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Publication numberUS3325053 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 13, 1967
Filing dateJun 15, 1965
Publication numberUS 3325053 A, US 3325053A, US-A-3325053, US3325053 A, US3325053A
InventorsS. Taylor Ave.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Beverage dispenser including means to puncture a pressurized gas cartridge
US 3325053 A
Images(4)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 13, 1967 A DE BOER ET AL 3,325,053

BEVERAGE DISPENSER INCLUDING MEANS TO PUNCTURE A PRESSURIZED GAS CARTRIDGE Filed June 15, 1965 4 Sheets-Sheet l June 13, 1967 A, H. DE BOER ETAL 3,325,053

BEVERAGE DISPENSER INCLUDING MEANS TO PUNCTURE A PRESSURIZED GAS CARTRIDGE 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed June 15, 1965 June 13, 1967 A, H. DE BOER ET AL 3,325,053

BEVERAGE DISPENSER INCLUDING MEANS TO PUNCTURE A PRESSURIZED GAS CARTRIDGE June 13, 1967 A, H. DE BOER ET AL 3,325,053

BEVERAGE DISPENSER I C UDING MEANS TO PUNCTURE A PRESSURI GAS CARTRIDGE Filed June 15, 1965 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 fllllllllulllllllt 7 fi llj,

Patented June 13, 1967 3,325,053 BEVERAGE DISPENSER INCLUDING MEANS T PUNCTURE A PRESSURIZED GAS CARTRIDGE Albert H. de Boer. Creve Coeur, Mo., Robert I. Franklin, Creve Coeur, M0. (601 S. Taylor Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 63110), and Malcolm B. Sturgis, Clayton, M0. (601 S. Taylor Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 63110); said De Boer assignor to said Franklin and said Sturgis Filed June 15, 1965, Ser. No. 464,163 7 Claims. (Cl. 222-) This invention relates to beverage dispensers for attachment to containers of carbonated beverages to be dispensed under a pressurized gas such as carbon dioxide.

Among the several objects of the invention may be noted the provision of a beverage dispenser for use with a beverage container having an opening normally closed by a plug, the dispenser being adapted to pierce the plug as it is mounted on the container and to provide pressurized gas to the container for driving beverage from it; the provision of such a beverage dispenser attachable under seal with the container for removal of beverage; the provision of such a beverage dispenser capable of providing an uninterrupted flow of pressurized gas (such as carbon dioxide) to a beverage container over sustained time intervals without freezing of the gas in the gas line; the provision of a beverage dispenser of the class described constructed to accommodate a cartridge of pressurized gas and incorporating improved means for placing the cartridge in communication with a gas line in the dispenser; the provision of a dispenser of the class described adapted for connection to a throwaway or disposable beverage container; and the provision of an improved pressure regulator incorporating safety devices to eliminate buildup of pressure above a predetermined safe value in such containers. Other objects and features will be in part apparent and in part pointed out hereinafter.

The invention accordingly comprises the constructions hereinafter described, the scope of the invention being indicated in the following claims.

In the accompanying drawings, in which several of various possible embodiments of the invention are illustrated,

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a beverage dispenser of the invention attached to a beverage container;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged ideal longitudinal section, partially broken away taken on line 22 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged detail showing a pressure regulator;

FIG. 4 is a right-end view of FIG. 2 with certain parts removed to show a mechanism for moving a gas cartridge;

FIG. 5 is a cross section taken along line 55 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is a section taken along line 6-6 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 7 illustrates another embodiment of the mechanism for moving a gas cartridge;

FIGURE 8 is a detail section illustrating one manner in which the dispenser may be placed in communication with the interior of the container; and

FIG. 9 is a view showing a modification of the structure for effecting communication between the dispenser and the container.

Corresponding reference characters indicate corresponding parts throughout the several views of the drawings.

Referring to FIGS. 1 and 2 of the drawings, a dispenser of the inveniton comprises a base 1 adapted for attachment to a beverage container 3. A hollow tube 5 is insertable into the container 3 and communicates via a passage 7 with a manual dispensing valve generally designated 9. There is also a gas passage 11 for delivery of gas (such as carbon dioxide) from a cartridge 13 containing the pressurized gas to the container 3. A pressure regulator generally designated 15 communicates with gas passage 11 between its ends and is adapted to open and close passage 11 to the flow of gas for maintaining a predetermined pressure differential between the interior of container 3 and the surrounding atmosphere. When the dispenser is mounted on the container 3 and the container is pressurized, a beverage 17 (such as beer) in the container may be dispensed by opening valve 9 to permit flow of the beverage through tube 5, passage 7 and valve 9.

More specifically, the container 3 is preferably of the disposable type and it has a cylindrical wall 19 closed by heads 21 and 23. Head 23 has a recessed center portion 23A in which is hole 238 normally closed by a resilient sealing plug 25 of rubber, plastic, or the like. The head 23 is fastened to the wall 19 by means of a bead or rim 23C formed at the intersection of the end and body of the container. The base 1 of the dispenser is adapted to snap on the rim 23C.

As shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, base 1 is provided with a finger desginated 27 shaped to snap over bead 23C to engage the outer surface of tubular portion 19 of container 3, as illustrated at the top of FIG. 2. At the opposite side of base 1 are two spaced feet 29 shown at the bottom of FIG. 4 which are attached to the main body portion of base 1 by legs 31. Feet 29 are also shaped to snap over the rim 23C for attaching the dispenser to container 3.

Referring to FIG. 2, beverage passage 7 is in a core or block 33 attached to base 1 by screws 34. Passage 7 has an inlet end portion 7A joined to an outlet end portion 7B by a cross portion 7C. Passage 7 has a branch 7D extending from portion 7C to the outer surface of block 33. Branch passage 7D is closed by a safety plug 36 adapted to blow out at a predetermined pressure value, thereby preventing excessively high explosive pressures in container 3.

A faucet is attached to block 33. It has a fluid passage through it comprising an inlet end 37A communicating with portion 78 of passage 7 and an outlet end 37B through which beverage is passed from the dispenser. Valve 9 has a tear-drop shaped end portion 39A positionable between passage portions 7B and 37A. The other end portion 39B of valve 9 is attached to a push button 41 which moves into and out of a recess 43 in faucet 35. A spring 45 in recess 43 reacts from a packing 47 against the inner surface of push button 41 for biasing the push button to its FIG. 2 position, thereby urging the tear-drop shaped end portion 39A of the valve against a seating member 49. This configuration or shape for the end portion 39A of the valve permits even flow of beverages (such as beer) without excessive foaming or aerating of the liquid. By depressing push button 41 the valve end portion 39A is moved away from its seat 49, thereby permitting beverage to flow through passage portions 37A and 373 out of the dispenser.

The gas passage 11 has an inlet end portion 11A adapted to receive gas under pressure and an outlet end portion 113, adapted to be placed in communication "with container 3. The gas passage is formed in the block 33. Portions 7A and 11B of the passages are substantially parallel to each other as shown in FIGS. 2 and 8 and extend through a plastic boss 51 and nose piece 52 on block 33. Boss 51 fits into a hole 53 in base 1. There is a metal sleeve 54 surrounding nose piece 52. Tube 5 is curved throughout substantially its entire length and it has one end positioned in passage 7A (FIG. 8) and its other end is positionable adjacent the intersection of wall '19 and end 21 of container 3 (FIG. 2). There is a piercing cutter shape 55 on the inner end of tube 5. This permits the tube 5 to be inserted in container 3 by piercing the plug with cutter 55 and then sliding tube 5 through the resulting hole. The sleeve 54 around nose 52 follows tube 5 through plug 25 as illustrated in FIG. 8. Sleeve 54 is somewhat larger in diameter than tube 5 and when it is in plug 25 the surface of the plug grips the periphery of the sleeve, thus sealing the connection between the sleeve and the plug so that no beverage is lost through the hole in the plug.

There is a check valve in passage 11 for preventing beverage 17 in container 3 from entering the gas passage from its outlet end 11B. This check designated 57 in FIG. 8 is formed by cutting away the bottom part of passage 11B at its outer end and turning down the resulting thin, flexible lip at the top of the passage to substantially close the end of the passage. The flexible lip of check 57 is forced open when the gas pressure in container 3 drops below the value of pressure in passage 11B. The valve lip closes to prevent beverage from entering passage 11.

Communication between a conventional CO gas cartridge 13 and inlet end 11A of the passage 11 is provided by a perforated fitting 59 (FIG. 7) which has a sharp tapered end 61 adapted to pierce the end of cartridge 13 so that the gas in cartridge 13 may flow through the fitting for delivery to passage 11A. The lower end 13A of cartridge 13 is a soft metal and there is a metalto-metal seal between it and the tapered end of fitting 59. A filter 63 prevents closing of passage 11 by any foreign particles carried with the compressed gas. A moving seal 64 is provided between members 59, 33 and 63. This prevents leakage to atmosphere and pressure-loads the member 59 against cartridge 13.

Referring now to FIG. 3, this shows the block 33 bored to form a hole 65 and is counterbored as shown at 67, 69 and 71. Hole 65 intersects the inlet end 11A of the gas supply passage. A regulator structure is mounted within the hole and the counterborcd areas for regulating passage of gas from end 11A to end 11B of the gas passage. The counter-bore area 69 communicates with end 11B of the gas passage. A fitting 73 threaded in the counterbored opening 67 is sealed to block 33 by an O-ring 75. Fitting 73 has a hole 77 through it and a tapered seat 79 which flares outwardly from one end of hole 77. A valve 81 is movable in hole 65 into and out of engagement with seat 79 for closing and opening communication between gas passage end portions 11A and 11B. Valve 81 has a stem 83 which loosely slides with clearance in hole 77. A spring 85 reacts from the bottom of hole 65 against an end of valve 81 for biasing the valve against its seat.

There is a flexible diaphragm 87 stretched across counterbored opening 71 and sealed against block 33 by a fitting 89 threaded in opening 71. Diaphragm 87 can flex into the counterbored area 69 toward the check valve 81 and away from valve 81 and within the annulus of fitting 29. A cover 91 threaded into fitting 89 is adjustable toward and away from diaphragm 87. Cover 9] has a port or opening 93 at its center which is axially aligned with an opening 95 in the center of diaphragm 87. There are a plurality of auxiliary ports 94 in cover 91 spaced from port 93 for venting fluid from cover 91.

On the inner surface of cover 91 there is an annular abutment or shoulder 97 coaxial with port 93. A bolt 99 has a head 99A on the gas passage side of diaphragm 87, that is, the left side of diaphragm 87. Shank 99B of bolt 99 projects through hole 95 in diaphragm 87 and its end is adpated for loose sliding movement within shoulder 97 and the port 93 in cover 91. Adjustable along bolt shank 99B is a nut 101 engageable with abutment 97 for holding bolt 99 against further movement to the right as viewed in FIG. 3.

A spring 103 reacts from the left surface of nut 101 against the inner portion of a diaphragm backing plate 105 for biasing the boundary of hole 95 in diaphragm 87 and bolt head 99A into engagement for sealing the connection between the bolt head and the diaphragm. Another spring 107 reacts from the inner surface of cover 91 against an outer portion of diaphragm backing plate for biasing the backing plate and diaphragm 87 to the left as viewed in FIG. 3. When nut 101 is abutting the shoulder 97 and fluid pressure in the counterbore 69 increases, spring 107 is compressed by the gas pressure on diaphragm 87 to unseat diaphragm 87 from bolt head 99A, thereby permitting gas to escape from the counterbore area 69 through hole 95, around the bolt and out ports 94 in cover 91, thus exhausting gas from the area downstream of valve 81 to the atmosphere. This structure comprises a safety valve which prevents excessive pressure from being built up in container 3 relative to the atmospheric pressure. Thus by adjusting cap 91 and nut 101, the relief action may be made to occur outside of the regulating pressure. Thus the regulator has means for automatically providing communication between the gas passage and the atmosphere on a second predetermined pressure differential between the gas passage downstream of the regulator valve and the atmosphere.

When diaphragm 87 flexes to the left under the influence of spring 107 as a result of pressure differential in the gas passage end 11B relative to the atmosphere, bolt head 99A engages stem 83 of valve 81, thus unseating valve 31 so that additional gas under pressure can pass from end 11A to end 11B of the gas passage, thus replenishing the gas supply in container 3.

Thus regulator 15 performs two functions. It maintains a given pressure in container 3 relative to the atmosphere and it functions as an automatic relief or valve to limit the maximum pressure delivered to container 3 relative to the atmospheric pressure. The desired pressure differential and relief presures can be obtained by adjustment of cover 91 and the nut 101 on bolt 99. A pressure of approximately 14 p.s.i. in container 3 has been found satisfactory when beer is being dispensed, and pressures of 50-76 p.s.i. may be required when carbonated soft drinks are being dispensed. Regulator 15 may be used in other applications where pressure regulation coupled with limitation of maximum pressure is desired.

The gas cartridge 13 is moved toward and held on fitting 59 by a sliding carrier generally designated 109 in FIGS. 2, 4 and 5. Carrier 109 includes a recess or opening 111 for cartridge 13 and it has a door or opening 113 at its front through which the cartridge is inserted and removed. Cartridge 13 is loaded in carrier 109 by tilting the cartridge and first inserting its rounded end 138 into the opening 111 and then swinging the remainder of the cartridge into the carrier through door 113. Carrier 109 is movable between a first position where the gas cartridge 13 can be loaded into the carrier and a second position (shown in FIG. 2) where the outlet end of cartridge 13 is pierced by the tapered end 61 of fitting 59 for placing the cartridge in communication with the gas passage 11. For this purpose (FIG. 5) carrier 109 has generally T-shaped recesses 115 on its back surface which receive T-shaped rails 117 projecting from the surface of base 1 opposite from container 3. This connection guides carrier 109 for movement between its two positions, thereby accurately directing cartridge end 13A into engagement with the end 61 of fitting 59.

Carrier 109 is moved between its first and second positions by twin link members 119 which have holes 121 through which studs 123 on carrier 109 project. In a similar manner the links 119 are connected to pivots or studs 125 on one end portion of two generally parallel lever arms 127. Lever arms 127 are in the form of ribs on an L-shaped operating lever 130 formed by walls 129 and 131. The wall 131 has a recess 132 which snaps onto a ridge 134 on base 1. On the inner surface of arms 127 there are studs or pivots 133 in recesses 135 in the sides of lock 33. The walls 129, 131 and lever arms 127 comprise the lever 130 which pivots about stud 133 and re cesses 135. The axis of each pivot 133 is displaced from the axis of the pivots 125.

FIGS. 2 and 6 show the carrier 109 at its lower position where cartridge 13 is pierced by fitting 59. In order to elevate the carrier 109 to insert or remove a cartridge 13, the wall 131 of level 130 joining lever arms 127 at the top of the dispenser is disengaged from ridge 134 of base 1. The lever 130 is then swung in a clockwise direction about an axis through the center of pivots 133. Pivots 125 to which links 119 are attached will be swung in a clockwise direction about pivots 133, thereby moving links 119 to the left as viewed in FIG. 6 and up as viewed in FIGS. 2 and 4. This moves the carrier 109 away from fitting 59 in core 33, thereby permitting removal of cartridge 13 through door or window 113. After a new cartridge 13 has been inserted in carrier 109, lever 130 is swung counterclockwise about pivot 133, thus swinging pivot 125 about pivot 133 to move links 119 which in turn forces carrier 109 and the cartridge 13 it is carrying toward the fitting 59 for piercing the cartridge. Reinforcing ribs 136 (FIG. 4) on base I prevent flexing of base 1 when a cartridge is being pierced.

As best seen in FIG. 6, the arrangement of pivots 123, 125 and 133 is such that when lever 130 is in its closed position as shown in FIG. 6 the mechanism is locked due to an ovencenter positioning of pivot 125, that is, the center of pivot 125 has moved past a line passing through the centers of pivots 123 and 133.

The mechanism of the dispenser is enclosed by a cover or housing which comprises a substantially annular wall 137 having a recess 139 which receives ridges 140 and 142 on base 1, thereby fixing the cover onto the base. Aattached to wall 137 is a front wall 141 through which faucet 35 projects. The walls 137 and 141 have openings which accommodate the walls 131 and 129 of the lever 130. When walls 129 and 131 are in the position shown in FIG. 1, the front and outer walls of the dispenser are substantially smooth. Housing wall 137 is supported on a pedestal 143.

The housing 137, 141 and the hinge parts 127, 129, 131 (as well as other parts of the dispenser) can be made from plastics such as polyethylene, polypropylene, etc.

Operation of the dispenser is as follows:

The dispenser is shown in connection with a container or can 3 containing beverage 17 and having opening 23B closed by the plug 25. The dispenser is mounted on the container 3 by placing the cutting end 55 of tube 5 against plug 25 and forcing the tube through the plug. Fingers 27 of base 1 are placed over head 23C and feet 29 are snapped onto the bead thereby affixing the dispenser to the container. Tube 5 is then fully received within the container with its end 55 at the bottom of the container, and the end of nose 52 is also received in the container 3. The end of wall 131 is then lifted to disengage the ridge 134 from base 1 and lever 130 is swung to its position about pivots 133, thus swinging pivots 125 in a clockwise direction (as viewed in FIG. 6) about pivots 133, thereby moving links 119 and carrier 109 so that the carrier is moved away from fitting 59. The walls 131 and 129 forming lever 130 form an openable and closable door. When open the door permits removal of an expended cartridge 13 and insertion of a new cartridge containing pressurized gas into the carrier through the carrier door 113. Walls 129 and 131 constitutin lever 130 are then swung back to the latched position shown in FIGS. 1, 2 and 6, thus pulling links 119 for moving carrier 109 and causing cartridge 13 to be pierced by end 61 of fitting 59. The cartridge 13 is prevented from drifting back by the overcenter locking mechanism including links 119 and pivots 123, 125 and 133, and their relation relative to each other.

As soon as cartridge 13 is pierced, gas under pressure can flow into the gas passage inlet end 11A. When the gas pressure in container 3 is less than the desired value (as determined by the setting of regulator then valve 81 of the regulator opens due to flexing of diaphragm 87 to the left in FIGS. 2 and 3, and gas under pressure flows from passage inlet end 11A around valve 81 and into the passage outlet end 11B as illustrated by the arrows in FIG. 3. When the pressure in container 3 reaches the desired value relative to atmospheric pressure, diaphragm 87 moves to the right to its FIG. 3 unflexed position, thereby disengaging bolt head 99A from stem 83 of valve 81 and permitting spring 85 to bias valve 81 against its seat 79 for closing the valve. Should check valve 81 fail to close for any reason, pressure continues to build up in the counterbore area immediately downstream of valve 81, thus causing diaphragm 87 to continue to move to the right under the influence of this gas pressure differential until nut 101 strikes abutment 97. Then any additional increase in gas pressure downstream of valve 81 unseats diaphragm 87 from bolt head 99A, thereby permitting discharge of gas from the counterbore area 69 through hole in the diaphragm and then through ports 94 in cover 91 to the atmosphere. When the pressure decreases to the desired pressure in container 3, the diaphragm returns to its FIG. 3 unflexed position where diaphragm 87 again seats against bolt head 99A due to the biasing force of spring 103 and gas pressure loading.

With container 3 properly pressurized, beverage 17 may be removed from the container by moving push button 41 against spring 45, thus unseating the valve end 39A from its seat 49. Due to the pressure in container '3 relative to the atmosphere, beverage 17 will pass through tube 5 and beverage passage 7 to the faucet, and then through passages 37A and 37B and out of the faucet. When push button 41 is released spring 45 returns it to the FIG. 2 position and valve 39A closes against its seat 49.

If for any reason the regulator fails to prevent buildup of pressures in container 3, then explosion of the container is prevented by blow-out plug 36 which is adapted to be blown out of branch passage 7D at a predetermined pressure value beneath the maximum pressure container 3 is constructed to withstand, thus permitting discharge of beverage 17 from branch 7D and reduction of pressure in container 3.

A modified form of a carrier for cartridge 13 is illustrated in FIG. 7 of the drawings and comprises a threaded nipple 145 having a central opening 147 for guiding end 13A of cartridge 13 into engagement with fitting 59. The modified carrier is designated 149 and has threads on its lower end cooperating with the threads on nipple 145 for moving the carrier and thus cartridge 13 toward and away from fitting 59. Carrier 149 has a recess 151 which receives cartridge 13, and the cartridge 13 is inserted and removed through a window 153. In this modification neither the lever nor the linkage 119 and carrier 109 are necessary and are omitted. In such event the walls 129 and 131 may be made an integral part of the walls 137, 141.

Another modification of the invention is illustrated in FIG. 9 of the drawings where the plug 25 of FIG. 8, which is furnished with container 3 for closing the opening 23B, is removed prior to fixing the dispenser on the container. The sealing obtained in the previously described embodiment by use of plug 25 is now obtained by a separate seal or grommet 157. Grommet 157 is positioned between base 1 and wall 23 of container 3 and surrounds opening 23B in wall 23 and opening 53 in base 1. Seal 157 is tightly pressed against the container and the base by engagement between the fingers 27 and feet 29 of the base and container bead 23C. A boss or nose 159 projects through a central opening 161 in seal 157 into container 3. Tube 5 is received in the inlet end 7A of the beverage passage in the manner previously described. However, the outlet end 118 of the gas passage is substantially larger than the gas passage for the previously described embodiment, such being possible due to the total removal of the plug 25 and the fact that nose 159 is substantially as large as the openings 23B in the con- I tainer. A suitable flexible check valve, such as shown at 158, is provided in the outlet end 11B of the gas passage to prevent beverage from flowing into the regulator. Any other suitable check valve at this point can be used.

One of the advantages of the structure shown in FIG. 9 is that the size throughout the gas passage 11 can be maintained substantially constant, thus preventing freezing of the gas at venturis resulting from changes in size of a passage. Such freezing is unlikely even with the structure shown in FIG. 8 unless there is a long uninterrupted period of beverage dispensing which requires flow of greater than normal quantities of gas through the passage 11.

The dispensers of the invention can be used with containers of various sizes, including gallon size containers. The safety features of the dispensers make it particularly suitable for home refrigerator use where the need for automatic safety devices are especially important. Beer, carbonated soft drinks and other beverages may be handled by the dispenser with appropriate adjustments being made on the regulator to obtain the pressure in the container required for dispensing the beverage and for maintaining the desired gas concentration in beverages that are carbonated or contain other gases. Container 3 is preferably of the type (often called a tin can) which is filled and sealed by a brewer or carbonated drink manufacturer and may be discarded by the purchaser when emptied. It will be understood, however, that the device may be applied to a returnable container.

In view of the above, it will be seen that the several objects of the invention are achieved and other advantageous results attained.

As various changes could be made in the above constructions without departing from the scope of the invention, it is intended that all matter contained in the above description or shown in the accompanying drawings shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

What is claimed is:

l. A beverage dispenser comprising a member adapted for attachment to a beverage container, a dispensing valve, a tube having an end portion positionable in the container, a beverage passage connecting the valve and the tube, a gas passage having an end communicating with the container, a check valve closing the gas passage to the flow of fluid from the container, receiving means connected with the gas passage for puncturing a cartridge which contains pressurized gas, a pressure regulator communicating with the gas passage and adapted to open and close said gas passage to the flow of gas in response to the gas pressure in the container relative to atmospheric pressure, whereby a predetermined pressure differential can be maintained between the gas pressure in the con tainer and atmospheric pressure, a carrier for a gas cartridge mounted on said member for movement between a first position in which a gas cartridge can be loaded into the carrier and a second position in which the cartridge is engaged with said receiving means to be punctured thereby and placed in communication with the gas pas sage means for moving the carrier between its first and second positions comprising a lever arm movable about a pivot at one of its end portions, and link means attached to said carrier and attached to said lever arm whereby movement of said lever arm about said pivot causes movement of said link and said carrier.

2. A dispenser as set forth in claim 1 wherein said regulator comprises a check valve, means biasing said regulator valve to a closed position, and means for automatically opening said valve in response to a change in said pressure differential resulting from a drop in gas pressure in said container.

3. A dispenser as set forth in claim 1 wherein said regulator includes a normally closed safety valve adapted to open at a given pressure differential caused by a gas pressure in the passage downstream with respect to the regulator check valve which is high relative to atmospheric pressure, for venting gas from the gas passage to prevent excessively high gas pressure in the container relative to atmospheric pressure.

4. A dispenser as set forth in claim 1 wherein there is a cutting edge on the end of the tube remote from the beverage passage whereby the tube is adapted for piercing a plug in a beverage container when attaching the dispenser to the container.

5. A beverage dispenser comprising a base adapted for attachment to a beverage container, a dispensing valve, a tube having an end portion positionable in the container, a passage for beverage connecting the valve and the tube, a gas passage having an end communicating with the container, a check valve closing the gas passage to the flow of beverage into the passage from the container, a fitting connected with the gas passage having a tapered end adapted for piercing a cartridge which contains pressurized gas for placing the cartridge in communication with the gas passage, a pressure regulator communicating with the gas passage and having a valve for opening and closing said passage to the flow of gas in response to the gas pressure in the container relative to atmospheric pressure whereby a predetermined pressure differential can be maintained between the gas pressure in the container and atmospheric pressure, said regulator having means for automatically providing communication between the gas passage and the atmosphere on a second predetermined pressure differential between the gas passage downstream of the regulator valve and the atmosphere, a carrier for a gas cartridge mounted on said base for movement between a first position in which a gas cartridge can be loaded into the carrier and a second position in which the cartridge is pierced by the tapered end of the fitting for placing the cartridge in communication with the gas passage, means for moving the carrier between its first and second positions, the beverage and gas passages being in a block, and the carrier moving means comprising an arm pivoted on the block and linked to the carrier Whereby movement of the arm causes movement of the carrier, the arm being linked to the carrier by a linkage member pivoted to the carrier and pivoted to the arm adjacent the connection between the arm and the block, and the connections between the link member, carrier and arm being arranged to provide an overcenter locking device for holding the parts against inadvertent movement from a position where the carrier is in its second position.

6. A beverage dispenser comprising a member adapted for attachment to a beverage container, a dispensing valve, a passage for providing beverage to the valve, a gas passage having an end positionable in communication with the container, receiving means connected to the gas passage for puncturing a cartridge which contains pressurized gas, a carrier for a gas cartridge mounted on said member for movement between a first position in which a gas cartridge can be loaded into the carrier and a second position in which the cartridge is engaged with said receiving means to be punctured thereby and placed in communication with the gas passage, means for moving the carrier between its first and second positions comprising a lever arm moved about a pivot at one of its end portions, and link means attached to said carrier and lever arm whereby movement of said lever arm about said pivot causes movement of the link and said carrier.

7. A dispenser as set forth in claim wherein the connections between the link means and the carrier and between the link means and the lever arm are arranged to provide an overcenter locking device for holding the parts against inadvertent movement when the carrier is in its second position.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 469,112 2/ 1892 Atkinson 222-209 X 1,262,077 4/1918 Maurer 222-61 (Other references on following page) 9 UNITED STATES PATENTS Manley 222440 Bates 222397 Yirava ZZZ-82 X Thomas 137116.5 Vischer.

Harr 222397 X Samel 222464 X Miller 222-82 X Bryant 137505.42 Saitta et a1. 2225 X Wentz et a1 222400.7 X Franck 22289 X Levinson et a1 22282 Johnston 222400.7

FOREIGN PATENTS Germany.

Falligant 222 s2 WALTER SOBIN, Primary Examiner.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3679104 *Jun 18, 1970Jul 25, 1972Exploitations Et De RealisatioSiphon-valve stopper comprising a body enclosing carbon dioxide capsule
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US8070023 *Mar 9, 2007Dec 6, 2011On Tap LlcBeverage dispensing assembly
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Classifications
U.S. Classification222/5, 222/82, 137/116.5, 222/61, 222/89, 222/400.7, 222/396
International ClassificationB67D1/00, B67D1/04
Cooperative ClassificationB67D1/0412
European ClassificationB67D1/04B