While some of the more salient features, characteristics and advantages of the instant invention have been above pointed out, others will become apparent from the following disclosures, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIGURE 1 is a side elevational view with parts shown in section of a protector embodying principles of the instant invention, showing the same in operative association with a cannulated needle and the catheter extending therethrough;

FIGURE 2 is a greatly exaggerated transverse vertical sectional view taken substantially as indicated by the line II-II of FIGURE I, looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIGURE 3 is an enlarged side elevational view of the protector of FIGURE 1, provided with a cover;

FIGURE 4 is a transverse vertical sectional view taken substantially as indicated by the line IVIV of FIG- URE 3;

FIGURE 5 is a fragmentary top plan view of a catheter protector of different form but also embodying principles of the instant invention;

FIGURE 6 is a transverse vertical sectional view taken substantially as indicated by the line VI-Vl of FIG- URE 5;

FIGURE 7 is a fragmentary plan view of the structure of FIGURE 5 shown in open position;

FIGURE 8 is an end elevational view of another modification of the instant invention;

FIGURE 9 is an enlarged top plan view of the structure of FIGURE 8;

FIGURE 10 is a fragmentary top plan view of a further modification of the instant invention;

FIGURE 11 is a transverse vertical sectional view taken substantially as indicated by the line XIX'I of FIGURE 10, indicating operation in dotted lines;

FIGURE 12 is a fragmentary top plan view, with parts broken away, of still another modification of the instant invention; and

FIGURE 13 is a top plan view of the structure of FIG- URE 12 in open position.

A shown in the drawings:

In most of the figures of the drawings the illustrated embodiments of the instant invention are shown exaggerated in size for purpose of clarity. All forms of the invention illustrated may satisfactorily be made of molded or extruded plastic material.

The first illustrated embodiment of the instant invention is shown in operative association with the remaining portion of a catheter placement unit, after the catheter has been placed. As seen in FIGURES 1 and 2, the remainder of the unit, the catheter sheath having been removed, in-

, cludes a catheter advancer 1 operatively connected with 3 an infusion tube 2, and also joined to the hub 3 of a cannulated needle 4 through which a catheter 5 extends. One end of the catheter is of course anchored in the advancer 1 in communication with the infusion tube 2.

The protector itself comprises an elongated block 6, generally of channel shape, the side walls of which are topped by parallel beads 77 extending longitudinally of the block, such beads being substantially circular in cross section. Each bead is larger in diameter than the wall portion therebeneath, defining parallel external grooves 8-8 and an interior channel 9 also circular in shape except for the space between the beads. Such structure is sufficiently resilient for the cannulated needle with the catheter therein to be pressed or snapped into the channel between the beads as seen in FIGURE 2. The length of the block 6 depends upon the length of cannulated needle utilized, and its cross sectional area depends upon that of the particular cannulated needle. The protectors will be manufactured in various sizes for various :sized needles. 7

The block is of sufficient length to embrace at least the pointed end portion of the needle and the adjacent portion of the catheter to hold these parts firmly against relative movement. At the same time the groove is of such depth that the needle is elfectively prevented from penetrating the skin of a patient while the catheter extends into the patients body. With this arrangement considerable freedom of movement is given the patient even while infusion is taking place. It is a simple expedient to attach the protector to the body of a patient with a strip of adhesive tape. It will be noted that a very small amount of time is required to press the end portion of the needle and the part of the catheter into the channel of the protector. The operation can be facilely and safely accomplished in a matter of seconds.

Under occasions where curious children may be around the patient, or where a small child is the patient and constant sight of the needle which frightened the child originally might result in adverse effects, it may be desired to completely cover and conceal at least the pointed end portion of the needle. In such case, a cover may easily be placed upon the protector above described, as seen clearly in FIGURES 3 and 4. A cover 10' in the form of a resilient plastic extrusion of inverted channel shape. is 'quite satisfactory to enclose the open side of the block 6. This cover is provided with an inward stiffening rib formation 11 centrally of the top thereof to confine the resiliency into arcuate depending walls 1212 each of which is shaped to inwardly embrace the outer side of one of the aforesaid beads 7, as seen clearly in FIGURE 4. The side walls 1212 frictionally grip the beads 7-7, and the cover may either be snapped over the block 6 or telescoped lengthwise thereof whichever may be desired. The cover may be applied even quicker to the block 6 than the needle is applied to the block. The cover renders at least the pointed end portion of the needle invisible, and renders access to the needle extremely difficult for an inexperienced child.

The embodiment of this invention seen in FIGURES 5, 6 and 7 is designed to maintain a loop in the catheter without permitting the catheter to kink. This block has a curvate or U-shaped groove 14 therein, and adjacent to the junction between each leg and the bight of the U, the block is provided with a V-shaped notch to receive the point of the needle 4 as best seen in FIGURE 7. The block 13 is provided with a handle 13a at one end thereof and also with an upstanding pin 16 which projects through a slot 17 in a cover 18, the block and cover being relatively slidable and the pin 16 limiting movement in either direction. As shown in FIGURE 6, the cover 18 embraces the block and has inwardly extendingflanges 1919 riding in complemental grooves in the bottom of the block, to keep the two parts joined.

In use, this form of the invention receives the needle on either side depending on whether it is desired to loop the catheter to the left or to the right, the point of the needle seating in one of notches 15. The catheter then follows the groove 14 and is looped as indicated at 20, the groove effectively preventing the catheter from kinking. After the needle and catheter have been placed in the groove, and the cover slides to closed position the pointed end portion of the needle is rather firmly held between the block and the cover, and it is a simple expedient to tape the protector to the body of a patient, the entire operation being very quickly and easily accomplished.

That embodiment of the invention shown in FIGURES 8 and 9 of the drawings is designed not only to sheath the needle, and maintain a loop in the catheter, but also to hold the needle and the part of the catheter thereadjacent at two different levels, whereby the catheter may be disposed immediately adjacent the skin of the patient, while the needle is elevated slightly thereabove for better connection with the actuator 1 and infusion system. Another feature of this embodiment is the fact that it comprises a single block 21 which is formed identically on both sides so that it is ready for use regardless of which side is uppermost.

The block 21 is generally rectanguiar in shape, and in one face thereof the block is provided with straight grooves 22and 23, one adjacent each side margin of the block. In the other face thereof, the block is provided with identical grooves 24 and 25. Between the two sets of grooves at the sides of the block, there is an arcuate or curvate rearward extension 26 integral with the block. This extension, as shown in FIGURE 8, is grooved as indicated at 27 in a manner to establish communication between the groove 22 in one face of the block and the groove 25 in the opposite face of the block and at the opposite side of the block. The same groove formation also establishes communication between the grooves 23 and 24. The cannulated needle may, of course, be pressed into any of the grooves, depending upon which way the catheter is to be looped. As shown, the needle has been pressed into the groove 23 and the catheter extending therethrough is looped as indicated at 28 from the groove 23 across the end portion 26 and downwardly and is then pressed into the groove 24 on the opposite face of the block. The block may then be taped to the body of a patient with the catheter adjacent the skin, and the needle will be elevated above the skin the thickness of the block. Consequently, the block may be disposed immediately adjacent the point the catheter enters the body of the patient and there is extremely little likelihood of the catheter being slightly disturbed regardless of the patients movements.

In FIGURES 10 and 11 we have shown an extremely quick acting protector. In this instance the protector embodies a single piece of plastic material comprising a base block 29 with an integral upstanding resilient latch 30 along one side thereof and a cover 31. The cover and base conjointly are provided with a relatively deep groove 32 therein which left a thin wall 33 connecting the cover and base and which thin wall portion functions as a hinge. The device will be received by the surgeon with the cover in the dotted line position seen in FIGURE 11, and it then is .a simple expedient for the surgeon to place the pointed end portion of the needle and adjacent part of the catheter in the groove 32 and press the protector between a finger and a thumb until the cover snaps behind the latch or detent 30 to the full line position seen in FIGURE 11. This action completes the application of the protector, and the protector is constructed so as to effect quite a forceable grip upon the needle portion therein.

The final embodiment of the invention illustrated in FIGURES l2 and 13 provides a choice in the manner of positioning the catheter either with or without a loop.

37 to receive a limiting pin 38 upstanding from the block 34, substantially in the manner above described in connection with FIGURES 5, 6 and 7.

The block 34 is provided with a U-shaped groove 39 having a V-shaped notch 40 to receive the needle point on each side of the bight, and is also provided with an oblique groove 41 leading away from an intermediate portion of the bight of the groove 39. This groove 41 communicates with a notch 42 in the base block 34 and from this notch to the other end of the base block a groove 43 is provided on the underside of the base block.

In using this form of the invention, the catheter may be looped and positioned in the U-groove 39 from either side, or, if a loop is not desired the catheter may extend through the oblique groove 41 through the notch 42 and along in the groove 43 on the under side of the block 34 thereby disposing the catheter at a lower level than the needle. When the catheter and needle portion are so positioned, and the cover slid over the base block the parts are held firmly in position, the catheter being pressed into the groove 43 on the under side of the block.

It will be noted that any of the illustrated embodiments of the instant invention may be reused, with the possible exception of the structure shown in FIGURES and 11, after suitable sterilization, if such reuse is found desirable or becomes necessary under certain circumstances. However, where there are no special circumstances dictating a reuse, any of the forms of the invention are sufficiently economical to warrant discarding after a single usage.

It will be understood that modifications and variations may be effected without departing from the scope of the novel concepts of the present invention.

We claim as our invention:

1. In an intravenous catheter placement unit including a needle, a catheter extending therethrough and a needle support means for protecting the patient and catheter from the pointed end portion of the needle during infusion, said needle support means comprising:

an elongated block having a lower surface and an upper surface,

said lower surface adapted to being attached to the body of the patient,

said upper surface having a groove formed therein and extending downwardly therefrom and longitudinally through at least a portion of the block,

said groove having means to frictionally hold at least the pointed end portion of the needle with the catheter therein substantially immobile so that the patients body and the catheter are protected from the pointed end of the needle.

2. A needle support means in accordance with claim 1 wherein a cover is slidably associated with said block and movable to and from open and closed positions to permit insertion of said catheter and needle portion and concealment after insertion.

3. A needle support means in accordance with claim 1 wherein a pair of transversely spaced parallel upstanding resilient beads is provided on said block and wherein said groove is formed by the transverse spacing between said beads.

4. A needle support means in accordance with claim 3 wherein the space between said parallel upstanding beads is less than the diameter of a needle being frictionally held within said groove.

5. A needle support means in accordance with claim 3 wherein said block is of sufficient length to cause the pointed end portion of the frictionally held needle and the adjacent extending portion of the catheter to be held in substantially fixed axial alignment.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,015,403 9/1935 Kiddle 174-135 X 2,704,302 3/1955 Budd 174-175 3,055,361 9/1962 Ballard 128214 3,059,645 10/ 1962 Hasbrouck et al 128346 3,167,072 1/1965 Stone et a1. 128-214 FOREIGN PATENTS 31,949 2/ 1962 Finland. 723,464 1/1932 France. 1,033,825 4/1953 France. 1,167,605 8/1958 France. 1,328,411 4/1962 France. 1,087,323 8/1960 France.

RICHARD A. GAUDET, Primary Examiner.

DALTON L. TRULUCK, Examiner.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification604/162, 24/545, 248/74.2
International ClassificationA61M5/32
Cooperative ClassificationA61M5/3216
European ClassificationA61M5/32C2D