Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3326112 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 20, 1967
Filing dateJul 26, 1965
Priority dateJul 26, 1965
Also published asDE1497361A1
Publication numberUS 3326112 A, US 3326112A, US-A-3326112, US3326112 A, US3326112A
InventorsReichner Philip, Chester A Sadlow, Robert W Wolfer
Original AssigneeWestinghouse Electric Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Air conditioning and lighting system
US 3326112 A
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 20, 1967 c SADLOW ET AL 3,326,112

AIR CONDITIONING AND LIGHTING SYSTEM Filed July 26, 1965 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 WITNESSES 6' INVENTO Chest A. 50 w Mi W Philip Reichner a R rfW.Wolfe GM l/ 7 wam,

ATTORNEY June 20, 1967 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed July 26, 1965 XWWWXWWW 7 E;@@ T M Mind QTH n; umunw UTUm; LPN IQ Q Unmfim WHQHQ n nnyim UTTTG mnwfww 3111 :@@@Q

FIG.4.

June 20, 1967 c SADLOW ET AL 3,326,112

AIR CONDITIONING AND LIGHTING SYSTEM Filed July 26, 1965 I 4 Sheets-Sheet June 20, 1967 Q SADLQW ET AL 3,326,112

AIR CONDITIONING AND LIGHTING SYSTEM 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed July 26, 1965 United States Patent 3,326,112 AER CONDITHGNING AND LIGHTING SYSTEM Chester A. Sadlow and Philip Reichner, Plum Bore, Pittsburgh, and Robert W. Wolfe, Pittsburgh, Pa, assignors to Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Pittsburgh, Pa., a corporation of Pennsylvania Filed .ltuiy 26, 1965, Ser. No. 474,751 6 (Claims. (Cl. 98-40) This application is a continuation-in-part of a copending application entitled, Luminaire, Ser. No. 347,806, filed on Feb. 27, 1964, and now abandoned, by the same inventors and assigned to the same assignee. This invention relates generally to air-conditioning systems and, more particularly, to air-conditioning systems combined with illumination and acoustical facilities, all of which are integrated into a false ceiling.

The trend in oi'fice buildings is to incorporate the airconditioning facilities into the ceiling to allow more working space in the rooms below. Frequently in accomplishing this, a maze of air ducts are included in the space immediately above the ceiling which adds to the height of each floor. It is desirable to eliminate these overhead ducts by including them into a thin false ceiling. Another desirable feature in ceiling installations is to include therein the illumination system and acoustical insulation for the room. It it also desirable to dispose of the heat generated by the light sources in the illumination system so as not to overload the air-conditioning system during the summer months. Movable partitions and room dividers, which are conveniently relocated, may interfere with the.room ventilation and illumination. It is desirable to eliminate this interference by independently air conditioning and illuminating each portion of the room separately from the other portions. It is also desirable to decrease the material and installation costs of ceiling units.

It is therefore the general object of this invention to provide within a room or habitable space, an improved illumination and air-conditioning system which forms a thin false ceiling thereacross.

Another object is to provide illumination and air-conditioning ducts and lighting facilities which are coplanarly positioned overhead to form a thin false ceiling.

A further object is to provide an improved illumination and air-conditioning system which operates uniformly throughout a room and which functions effectively independently of the relocation of partitions or movable walls.

Yet another object is to provide a method of operating an illumination system and air-conditioning system which decreases both the cooling load in the summer months and the heating load in the winter months.

It is another object to provide an illumination and airconditioning system incorporated in a false ceiling which is comprised of small, standardized, easily handled and installed ceiling modules.

It is a further object to provide a false ceiling which coplanarly incorporates illumination and air-conditioning facilities including central distribution and collection ducts.

Still another object of this invention is to provide an illumination and air-conditioning system arranged within a building so as to conserve building space.

A further object is to provide ceiling modules for a false ceiling which are reduced in weight and cost.

Another object is to provide an air-conditioning system in which the need for a separate air return duct is eliminated.

Yet another object is to provide an improved luminaire which does not radiate infrared radiations into the area to be illuminated.

It is a further object to provide an improved luminaire ice in which the heat generated therein is removed and is not allowed to enter the area to be illuminated.

Briefly, these and other objects are achieved by providing air-conditioning, lighting, and acoustical features in the periphery of a habitable space such as a room or oifice, preferably in the ceiling. These features are manufactured in the form of thin, standard sized units or modules at the factory. The modules are then shipped to the installation site and fitted together across the upper portion of the room forming a thin false ceiling. If square ceiling modules are used, the false ceiling may resemble a giant checkerboard. Each ceiling module has a luminaire which illuminates the area directly thereunder. Each ceiling module has a supply duct section on one side of the luminaire and a return duct section on the other. The shorter duct sections are open-ended and engage the duct sections of the adjacent ceiling modules forming longer complete supply ducts and return ducts across each row of the checkerboard false ceiling. The duct sections and the luminaire are coplanar, thus forming a single layer in the false ceiling.

As the conditioned or fresh air in the complete supply ducts passes through each ceiling module, a flow of air is directed int-o the room below and another flow is directed into the luminaire associated with that ceiling module. The room flow enters the room in a downward draft at one end of each ceiling module. Stale air is exhausted from the room in an upward draft at the other end and into the return duct. The entire room is ventilated in this manner and each ceiling module provides a small area of the room immediately thereunder with air-conditioning and illumination. The movable walls and partition in the room may be relocated freely without disturbing the effectiveness of the ventilation or lighting in any section of the room.

The conditioned air directed into the luminaire in each ceiling module impinges against a light-transmitting shield forming the bottom of the luminarie and circulates between the light sources. The luminaire air flow is then exhausted into the return duct. The heat generated by the light sources is thus prevented from heating the light transmitting shield and being radiated into the room. Instead this heat is carried away by the luminaire air flow. Removing the generated heat in this manner decreases the room cooling load of the air-conditioning facilities during the summer months. In the winter months this luminaire air flow is shutoff. The generated heat is allowed to pass into the room through the light-transmitting shield causing a decrease in the heating load during the winter months.

For a better understanding of the present invention reference should be had to the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIGURE 1 shows a bottom perspective view of a ceiling module with arrows indicating the air-flow paths;

FIG. 2 shows a top perspective view of the ceiling module of FIG. 1 with cut away portions to illustrate the air flow paths therein;

FIG. 3 shows a bottom perspective View of a false ceiling formed by many ceiling modules;

FIG. 4 shows a schematic diagram of the false ceiling illustrating the air flow through a coplanar air distribution and collection system;

FIG. 5 shows a modified ceiling module with no outer side walls in the supply duct and the return duct, and no end wall in the room entrance and room exhaust chambers;

FIG. 6 shows another modified ceiling module with no side or top wall on the return duct;

FIG. 7 is a sectional view taken on the line VIIVII in FIG. 8 in the direction of the arrows, showing another embodiment of the present invention, without the coplanar air ducts but including a ballast enclosure for the luminaire;

FIG. 8 is a sectional view taken on the line VIII-VIII in FIG. 7 in the direction of the arrows; and

FIG. 9 is a modified embodiment of the luminaire embodiment shown in FIG. 7, showing a side distribution plenum.

Referring now to FIGURE 1, there is shown a single ceiling module 10 with an open-ended supply duct section 11 along one edge of the upper side, and a parallel open-ended return duct section 13 along the opposite edge. The luminaire 15 (which can be seen in the cutaway portion of FIG. 2) is disposed between the ducts as indicated by the elongated light-transmitting shield 17 extending across the center of the ceiling module 10 between the parallel ducts. The inner side walls of each duct 11 and 13 are concurrent with the side walls 16 of the luminaire 15. The downward room entrance flow path 19 is shown emerging from one end of the ceiling module 10 through a room entrance slot 21 which opens into the supply duct section 11. The room entrance slot 21 is proximate and parallel with one end of the light-transmitting shield 17 The end of the shield 17 forms one edge of the slot 21. An upward room exhaust flow path 23 is shown as disappearing into the ceiling module 10 at the other end thereof, through a room exhaust slot 25 which opens into the return duct section 13. The room exhaust slot 25 is positioned in a manner similar to the room entrance slot 21 only at the other end of the light-transmitting shield 17. The ceiling module 10 is suspended from the ceiling by means of a clip 27 provided at each corner thereof. Similar clips are located at corresponding positions on the ceiling overhead.

Referring now to FIG. 2 there are illustrated the air flow paths within a single ceiling module 10. The supply air flow 29 passes through the supply duct section 11 and branches forming a luminaire air flow path 31 and a room air flow path 33. The luminaire air flow path 31 leaves the supply duct section 11 through an adjustable transverse air slot 35 and enters a plenum or distribution chamber 37 located directly above a depressed luminaire housing 39. The volume of the air flow in the path 31 may be controlled by adjusting the opening in the transverse air slot 35 with the adjacent slider or damper 41. The damper 41 is adapted to he slid over the transverse air slot 35 in the direction of the arrow 42 to partially or completely stop the luminaire air flow 31 from entering the distribution chamber 37. The distribution chamber 37 is provided with a number of entrance air ports or jets 43 in the bottom portion thereof which open into the luminaire housing 39. These entrance jets 43 direct streams of air downward between the fluorescent lamps 45 and against the light-transmitting shield 17. The air flow spirals around the fluorescent lamps 45 and the lampholders 46 and exits from the luminaire housing 39 through perforated luminaire end walls 47 and 48 at either end thereof. The air then passes into the collection chambers 49 and 50 respectively provided at each end of the luminaire housing 39. The collection chambers 49 and 50 direct the air into the return duct section 13 through air return ports 51 and 52 respectively provided therein. The luminaire air flow path 31 merges with the return air flow path 53 in the return duct section 13 at the return ports 51 and 52.

The room air flow path 33 leaves the supply duct section 11 through an air supply port 55 and enters the room entrance end chamber 57 provided at one end of the luminaire housing 39. The end chamber 57 has the room entrance slot 21 provided in the bottom thereof, which allows the conditioned air to enter the room forming the downward room air flow path 19. FIG. 1 illustrates the downward room air flow path 19 and the room entrance slot 21 which is located along the end edge of the light-transmitting shield 17. The other end of the shield is provided with a room exhaust slot 25 through which the room air flow exhausts along the path 23 from th room and into a room exhaust end chamber 59 at the other end of the luminaire housing. This second end chamber 59 opens into the return duct section 13 through the same air return port 52 as the luminaire collection chamber 51 located at the end of the luminaire housing 39. The room exhaust flow path 23 passes through the second end chamber 50 and merges with the return air flow 53 at the return port 52.

A layer of suitable acoustical lining material 61 is placed in the bottom of the ducts to obtain the maximum sound absorption. The lining material is merely laid in the ducts and need not be secured thereto. This feature is known in the art of acoustics. The lining material 61 may also have appropriate fire proof and heat insulation properties.

In order to save on the cost of installation labor, the ceiling modules are assembled as completely as possible at the factory. Only minor operations need be performed by the on-site work screws. The size and weight of the ceiling modules are such as to be easily installed by hand.

In FIG. 3 a plurality of ceiling modules are shown engaging one another to form the false ceiling 63 which is suspended beneath the structural ceiling 64. The ceiling modules are not limited to a square shape, and may be supported by other drop ceiling networks, if desired. The supply duct sections 11 and return duct sections 13 of each ceiling module along a single row engage to form a longer complete supply duct 65, and a longer complete return duct 67 which extend along that row. The complete supply ducts 65 terminate in an open end at one end of each row and the complete return ducts 67 terminate in an open end at the other end of each row. The complete supply ducts 65 are supplied with fresh air through this open end termination by a central distribution duct 69, as shown in FIG. 4. The distribution duct 69 is formed by a row of hollow ceiling modules running perpendicular to the complete duct rows and engaging the supply duct open end terminations. The air enters the complete supply duct 65 and passes into each ceiling module, which in turn exhausts the air into the complete return duct 67. The exhaust air passes out of the open ends of the complete return duct 67 at the other end of each row and into a central collection duct 71. The collection duct 71 is also formed by a row of hollow ceiling modules extending perpendicular to the complete duct rows.

The hollow ceiling modules do not have luminaires or room entrance and exhaust ports. They are the same thickness as the regular ceiling modules and are installed coplanar to them preserving the uniform thickness of the false ceiling 63. The requirement of separate ducts located above the false ceiling is eliminated. The false ceiling 63 can thus be positioned much closer to the structural ceiling 64 thereby conserving building space.

FIG. 4 shows a schematic diagram of the false ceiling 63 illustrating the operation of the central distribution ducts 69 and collection ducts 71. Two five by five checkerboard areas 73 consisting of fifty ceiling modules 10 are shown on either side of a central distribution duct 69. This distribution duct 69 feeds the complete supply ducts 65 of both checkerboards 73. A central collection duct 71 extends along the opposite edge of each checkerboard 73 and collect the exhaust air therefrom. The collection ducts 71 also collect exhaust air from the checkerboards 75 partially shown on the other side of the duct 71.

The false ceiling 63 as viewed from the room will have spaced rows of hollow ceiling modules without lights separating the checkerboard areas of ceiling modules with lights. Every other lightless row is a central distribution duct 69 and the alternate every other row is a central collection duct 71. The distribution ducts feed into both adjacent checkerboards and the collection ducts 71 collect from both the adjacent checkerboards. The need for separate supply and collection ducts located above the false ceiling 10 is eliminated. The space and material required for separate ducts is conserved because the distribution and collecting system is coplanarly included in the false ceiling 63.

This invention has two basic modes of operation; the summer mode and the winter mode. When operating in the summer mode, the heat generated by the fluorescent lamps 45 are removed as described previously. The luminaire air flow 31 is directed through the luminaire housing 39 into the return duct 13. The summer operation might require the adjustable transverse slot 35 to be for example, half-way closed by damper 41. When operating in the winter months this air flow 31 might be shut off completely by closing the adjustable transverse slot 35 between the supply duct section 11 and the distribution chamber 37. To close the slot 35 the adjacent damper 41 is slid over the slot 35 as indicated by the arrow 42. The heat developed within the luminaire housing 39 is not removed by the luminaire air flow 31 during the winter months.

This heat is predominantly infrared radiation, much of which will not pass directly through the shield 17 into the room, but is converted into heat which conducts through the shield 17. These radiations are omitted in all directions from the fluorescent lamps 45. The radiations striking the shield 17 are absorbed at the inner surface thereof. The radiations that strike the overhead reflector portion of the top and side walls 16 of the luminaire housing 39 and are reflected downward and also absorbed at the inner surface of the shield 17. These absorbed infrared radiations heat the inner surface of the shield 17 and this heat is conducted by the shield 17 to the outer surface thereof and into the room. The luminaire air flow path 31 employed in the summer months removes the heat in the luminaire housing 39 a it develops at the inner surface of the shield 17. During the winter months the luminaire air flow path 31 is shut oif and the heat generated by the fluorescent lamps 45 builds up inside the luminaire housing 39 and conducts across the shield 17 into the room.

Referring now to FIG. 5, there is shown a modified ceiling module 77 having no outer side wall (indicated by numeral 79) on the supply duct section 11 and the return duct section 13. These modified sections are adapted to engage similarly modified supply duct sections and return section on the adjacent ceiling modules. This engagement forms supply ducts and return ducts which are twice as wide as those in the embodiment described previously.

FIG. 5 also shows open end chambers 78 and 89 at each end of the luminaire housing. The open room entrance end chamber 78 is adapted to engage an open room entrance end chamber of the adjacent ceiling module. A closed end chamber is thereby formed which is twice as big as the end chamber described in the previous embodiment. A closed room exhaust end chamber is formed in a similar manner by engaging the open room exhaust end chamber 89 with the corresponding open end chamber on the adjacent ceiling module.

Another modification of this invention employs the space above the false ceiling as the return duct, thus allowing the elimination of the side and top wall of the return duct described in the first embodiment. FIG. 6 shows ceiling module 81 having a topless, sideless return duct 83 opening into the space above the false ceiling. In contrast to the two previous embodiments, various outer surfaces of the ducts and chambers have been eliminated to decrease in the weight and cost of the ceiling module. In any of the previous embodiments, the entire return system may be eliminated by returning the air to waste into the room. Large fans at the end of each room or ballway would exhaust the air to the outside of the building, or a conventional central return duct may be utilized.

Referring now to FIGS. 7 and 8, there is shown a ductless luminaire comprised of three major parts: a luminaire housing 85 having a top wall, side and end walls, and a bottom opening, a distribution chamber 87 located above the lumiaire housing 85, and a light-transmitting shield 6 17 forming an air tight seal with the bottom opening of the luminaire housing 85.

The distribution chamber 87 is provided with an overhead entrance 89 which opens into a source of cool or conditioned air. The luminaire ballast enclosure 91 is located with three of its four sides exposed to the cool area in the distribution chamber 87. The cool air, after entering through inlet 89 and filling the distribution chamber 87, is distributed into the luminaire housing through slots or airjets 43 and circulated around and about the fluorescent lamps 45 and their holding means 46 in a spiral fashion. The effect is to decrease the operating temperature of the fluorescent lamps 45 thereby increasing their efliciency and reducing the amount of heat radiated into the illuminated area. After cooling the interior of the luminaire housing 85, the air leaves the luminaire through the nozzle-shaped apertures or return ports 93 and enter a return duct. As an alternate, the heated air my be discharged to a waste plenum eliminating the need for a return duct.

An end chamber 95 located at one end of the luminaire housing is employed to direct cool air into the illuminated area to supply the cooling needs of that area. The entire combination air diffuser and luminaire is recessed totally within the ceiling 96 and provides a pleasing appearance. The end chamber 95 may or may not be used as necessity dictates. The overall result of providing the enclosed luminaire with cool air is that the light shield is maintained substantially at room temperature as are the fluorescent lamps 45. Consequently, head radiation from the luminaire is eliminated.

FIG. 9 depicts an alternate construction of the .luminaire shown in FIGS. 7 and 8. The distribution chamber 87 in this arrangement is located adjacent a side wall of the luminaire housing 85 rather than adjacent to the top wall. Cool air is supplied to the room through a room entrance slot 97 if desired. In this alternate construction air enters the luminaire housing 85 through intake slots 99 located in the side wall thereof. The return port 98 is connected either to a return duct or to a waste plenum. The pressure immediately outside the return port 98 is lower than the pressure at the intake slot 99. Air is directed horizontally into the luminaire housing 85, the direction imparted by its initial velocity, continues over and around the fluorescent lamps and support means therefor, and then exhausts through the return port 98. This arrangement may be preferred Where the desirability of reducing ballast compartment temperatures is not as accentuated.

It will be recognized that the objects of the invention have been achieved by providing a thin false ceiling comprised of standard sized ceiling modules, each equipped to illuminate and air-condition the area directly beneath the module. Each area of the room is illuminated and airconditioned independently of other areas and independently of the partition arrangement in the room. The duct work for the air-conditioning is coplanarly included in the false ceiling, eliminating the need for separate ducts and the need for an extensive space above the false ceiling to contain the separate ducts. The method of operating the system is such that the heat generated by the luminaire may be directed to supplement the heating facilities of the room or diverted so as not to hinder the cooling facilities of the room. In the summer months this heat is removed by means of an air flow. In the winter months the heat is not removed and is allowed to conduct through the luminaire shield into the room.

Although this invention has been described with respect to particular embodiments thereof, it is not to be so limited as changes and modifications may be made therein which are within the full intended scope of the invention.

We claim as our invention:

1. In an illumination, sound absorbing, and airconditioning device adapted to be mounted in the ceiling of a room, the combination comprising:

(a) an elongated luminaire housing adapted to contain elongated discharge type light sources, said housing comprising side walls, end Walls, a top portion, and an at least partially light transmitting bottom portion;

(b) an elongated air supply duct for bringing fresh air to said room and cooling air to said housing, said air supply duct positioned adjacent to one side of said housing and having said side concurrent therewith;

(c) an air return duct for taking away stale air from said room and warmed air from said housing, said air return duct positioned adjacent to the opposite side of said housing and having said opposite side concurrent therewith;

(d) :a supply air distribution chamber located above said housing and opening into said air supply duct through an adjustable transverse slot in the side wall thereof, said housing having at least one row of air jets opening from said distribution chamber and spaced longitudinally thereacross allowing cooling air from said air supply duct to impinge on said light transmitting bottom portion and circulate within said housing at a rate of predetermined flow;

(e) a return air collection chamber located at each end of said housing and opening into said air return duct and said housing allowing the air circulating within said housing which has been warmed by said light sources to flow therefrom into said air return duct;

(f) a room entrance end chamber located at one end of said housing and opening into said air supply duct and into said room allowing fresh air to enter there- (g) a room exhaust end chamber located at the opposite end of said housing and opening into said room and into said air return duct allowing stale air to exit from said room; and

(h) the bottom portions of said air supply duct, said air return duct, said collection chambers, and said end chambers comprising material of predetermined characteristics suitable to form a part of the ceiling of the room to be illuminated and air conditioned.

2. In a generally rectangular ceiling module adapted to be horizontally installed in a room and to engage similar adjacent modules forming a thin false ceiling thereacross which incorporates lighting, acoustic, and ventilation facilities, the combination comprising:

(a) a thin elongated, horizontal air supply duct on the upper side and along one edge of said ceiling module, said air supply duct having open ends adapted to engage the air supply ducts of said adjacent ceiling modules, said air supply duct having inner and outer side walls, a top portion, and a suitably insulated bottom portion which forms a part of said false ceiling;

(b) a thin elongated horizontal air return duct on the upper side and along the opposite side of said ceiling module in parallel relationship to said air supply duct, said air return duct having open ends adapted to engage the air return ducts of said adjacent ceiling modules, said air return duct having inner and outer side walls, a top portion, and a suitably insulated bottom portion which is formed a part of said false ceiling;

(c) a thin elongated horizontal luminaire housing adapted to contain therein elongated arc discharge light sources, said luminaire housing located between said air ducts and in parallel relationship thereto and having reflective side walls concurrent with adjacent inner side walls of said air ducts, said luminaire housing having perforated end walls indented substantially from the open ends of said air ducts, and a depressed reflective top portion with air jet means provided therein, said luminaire housing having a return air collection chamber leading into said air return duct, and said luminaire housing having an at least partially light transmitting bottom portion;

(d) a thin distribution chamber occupying the space above said depressed luminaire housing top portion and having a bottom portion concurrent therewith, said distribution chamber having an adjustable air supply means leading into said air supply duct, and

(e) a first and a second end chamber provided at the respective ends of said luminaire, said first end chamber having an air supply means provided therein leading into said air supply duct and having a room entrance means provided in the bottom thereof proximate to the opposite end of said light transmitting bottom portion and having a return air means provided therein leading into said air return duct.

3. In a generally rectangular ceiling module adapted to be horizontally installed in a room and to engage similar adjacent modules forming a thin false ceiling thereacross which incorporates lighting, acoustic, and ventilation facilities, the combination comprising:

(a) a thin elongated horizontal air supply duct on the upper side and along one edge of said ceiling module, said air supply duct having open end adapted to form air tight engagement with the supply ducts of said adjacent ceiling modules, said air supply duct having inner and outer side walls, a top portion, and a suitably insulated bottom portion which is part of said false ceiling;

(b) a thin elongated horizontal air return duct on the upper side and along the opposite edge of said ceiling module in parallel relationship to said air supply duct, said air return duct having open ends adapted to form air tight engagements with the air return ducts of said adjacent ceiling modules, said air return duct having inner and outer side walls, a top portion, and a suitably insulated bottom portion which is part of said false ceiling;

(c) a thin elongated horizontal luminaire housing adapted to contain therein elongated arc discharge light sources, said luminaire housing located between said air ducts and in parallel relationship thereto and having reflective side walls concurrent with the adjacent inner side walls of said air ducts, said luminaire housing having perforated end walls indented substantially from the open ends of said air ducts, and a depressed reflective top portion with at least one row of air entrance jets running longitudinally thereacross, said luminaire housing having a return air collection chamber adjacent each perforated end wall which opens into said air return duct, and said luminaire housing having at least partially light transmitting bottom portion forming a part of said false ceiling;

(d) a thin distribution chamber occupying the space above said depressed luminaire housing top portion and having a bottom poition concurrent therewith, said distribution chamber having an adjustable air supply means leading into said air supply duct; and

(e) a first and a second end chamber located at the respective ends of said luminaire housing, said first end chamber having an air supply means provided therein leading into said air supply duct and having a room entrance air slot provided in the bottom thereof proximate to and parallel with one end of said light transmitting bottom portion, said second end chamber having a room exhaust slot provided in the bottom thereof proximate to and parallel with the opposite end of said light transmitting bottom portion and having an air return means provided therein leading into said air return duct.

4. In a module adapted to engage other adjacent modules forming a portion of the inside surface of a habitable space and incorporating lighting and ventilation facilities therefor, the combination comprising:

(a) an air supply duct on the outside and along one edge of said module, said air supply duct having open ends and an open side adapted to engage the open ends and open sides of the supply duct of said adjacent modules;

10 with an air entrance means between said supply duct and the habitable space for allowing the fresh air to enter the habitable space; (d) an elongated air return duct within and across (b) an air return duct on the outer side and along said module generally parallel to said supply duct, the opposite edge of said module, said air return duct said return duct having open ends adapted to engage having open ends and an open side adapted to enthe open ends of the return ducts on said adjacent gage the open ends and open sides of the air return modules to form a continuous return duct across duct of said adjacent modules; said portion of the peripheral surface of the habitable (c) a luminaire housing located between said air ducts space formed by said modules, said module further and adapted to contain light sources for illuminating being provided with an air exhaust means between said habitable space, said housing opening into said said return duct and said habitable space for perair supply duct and opening into said air return duct mitting stale air in the habitable space to enter said at predetermined points allowing air from said air return duct; supply duct to circulate through said housing in a 1 (e) air passage means connecting said fresh air supply predetermined flow effective to remove heat thereduct to said luminaire housing, and collection chamfrom; bers positioned at each end of said luminaire hous- (d) a first and a second open ended end chamber 10- ing, each of said collection chambers opening into cated at the respective ends of said luminaire houssaid luminaire housing and into said return duct ing and adapted to engage the respective p ended to allow the air entering said housing to flow thereend chambers of said adjacent modules forming a through and into said return duct for removing heat first and a second closed end chamber at the respecfrom the interior of said housing; and tive ends of said module, said first closed end cham- (f) a distribution plenum included in said air passage ber leading into said air supply duct and havi g a means and positioned directly above said luminaire habitable space entrance means provided therein h i dj id supply duct, id plenum openwhich allows fresh air from said air supply duct to ing i t id supply duct through a i ort means enter said habitable space, said second closed end provided therebetween, said plenum opening into chamber opening into said air return duct and having said housing through a plurality of spaced air jets a habitable space exhaust means provided therein provided therebetween whereby air from said supply which allows stale air in said habitable space to eX- duct flows through said plenum and is directed therehaust therefrom. from to impinge on said light transmitting shield and 5. In combination, aplurality Of modules for illuminatthen circulate through said housing and out said ing and air conditioning a habitable space, said modules collection chambers to said return duct to thereby being adjacently positioned to form a p rti n Of t remove heat from said light source means and said peripheral surface of the habitable space, each of said light transmitting shield.

modules comprising: 6. The combination as specified in claim 5, wherein (a) a luminaire housing adapted to contain a light said air port means is adjustable to control the volume source means and having a top wall, side and end of supply air flowing through aid housing, walls and a bottom opening;

(b) a light transmitting member covering said bottom References Cited opening and substantially sealing off said housing UNITED STATES PATENTS from said habitable s ace;

(c) an elongated air su pply duct extending within and 2886699 5/1959 Hurling. 240 47 X across said module and having open ends adapted 3010378 11/1961 Geocaris 98 40 to engage corresponding open ends of the supply 3O65686 11/1962 Ge9cans 9840 ducts on said adjacent modules to form acontinuous 31O3157 9/1963 Qum 98 40 air supply duct across said portion of the peripheral j surface of the habitable space formed by said mod- ROBERT OLEARY P'lmary Exammer' ules, said continuous supply duct adapted to be con- 50 W. E. WAYNER, Assistant Examiner.

nected to a source of fresh air, said module provided

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2886699 *Sep 23, 1957May 12, 1959Mc Graw Edison CoFluorescent luminaire
US3010378 *Oct 22, 1959Nov 28, 1961Thomas Industries IncLighting and ventilating system
US3065686 *Apr 29, 1960Nov 27, 1962Thomas Industries IncLighting and ventilating fixture
US3103157 *Nov 6, 1961Sep 10, 1963Emerson Electric Mfg CompanyLighting and air conducting apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3393728 *Jul 21, 1966Jul 23, 1968Integrated Dev And Mfg CoCooling arrangement for environmental growth chamber lighting systems
US3555267 *Sep 13, 1967Jan 12, 1971Lok Products CoVentilated lighting fixture
US3687056 *Feb 11, 1971Aug 29, 1972Norsk Viftefabrikk AsCeiling structure ii
US3693530 *Dec 29, 1971Sep 26, 1972Larkfeldt BirgerVentilated fluorescent tube fixture
US3788206 *Aug 21, 1972Jan 29, 1974G MulveyModular ceiling construction
US3885462 *Jul 1, 1974May 27, 1975Gullfiber AbDevice to condition rooms
US5136486 *Feb 13, 1991Aug 4, 1992Gulton Industries Inc.Lighting fixture with diffuser for light and air
US5171084 *Nov 1, 1991Dec 15, 1992Gulton Industries, Inc.Apparatus for diffusing light and directing air circulation
US6264551 *Sep 8, 2000Jul 24, 2001Randall L. SmithConcentric air diffuser
US7128303Apr 2, 2004Oct 31, 2006Broan-Nu Tone LlcFan mounting spacer assembly
US7175309Nov 14, 2003Feb 13, 2007Broan-Nutone LlcLighting and ventilating apparatus and method
US7203416Nov 21, 2003Apr 10, 2007Broan-Nutone LlcVentilating and heating apparatus with heater shielded by tapered discharge duct
US7455432Feb 13, 2007Nov 25, 2008Broan-Nutone LlcLighting and ventilating apparatus and method
US7455500Dec 6, 2005Nov 25, 2008Broan-Nu Tone LlcModular ventilating exhaust fan assembly and method
US8397527 *Jul 30, 2007Mar 19, 2013Jack V. MillerEnergy saving integrated lighting and HVAC system
US8434916Nov 25, 2008May 7, 2013Broan NuTone, LLCLighting and ventilating apparatus and method
US8756888 *May 16, 2011Jun 24, 2014Feature WaltersModular building panel and duct system
US20110277405 *May 16, 2011Nov 17, 2011Features WalterModular building panel and duct system
US20120067073 *Sep 19, 2010Mar 22, 2012Wen-I HuangEnergy-saving air conditioner and illumination controller
Classifications
U.S. Classification454/248, 362/96, 362/148, 454/294
International ClassificationF24F13/078, E04B9/02, F21V33/00, F24F13/06, F24F3/044, F24F3/056
Cooperative ClassificationF24F3/056, F21V33/0092, E04B9/02, B60Q2500/20, F21Y2103/00, F24F13/078
European ClassificationE04B9/02, F24F3/056, F24F13/078, F21V33/00F2
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Oct 25, 1982ASAssignment
Owner name: COOPER INDUSTRIES INC 1001 FANNIN HOUSTON TX 77002
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:WESTINGHOUSE ELECTRIC CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:004059/0357
Effective date: 19821001