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Publication numberUS3325152 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 13, 1967
Filing dateApr 21, 1966
Priority dateApr 21, 1966
Publication numberUS 3325152 A, US 3325152A, US-A-3325152, US3325152 A, US3325152A
InventorsWahnish George I
Original AssigneeWahnish George I
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for providing a fuel-air mixture
US 3325152 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 1967 e. WAHNISH APPARATUS FOR PROVIDING A FUEL-AIR MIXTURE Filed April 21, 1966 5 Sheets-Sheet INVENTOR. A GEORGE I. WAHNISH BY igrmm w June 13, 1967 WAHMSH 3,325,152

APPARATUS FOR PROVIDING A FUEL-AIR MIXTURE Filed April 21, 1966 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR.

GEORGE I. WAHNISH BY ATTORNEY June 13, 1967 G. I. WAHNISH 3,325,152

APPARATUS FOR PROVIDING A FUEL-AIR MIXTURE Filed April 21, 1966 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTOR. GEORGE I. WAHNISH BY WEY 2 June 13, 1967 G. I. WAHNISH APPARATUS FOR PROVIDING A FUEL-AIR MIXTURE 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed April 21, 1966 INVENTOR. GEORGE I. WAHNISH June 13, 1967 G. I. WAHNISH APPARATUS FOR PROVIDING A FUEL-AIR MIXTURE 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed April 21, 1966 GEORGE I. WAHNISH ATTORNEY United States Patent 3,325,152 APPARATUS FCBR PROVIDING A FUEL-AIR MIXTURE George I. Wahnish, 246 E. Plenty St, Long Beach, Calif. 90805 Filed Apr. 21, 1966, Ser. No. 544,214 11 Claims. (Cl. 261-46) The present invention relates to a new and novel apparatus for providing a fuel-air mixture, and particularly to an apparatus which is adapted to produce highly combustible gas or vapor, or mixture thereof, as utilized, for example, with internal combustion engines and the like. More particularly, it relates to a carburetor adapted to produce a combustible mixture of fuel vapors and air which, although deriving its fuel content from an orginally liquid material, is essentially altogether free of carryover droplets of liquid fuel. Still more particularly, it relates to a carburetor having the above-described capabilities which is further capable of producing a mixture of fuel vapor and air in an essentially stoichiometric ratio which, therefore, burns with the greatest of efficiency, neither wasting any excess of fuel nor being chilled and thereby reduced in power by the presence of any significant amount of excess air.

A carburetor as presently employed with internal combustion engines and the like generally includes an air passage through which air moves during operation of the engine, and means for supplying a fine mist of tiny droplets of fuel such as gasoline through and into the air stream. With this arrangement of the prior art, the droplets of gasoline moving rapidly into the combustion chambers or cylinders of the engine do not ordinarily become completely vaporized even though passed over a heated plate. As a result, at least somewhat inefiicient combustion is obtained because the fuel does not burn completely, some unconsumed droplets thereof going out as a misty waste in the engine exhaust. It should be noted that these droplets represent not only waste but also contamination or pollution in the stream of gaseous material leaving an engine, and are a primary cause of contamination of the atmosphere in regions of high automotive traffic concentration, that is, major cities.

With the present invention, a novel arrangement is provided whereby substantially complete vaporization of liquid fuel to generate a dry gas is obtained when the fuel is mixed first of all with a stream of air constituting only a portion or fraction of the total air flow to an engine or other combustion device, and, in mixed form, later with the remainder of the total air flowing through the carbu'retors main air passage. In this way more effective carburetion is obtained, and the efriciency of engine operation is increased with elements of the fuel-air mixture which usually go to waste being usefully consumed, and giving a clean, hot exhaust.

The improved vaporization which is characteristic of the present invention is achieved by providing a carburetor having a fuel chamber spaced from but in gas or vapor flow communication with the carburetor main air flow passage and itself having passages through which air from a region outside the carburetor can enter and impinge upon and mix with liquid fuel or the vapor thereof from a body of fuel maintained at a substantially determinate level in the lower region of the chamber. The impingement of this air upon the fuel may take place substantially immediately upon the air entering the fuel chamber, or the air may be used first to drive a mechanical agitating means within the fuel chamber and from this means be deflected onto the fuel or into vapor or froth generated therefrom, and thereby further agitate or turbulate the fuel to effect a primary vaporization thereof and the generation of a rich fuel-air mixture therefrom.

Whether the air entering the aforesaid fuel chamber from a region outside the carburetor of the present invention impinges directly upon the fuel or is used to drive an agitating means in the first instance, the rich fuel-air mixture formed as aforesaid is drawn outwardly from the chamber by an aspirating effect caused by movement of air through the main air flow passage of the carburetor. Within this passage there is thus effected a mixture of air with the previously formed rich fuel-air mixture to give a resultant mixture which is of essentially stoichiometric ratio, and which is essentially entirely free from droplets of liquid fuel, that is, a mixture which is essentially a dry gas mixture.

It may thus be seen that the final mixture of fuel and air leaving the carburetor of the present invention and flowing towards an internal combustion engine or other combustion device includes air which has, so far as the fuel is concerned in the immediate sense, come from two sources. One of these sources is the traditional main air inlet or air cleaner of the engine in direct communication with the main air flow passage of the carburetor. The other is the region surrounding the aforesaid fuel chamber, although air from this source is to be understood clearly to be filtered or cleaned air, and may well be air diverted through a branch pipe from the total air flowing from a single air intake cleaner. Most desirably, in all conditions of carburetor and/or engine operation, a substantially constant ratio of air flow from each of these sources is maintained, although of course the actual air flow from either source blending together to form the total air flow will vary with the engine power demands.

The nature and substance of this invention as well as its objects and advantages will be more clearly perceived and fully understood by referring to the following description and claims taken in connection with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 represents a view in longitudinal sectional elevation through a first apparatus embodiment of the present invention taken along line 1-1 in PEG. 2 looking in the direction of the arrows, this embodiment being a carburetor particularly adapted to serve a piston-type internal combustion engine;

FIG. 2 represents a view in transverse sectional elevation through said first apparatus embodiment of the present invention taken along line 2-2 in FIG. 1 looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIG. 3 represents a view in longitudinal sectional elevation through a second apparatus embodiment of the present invention taken along line 3-3 in FIG. 4 looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIG. 4 represents a view in transverse sectional elevation through said second apparatus embodiment of the present invention taken along line 4-4 in FIG. 3 looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIG. 5 represents a view in sectional plan through said second apparatus embodiment of the present invention taken along line 5-5 in FIG. 3 looking in the direction of the arrows, and showing particularly the interior bottom configuration of the fuel chamber;

FIG. 6 represents a fragmentary view in sectional plan through said second apparatus embodiment of the present invention taken along line 6-6 in FIG. 3 looking in the direction of the arrows with certain structure broken away, and showing particularly the interior configuration of the upper region of the fuel chamber and the structure to which this chamber is attached, and also the rotatable agitating means within the fuel chamber;

FIG. 7 represents a fragmentary view in sectional elevation through said second apparatus embodiment of the present invention taken along line 77 in FIG. 6 looking in the direction of the arrows, and showing particularly the arrangement of air flow passages or nozzles in the fuel chamber wall and turbine cups or buckets formed in the rim of the driving element of the fuel agitating means whereby this means may be rotated;

FIG. 8 represents a fragmentary view in exterior elevation of the fuel chamber of said second apparatus embodiment of the present invention taken along line 8-8 in FIG. 7, and showing particularly some of the air flow passages or nozzles in the fuel chamber wall;

FIG. 9 represents a fragmentary view in essentially sectional plan through said second apparatus embodiment of the present invention taken along line 9-9 in FIG. 7, this line being an axial line of one of the air flow nozzles in the fuel chamber wall, and

FIG. 10 represents a fragmented view in perspective of the rotatable fuel agitating means used within the fuel chamber of said second apparatus embodiment of the present invention.

Referring now to the drawings in detail, a first apparatus embodiment of the present invention in the form of a carburetor particularly adapted to serve a pistontype internal combustion engine i shown in FIGS. 1 and 2. A substantially cylindrically shaped pipe 12 having appropriately shaped holes 13 extending through the walls thereof forms the main 'air flow passage 14. The air inlet portion of pipe 12 (as viewed at the right in FIG. 1) is equipped with a standard choke valve 15 which controls the amount of air flow through passage 14. The exit end of air flow passage 14 is equipped with a standard throttle valve 16 which controls the flow of the fuelair mixture from the air flow passage to an outlet elbow 17 adapted to mount on the inlet opening of an engine manifold, and through which the whole carburetor may be'attached to the manifold by means of a bolt or headed screw 18 shown in outline form in FIG. 1.

A fuel housing, designated generally as 19, is secured to pipe 12. Housing 19 comprises a jacket 20 which surrounds pipe 12 in substantial part and is secured to a flange 21 which extends outwardly from the pipe. Suitable fastening elements 22 are provided for attaching jacket 20 to flange 21. The lower portion of housing 19 comprises a fuel chamber 23, an air jacket 24 laterally surrounding said fuel chamber, a conventional float chamber 25, and an air inlet pipe or conduit portion 26. Jacket 24 is constructed integrally with jacket 21) (see FIG. 2) and extends downwardly therefrom.

Fuel chamber 23 is positioned inside jacket 24 and an airspace or plenum 27 is defined therebetween. The fuel chamber is secured at an outwardly extending flange 28 to a similar flange 29 on jacket 24. Suitable fastening elements 30 are provided for attaching these flanges one to the other. A suitable gasket 31 is located between fuel chamber 23 and jacket 20 to form an airtight seal between the upper edge or surface of the chamber and a shoulder on the lower end of the jacket. Float chamber 25 is of standard construction, and has a conventional float 32 within it for regulating the amount of fuel which passes through passageway 33 into the lower portion of fuel chamber 23.

Air inlet pipe 26 communicates with air space 27 formed between fuel chamber 23 and jacket 24, and provides a regulated flow or current of air to said air space. A choke valve 34 is disposed in pipe 26 to control the air flow therethrough. A plurality of air flow passages or nozzles 35 in circumferential array extend inwardly and downwardly through the walls of fuel chamber 23 to place the space or plenum 27 in air flow communication with the interior of the fuel chamber. A circular baffle member 36 having a depending rim or flange 37 is secured substantially axially centrally within fuel chamber 23 above the inner ends of passages 35. Support for the baflle is provided by stem or column 38 arising from the interior bottom surface of the fuel chamber. A tip 39 on 4 the upper end of the stem passes through baffle 36, and is headed over to effect attachment of the baflle to stem 38.

Choke valve 34 is linked to choke valve 15 by lost motion means only partially shown so that the two valves open and close substantially in unison, except that lower choke valve 34 has freedom to be opened wider but not less widely than upper choke valve 15. In this way a substantially constant ratio of air flows past valves 15 and 34 is maintained for all levels of engine power, except when there is a sudden increase in engine power demand or an acceleration surge and an abruptly greater flow of air is needed through air inlet pipe 26 and past valve 15 for at least a momentarily great stepping up of the rate of fuel vaporization according to the method of this invention as explained in greater detail hereinafter.

The operation of the above-described apparatus for providing a fuel-air mixture will now be described. Referring to FIG. 1, a first current or stream of air from the traditional main air inlet or air cleaner of an internal combustion engine is provided at the inlet or right hand end of air flow passage 14. The amount of air permitted 7 to enter the air flow passage is controlled by choke valve 15 and the position or setting of this valve is, in turn, controlled by the overall engine operation as regulated by throttle valve 16. A second stream or current of clean air, which stream may come from an entirely independent source or from a branch pipe withdrawing air from the total air stream flowing from a single air intake cleaner, is provided at the inlet of air pipe or conduit portion 26. Choke valve 34 controls the amount or flow rate of air permitted to pass through pipe 26, and, as suggested above, it has been found to be very desirable that the flow rate of air past valve 34 form a substantially constant ratio with the air flow rate past choke valve 13 in all conditions of carburetor and/ or engine operation except the aforedescribed special and temporary or transient condition of acceleration surge. Of course, the actual air flow from either source blending together to form the total air flow will vary with the engine power demands.

As the second current of air leaves pipe 26 flowing at a rate substantially less than that needed for a stoichiometric mixture 'with fuel evaporated at a rate consistent with the engine power demand it fills space 27 and surrounds fuel chamber 23. The vacuum formed by the normal engine operation pulls the air forcefully through passages or nozzles 35 formed in the fuel chamber wall, and the air jets from these nozzles impinge slantwise upon, depress and agitate the surface of the fuel contained in the bottom of fuel chamber 21. The central depression of the fuel surface in its annular extent between the inner wall surface of fuel chamber 23 and the surface of stem 38 provides an at least somewhat larger surface area from which fuel can be evaporated or swept off than that available when the fuel is not subjected to air agitation. The highly agitated fuel surface gives off a fuel vapor which mixes readily with the second current of air, and the resulting rich fuel-air mixture is drawn upwardly through the fuel chamber, as a first and/or intermediate mixture.

Although the fuel-air mixture as first formed is essentially dry in the sense of being free from droplets of liquid fuel, any incidental fuel droplets in it are knocked out by flanged baffle 36 on stem 33 as the rich mixture flows inwardly and upwardly under the bafflle and then outwardly and downwardly beneath the lower edge of baffle flange 37 before starting its final rise within the fuel chamber. The flow path of air and the fuel-air mixture within fuel chamber 23 is indicated by lines of arrows in FIG. 1. An internal opening in fuel housing 19 is provided around the upper periphery of fuel chamber 23 which permits the rich fuel-air mixture to pass upwardly into jacket 20 and thus completely surround a portion of pipe 12 and air flow passage 14- within it.

The rich mixture is drawn into the air flow passage through shaped holes 13, and there mixes with the first stream or current of air flowing at a rate to provide a second, final mixture of air and dry fuel vapor in an essentially stoichiometric ratio. This mixture will burn in the engine cylinders to give a hot, clean, and fully gaseous exhaust stream.

Having thus described the structure and operation of a first embodiment of the present invention, a second apparatus embodiment thereof will now be described in detail. This embodiment, too, is presented in the form of a carburetor particularly adapted to serve a pistontype internal combustion engine.

Referring to FIGS. 3 through 10, especially FIGS. 3 and 4, the basic components of the carburetor shown therein are essentially similar to those of the one shown in FIGS. 1 and 2. The flow of a first stream of air from a traditional main air inlet or air cleaner (not shown) into a pipe 40 wherein there is defined a main air flow passage 41 is controlled by a choke valve 42. Pipe 40 has a plurality of appropriately shaped holes 43 defined in a section of its length, and a throttle valve 44 controls the flow of mixtures of fuel 'vapor and air from the outlet end of passage 41. At its discharge or outlet end pipe 40 is provided with an outlet elbow 45 similar to elbow 17 and this is configured to accommodate a manifold inlet attaching means 46 similar to bolt or headed screw 18.

Jacket 47 is mounted around the perforated section of pipe 40 and is secured to pipe flange 48 by suitable attaching elements 49. An annular space 50 is defined between jacket 47 and the perforated section of pipe 40, and this space accommodates the flow of a first intermediate fuel-air mixture which is described hereinafter. An air jacket 51 is formed integrally with jacket 47, and extends downwardly therefrom (see FIG. 4). The upper portion of a fuel chamber 52 is disposed within jacket 51, and the fuel chamber is secured at its outwardly extending flange 53 to a flange 54 located on the jacket. Suitable attaching elements 55 secure flange 53 to flange 54.

A fuel agitating mechanism or assembled device generally designated 56 is mounted within fuel chamber 52 for rotary movement. This mechanism comprises a vertically oriented spindle 57 which has a pointed tip 58 at its lower end. The tip fits rotatably within a support hearing 59 in the bottom wall or panel of fuel chamber 52. The upper end of the spindle is equipped with a concentric shaft or axial extension 60 (see FIGS. 3 and which is journaled in an alignment bearing 61. This hearing is supported essentially in the top center of fuel chamber 52 by a spider 62 (see FIG. 6). The open construction of this spider allows a vaporous mixture generated in the fuel chamber to pass freely upwardly through it. i A fuel agitator element 63 is secured to spindle 57 near the lower end thereof by a hub 64 and set screw 65. This agitator is preferably constructed of an o en mesh screen material, and is pleated as shown in FIG. 10 to provide a highly effective turbulating or agitating surface when it is rotated rapidly within a relatively shallowy body of fuel. The internal surface of the bottom panel of fuel chamber 52 is provided with a plurality of deflector vanes or baffles 66 (see FIG. 5), which contribute to the agitation or turbulation of the fuel contained in chamber 52 by their orientation tending to oppose the motion imparted to the fuel by agitator 63 turning in a preferred direction.

A driving rotor generally designated 67 is secured to spindle 57 near the upper end thereof. This rotor comprises a ring 68 (see FIG. 10) which is supported fixedly on spindle 57 by hub 69 and spokes 70. As in the case of spider 62, the central portion of rotor 67 is substantially open to provide a path for a fuel-air mixture to pass therethrough. The annular gap or clearance between the outer peripheral surface of ring 68 and the inner vertical wall surface of fuel chamber 52 is quite small, being perhaps only about 0.015 in. The outer peripheral surface of ring 68 has a plurality of spaced, substantially semi-circular bucket-like cups 71 formed in it which open downwardly into the fuel chamber but do not extend entirely to the upper surface of the ring; that is, they are closed or blind at their upper ends. Cups 71 are in the nature of turbine buckets.

A plurality of passages 72 (see FIGS. 7, 8, and 9) are defined in the wall of fuel chamber 52 at the elevation of driving rotor 67, that is, closely adjacent cups 71. These passages are arranged in two staggered rows, and are essentially small nozzles for directing air against cups or buckets 71 in ring 68. Referring to FIG. 9, passages or nozzles 72 have their axes at an angle 0:, preferably about 45 to planes tangent to the fuel chamber outer vertical wall surface so that air flowing or drawn through them will impinge against bucket-like cups 71 in such a manner that driving rotor 67, and thus the entire agitating mechanism 56, will be rotated in a clockwise direction as viewed in FIG. 9. The axes of nozzles 72 are also inclined downwardly by a small angle 5, preferably about 7.

The downward inclination described and illustrated gives the streams or jets of air from the nozzles some initial tendency to flow toward the lower or open ends of rotor cups 71, from whence the air can flow toward agitator element 63 and any liquid fuel in chamber 52 in which the agitator is immersed. Primarily, of course, deflection of air jets downwardly from bucket-like cups 71 is effected by the closed upper ends of these cups, that is, by the absence of any easy path of escape for the air directly upwardly from the cups. The number of passages or nozzles 72 in each row of nozzles is preferably at least slightly mismatched with the number of rotor cups 71. For example, there may be fifty-five bucket-like cups formed in the outer peripheral surface of rotor ring 68 and fifty-four nozzles in each row of passages or nozzles 72. This mismatch is in keeping with established turbine theory for the avoidance of undesirable vibration of harmonic effects.

Referring again to FIGS. 3 and 4, a float chamber 73 is provided adjacent fuel chamber 52, and furnishes liquid fuel to the lower portion of the fuel chamber through passageway 74. A float 75 of conventional design is dis posed within chamber 73, and controls the operation of a needle valve 76 located in inlet 77 through which gasoline or other liquid fuel is supplied to the float chamber through a conduit 78 leading from a suitable source of fuel.

A second stream or current of air is supplied to the carburetor through an air inlet pipe or conduit connection 79. The flow of air through this pipe is controlled by a choke valve 36. This valve is mounted pivotably within pipe 79 on a shaft 81 (see FIG. 4). As in the case of the embodiment of the present invention illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2, it is desirable to regulate together the rate of flow of the first stream of air past the upper choke valve and the rate of flow of the second stream of air past the lower choke valve. Most desirably, over a wide range of conditions of engine operation, a substantially constant ratio is maintained of these two air flow rates, although of course the actual rate of flow in either stream with the two streams together constituting the total air flow to an engine will vary with the engine power demands. This ratio may be maintained by connecting the operating lever or crank of choke valve 42 with that of choke valve by a linkage 82. In some situations, namely those of acceleration surge mentioned before, it may be desirable to open the lower choke valve more than the upper choke valve to provide a temporarily relatively high flow rate of the second stream of air. For this reason, linkage 82 is provided with a lost motion capability to allow valve 80 to be opened ahead of valve 42.

Air flowing from the outlet end of pipe 79 fills the space or plenum 83 between jacket 51 and fuel chamber 52. The vacuum created by engine operation causes this air to be pulled through passages or nozzles 72, and the air jets or small streams issuing from these nozzles impinge upon the cups or buckets 71 formed in the periphery of driving rotor 67 and impose a turning torque on fuel agitating mechanism 56. Rotation of agitator 63 within the body of fuel contained in the lower portion of fuel chamber 52 and the counteraction of baffle blades 66 impart a turbulence to this fuel which increases the fuel surface greatly, and a substantially parabolic cavity or configuration 84 is formed in or on the fuel body as indicated in FIG. 3. In practice, the fuel in chamber 52 is beaten or agitated to a bubbly froth or foam.

Air of the second stream of air leaving rotor cups 71 is deflected downwardly as aforesaid, and thus flows across the frothy surface of the body of fuel contained in the fuel chamber. This air also contributes to the turbulation or agitation of the fuel, particularly the fuel surface. In its passage across this surface the second stream of air picks up and mixes with fuel vapor coming off the fuel froth, and thus there is created a rich, first and intermediate fuel-air mixture which is relatively free from liquid droplets, that is, a substantially dry gas mixture. The natural path of the second stream of air, after sweeping downwardly and inwardly over the fuel in chamber 52, is upward through rotor spokes 70 and spider 62 into space 50 between jacket 47 and main air flow pipe 40, as indicated by lines of arrows in FIG. 3.

Actually, of course, it is not just the second stream of air'which follows the cited rising path but rather the aforedescribed rich fuel-air mixture. As this mixture flows through spokes 70 which are turning at a high rotational speed these spokes act as dynamic baffles to knock out any few droplets of liquid fuel which may have been carried up that far in and by the rich fuel-air mixture, thus drying this mixture even furtherv The first and intermediate and relatively rich fuel-air mixture is finally drawn out of annularspace 50 into main air flow passage 41 through holes 43 in pipe 40. Within passage 41 it mixes with the first stream of air flowing through pipe 40 to form a second and final fuel-air mixture having air and fuel vapor present in an essentially stoichiometric ratio, and being essentially dry of any droplets or even misty particles of liquid fuel.

From the foregoing description of the structures and modes of operation of two apparatus embodiments of the present invention, those skilled in the pertinent art will comprehend that this invention provides, in specific terms, a carburetor arrangement whereby substantially complete vaporization of a liquid fuel to generate a dry, hot-burning gas or stoichiometric gas mixture is obtained when the fuel is mixed first of all or intermediately with a stream or current of air constituting only a portion or fraction of the total air flow to a combustion device such as an engine, and, in mixed form, later and finally with the remainder of the total air flowing through the carburetors main air passage.

While this invention has been described as being particularly useful with piston-type internal combustion engines, the invention is not limited to such an end use. It may also be used with numerous other devices which require, or at least can benefit substantially from, a supply of a particularly dry fuel-air mixture, that is, one essentially entirely free of liquid fuel particles. These other devices include welding and cutting torches, combustion gas turbines, space heating apparatuses, and domestic heating and cooking devices. It is contemplated that the last-designated devices would be provided with a fuel-air mixture through a pressurized gas line from a point of mixture manufacture, or else be fed with a compressed mixture from storage bottles which had previously been charged at a manufacturing plant or station. At such a station a means of creating a draft to effect fuel agitation and 8 vaporization would be needed'This draft might be created by the means whereby the mixture is compressed; that is, an apparatus embodiment of the present invention could be connected to the suction side of a gas compressor.

Protection by Letters Patent of the present invention in all its aspects as the same are set forth in the appended claims is sought to the broadest extent that the prior art allows.

I claim as my invention:

1. An apparatus for providing a fuel-air mixture, said apparatus comprising (1) a pipe-like member wherein a main air flow passage is defined, this passage being adapted to be supplied with a first stream of air, and said pipe-like member having a plurality of holes extending through the wall thereof; (2) a first jacket member partially surrounding and in spaced relation to the region of said pipelike member having said holes therein; (3) a fuel chamber adapted to receive a body of liquid fuel, said fuel chamber opening through said first jacket member into the space defined between it and the outer periphery of said pipe-like member so that a gaseous mixture formed in said fuel chamber may be distributed around the pipelike member and pass through the holes in the wall thereof to enter said main air flow passage therein, and (4) means associated with said fuel chamber whereby a second stream of air may be directed thereinto in a manner effective to agitate at least the surface of said body of liquid fuel and generate and form a first and intermediate gaseous fuel-air mixture with vapors therefrom, said fuel chamber being in gas flow communication with said main air flow passage as aforesaid so that a first and intermediate gaseous fuel-air mixture formed in the chamber may be drawn into the main air flow passage and there mix with a first stream of air flowing therein to form a second and final gaseous fuel-air mixture, said means comprising (i) a second jacket member surrounding said fuel chambe and defining a space between itself and the fuel chamber for receiving said second stream of air and distributing it around the outer periphery of the chamber, and (ii) a plurality of spaced passages defined in the wall of said fuel chamber through which said second stream of air may flow into the interior of the fuel chamber.

2. An apparatus for providing a fuel-air mixture according to claim 1, said apparatus further comprising means disposed in said fuel chamber for removing droplets of liquid fuel from a first and intermediate gaseous fuel-air mixture formed in the fuel chamber.

3. An apparatus for providing a fuel-air mixture according to claim 1, said apparatus further comprising a float chamber in liquid flow communication with said fuel chamber, said float chamber being adapted to feed liquid fuel to said fuel chamber and regulating the depth of a body of fuel therein.

4. An apparatus for providing a fuel-air mixture according to claim 1, said apparatus further comprising means for maintaining a substantially constant ratio of the flow rate of said first stream of air to the flow rate of said second stream of air over a range of total air flow rates.

5. An apparatus for providing a fuel-air mixture, said apparatus comprising (1) a pipe-like member wherein a main air fiow passage is defined, this passage being adapted to be supplied with a first stream of air; (2) a fuel chamber adapted to receive a body of liquid fuel; (3) means associated with said fuel chamber whereby a second stream of air may be directed thereinto, and (4) a fuel agitatin mechanism disposed in said fuel chamber to be in contact with a body of fuel therein, said mechanism including means responsive to the flow of a second stream of air into the fuel chamber for operatively driving the mechanism to agitate at least the surface of said body of fuel and disposed to allow said second stream of air to flow toward the surface of the body of fuel in the fuel chamber and form a first and intermediate gaseous fuel-air mixture with vapors generated from said surface, said fuel chamber being in gas flow communication with said main air flow passage so that a first and intermediate gaseous fuel-air mixture formed in the chamber may be drawn into the main air flow passage and there mix with a first stream of air flowing therein to form a second final gaseous fuel-air mixture.

6. An apparatus for providing a fuel-air mixture according to claim 5, said apparatus further comprising means for regulating the flow rate of said first stream of air; (6) means for regulating the flow rate of said second stream of air; and (7) means for maintaining a substantially constant ratio of the flow rate of said first stream of air to the flow rate of said second stream of air over a range of total air flow rates.

7. An apparatus for providing a fuel-air mixture, said apparatus comprising 1) a pipe-like member wherein a main air flow passage is defined, this passage being adapted to be supplied with a first stream of air; (2) a fuel chamber adapted to received a body of liquid fuel; (3) means associated with said fuel chamber whereby a second stream of air may be directed thereinto, and (4) a fuel agitating mechanism disposed in said fuel chamber to be in contact with a body of liquid fuel therein, said mech anism including means responsive to the flow of a second stream of air into the fuel chamber for operatively driving the mechanism to agitate at least the surface of said body of fuel and disposed to allow said second stream of air to flow toward the surface of the body of fuel in the fuel chamber and form a first and intermediate gaseous fuel-air mixture with vapors generated from said surface and comprising the assembly of (i) a spindle rotatably mounted within said fuel chamber; (ii) an agitator element secured to said spindle and disposed to be at least partially immersed in a body of liquid fuel maintained in the fuel chamber, and (iii) a driving rotor secured to said spindle and disposed to have said second stream of air impinge upon it to rotate it, the spindle, and the agitator element, and thereby operatively drive said fuel agitating mechanism, said fuel chamber being in gas flow communication with said main air flow passage so that a first and intermediate gaseous fuel-air mixture formed in the chamber may be drawn into the main air flow passage and there mix with a first stream of air flowing therein to form a second and final gaseous fuel-air mixture.

8. An apparatus for providing a fuel-air mixture according to claim 7 in which said agitator element comprises a substantially circular, pleated open mesh screen member.

9. An apparatus for providing a fuel-air mixture according to claim 7 in which said driving rotor comprises a ring member having a plurality of spaced, bucket-like cups formed in its outer periphery, these cups being disposed to have said second stream of air impinge upon upon them to impart rotation to said ring member, the spindle, and the agitator element.

10. An apparatus for providing a fuel-air mixture according to claim 9 in which the wall of said fuel chamber within which said ring member rotates is characterized by a plurality of spaced passages through which said second stream of air may flow to impinge upon said cups.

11. An apparatus for providing a fuel-air mixture according to claim 10 in which said bucket-like cups are so configured that jets of air impinging upon them from said spaced passages as said second stream of air flows through these passages are deflected from the cups toward said agitator element within the fuel chamber.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 165,564 7/1875 Losby 261-84 X 249,163 11/1881 De Witt 261-84 782,042 2/1905 Mullen 261-119 844,996 2/ 1907 Colbath 261-124 976,813 11/1910 Kreis 261-119 1,044,594 11/1912 Stroud 26 1-119 1,150,115 8/1915 Heinze 26 1-91 X 1,273,030 7/ 1918 Campbell 26 1-83 1,832,245 11/1931 Runyon 261-119 X 2,789,801 4/1957 Durbin 26 1-46 3,182,972 5/1965 Alsop et al 261-91 X HARRY B. THORNTON, Primary Examiner. T. R. MILES, Assistant Examiner.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4368712 *Aug 1, 1980Jan 18, 1983V.G.A.S., Inc.Vaporous gasoline fuel system and control therefor
US4397286 *Aug 20, 1980Aug 9, 1983V.G.A.S., Inc.Vaporous gasoline aspiration system and fuming tank
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Classifications
U.S. Classification261/46, 261/119.1, 96/332, 261/74, 261/91
International ClassificationF02M29/00, F02M17/22, F02M17/16, F02M29/02, F02M17/00
Cooperative ClassificationF02M17/22, F02M29/02, F02M17/16
European ClassificationF02M17/22, F02M17/16, F02M29/02