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Publication numberUS3324862 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 13, 1967
Filing dateAug 31, 1964
Priority dateAug 31, 1964
Publication numberUS 3324862 A, US 3324862A, US-A-3324862, US3324862 A, US3324862A
InventorsDe Simone Bessie
Original AssigneeDe Simone Bessie
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Smoking device
US 3324862 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 13, 1967 B. DE SIMONE 3,324,862

SMOKING DEVICE Filed Aug. 31, 1964 INVENTOR.

BESSIE DE SIMONE Y Mand United States Patent 3,324,862 SMOKING DEVICE Bessie De Simone, 2554 Washington St, Haverhill, Mass. 01830 Filed Aug. 31, 1964, Ser. No. 393,040 4 Claims. c1. 131 10.5

This invention relates to a smoking device and, more particularly, to an improved construction of cigarettes, cigars, and similar smokers articles.

The smoking of tobacco is recognized by various authorities as injurious to the delicate membranes of the nose, throat, and lungs of smokers. The smoking of tobacco is credited with causing cancer of the lips, mouth, throat, lungs larynx, and esophagus. It also is credited with inducing various types of circulatory diseases. Notwithstanding the foregoing, the smoking of tobacco is widespread.

The damage is due to the smoke entering the mouth, throat, and lungs of the smoker. Cigarette smoke is a heterogeneous mixture of gases, uncondensed vapors, and liquid particulate material. For purposes of investigating chemical composition and biological properties, cigarette smoke is separated into a particulate phase and a gas phase.

The various types of filters, which are presently employed with cigarettes, remove a portion of the particles in the particulate phase. However, they are not effective against the gas phase of cigarette smoke.

Since the gas phase accounts for 60 percent of total cigarette smoke, it is desirable to reduce the dangers from the gas phase as well as the particulate phase without completely eliminating the effects, which the smoker desires. Otherwise, the smoker will not utilize the safety device.

One component of the gas phase is carbon monoxide, which has a concentration of 42,000 p.p.m. The safe level of carbon monoxide for industrial exposure is 100* p.p.m. when based on a time-weighted average concentration for a normal work day.

Another component found in the gas phase of the cigarette smoke is hydrogen cyanide, which is a respiratory enzyme poison. Tests have indicated that the concentration of hydrogen cyanide in cigarette smoke is 1,600 p.p.m. whereas the safe level for industrial exposure, as mentioned in relation to carbon monoxide, is p.p.m. Thus, it is desirable to reduce the concentration of these various components of the gas phase when they enter the mouth of the smoker to decrease the danger to the smoker.

The present invention satisfactorily solves this problem by introducing cool air into the mouth of the smoker whenever the smoker inhales on the cigarette. By the use of the present invention, the concentration of all of the harmful particles of the gas phase is reduced. Furthermore, the smoker still receives the taste effects of the cigarette smoke but they are diluted to provide protection to the smoker.

Additionally, the cool air entering the smokers mouth directly results in a lowering of temperatures in the smokers mouth, throat, and lungs. This produces a more desirable smoking effect.

An object of this invention is to provide a smokers article construction in which cool air is supplied directly to the mouth of a smoker when he inhales.

Another object of this invention is to provide a smokers article construction that makes smoking of the article less harmful.

Other objects of this invention will be readily perceived from the following description.

This invention relates to a smokers article comprising a flexible wrapper having tobacco contained therein. The article has a plurality of air passages disposed at one end thereof in substantially parallel relationship to its longitudinal axis with the passages being adjacent to the wrapper. The passages have their inlets disposed sufiiciently forward of the end of the article to be exterior of the mouth of a smoker when the article is disposed within the mouth of the smoker.

The attached drawing illustrates a preferred embodiment of the invention, in which- FIGURE 1 is a longitudinal sectional view of a cigarette illustrating one embodiment of the present invention;

FIGURE 2 is a sectional view taken along the line 2-2 of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a longitudinal sectional view of a cigarette showing another form of the present invention;

FIGURE 4 is a sectional view taken along the line 4-4 of FIGURE 3;

FIGURE 5 is a longitudinal sectional view of a cigarette disclosing another modification of the present invention; and

FIGURE 6 is a sectional view taken along the line 6-6 of FIGURE 5.

Referring to the drawing and particuluarly FIGURES 1 and 2, there is shown a cigarette 10 having a paper wrapper 11 enclosing tobacco 12 and a filter 14 at one end. A plurality of air passages is formed about the filter 14 by air inlet tubes 15, which are preferably formed of paper. Any other suitable material may be employed to form the tubes 15 as long as it has sufficient strength to prevent collapse and closing of the air passages, which are formed by the tubes 15, when the cigarette 10 is held in the mouth of the smoker.

As shown in FIGURE 2, the tubes 15 are preferably oval shaped although they could have other configurations if desired. Furthermore, while four. tubes 15 have been shown, it should be understood that the number could be greater or lesser depending on the desired dilution of the smoke an the area of the tubes 15.

The paper wrapper 11 has a plurality of apertures 16 with each of the apertures 16 providing communication for one of the air passages to the exterior of the wrapper 11 through passages 17 in the tobacco 12. While the tubes 15 are shown terminating adjacent the end of the filter 14, it should be understood that the air intake tubes 15 need only have a length sufiicient to permit the communicating apertures 16 to be exterior of the mouth of a smoker when the smoker holds the cigarette Within his mouth.

Furthermore, while the wrapper 11 is shown as a continuous wrapper, there could be a separate wrapper surrounding the tobacco 12 and another wrapper surrounding the filter 14 and overlapping the wrapper surrounding the tobacco 12. When used in the claims, the term Wrapper includes either a single wrapper or a dual wrapper arrangement in which one paper mapper surrounds the tobacco 12 and the other wrapper surrounds the filter 14 and overlaps the wrapper around the tobacco 12.

When the smoker holds the cigarette within his mouth and inhales, air readily passes through the apertures or openings 16 in the wrapper 11 and through the air passages, which are formed within the air inlet tubes 15, into the mouth of the smoker. This cool air serves to reduce the temperature of the smoke within the mouth of the smoker along with diluting the injurious components of the gas phase of the cigarette smoke.

The modification of FIGURES 3 and 4 includes a cigarette 20 having a paper wrapper 21. The wrapper 21 encloses tobacco 22 and a filter 23 at one end. As explained with respect to the embodiment of FIGURES 1 and 2, the wrapper 21 may be either a single wrapper or two Wrappers.

A plurality of air inlet tubes 24 is attached to the exterior of the wrapper 21 by a suitable adhesive such as glue, for example. As shown in FIGURE 4, there are four air inlet tubes 24 but the number may be increased or decreased a explained with respect to FIGURES 1 and 2.

The air inlet tubes 24 are preferably formed of paper of sufficient strength to prevent the closing of the air passages, which are formed by the tubes 24, when the cigarette 20 is disposed within the mouth of the smoker. If desired, other material than paper may be employed as long as it has the required structural characteristics.

A third form of the invention is'disclosed in FIGURES and 6 wherein there is shown a cigarette 30 having a paper wrapper 31. The wrapper 31 encloses tobacco 32 and a filter 33 at one end.

In the cigarette 30, 'air passages 34 are formed by creating depressions extending the length of the filter 33 along its periphery. Thus, the air inlet tubes are eliminated. However, the filter 34 is surrounded by a shell 35, which is preferably formed of paper, to prevent the passages 34 from being closed when the cigarette 30 is held in the mouth of the smoker.

In order to provide inlets to the passages 34, the wrapper 31 has a plurality of apertures or openings 36 therein. The number of apertures 36 is equal to the number of air passages 34 with each of the apertures 36 communicating with one of the air passages 34 through passages 37 in the tobacco 32. As previously mentioned with respect to the wrappers 11 and 21, the paper wrapper 31 may be either a continuous wrapper or two separate wrappers.

When the smoker inhales on the cigarette 30, cool air enters the apertures 36 and flows through the passages 34 into the mouth of the smoker. This air cools the smoke and dilutes the harmful components of the gas phase of the cigarette smoke as previously mentioned.

While the present invention has been described with respect to a cigarette having a filter, it will be readily understood that the modifications of FIGURES 1, 2, and 3, 4 may be easily employed with a cigarette not having a filter. Furthermore, the embodiment of FIGURES 1, 2 and 3, 4 also may be easily used with other smokers articles such as cigars, for example.

An advantage of this invention is that it dilutes the ratio of the various harmful components of the gas phase of the cigarette smoke such as carbon monoxide, for example, to air. Another advantage of this invention is that it reduces the temperature of the cigarette smoke in the mouth of the smoker.

For purposes of exemplification, particular embodiments of the invention have been shown and described according to the best present understanding thereof. However, it will be apparent that changes and modifications in the arrangement and construction of the parts thereof may be restorted to without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

I claim:

1. A smokers article comprising a flexible continuous wrapper, tobacco contained within said wrapper, a plurality of hollow tubes disposed within said wrapper at one end thereof, said tubes being separate from said wrapper and being disposed in substantially parallel relationship to the longitudinal axis of said article and to each other, said wrapper being uninterrupted in a transverse direction in the region of said tubes, each of said tubes being formed of a material to prevent collapse and closing thereof when said article is disposed within the mouth of a smoker, said wrapper having a plurality of apertures therein ,equal in number to the number of said tubes, separate\passages formed in said tobacco to connect each of said apertures to a corresponding one of said tubes, said tubes being adjacent said wrapper, and said apertures being disposed sufficiently forward of the end of said article to be exterior of the mouth of the smoker when said article is disposed within the mouth of the smoker,

2. A smokers article comprising a flexible continuous wrapper, tobacco contained within said wrapper, at least four oval-shaped hollow tubes disposed within said wrapper at one end thereof and equally angularly spaced from each other, said tubes being separate from said wrapper and being disposed in substantially parallel relationship to the longitudinal axi of said article and to each other, said wrapper being uninterrupted in a transverse direction 'in the region of said tubes, eachof said tubes being formed of a material to prevent collapse and closing thereof when said article is disposed within the mouth of a smoker, said wrapper having a plurality of apertures therein equal in number to the number of said tubes, separate passage formed in said tobacco to connect each of said apertures to a corresponding one of said tubes, said tubes being adjacent said wrapper, and said apertures being disposed sufficiently forward of the end of said article to be exterior of the mouth of the smoker when said article is disposed within the mouth of the smoker.

3. A smokers article comprising a flexible continuous wrapper, tobacco contained within said wrapper, a filter within said wrapper at one end thereof, a plurality of hollow tubes disposed within said wrapper at said filter end, said tubes being separate from said wrapper and being disposed in substantially parallel relationship to the longitudinal axis of said article and to each other, said wrapper being uninterrupted in a transverse direction in the region of said tubes, each of said tubes being formed of a material to prevent collapse and closing thereof when said article is disposed within the mouth of a smoker, said wrapper having a plurality of apertures formed therein equal in number to the number of said subes, separate passages formed in said tobacco to connect each of said apertures to a corresponding one of said tubes, said tubes being adjacent said wrapper and extending for the length of said filter, and said apertures being disposed forward of said filter so as to be exterior of the mouth of the smoker when said article is disposed within the mouth of the smoker.

4. A smokers article comprising a flexible continuous wrapper, tobacco contained within said wrapper, a filter within said wrapper at one end thereof, at least four ovalshaped hollow tubes disposed within said wrapper at said filter end and equally angularly spaced from each other, said tubes being separate from said wrapper and being disposed in substantially parallel relationship to the longitudinal axis of said article and to each other, said wrapper being uninterrupted in a transverse direction in the region of said tubes, each of said tubes being formed of a material to prevent collapse and closing thereof when said article is disposed within the mouth of a smoker, said wrapper having a plurality of apertures formed therein equal in number to the number of said tubes, separate passages formed in said tobacco to connect each of said apertures to a corresponding one of said tubes, said tubes being adjacent said wrapper and extending for the length of said filter, and said apertures being disposed forward of said filter so as to be exterior of the mouth of the smoker when said article is disposed within the mouth of the smoker.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS ALDRICH F. MEDBERY, Primary Examiner.

SAMUEL KOREN, H. P. DEELEY, JR.,

Assistant Examiners.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1718122 *Jan 18, 1927Jun 18, 1929De Shon Clarence LCigarette tip
US2226473 *Feb 14, 1939Dec 24, 1940Henry Kennedy GeorgeCigarette
US2988088 *Aug 10, 1954Jun 13, 1961Olin MathiesonCigarette
US3240213 *Jan 25, 1962Mar 15, 1966Achilles CorpCigarette
AU240650B * Title not available
FR1349992A * Title not available
GB864247A * Title not available
GB867669A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3390684 *Aug 9, 1965Jul 2, 1968Armstead B. HudnellCigarette with controllable mildness
US3490461 *Apr 20, 1967Jan 20, 1970Philip Morris IncCigarette ventilation
US3789855 *Jun 22, 1971Feb 5, 1974Liggett & Myers IncHigh flavor impact, low smoke yield cigarette mouthpiece
US3860011 *Aug 27, 1973Jan 14, 1975Liggett & Myers IncHollow filter
US4386618 *Jun 29, 1981Jun 7, 1983Brown & Williamson Tobacco CorporationCigarette filter
US4492238 *Jan 12, 1982Jan 8, 1985Philip Morris IncorporatedMethod and apparatus for production of smoke filter components
US4498487 *Feb 12, 1982Feb 12, 1985Fabriques De Tabac Reunies, S.A.Rod-like smoking article with secondary air channels and apparatus for producing such an article
US4616664 *Mar 17, 1981Oct 14, 1986American Brands, Inc.Tobacco product
US4637409 *May 7, 1981Jan 20, 1987American Filtrona CorporationTobacco smoke filter and method and apparatus for making same
US4784632 *Sep 12, 1986Nov 15, 1988American Filtrona CorporationTobacco smoke filter and method and apparatus for making same
US4942887 *Jun 9, 1988Jul 24, 1990Fabriques De Tabac Reunies, S.A.Filter mouthpiece for a smoking article
US5178166 *Sep 20, 1990Jan 12, 1993Philip Morris IncorporatedFilter cigarette
DE3147896A1 *Dec 3, 1981Jun 24, 1982Brown & Williamson TobaccoZigarettenfilter
DE3150087A1 *Dec 17, 1981Jun 24, 1982Imp Group Ltd"spitzenanordnung fuer einen laenglichen rauchgegenstand"
DE3216667A1 *May 4, 1982Nov 25, 1982Cigarette Components LtdTabakrauch-filter
EP0061275A1 *Mar 15, 1982Sep 29, 1982American Brands, Inc.Tobacco product
Classifications
U.S. Classification131/336, 131/339
International ClassificationA24D3/04, A24D3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA24D3/043
European ClassificationA24D3/04B