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Publication numberUS3324866 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 13, 1967
Filing dateJun 16, 1965
Priority dateJun 16, 1965
Publication numberUS 3324866 A, US 3324866A, US-A-3324866, US3324866 A, US3324866A
InventorsRandall Davis
Original AssigneeEducation Of The City Of Los A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sanitation system
US 3324866 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 13, 1967" Filed June 16, 1965 SANITATION SYSTEM R. DAVIS 5 heets-Sheet '1' June 13,1967 I R. DAVIS 3,324,866 I SANITATION SYSTEM I Filed June 16, 1965 3 heets-Sheet 2 Ml \y [WE/yr? Aim/0124 04 W:

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SANITATION SYSTEM Filed June 16, 1965 3 heets-Sheet 5 H .LL

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United States Patent 3,324,866 SANITATION SYSTEM Randall Davis, Panorama City, Calif., assignor to The Board of Education of the city of Los Angeles, Los Angeles, Calif.

Filed June 16, 1965, Ser. No. 464,372 11 Claims. (Cl. 134-52) The present invention relates to a sanitizing system for trash receptacles or containers, and particularly to a mobile system for cleaning trash containers at the location of their use.

In recent years, widespread urbanization has been accompanied by considerably improved methods for handling trash, garbage and the like. One technique that has come into generally widespread use in automated trash handling involves a trash container which is fitted to be somewhat automatically emptied by the apparatus of a removal or collecting truck, that engages the container and lifts it to dump the contained trash into the carryingspace of the removal truck. Several different detailed structures have been proposed, which function in this manner; however, in one successful form, the truck carries a fork-lift apparatus to engage trash containers on the ground and elevate them from a position in front of the truck to a dump position above the truck bed in which they are inverted, emptying the trash accumulated in the container into the truck. This arrangement has been found particularly successful in serving commercial establishments and the like, which produce a relatively large volume of trash, and in general which establishments employ trash containers that are relatively large. Of course, if the containers are not made rather large, the capability of the automatic, powered emptying apparatus is not fully utilized. Therefore, the containers are generally of a size as to be somewhat stationary, except when they are being emptied by power apparatus.

After a period of use, the trash containers normally accumulate a residue of dust, dirt, and so on, depending upon the nature of the trash deposited in the container. Unless the residue is periodically cleaned from a container, it continues to accumulate and soon becomes not only unsightly but also a potential health hazard. However, in view of their large size and immobile nature, cleaning trash containers of the type here considered has in the past presented a substantial problem. Therefore, a true need has existed for an effective apparatus for cleaning these large trash containers.

In considering the possibility of a mobile powered unit for cleaning large trash containers, several problems are apparent. Specifically, the selection of a cleaning medium and the conservation and storage thereof may affect the system considerably, Furthermore, the delivery force for the cleaning medium presents a problem as pressure tanks from which the medium could be released to impact with a cleaning force are expensive, dangerous and of limited capacity. Alternatively, prior pressurizing apparatus as for use in systems of the type under consideration usually require time to build up to an operating level and often must be provided with precise controls to avoid undue delay waste of the cleaning medium, and containment thereof.

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide an improved system of handling and cleaning trash containers.

Another object of the present invention is to provide an improved apparatus for cleaning large trash containers, which is self-contained, efficient in operation and relatively economical.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide an improved system for cleaning trash containers, which system is mobile and utilizes an internal combus- "ice tion engine to forcefully propel cleaning solutions through a plumbing system into trash containers, which engine and plumbing system are both controlled by a structure actuated by a container placed in a position to be cleaned, to thereupon broadcast solution with increased cleaning force into the container.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide a mobile system for cleaning trash containers somewhat automatically and without manual handling, which system is economical, safe, fast and does not require excessive maintenance.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide an improved apparatus for cleaning large trash containers with fluid released under pressure to impact with cleaning effect, which is capable of fast operation and which does not require high-pressure storage capability.

A further object of the present invention is to provide an effective system for cleaning containers at the location of their use, which system is self contained and includes plumbing structure for propelling a medium to impact with cleaning force, capturing spent medium and circulating the medium for filtering and re-use. Briefly, these and other objects and advantages of the present invention are achieved in accordance with the structural features of one example of the invention disclosed herein, which includes, a vehicle for transporting the system, under its own power, to the locations of trash containers for example. The vehicle is provided with a lifting means for engaging the container and raising it with power to an inverted cleaning position, and with a structure for impelling a fluid cleaning medium into the container and capturing the spent fluid for re-use. The fluid-handling structure incorporates a pump to draw fluid from a drain sump and force the fluids release with force. In this regard, automatically actuated controls are provided, which bypass fluid from the pump until a container is placed in a position for cleaning and which similarly idles the drive engine until useful in forcefully impelling fluid.

Further details of these and other novel features of the present invention, as well as additional objects and advantages thereof will become apparent from a consideration of the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings which disclose structure presented by way of illustrative example only and in which:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective and sectional view of a mobile sanitation system constructed in accordance with the present invention;

FIGURE 2 is an enlarged perspective view of a portion of the structure of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a view similar to that of FIGURE 2, showing the system in a different operating position;

FIGURE 4 is a side plan view of a portion of the system of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 5 is a top plan view of the structure of FIG- URE 4; and

FIGURE 6 is a fragmentary enlarged end plan view of the structure of FIGURE 4.

In referring to the figures in greater detail, it is stressed that the particulars shown are by way of example only, for purposes of illustrative discussion and to disclose what is believed to be a useful and easily understandable description of the principles and structural concepts of the invention. In particular, no attempt has been made to show structure of the disclosed apparatus in greater detail than is necessary for a fundamental understanding of the invention. Furthermore, the detailed showing of the invention is not to be taken as a limitation on the scope thereof which rather is defined by the appended claims, forming along with the drawing, a part of this specification.

In FIGURE 1, there is shown a vehicle, or truck V incorporating a lifting apparatus L for lifting and positioning a trash container C from ground level to the cleaning position essentially as shown, above a cleaning unit U that is carried on the bed of the truck V. In operation, generally, the truck V is driven to a location and position contiguous to an empty container C. Then the apparatus L engages a container C and elevates it to the position as shown above the unit U. Thereafter as the container C is lowered into the cleaning unit U, controls (as described below) are actuated to forcefully direct cleaning fluid into the container C removing dirt and residue therefrom on impact, and fluishing the container clean. Next, the container C is elevated to be withdrawn from the cleaning unit U, causing the controls to stop the broad cast of cleaning solution. As a last step, the container is then lowered to ground level and released, clean and again ready for use.

Considering the system in somewhat greater detail, the truck V may be of somewhat basic configuration including an overengine cab 12 and a partially open bed enclosure 14 carried on a running gear including wheels 16. The cleaning unit U is fixed in the enclosure 14 near the front thereof, somewhat adjacent the cab 12 at the terminus 17 of the track structure 18 upon which the container is carried. The truck structure 18 is generally arcuate above the cam 12 from the upper terminus 17 thereof to a vertical section 20 which continues to a location just above ground level. The vertical section 20 of the track structure 18 includes a pair of tracks 22 defining an open space immediately forward of the cab 12 to afford clear visibility to the operator. However, from a horizontal bar 24 above the cab 12, the arcuate section of the track structure 18 is closed by a shield 26, and reinforced by a pair of T-shaped side braces 28 connected to the bed enclosure 14.

The traveler 30 which rides on the tracks 22 is shown in greater detail in FIGURE 2, to which reference will now be had. The tracks 22 provide channels containing power chains 32 which are engaged to the traveler 30 and which are drawn upward into the bed enclosure 14 as well-known in the prior art to lift the traveler 30 and the container C. The power for the traveler 30 is provided from the engine of the truck V, such power take-off structures being very well-known in the prior art. Structurally, the traveler includes a pair of lift-fork horizontal cantilevered columns 34 that extend to engage the container C in channels 36 affixed to the bottom, of the somewhat parallelopiped container C. The columns 34 extend horizontally forward from the traveler considerably beyond a pair of upper cushioned bumpers 38 and lower cushioned bumpers 40, and are rigidly affixed to a support frame 42 which is pivotally fixed to the body 44 of the traveler 30. The pivotal joints 46 between the frame 42 and the body 44 are near the top of the body 44, so that the lower end of the frame 42 may swing outwardly from the body as shown in FIGURE 3. The outward swing of the body 44 is accomplished by a pair of hydraulic actuators 48 fixed between the body 44 and pivot mounts 50. The actuators 48 are controlled by a hydraulic mechanism 52 (FIGURE 2) fed by control lines 54 as well-known in the prior art. Thus, in the structure illustratively disclosed, a trash container C is engaged by the fork columns 34 entering the channels 36, lifted slightly, then tilted rearward by displacing the bottom of the container C forward as shown in FIGURE 3. The container C, so engaged, is then lifted by driving the chains 32, as Wellknown in the prior art, .to place the container in an inverted position as shown in FIGURE 1, in which the container is truly inverted, i.e. the bottom is horizontal and the sides are vertical. A slight additional movement of the container C into the enclosure 14, from the position as shown in FIGURE 1, automatically activates the cleaning unit U to flush the container clean with forcefully broadcast solution. The operation and details of the cleaning unit U will now be considered, with reference to FIGURES 4, 5 and 6.

The containers C are lowered into a rectangular splash shield 56 for cleaning, which shield is afl'ixed to the walls of an open primary housing 58 of the unit and extends upward and outward therefrom. When lowered into such a position, the containers are flushed clean by a jet spray rotary washer head 60 expelling water from nozzles 62 which revolve about two perpendicular axes. That is, the nozzles 62 are fixed in a somewhat-annular member 64 rotary about a horizontal axis, which is in turn supported in a coupling 66 that revolves about a vertical axis. As a result, the individual nozzles 62 dispense water in virtually all directions as the revolving action is accomplished hydraulically by the solution flowing through the head 60, as well-known in the prior art. One exemplary form of such head is available from UTRCO Products Inc. of Los Angeles, California.

The head 60 is supplied with cleaning liquid which may comprise an aqueous cleaning solution, from a pump 68 which is driven by a gasoline engine 70 mounted on a platform 72 carried on beams 74 which are fixed to the truck bed 81 inside the enclosure 14. The pump 68 draws the solution from a sump 76 integral with the housing 58, through a line 78 containing a manually-operable valve 80. The solution is then forced from the output of the pump 68 through a vertical line 82 to flow through one of two alternative paths. The line 82 branches into a first line 84 to the nozzle head 60, and to a second line 86 which provides a bypass path for the solution back to the sump 76. In function, the line 86 is employed as a bypass path for solution during intervals of quiescent operation when the pump 68 is ope-rating, but there is no container in a cleaning position.

The lines 84 and 86 in the plumbing system for cleaning solution are controlled for time-opposed operation by a pair of lever arms 88 and 90 (FIGURE 5) extending through slots 92 and 94 respectively in a side Wall 96 of the splash shield 56. The arms 88 and 90 are both depressed when a trash container C is lowered into the unit. The lever arm 88 then acts to open a flow path for cleaning solution from the pump 68 to the spray head 60, while somewhat simultaneously the lever arm 90 closes a bypass flow path from the pump 68 to the sump 76 through the housing 58.

The lever arms 88 and 90 are pivotally fixed in a yoke 98 (FIGURE 6) which is rigidly affixed to the rails 74 (FIGURE 4). Specifically, the arm 88 is pivotally affixed to a leg 100 of the yoke, while the arm 90 is similarly fixed to a leg 102. The lever arms 88.and 90 are each spring biased to a raised position within the shield 56 by springs 103 (FIGURE 6) connected between the arms and horizontal extensions 104 from the rigid yoke 98.

The outside ends of the lever arms 88 and 90 are connected to control valves in the lines 84 and 86 respectively through linkages that include tension springs. Specifically, the lever arm 90 (FIGURE 6) has its outside terminus connected through a pivot yoke 106, a coil spring 108, a draw bar and a valve arm 112 to a spring-loaded lever-operated gate valve 114 as shown in FIGURE 4. The spring load of the valve 114 is of somewhat less strength than the spring 108 so that force to operate the valve may be effectively transmitted through the spring 108. A similar connection is made between the lever arm 88 and a spring-loaded lever-operated gate valve 116; however, in a reversed fashion so that when the lever arm 88 is depressed, the valve 116 is opened while the valve 114 is closed. Considering the connections in detail, the lever arm 88 has its exterior end connected through a pivot yoke 118 (FIGURE 6) a tension coil spring 120 and a draw bar 122 to the gate valve 116. It may thus be seen that depending upon the presence or absence of a container C within the cleaning unit U to actuate the lever arms 88 and 90, solution is either broadcast from the head 60, or bypassed to the sump or reservoir for repeated circulation.

The lever arm 114 is also connected to control the operating speed of the engine 70, so that when no container is being cleaned, the engine merely idles; however, when the head 60 is broadcasting cleaning solution the engine 70 operates at full speed to provide maximum drive to the pump 68 and resultant high-impact force to the cleaning solution. Specifically, the draw bar 111) (FIG- URE 4) is connected to a cable 121 wich passes over a pulley 123 that is mounted on the yoke leg 102, and continues to the engine 70 for connection to the accelerator thereof. Thus, when the lever arm 90 is depressed by a lowered trash container, the cable 121 opens the throttle of the engine 78 for full speed drive to the pump 68.

Inside the cleaning unit U, the spent solution along with any refuse, falls first to a primary screen 125 (FIG- URE 5) which is carried in a frame 125a (FIGURE 4) fitted within a gap, so as to be easily withdrawn from the unit for cleaning. The screen 125 is seated above a grid of baffles 124 (FIGURE 5) which separate the lower portion of the housing 58 into a plurality of separate chambers. These chambers are interconnected by ports 126 (FIGURE 4) in the baffles 124; however, the baffles reduce the effects of momentum forces exerted by the solution While the truck is traveling.

The cleaning solution is drawn from the reservoir containing the bat-lies 126 through a filter section 128 (FIG- URE 6) which contains a removable screen 130, then through the sump 76, a tank outlet 132 and the valve 813 to the pump 68. Thus, the flow cycle is completed with the cleaning solution either being propelled to flush a trash container clean or bypassed to the reservoir for re-use.

Considering the operation of the illustrative example disclosed herein in somewhat greater detail, the solution will normally be prepared in the tank housing 58 before going to the locale of containers to be cleaned. In this regard, the cleaning solution, which may be aqueous, is placed in the housing 58 to a level of the top of the baffles 126. In one successful design embodiment, the amount of solution used amounts to some five hundred gallons. It is to be noted that storage space for additional solvent or cleaning concentrate fluid, and the like is also provided in the truck bed enclosure 14 along with the cleaning unit as shown in FIGURE 1.

After filling the housing 58 to the desired level, the truck V is driven to the locale of trash containers to be cleaned, and normally will be operated in cooperation with a trash pickup truck. The pickup truck first empties a trash container, then the truck V cleans the container. Of course during the time of driving the truck V to the locale of trash containers, the traveler 30 is locked in a raised position clear from the cab 12.

Upon arrival at the locale of trash containers to be cleaned, and preparatory to picking up a trash container, the cleaning unit is put into operation. The suction pump valve 80 is opened and the engine 71) is started. In this regard, it will normally be commercially worthwhile to equip the engine 70 with a self-starter and an independent electrical system; however, in view of the well known nature of such structure, no details thereof are here shown.

If the solution in the system has not been previously circulated, an initial period of bypass circulation is desirable to thoroughly mix the solution. During such period of operation, the cleaning solution is drawn from the sump 76 (FIGURE 6) through the outlet 132, line 78, (FIG- URE 4) valve 80 into the pump 68. The solution is then forced through the lines 82, and 86, through the open valve 114 and re-enters the tank housing 58 at a location near the surface of the solution contained therein. Thus during such quiescent operation the solution circulates in a somewhat closed system, essentially contained and yet ready for the actual cleaning operation.

The truck V is next manipulated to engage the trash container C as shown in FIGURE 2. The fork columns 34 are lifted slightly, then angularly displaced from the horizontal by the actuators 48 expanding and thereby urging the bottom of the frame 42 outward. As a' result, the container C is canted, though still upright. Next, the traveler 30 with the container C is elevated and inverted to the position shown in FIGURE 1, by force applied through the chains 32. It is to be noted that when in the elevated position, the container C is squarely inverted, i.e. the bottom of the container is upright and horizontal.

Slight additional travel of the traveler 30 from the position shown in FIGURE 1 causes the high edge of container C to engage the lever arms 88 and 90 as shown in FIGURE 5, depressing them to operate the gate valves 114 and 116 respectively. Specifically, the valve 114 is closed halting the bypass of the cleaning solution while the valve 116 is opened to permit the cleaning solution to flow from the pump 68 out of the head 60. Thus, the cleaning solution is broadcast as the nozzles 62 scan through a rotary cleaning pattern, hydraulically driven by the discharged solution. It is to be noted that in lowering the trash container C into the cleaning unit U, the depth of engagement is not particularly critical. That is, as the container C is lowered to engage the lever arms 88 and 90, the arms are moved to in turn actuate the valves 116 and 114 through the initially un-yielding springs 108 and (FIGURE 6). At the stage where the valves are fully operated, further travel of the lever arms 88 and 90 under force of the trash container, is simply taken up by the springs 108 and 120 yielding to accommodate such motion. Thus, the control is accomplished to broadcast the cleaning solution within a container.

The solution being forcefully directed to impinge on the interior of the container C rapidly removes and carries away dirt and'accumulated foreign material from the container. The spent solution falls from the container back into the housing 58 to be recirculated by the pump 68. However, refuse particles carried by the solution (which are of significant size) are caught on the screens and 128 or filtered from the solution within the sump 76.

As a further significant factor in the cleaning operation, during the interval when the solution is being broadcast, the cable 121 (FIGURE 4) connected to the draw bar 110 acts on the accelerator of the engine 70 to drive the engine at maximum speed. As a result, the engine consumes maximum fuel only when the energy therefrom is effective; however, during that interval full force of impact is provided.

In general, the period during which the solution is impinged against the inside walls of the container C will depend on various considerations as the type of dirt or other material to be removed, the type solution used, the size of the container and so on; however, in one operating embodiment it has been found usually desirable to operate the cleaning head 60 for at least two minutes in a container.

After a period of cleaning operation, the traveler 30 is again actuated, now in reverse, to draw the container C from the cleaning unit U. As a result, the lever arms 88 and 90 are released to permit the spring biased valves 114 and 116 to respectively open and close in opposite time phase so that the pump 68 is not overloaded. Some- What simultaneously, the spring biased accelerator (not shown) of the engine 70 is released by the cable 121 so as to idle the engine while not driving the pump 68 to perform a cleaning operation. During this re-established quiescent state of operation, solution is again circulated in a bypass mode to preserve the pump 68 operative and ready without actually broadcasting solution, yet while still filtering the solution. After withdrawal, the container may be held momentairly above the housing 58 to drain, then lowered 'back to the ground by the traveler 30.

Several containers may be cleaned at one location simply by repeating the operations described above. Thereafter, the engine 70 will normally be shut off while the truck is driven to the next location of containers to be cleaned. In general, the number of containers that can be cleaned with a quantity of cleaning solution is subjected to wide variation. However, it has been found somewhat desirable to drain the solution from the system at the end of a days use and clean the screens. Specifically, a drain 136 (FIGURE 6) is provided with a valve 138 through which contaminated solvent may be removed for disposal. Next, the screen 125 is removed and flushed clean and the screen 130 and filter in the sump 76 may be back flushed. In this regard, an access port 140 is provided into the sump 76 for connection of a pressure hose so as to back flush the sump.

'In the use of the present system, an important feature resides in the fact that the cleaning solution is effectively contained and controlled, yet the system (with little time delay) broadcasts the solution with considerable force to accomplish eifective cleaning when the container to be cleaned is in the proper position.

There has been disclosed an exemplary sanitation system constructed in accordance with the present invention, which achieves the object and exhibits the advantages set forth above. However, it is emphasized that the scope hereof shall not be determined with reference to the exemplary structure, but rather by the claims appended hereto.

What is claimed is:

1. A mobile system for cleaning containers at the location of their use, by impinging liquid solution on such containers, comprising:

a mobile transport means for propelling said system to said location;

power-actuated pickup means for engaging a container and lifting said container to an elevated cleaning position in which said container is inverted;

an open housing positioned to lie below a container in said elevated position, and adapted to contain cleaning solution;

circulating means for drawing solution from said open housing;

means for propelling said solution with cleaning force in a cleaning pattern;

plumbing means for alternatively connecting said circulating means to said means for propelling and to said open housing; and

means for sensing the presence of a container in said elevated position to thereupon control said plumbing means to connect said circulating means to said means for propelling to thereby clean said container.

2. A mobile system for cleaning containers at the location of their use, by impinging liquid solution on such containers, comprising:

a mobile transport means for propelling said system to said location;

power-actuated pickup means for engaging a container and lifting said container to an elevated cleaning position in which said container is inverted;

an open housing positioned to lie below a container in said elevated position; and adapted to contain cleaning solution;

circulating means for drawing solution from said open housing;

means for propelling said solution with cleaning force in a cleaning pattern;

plumbing means for alternatively connecting said circulating means to said means for propelling and to said open housing; and

means for sensing the presence of a container in said elevated position to thereupon control said plumbing means to connect said circulating means to said means for propelling to thereby clean said container, and to accelerate said circulating means to increase the force with which said solution is propelled.

3. A system for cleaning open containers with forcefully propelled liquid, comprising:

an open tank for receiving said open containers and containing said liquid;

means for suspending said open containers inverted within said open tank in cleaning postion;

a spray head means for broadcasting liquid in a cleaning pattern;

a circulating system for drawing liquid from said open tank; and

liquid control means to sense the presence of an open container in said cleaning position to couple said circulating system to said spray head whereby to flush said container clean.

4. A system for cleaning open containers with forcefully propelled liquid, comprising:

an open tank for receiving said open containers and containing said liquid;

means for suspending said open containers inverted within said open tank in cleaning position;

a spray head means for broadcasting liquid in a cleaning pattern;

a variable-force circulating system for drawing liquid from said open tank and alternatively returning said liquid directly thereto and supplying liquid to said spray head means; and

means for sensing the presence of an open container in said cleaning position to control said circulating system to supply liquid to said spray head means with increased force.

5. A system for cleaning open containers with forcefully propelled liquid, comprising:

an open tank for receiving said open containers and containing said liquid;

means for suspending said. open containers inverted within said open tank in cleaning position;

a spray head means for broadcasting liquid in a cleaning pattern;

a pump means for drawing liquid from said open tank and alternatively returning said liquid directly thereto and supplying liquid to said spray head means;

variable-speed motive means for driving said pump means; and

means for sensing the presence of an open container in said cleaning position to control said pump means to supply liquid to said spray head means and to accelerate said motive means.

6. A system according to claim 5 wherein said variable speed motive means comprises an internal-combustion engine.

7. A system according to claim 5 wherein said pump means includes a normally-open valve connecting said pump means to said open tank and a normally closed valve connecting said pump means to said spray head means.

8. A system according to claim 7 wherein said means for sensing comprises a pair of levers engageable by said container in said cleaning position whereby to open said normally-closed valve and to close said normally-open valve.

9. A mobile system for cleaning containers at the location of their use, by impinging liquid solution on such containers, comprising:

a mobile transport means for propelling said system to said location;

power-actuated pickup means for engaging a container and lifting said container to an elevated cleaning position in which said container is inverted;

an open tank for receiving said open containers and containing said liquid;

a spray head means for broadcasting liquid in a cleaning pattern;

a pump means for drawing liquid from said open tank and alternatively returning said liquid directly thereto and supplying liquid to said spray head means;

variable-speed motive means for driving said pump 10 References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 9/1965 Wintzer 134-115 10/1965 Cuillier 134-152 X 12/1966 Diamond 134104 12/1966 Roch et a1. 15352 X FOREIGN PATENTS 4/1953 Denmark. 11/ 1958 Germany.

CHARLES A. WILLMUTH, Primary Examiner. R. L. BLEUTGE, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3844434 *Aug 20, 1973Oct 29, 1974Fabit CorpRefuse container loading and transport assembly
US3881950 *Feb 19, 1974May 6, 1975Pettit Bruce HaroldMultiple drum washing apparatus for vehicles
US3901255 *Feb 19, 1974Aug 26, 1975Pettit Bruce HaroldDrum washer for vehicles
US4029116 *Nov 13, 1975Jun 14, 1977Paul BeyerGerminating tank for germinating and softening of malt
US4211745 *Jun 24, 1976Jul 8, 1980Leroy BoydRefuse container sprayer
US4242311 *Mar 8, 1979Dec 30, 1980Middaugh Ralph EGarbage and trash container select spray system
US4694846 *Sep 9, 1986Sep 22, 1987Bouchard Roland DGarbage truck with trash bin cleaning system
US4941796 *Jan 23, 1989Jul 17, 1990Quinto De FilippiFront loading refuse vehicle
US6336239 *Jan 19, 2000Jan 8, 2002Norman William CooperBin washer
US6554008 *Dec 29, 2000Apr 29, 2003Dustin DeweyApparatus for and a method of cleaning a trash bin
US7225816 *Aug 25, 2005Jun 5, 2007Blast-N-Clean, LlcWaste container cleaning system with conveyor
US7846263 *May 1, 2007Dec 7, 2010Marcantel Gregory PMobile trash receptacle cleaning system and method
US8603256Feb 16, 2009Dec 10, 2013Rainbow Conversion Technologies, LlcMobile container cleaning system
EP0278848A1 *Jan 29, 1988Aug 17, 1988Etudes Et Realisations A.D.V.Cleaning device for containers and vehicle fitted with this device
WO2006024027A2Aug 25, 2005Mar 2, 2006Ernest F ByersWaste container cleaning system
Classifications
U.S. Classification134/52, 134/168.00R, 298/17.00R, 134/115.00R, 134/111, 414/409, 134/152
International ClassificationB08B9/08, B65F7/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65F7/005, B08B9/0826
European ClassificationB08B9/08H2, B65F7/00D