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Publication numberUS3325852 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 20, 1967
Filing dateNov 23, 1964
Priority dateNov 23, 1964
Publication numberUS 3325852 A, US 3325852A, US-A-3325852, US3325852 A, US3325852A
InventorsHill Harvey J
Original AssigneeRoberts Cons Ind Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Anchor clip for carpet gripper strip
US 3325852 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 20, 1967 H. J. mu. 3,325,852

ANCHOR CLIP FOR CARPET GRIPPER STRIP Filed Nov. 23, 1964 INVENTOR. H 4e1 J. H/LL By Ms ATTORNEYS f/ ze/s, A7501; P055541. & Afs/av United States Patent 3,325,852 ANCHOR CLIP FOR CARPET GRIPPER STRIP Harvey J. Hill, Monterey Park, Calif., assignor to Roberts Consolidated Industries, Inc., City of Industry, Calif., a corporation of California Filed Nov. 23, 1964, Ser. No. 413,662 13 Claims. (Cl. 16-16) The present invention relates in general to means for anchoring carpet gripper strips to floors adjacent walls bounding floor areas to be carpeted and, more particularly, to means for anchoring carpet gripper strips to floors adjacent walls which do not provide the accessibility necessary for direct nailing of the strips to the floors in the usual manner.

Considering a typical situation to which the invention is applicable, it is frequently necessary to lay carpeting in rooms having built-in cabinets, furniture, and the like, which are provided with horizontally-recessed toe spaces at floor level. The forward overhang of the built-in above the toe space makes it impossible to secure a carpet gripper strip to the floor adjacent the rear wall of the toe space by direct nailing of the strip to the floor in the normal manner.

A primary object of the present invention is to provide a gripper-strip anchoring means which is nailable, or similarly fastenable, directly to the floor forwardly of the forward overhang of the built-in, but which secures the gripper strip in a position adjacent the rear wall of the toe space. With this construction, the gripper strip may be so located as to permit carpeting the floor all the way to the rear wall of the toe space and, at the same time, the gripper strip may be anchored in the desired position by direct nailing to the floor. It will be understood that anchoring of the carpet gripper strip by direct nailing is highly desirable since it is much more efiicient than any system of indirect nailing, such as hammering on a heavy bar having one end resting on the floor well forwardly of the forwardly overhanging built-in and having its other end resting on a nail within the toe space. Also, nailing to the floor is more eflicient than securing the gripper strip to the floor within the toe space by means of an adhesive, which requires an excessive amount of time to set firmly enough to permit stretching of carpeting hooked onto the gripper strip.

Considering the invention more specifically now, a basic object thereof is to provide an anchor clip, for se curing the carpet gripper strip to the floor adjacent the rear wall of a toe space, having a forward end adapted to be driven into the rear wall of the toe space, and having a rearward end adapted to be nailed, or similarly fastened, to the floor at a point clear of the overhang of the built-in, whereby direct nailing is possible. (The forward end of the anchor clip may actually be driven into the material, usually wood, forming the rear wall of the toe space, or it may be driven under such material. Describing the forward end of the anchor cl-ip as driven into the rear wall of the toe space is intended to include either possibility.)

Still more specifically, an object of the invention is to provide an anchor clip comprising an elongated member, having forward and rearward ends, which is equipped at its forward end with at least one integral prong insertable into the rear wall of the toe space, and which is equipped adjacent its rearward end with a hole for a nail, or similar fastener, for securing the member to the floor, the length of the member being sufiicient to position the nail hole clear of the overhang of the built-in to permit direct nailing.

Another object is to provide an anchor clip of the foregoing nature wherein the elongated member is equipped adjacent its forward end with at least one integral stop engageable with the rear wall of the toe space to limit the distance which the prong or prongs at the forward end of the member may be driven into suchwall.

Another important object of the invention is to provide an anchor clip of the foregoing character wherein the elongated members 'is provided wit-h gripper-strip retaining means located between the stop or stops and the rearward end of the member, and spaced from the stop or stops, so that a gripper strip held by the retaining means is spaced outwardly from the rear wall of the toe space a distance sufiicient to permit tucking in of the edge of carpeting secured to the gripper strip. The provision of such a space or clearance for tucking in the edge of the carpeting is important to protect against fraying and unraveling of the raw edge of the carpeting,

, and to protect against the possibility of unhooking of the carpeting-from the gripper strip.

Still another important object of the invention is to provide the elongated member with a configuration such that the prong or prongs are inclined upwardly and forwardly relative to the rearward end of the elongated memher so that, when the prongs are driven horizontally into the wall at floor level, they act to space the rearward end of the elongated member upwardly from the floor to support a nail in the nail hole in a position to be hammered into the floor, the length of the nail being such that it does not quite touch the floor prior to being driven. This construction represents an important feature of the invention since it does not require the nail to be hand held, it merely being necessary to drop the nail into the hole and then drive it. This is particularly advantageous where a short concrete nail is used. (However, simila advantages accrue even when a longer nail is employed, in which case the point of the nail rests on the floor prior to driving.)

Another important object in connection with the foregoing is to deform the elongated member around the nail hole so that the periphery of the hole is in a plane substantially parallel to the plane of the prong or prongs. Consequently, a nail seated on the elongated member around the periphery of the hole therein is suspended in a substantially vertical position when the rearward end of the Ion-gated member is elevated above the floor by the prong or prongs. This insures that the nail will-'be driven vertically into the floor. I

Another object of the invention is to provide a gripperstrip retaining means comprising integral forward and rearward retaining elements adapted to secure the gripper strip therebetween, and to provide a forward retaining element having the form of an upwardly extending and rearwardly facing hook engageab'le withancdge of and an adjacent portion of the top surface of the gripper strip. With this construction, the forward retaining element-or. hook acts in tension to resist the tendency of the gripper strip to rotate about its own axis in response to the force applied to the gripper strip by tensioned carpeting hooked thereonto. Horizontal displacement of the gripper strip by the tensioned carpeting is prevented by the rear retaining element.

Another object of the invention is to form the forward retaining element or hook with one or more holes at its junction with the elongated member, thereby weakening this retaining member sufiiciently to provide, in efiect, a hinge permitting such retaining member to be bent as required to accommodate gripper strips of slightly different widths. The presence of such a hole 'or holes, however, does not weaken the retaining element in question sufiiciently to preclude its acting in tension to pre vent the aforementioned tendency of the gripper strip to rotate about its own axis.

As will be apparent from the foregoing, the present invention does not rely on the rear wall of the toe space to resist the tension in the carpeting hooked onto the gripper strip, the nail for securing the anchor clip acting in shear to resist the carpet tension. The material forming the rear wall of the toe space is required to resist only the tendency of the stretched carpeting to bend the anchor clip upwardly about an axis parallel to the gripper strip and intersecting the nail. This is an important feature since the structure of the rear wall of the toe space may not be strong enough to resist the stresses developed as the carpeting is tensioned during laying. v

The foregoing objects, advantages, features and results of the present invention, together with various other objects, advantages, features and results thereof which will be evident to those skilled in the carpeting art in the light of this disclosure, may be achieved with the exemplary embodiment of the invention described in detail hereinafter and illustrated in the accompanying drawing, in

which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a carpet-gripper-strip anchor clip which embodies the invention;

FIGS. 2 and 3 are transverse and longitudinal sectional views, respectively, which are taken as indicated by the arrowed lines 22 and 3-3, respectively, of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary side elevational view of the anchor clip showing a gripper strip partially installed thereon;

FIG. 5 is a view similar to FIG. 4, but showing the gripper strip fully installed;

' FIG. 6 is a side elevational view of the anchor clip, on a reduced scale, showing it partially installed in a toe space under a built-in; and

FIG. 7 is a side elevational view of another anchor clip of the invention showing it partially installed in a toe space under a built-in.

Referring to the drawing, the anchor clip of the invention is designated generally therein by the numeral 10 and comprises an elongated member 12 having forward and rearward ends 14 and 16. The member 12 is preferably formed of thin sheet metal which is provided with longitudinal corrugations 18 for increased stiffness. To avoid wear of the carpeting above the rearward end 16 of the member 12, the corrugations 18 converge from the forward end 14 of the member to the rearward end 16 thereof. The corrugations 18 taper virtually to zero at the rearward end 16 of the member 12 so that the latter is virtually flat in this region to prevent localized wear of carpeting thereabove.

The anchor clip 10 includes two integral, forwardly extending prongs 20 at the forward end 14 of the member 12, such prongs preferably being aligned with the corrugations 1-8 for maximum strength. The prongs 20 are at least substantially flat and are adapted to be driven into a wall, at floor level and in flat engagement with the floor adjacent the wall, by light hammer blows on the rearward end 16 of the member 12. In FIG. 6 of the drawing, the prongs 20 are shown driven into the rear wall 22 of a toe space 24 under an overhanging built-in 26, the prongs 20 being in flat engagement with the floor 28. (It will be understood that FIG. 6 is merely illustrative of one environment in which the anchor clip 10 may be used.)

The anchor clip 10 includes two integral stops located rearwardly of the prongs 20 (relative to the member 12) to limit the extent to which the prongs may be driven into the wall 22. Preferably, the stops 30 are formed by upturned edge portions of the member 12.

The prongs 20 and the stops 30 are relatively widely spaced laterally of the member 12. This construction insures that the anchor clip 10 will automatically be oriented perpendicularly of the wall 22 when the prongs 20 are driven thereinto, which is an important feature. If a single' prong and a single stop were used, it would be difficult to obtain the desired perpendicular orientation.

As best shown in FIGS. 1 and 3 of the drawing, the prongs 20 are inclined upwardly and forwardly relative tothe bottom surface of the member 12 at its forward end, making obtuse angles therewith. Consequently, as shown in FIG. 6, when the prongs 20 are driven into the wall 22 in flat engagement with the floor 28, they act to space the rearward end 16 of the member 12 upwardly from the floor. With this construction, a nail 32 inserted downwardly through a nail hole 34 in the member 12 adjacent its rearward end 16 is automatically supported in a position to be driven into the floor 28 by a hammer, which is an important feature of the invention. (It will be noted that the length of the member 12 is sufficient to locate the nail hole 34 clear of the overhanging built-in 26 so that the nail 32 can be driven by direct hammer blows, which is also an important feature.) Preferably, the upward spacing of the nail hole 34 which is produced by the prongs 20, and the length of the nail 32, are so related that the point of the nail does not quite touch the floor 28. Also, the member 12 is downwardly dimpled around the nail hole 34 vin such a manner that the periphery 36 of the nail hole is in a plane substantially parallel to the plane of the prongs 20. Consequently, the nail 32 is suspended in a substantially vertical position when its head is seated on the periphery 36 of the nail hole 34. This insures that the nail 32 will be driven vertically into the floor 28.

As will be apparent, the foregoing construction provides a simple and effective means for automatically supporting the nail 32 in the correct position for direct hammering into the floor 28. In other words, it is unnecessary to hold the nail 32 manually, and it is unnecessary to utilize any indirect nailing technique. These features of the present invention are particularly important where the nail 32 is a short, heavy one for use in concrete. Such a nail is so short as to be virtually impossible to hold in place by hand, and is desirably driven into a concrete floor with one or two sharp hammer blows, which can readily be accomplished with the present invention. 6

It will be understood that when the nail 32 is fully driven, the downwardly dimpled periphery 36 of the nail hole 34 is deformed upwardly so that the rearward end 16 of the member 12 lies flat against the floor 28. This insures that when paddingand carpeting are laid over the rearward end 16 of the member 12, localized wear of the carpeting thereabove will be minimized.

The anchor, clip 10 includes an integral retaining means 40'for a conventional carpet gripper strip 42 equipped with pointed carpet-hooking elements 44 which are inclined upwardly toward the wall 22 when the gripper strip is in its proper position. An important fea ture of the invention is that the retaining means 40 is independent of the stops 30 and is spaced therefrom toward the rearward end 16 of the member 12. With this construction, when the anchor clip 10 is installed, there is a space or clearance 46 between the wall 22 and the gripper strip 42 into whichthe raw edge of carpeting, not shown, hooked onto the elements 44 may be tucked downwardly. This is important since it prevents fraying or raveling of the raw carpet edge, and also minimizes any possibility of unhooking of the carpeting from the elements 44.

Consideringthe gripper-strip retaining means 40 in more detail, it comprises forward and rearward retaining elements 50 and 52 adapted to receive the gripper strip 42 therebetween. The rearward retaining element 52 merely comprises an upwardly struck portion of the member 12 and has a flat, substantially vertical surface 54 which is engageable with the outer edge of the gripper strip 42, i.e., the edge of the gripper strip farthest from the wall 22. As will be apparent, carpettension load acting on the gripper strip 42 is transmitted to the retaining element 52, which acts through the portion of the member 12 between it and the nail 32 to transmit the load to the nail. The latter acts in shear to resist the load.

The forward retaining element 50 has the form of an upwardly and forwardly extending, rearwardly facing hook when engages the inner edge of the gripper strip 42 and a portion of the top surface of the gripper strip adjacent its inner edge. Referring to FIG. 5, when carpeting in tension is hooked on to the elements 44, the tension load tends to rotate the gripper strip 42 about its axis in the clockwise direction. This tendency of the gripper strip 42 to rotate is prevented by the forward retaining element 50 because of the fact that it is hooked over the upper surface of the gripper strip adjacent its inner edge. Thus, the forward retaining element 50 acts in tension to resist the tendency of the carpet tension load to rotate the gripper strip. The tendency of the tensile stress in the forward retaining element 50 to lift the forward end of the member 12 is resisted by the prongs inserted into the wall 22.

The gripper strip 42 is installed between the forward and rearward retaining elements 50 and 52 in the manner shown in FIGS. 4 and 5 of the drawing. In other words, the edge of the gripper strip 42 nearest the forward end 14 of the member 12 is first inserted under the hooklike retaining element 50. The other edge of the gripper strip 42 is then pressed downwardly into engagement with the surface 54 of the rearward retaining element 52, as indicated by the arrow in FIG. 4.

The anchor clip 10 is provided with a hole 56 at the junction of the forward retaining element 50 with the member 12, and midway between the laterally spaced edges of the forward retaining element. This hole weakens the forward retaining element sufiiciently to provide in effect, a hinge at its junction with the member 12. The element 50 is also relatively narrow at this point for the same reason. Such hinge permits easy bending of the forward retaining element 50 toward and away from the rearward retaining element 52 to accommodate variations in the width of the gripper strip 42. However, the volume of metal removed by the hole 56 is insufficient to preclude the forward retaining element 50 from acting in tension to prevent rotation of the gripper strip 42 about its own axis in the manner hereinbefore described.

Anchor clips 10 of the invention are spaced apart along end-abutting gripper strips at intervals spaced sufficiently closely to resist the tension in the carpeting hooked onto the gripper strips. The exact spacing is variable and depends on the requirements of the particular installation. For example, the anchor clip spacing may vary between about four inches and about eight inches. Additionally, wherever two gripper strips are in end abutting relation, one of the anchor clips 10 is placed under the abutting ends.

Two modes of installation are possible. In one mode, the anchor clips 10 are installed first, and the gripper strips are then mounted in the anchor clips in the manner described. Alternatively, the anchor clips and gripper strips may be assembled prior to driving the prongs of the anchor clips into the wall and nailing the anchor clips in place.

Turning now to FIG. 7 of the drawing, illustrated therein is an alternative anchor clip 111) which is similar to the anchor clip 10. For convenience, the various parts of the anchor clip 110 are identified by reference numerals higher by one hundred than those used to identify the corresponding parts of the anchor clip 10.

Thus, the anchor clip 110 comprises an elongated member 112 provided at its forward end with two integral, forwardly extending prongs 120. Two integral stops 13G limit the extent to which the prongs 121) may be driven into the wall 22. The elongated member 112 is provided adjacent its rearward end with a hole, not shown, for a nail, or other fastener. Such hole may be formed directly in the elongated member 112, or it may be formed in a downward dimple in much the same manner as the hole 34 in the anchor clip 10. The anchor clip 110 includes an integral retaining means 140 for a carpet gripper strip,

6 and comprises forward and rearward retaining elements 150 and 152 similar to the elements 50 and 52.

The principal difference between the anchor clips 10 and is that the latter is upwardly concave between its forward and rearward ends. This has the effect of inclining the prongs forwardly and upwardly relative to the rearward end of the elongated member 112. Consequently, when the prongs 120 are driven into the wall 22 in flat engagement with the floor 28, they act to space the reaward end of the member 112 upwardly from the floor in much the same manner that, and for the same purpose as, the rearward end of the elongated member 12 is spaced upwardly from the floor by the prongs 20.

Preferably, the elongated member 112 is uniformly arcuate from its forward end to its rearward end, the radius of curvature being sufiicient to space the rearward end upwardly from the floor a distance of the order of one-quarter inch when the prongs 120 are driven into the wall 22 in flat engagement with the floor 28. The upward concaveness of the elongated member 112 should not be excessive so as to avoid excessively reducing the rigidity of the device in the longitudinal direction.

Although exemplary embodiments of the invention have been disclosed herein for purposes of illustration, it will be understood that various changes, modifications and substitutions may be incorporated in such embodiments without departing from the spirit of the invention as defined by the claims which follow.

I claim:

1. An anchor clip for securing a carpet gripper strip to a floor adjacent a wall, comprising an elongated member having forward and rearward ends, said member having at its forward end at least one integral prong insertable into the wall by a force applied to the rearward end of said member, said member having adjacent its forward end an integral stop engageable with the wall to limit insertion of said prong, said member having thereabove integral forward and rearward gripper-strip retain ing elements intermediate said stop and said rearward end of said member, whereby said stop spaces the gripper strip outwardly from the wall, and means for securing the rearward end of said member to the floor.

2. An anchor clip for securing a carpet gripper strip to a floor adjacent a wall, comprising an elongated member having forward and rearward ends, said member having at its forward end at least one integral prong insertable into the wall by a force applied to the rearward end of said member, said member having adjacent its forward end an integral stop engageable with the wall to limit insertion of said prong, said member having integral forward and rearward gripper-strip retaining elements intermediate said stop and said rearward end of said member, whereby said stop spaces the gripper strip outwardly from the wall, said forward retaining element comprising an upwardly extending and rearwardly facing hook engageable with a forward edge of and a portion of the top surface of the gripper strip, said rearward retaining element being engageable with a rearward edge of the gripper strip, and said member having a fastener hole therein adjacent its rearward end.

3. An anchor clip for securing a carpet gripper strip to a floor adjacent a wall, comprising an elongated member having forward and rearward ends, said member having at its forward end at least one integral prong insertable into the wall by a force applied to the rearward end of said member, said member having adjacent its forward end an integral stop engageable with the wall to limit insertion of said prong, said member having integral forward and rearward gripper-strip retaining elements intermediate said stop and said rearward end of said member, whereby said stop spaces the gripper strip outwardly from the wall, said forward retaining element comprising an upwardly extending and rearwardly facing hook having a hole at its junction with said member, said hook being engageable with a forward edge of and a portion of the top surface of the gripper strip, said'rearward retaining element being engageable with a rearward edge of the gripper strip, and said member having a fastener hole therein adjacent its rearward end.

4. An anchor clip for securing a carpet gripper strip to a floor adjacent a wall, comprising an elongated member having forward and rearward ends, said member having at its forward end at least one integral prong insertable into the wall by a force applied to the rearward end of said member, said member having integral forward and rearward gripper-strip retaining elements intermediate said prong and said rearward end of said member, said forward retaining element comprising an upwardly extending and rearwardly facing hook engageable with a forward edge of and a portion of the top surface of the gripper strip, said rearward retaining element being engageable with a rearward edge of the gripper strip, and said member having a fastener hole therein adjacent its rearward end.

5. An anchor clip for securing a carpet gripper strip to a floor adjacent a wall, comprising an elongated member having forward and rearward ends, said member having at its forward end at least one integral prong insertable into the wall and having integral forward and rearward gripper-strip retaining elements intermediate said prong and said rearward end of said member, said member having a fastener hole therein adjacent its rearward end, and said prong being inclined upwardly relative to said rearward end of said member to space said rearward end of said member above the floor when said prong is inserted horizontally into the wall.

6. An anchor clip for securing a carpet gripper strip to a floor adjacent a wall, comprising an elongated member having forward and rearward ends, said member having at its forward end at least one integral prong insertable into the wall and having integral forward and rearward gripper-strip retaining elements intermediate said prong and said rearward end of said member, said member having a fastener hole adjacent its rearward end, said prong heing inclined upwardly relative to said rearward end of said member to space said rearward end of said member above the floor when said prong is inserted horizontally into the wall, and the plane of the periphery of said hole being substantial-1y parallel to the plane of said prong to maintain substantially vertical a headed fastener in said hole when said rearward end of said member is spaced above the floor by said prong,

7. An anchor clip for securing a carpet gripper strip to a floor adjacent a wall, comprising an elongated member having forward and rearward ends, said member having at its forward end at least one integral prong insertable into the wall and having adjacent its forward end an integral stop engageable with the wall to limit insertion of said prong, said member having integral forward and rearward gripper-strip retaining elements intermediate said stop and said rearward end of said member, whereby said stop spaces the gripper strip outwardly from the wall, said member having a fastener hole therein adjacent its rearward end, said prong being inclined upwardly relative to said rear-ward end of said member to space said rearward end of said member above the floor when said prong is inserted horizontally into the wall, and the plane of the periphery of said hole being substantially parallel to the plane of said prong to maintain substantially vertical a headed fastener in said hole when said rearward end of said member is spaced above the floor by said prong.

8. .A device for securing a carpet gripper strip to a floor adjacent a wall, comprising an elongated member having forward and rearward ends, said member having at its forward end at least one integral prong insertable into the wall and having adjacent its forward end an integral stop engageable with the wall to limit insertion of said prong, said member having integral forward and rearward gripper-strip retaining elements intermediate said stop and said rearward end of said member, whereby said stop spaces the gripper strip outwardly from the wall, said member having a fastener hole therein adjacent its rearward end, said prong being inclined upwardly relative to said rearward end of said member to space said rearward end of said member above the floor when said prong is inserted horizontally into the wall, and the plane of the periphery of said hole being substantially parallel to the plane of said prong to maintain substantially vertical a headed fastener in said hole when said rearward end of said member is spaced above the floor by said prong, said device including a fastener insertable into said hole and of a length just insufficient to touch the floor when a head of the fastener is seated on said periphery of said hole and when said rearward end of said member is spaced above the floor by said prong.

9. An anchor clip for securing a carpet gripper strip to a floor adjacent a wall, comprising an elongated member having forward and rearward ends, said member having at its forward end at least one integral prong insertable into the wall and having adjacent its forward end an integral stop engageable with the wall to limit insertion of said prong, said member having integral forward and rearward gripper-strip retaining elements intermediate said stop and said rearward end of said member, whereby said stop spaces the gripper strip outwardly from the wall, said forward retaining element comprising an upwardly extending and rearwardly facing hook engageable with-a forward edge of and a portion of the top surface of the gripper strip, said rearward retaining element being engageable with a rearward edge of the gripper strip, said 'member having a fastener hole therein adjacent its rearward end, said prong being inclined upwardly relative to said rearward end of said member to space said rearward end of said member above the floor when said prong is inserted horizontally into the wall, and the plane of the periphery of said hole being substantially parallel to the plane of said prong to maintain substantially vertical a header fastener in said hole when said rearward end of said member is spaced above the floor by said prong.

10. An anchor clip for securing a carpet gripper strip to a floor adjacent a wall, comprising an elongated member having forward and rearward ends, said member having at its forward end at least one integral prong insertable into the wall and having adjacent its forward end an integral stop engageable with the wall to limit insertion of said prong, said member having integral forward and rearward gripper-strip retaining elements intermediate said stop and said rearward end of said member, whereby said stop spaces the gripper strip outwardly from the wall, said forward retaining element comprising an upwardly extending and rearwardly facing hook having a hole at its junction with said member, said hook being engageable with a forward edge of and a portion of the top surface of the gripper strip, said rearward retaining element being engageable with a rearward edge of the gripper strip, said member having a fastener hole therein adjacent its rearward end, said prong being inclined upwardly relative to said rearward end of said member to space said rearward end of said member above the floor when said prong is inserted horizontally into the wall, and the plane of the periphery of said fastener hole being substantially parallel to the plane of said prong to maintain substantially vertical a headed fastener in said fastener hole when said rearward end of said member is spaced above the floor by said prong.

11. An anchor clip according to claim 5 wherein said prong makes an obtuse angle with the forward end of said member and wherein said member is substantially straight between its forward and rearward ends, whereby to space said rearward end of said member above the floor when said prong is inserted horizontally into the wall.

12. An anchor clip as set forth in claim 5 wherein said member is upwardly concave between its forward and rearward ends so as to incline said prong upwardly relative to said rearward end of said member.

13. An anchor clip as set forth in claim 1 wherein said member is provided with an integral corrugation extending from substantially its forward end toward its rearward end, said corrugation being aligned with said prong and terminating at the forward end of said member in said prong to stiffen said member with respect to a force applied to the rearward end of said member, said corrugation tapering to zero adjacent said rearward end of said member.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,563,615 8/1951 Paul 16-16 2,614,284 10/1952 Elchin 165 MARVIN A. CHAMPION, Primary Examiner. 10 EDWARD C. ALLEN, Examiner.

D. L. TROUTMAN, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2563615 *Dec 27, 1949Aug 7, 1951 Caepet attaching strip and bracket
US2614284 *Jan 10, 1949Oct 21, 1952Arnold C Eichin IncCarpet fastener
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7762031 *Jun 18, 2004Jul 27, 2010Simpson Strong-Tie Company, Inc.Strap hold down with restraint opening
EP0277752A1 *Jan 26, 1988Aug 10, 1988Edward MakinsonClip for installing carpet fixing strip
Classifications
U.S. Classification16/16
International ClassificationA47G27/00, A47G27/04
Cooperative ClassificationA47G27/0462
European ClassificationA47G27/04C2T