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Publication numberUS3326383 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 20, 1967
Filing dateApr 8, 1964
Priority dateApr 11, 1963
Also published asDE1460305A1
Publication numberUS 3326383 A, US 3326383A, US-A-3326383, US3326383 A, US3326383A
InventorsPranovi Ugo
Original AssigneePranovi Ugo
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Solvent filter for garment dry cleaning machines
US 3326383 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 20, 1967 u. PRANOVI 3,326,383

SOLVENT FILTER FOR GARMENT DRY CLEANING MACHINES Filed April 8, 1964 United States Patent Claims. or. 210-407 This invention relates to solvent filters for garment dry cleaning machines.

The conventional solvent filters used at present in garment dry cleaning machines have the disadvantage that they require after a number of washing cycles of the machine a cleaning involving a stopping of the machine. This operation is absolutely indispensable because with a dirty solvent filter the garment cleaning is not accomplished satisfactorily. For this reason the known cleaning machines, while often equipped with a substantial number of automatic devices, cannot be considered as fully automatically operating machines. In addition to the disadvantage of stopping the machine, there is also the possibility of careless slips in performing the cleaning operation and even of forgetfulness.

This invention obviates said disadvantage by providing a self-cleaning solvent filter without any need of an intervention by an operator. Thus, the solvent filter, at each new cleaning cycle, starts really clean and in addition assures a continuous operation of the machine over an indefinite number of cycles without requiring to stop the machine for cleaning the filter.

The solvent filter according to the invention is characterized in that it comprises a housing disposed above the distiller housing and communicating with the inside of the distiller through an opening in the distiller housing, a filtering body disposed inside the housing, supported by a rod carrying at the lower side a valve adapted to close the opening in the distiller housing, and extending at the upper side through the top wall of the filter housing, a spring interposed between the top wall of the filter housing and an abutment secured to the rod carrying the filtering body, outside the filter housing, means disposed adjacent the upper end of the rod adapted to impart intermittent blows to the rod, an abutment 0n the filter housing, and an abutment cooperating therewith disposed at the end of the filtering body.

According to a feature of the invention the means adapted to impart intermittent blows to the rod comprises at least one electromagnet adapted to attract one or more armatures carried by the rod.

According to another feature of the invention the filter housing is crossed at its lower side by a solvent inlet conduit terminating in a nozzle concentric to the body supporting rod and having its outlet facing upwardly beneath the bottom of the filtering body.

According to a further feature of the invention the filter housing has a built-in siphon for the outflow of the solvent.

These and further features of the invention will become better apparent from the following detailed specification, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawing, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a diagram of an automatic garment dry cleaning machine equipped with a solvent filter according to the invention, and

FIG. 2 is a vertical center line section through a solvent filter according to the invention.

Referring first to FIG. 1, the machine comprises a cleaning drum 1 connected to a lint filter or prefilter 2 either directly through a conduit 3 or through a discharge valve 4. The prefilter 2 is connected through a conduit ice 5 to a tank 6 communicating through a conduit 7, a solvent pump 8 and a conduit 9 with a solvent filter 10. The latter is connected through a conduit 11 to a cleaning drum 1. The solvent filter 10 is connected at its bottom for the discharge to the distiller 12, which is connected through a still-condenser unit 13, a decanter 14 and a siphon 15 extending therefrom, to the tank 6.

In one practical embodiment of the invention the prefilter 2 and the pump 8 could be dipped into the tank 6 and in such a case the conduits 5 and 7 would be omitted.

All of the mentioned parts of the machine, with the exception of the solvent filter 10, can be of a conventional type and therefore they will not be described here in detai As shown in FIG. 2, the filter 10 comprises a cylindrical housing 16 supported by a funnel bottom 17 secured to the top of a distiller housing 18 perforated at 19 to allow communication between the filter and the distiller.

At the lower end of the funnel bottom 17 there is provided at 20 a seat for a conical valve 21 carried by a rod 22 disposed along the center line of the cylindrical housing 16 and extending from the top wall 23 of said housing through a hole 24 in a gland guide 25 seated in a corresponding hole in the wall 23. The rod 22 carries at its upper end a cross-bar 26- secured thereto by means of a nut 27 and a lock-nut 28 which are screwed on the threaded end of the rod 22, and carrying at each end of a block of magnetic material 29 and 30 respectively. Facing each block 29, 30 is an electromagnet 31 and 32 respectively, secured to a base 33- superimposed upon the top wall 23. A spring 34 interposed between the guide 25 and an abutment 36 resting against a nut 35 contacting a nut 27 urges steadily the rod 22 upwardly and therefore the blocks 29, 30 in a spaced position with respect to the electromagnets 31, 32.

Inside the housing 16 a filtering body 37 is secured to the rod 22 with the aid of a spring 38 interposed between the top wall 39 of the filtering body and an abutment 40 secured to the rod 22, as well as a second spring 41 interposed between an abutment 42 secured to the rod 22 and the same top wall 39 of the filtering body, but on the opposite side with respect to the spring 38. The filtering body 37, which can be of a conventional type terminates at the lower side in a flared collar 43 which is normally urged by the action of the spring 34 against a ring 44 projecting from the housing 16 and operating as an abutment for the filtering body 37.

The funnel bottom wall 17 is perforated to pass a solvent inlet conduit 45 terminating in a nozzle 46 disposed centrally, around the rod 22, with the toroidal outlet facing upwardly.

In the side wall of the housing 16 there is at the lower side a hole 47 leading to a siphon 48 provided with an outlet 49 for the filtered solvent.

At its upper side the housing 16 is provided with an air vent hole 50.

The operation of the described solvent filter is as follows:

Under normal operating conditions the spring 34 holds the filtering body 37 with its lower collar 43 pressed against the abutment ring 44 to provide a seal therebetween. The solvent to be filtered entering from the conduit 45 flows out from the nozzle 46 and flows upwardly and outwardly through the filtering wall of the filtering body 37. The filtered solvent flows out through the siphon 48 and the opening 49 only after the filter is full, whereas the air bubbles which might develop from the solvent flow out through the air vent 50.

At the end of the cleaning operation, at predetermined times which are determined by a program control of the machine, the electromagnets 31, 32 are energized and attract the magnetic blocks 29 and 30 lowering the cross- 3 bar 26 and thus also the rod 22. The downward movement of the rod 22 causes the lowering of the collar 43 with respect to the abutment ring 44 and the valve opening 21. Thus, the liquid in the filter discharges in the distiller lying below.

It should be noted that because of the abrupt attraction caused by the electromagnet the filtering body 37 receives a blow causing the filtering powders together with the impurities retained thereby to separate from the holes of the filtering body and to precipitate into the distiller.

The deposits which develop in the groove defined by the collar 43 and the abutment ring 44 are also precipitated by the blow given by the electromagnets.

When the electromagnets 31, 32 are deenergized the spring 34 returns the filtering body in the position with the collar 43 abutting the abutment ring 44 and closes the valve 21. The spring 38 serves to assure a safe closure of the valve 21 and "yet to assure simultaneously a safe contact between the collar 43 and the ring 44. The spring 41 serves to store energy at the time the electromagnets attract the armatures 2 930 and to transfer it abruptly to the filtering body 37 so as to enhance the bloW given to said body to separate the powders and the impurities.

From the foregoing it will be seen that the filter according to the invention is cleaned fully automatically without requiring the stopping of the machine. It is the program control that, after some cleaning time, stops the pump 8, opens the valve 4 for discharging the solvent from the machine housing and closes the electromagnet circuit.

Besides providing for the described cleaning operation of the filter, which occurs after predetermined cleaning times, the program control of the machine also separates the residual powder which might remain attached to the filtering body by means of subsequent small blows given by means-of the electromagnets at regular times.

Although but one embodiment of this invention has been described, it is obvious that many changes and modifications can be made Without departing from the scope of the invention.

I claim:

1. Asolvent filter for garment dry cleaning machines,

characterized in that it comprises a filter housing disposed above a distiller housing and communicating therewith through an opening in said distiller housing, a filter body disposed inside said filter housing, a rod carrying at its lower end a valve adapted to close the opening in said distiller housing and extending at its upper end through the top wall of said filter housing, said filtering body being connected to said rod by means of a spring interposed between the top wall of said filtering body and an abutment secured to said rod beneath said top wall of said filtering body, and means disposed adjacent the upper end of said rod adapted to impart intermittent blows to said rod.

2. A solvent filter as claimed in claim 1 wherein said last mentioned means includes at least one electromagnet having an armature connected with the rod and which comprises in addition, a spring interposed between the top wall of the filtering body and an abutment secured to said rod above said top wall.

3. A solvent filter as claimed in claim 1, characterized in that the filter housing is crossed at its lower side by a solvent inlet conduit terminating in a nozzle concentric to the body supporting rod and having its outlet facing upwardly beneath the bottom of the filtering body.

4. A solvent filter as claimed in claim 1, characterized in that the filter housing has a built-in siphon for the outflow of the solvent.

5. A solvent filter as claimed in claim 1, characterized in that the rod is connected to the filtering body through a spring interposed between an abutment secured to the rod and the top wall of the filtering body at the outer side of said wall.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,781,076 11/1930 Palmer 210388 X 2,081,009 5/1937 Kelley 210-332 X 2,087,775 7/1937 Matthews 210167 X 2,167,236 7/1939 Gieseler 210-388 X 2,836,045 5/1958 Smith 210-167 X 3,097,164 7/1963 Shields 2l0167 X REUBEN FRIEDMAN, Primary Examiner.

J. DE. CESARE, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1781076 *Apr 4, 1927Nov 11, 1930Nat Dehydrator CorpMethod and means of dehydrating oil
US2081009 *May 13, 1935May 18, 1937Kelley BlainePressure filter
US2087775 *May 23, 1935Jul 20, 1937American Laundry Mach CoFabric cleaning system
US2167236 *Jun 17, 1938Jul 25, 1939Dracco CorpFiltering apparatus
US2836045 *Jun 4, 1954May 27, 1958Detrex Chem IndDry cleaning apparatus
US3097164 *Jan 29, 1960Jul 9, 1963Noubar S AbdalianDry cleaning process
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3438497 *Jun 8, 1967Apr 15, 1969Gino MaestrelliMethod and apparatus for the automatic cleansing of the filter for a solvent,particularly in dry-cleaning plants
US3508660 *Mar 21, 1968Apr 28, 1970Rasa CorpSlag extracting apparatus
US3543483 *Jul 6, 1967Dec 1, 1970Buell Eng CoSeparator apparatus
US3545178 *Jul 6, 1967Dec 8, 1970Buell Eng CoBag type separator apparatus having cleaning means therefor
US3855131 *Jun 5, 1973Dec 17, 1974H ThumbergerGyratory filter
US3933648 *Oct 23, 1973Jan 20, 1976Kabushiki Kaisha Hosokawa Funtai Kogaku KenkyushoScreening apparatus
US4174198 *Sep 8, 1978Nov 13, 1979Nihon Repro Machine Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaForeign material removing device in synthetic resin reclaiming machine
US4245483 *May 14, 1979Jan 20, 1981Kabushiki Kaisha Toyo SeisakushoSystem for purifying contaminated refrigerant and reproducing the same for use with freezing liquid spray refrigerator
US4954222 *Nov 18, 1988Sep 4, 1990Durr Larry LDry cleaning solvent filtration and recovery system with filter rinsing apparatus
US4960044 *Nov 7, 1989Oct 2, 1990Stork Friesland B. V.Apparatus for preparing a curd mass
US5069755 *Apr 20, 1990Dec 3, 1991Durr Larry LDry cleaning solvent filtration and steam distillation recovery system
US5711775 *Apr 15, 1996Jan 27, 1998Tennant CompanySweeper with electromagnetic filter cleaning
US5829094 *Feb 19, 1997Nov 3, 1998Tennant CompanySweeper with electromagnetic filter cleaning
US8221618 *Aug 15, 2007Jul 17, 2012Monteco Ltd.Filter for removing sediment from water
US8287726Oct 27, 2011Oct 16, 2012Monteco LtdFilter for removing sediment from water
US20090045149 *Aug 15, 2007Feb 19, 2009Christopher Adam MurrayFilter For Removing Sediment From Water
EP0444141A1 *Nov 8, 1989Sep 4, 1991CLAY, Byron JanDry cleaning solvent filtration and recovery system
WO1990005571A1 *Nov 8, 1989May 31, 1990Larry L DurrDry cleaning solvent filtration and recovery system
Classifications
U.S. Classification210/407, 68/18.00F, 55/300, 210/429, 68/181.00R, 55/432, 210/167.31
International ClassificationD06F43/08, B01D36/00, B01D29/00
Cooperative ClassificationB01D29/0075, B01D29/0072, B01D29/0036, B01D29/72, B01D36/001, B01D29/009, D06F43/085
European ClassificationB01D29/72, B01D29/00A38, B01D29/00A42, D06F43/08B4, B01D29/00A10K14, B01D29/00A36, B01D36/00D