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Publication numberUS3327870 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 27, 1967
Filing dateAug 4, 1965
Priority dateAug 4, 1965
Publication numberUS 3327870 A, US 3327870A, US-A-3327870, US3327870 A, US3327870A
InventorsFairchild Jr Elmer E
Original AssigneeSprout Waldron & Co Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bolted bin construction
US 3327870 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 1967 E. E. FAIRCHILD, JR

BOLTED BIN CONSTRUCTION 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Aug. 4. 1965 INVENTOR. ELMER E. F'AIRCHILD, JR.

June 1967 E, E. FAIRCHILD, JR

BOLTED BIN CONSTRUCTION 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Aug. 4, 1965 INVENTORJ ELMER E. FAIRCHILD, JR.

ATTYVS,

United States Patent 3,327,870 BOLTED BIN CONSTRUCTION Elmer E. Fairchild, Jr., Muncy, Pa., assignor to Sprout, Waldron & Company, Inc., Muncy, Pa., a corporation of Pennsylvania Filed Aug. 4, 1965, Ser. No. 477,180 15 Claims. (Cl. 211183) The present invention relates generally to modular storage bins for dry materials and relates more particularly to a bolted panel type storage bin construction characterized by novel interchangeable panels which intercoact upon assembly to form tubular corner columns.

The invention is directed especially to storage bins for dry materials such as grain, flour and the like and which are commonly provided with hoppers for gravity discharge of the materials. One disadvantage of conventional constructions is the need for a variety of specially shaped and sized elements which must be assembled in the field, often at an inconvenient height. Labor costs and time required for assembly are also relatively high for this type of bin. A further disadvantage is the necessity with most common constructions of erecting bins of a fixed capacity, there being no easy provision for the addition or removal of bin units to suit changes in storage capacity requirements.

In view of the above disadvantages of conventional bin constructions, it is a first object of the present invention to provide a modular storage bin construction for dry materials which is assembled from novel prefabricated, interchangeable, self-supporting panels.

A further object is to provide a storage bin construction as described, the panels of which are secured solely -by bolts, thus eliminating field welding and permitting ready assembly or disassembly of the bin units.

An additional object of the invention is to provide a modular bin construction as described, the number of individual bin units of which may be easily increased or decreased to suit changes in the bin capacity requirements.

Still another object of the invention is to provide novel, interchangeable bin panels which intercoact upon assembly to form tubular corner columns.

Additional objects and advantages of the invention will be more readily apparent from the following detailed description of an embodiment thereof when taken together with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view showing a bin assembly constructed in accordance with the invention which is partly cut away to show construction details;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view showing the upper end of a typical interchangeable bin panel;

FIG. 3 is a plan view of the bin assembly shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged partial plan view showing the manner in which the tubular corner columns are formed by the intercoacting panels;

FIG. 5 is a greatly enlarged plan view taken along line 5-5 of FIG. 1 showing the details of a typical bin corner; and

FIG. 6 is a view partly in section taken along line 66 of FIG. 5 showing the details of the horizontal panel buckstays.

Referring to the drawings, FIG. 1 shows a bin construction generally designated 10 embodying the present invention and including a horizontal frame 12 of I-beams or other suitable structural elements for supporting the vertical bin walls 14 and the depending hoppers 16.

The bin walls comprise a plurality of novel interchangeable panels 18, each one of which as shown in FIG. 2 including a rectangular panel sheet of sheet 3,327,870 Patented June 27, 1967 metal or metal plate having angles 22 secured along the length of the parallel vertical sheet edges. In the illustrated embodiment, the angles 22 are standard structural steel angles of the unequal leg type, having a short leg 24 and a long leg 26. Although the equal leg type angles could also be used, the unequal leg angles are lighter and are particularly suited for the present bin corner construction as will be apparent from the following description of the bin assembly.

The panel sheet edges are secured such as by continuous Welding to the longitudinal center line of the outer faces 28 of the long angle legs 26, so that the short angle legs 24 are parallel to and extend away from the panel sheets 20. The angles of each panel are arranged in opposed relation with the outer faces 30 of the short legs 24 facing in opposite directions. The opposed relationship of the angles is necessary to permit the proper assembly of the panels, and the relationship must be the same for each panel. The panels being reversible, it can be understood that there is no inside, outside, front or back face of the panels, this feature being advantageous in permitting expansion of the bins without altering existing bin walls.

The short angle legs 24 are provided with a row of aligned spaced holes 32, and the outer end of the long angle legs 26 includes an aligned row of identically spaced, larger holes 34 to accommodate the connecting bolts as described below. As shown in FIG. 5, nuts 35 concentric with the holes 32 are welded to the inner faces of the short angle legs.

Horizontal buckstays 36 are secured in spaced relation to the panel sheets, extending across the full width thereof. The buckstays include, as shown most clearly in FIGS. 1 and 6, opposed hollow box-like structures on each face of the panel sheet, each such structure being formed of sheet metal or metal plate and including an inclined portion 38 extending downwardly from a welded joint 40 with the panel sheet, :a vertical portion 42, and a horizontal portion 44 which is secured to the panel sheet at the welded joint 46. The ends of the buckstays are preferably welded to the angles 22 such as shown at 48 in FIG. 5 to provide the maximum structural strength.

The assembly of the prefabricated panels constitutes simply the positioning of the panels 18 on the frame 12 to form modular bin units or compartments, the angles 22 of the panels intercoacting to form tubular columns 49 as shown most clearly in FIG. 5. Bolts 50 are inserted into the aligned holes 32 and 34 of the overlapping panel angles, and the bolts are threaded into the nuts 35. The resulting tubular column not only provides a simple, strong corner arrangement, but also provides a smooth interior bin corner, allowing dry materials to pass in an unimpeded manner along the bin walls. The inclined portions 38 of the buckstays similarly prevent the accumulation of material on the buckstays, and since the buckstays join with vertical faces of the corner angleo, there are no horizontal or nearly horizontal material-retaining shelves or pockets. The high strength of the tubular columns permits the supporting of heavy machinery and other superstructures on top of the bin assembly without additional supporting columns.

As shown particularly in FIGS. 1 and 3, bin corner columns other than theinterior corner columns 49 are formed by bolting filler angles 52 in place of the panel angles to complete the tubular columns. The side columns 54 and corner columns 56 are thus of the same rigid tubular construction as the interior columns 49. Since the filler angles 52 may be readily unbolted and removed, it is apparent that additional bin units may be added as desired. The interior and exterior of the bin panels being identical, alterations to the existing bin.

walls are unnecessary for the addition ofsuch further units.

The bolted corner construction similarly permits relatively simple removal of various bin units should the required capacity be reduced, and in fact the entire bin assembly may be disassembled and moved to a new location should circumstances so require. Changes in capacity or location of bin assemblies such as may be easily accomplished with the present construction are usually not feasible or convenient with conventional bin constructions.

The prefabricated panels due to the welded angles and b-uckstays are exceptionally rigid and it is anticipated that panel heights up to 40 feet may be feasible, with higher bin units being formed by the end-.to-end fieldwelding and bolting of suitably sized panels.

While the invention has been presented in the setting of a bin assembly, it can be understood that the structural corner arrangement described and claimed may suitably be employed for a variety of other uses including various types of building construction.

Manifestly, changes in details of construction can be effected by those skilled in the art Without departing from the spirit and the scope of the invention as defined in and limited solely by the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A bin assembly comprising a frame, and a plurality of modular bin units supported by said frame, the walls of said bin units comprising a plurality of interchangeable, bolted panels, each said panel comprising a rectangular panel sheet, an angle secured to each of a pair of opposed edges of said sheet and extending along the length of said edges, one leg of said angle being disposed normal to the said panel sheet and the other leg being disposed parallel to and extending away from said panel sheet, each said angle including spaced holes in each leg thereof to permit bolted connection of adjoining panels to form corner columns.

' 2. A bin assembly comprising a frame, and a plurality of modular bin units supported by said frame, the walls of said bin units comprising a plurality of interchangeable, bolted panels, each said panel comprising a rectangular panel sheet, an'angle secured to each of a pair of opposed edges of said sheet and extending along the length of said edges, one leg of said angle being disposed normal to the said panel sheet and the other leg being disposed parallel to and extending away from said panel sheet, said angles being in an opposed relationship with the correspond-ing faces of the extending legs facing in opposite directions, each said angle including spaced holes in each leg thereof to permit bolted connection of adjoining panels to form corner columns, and a plurality of spaced 'buckstays secured to said panel sheet extending between and substantially perpendicular to said 7 angles.

3. A storage bin assembly comprising a frame, and a plurality of modular bin units supported by said frame, the vertical walls of said bin units comprising a plurality of interchangeable, bolted panels, each said panel comprising a rectangular panel sheet, an angle secured to each of a pair of opposed edges of said sheet and extending along the length of said edges, one leg of said angle being disposed normal to the said panel sheet and the other leg being disposed parallel to and extending away from said panel sheet, said angles being in opposed relation with the corresponding faces of the extending legs facing in opposite directions, each angle being joined to a respective sheet edge along substantially the center line of the outer face of the normal leg thereof, a plurality of aligned, spaced holes in each leg of said angles adapted to permit the bolted attachment of adjacent panel angles, the connected angles of adjoining panels forming corner columns, and a plurality of spaced, horizontal buckstays secured to said panel sheet extending between and joined to said angles.

4. A storage bin assembly as claimed in claim 3 wherein said buckstays are secured to said panel sheet on both sides of said sheet in opposed relation and wherein said buckstays are characterized by an inclined upper portion which permits the free flow of .dry mate-rials along the bin walls.

5. A storage bin assembly as claimed in claim 4 wherein the ends of said inclined portions of said buckstays intersect with and are secured to the vertical faces of said angles.

6. A prefabricated panel comprising a rectangular panel sheet, an angle secured to each of a pair of opposed edges of said sheet and extending along the length of said edges, one leg of said angle being disposed normal to the said panel sheet and the other leg being disposed parallel to and extending away from said panel sheet, said angles including spaced holes along each leg thereof to permit bolted connection of a plurality of said panels to form a structural column.

7. A prefabricated panel comprising a rectangular panel sheet, an angle secured to each of a pair of opposed edges of said sheet and extending along the length of said edges, one leg of said angle being disposed normal to the said panel sheet and the other leg being disposed parallel to and extending away from said panel sheet, a plurality of spaced buckstays secured to said panel sheet extending between and substantially perpendicular to said angles, and a plurality of aligned, spaced holes in each leg of said angles adapted to permit the bolted attachment of adjacent panel angles to form corner columns.

8. A prefabricated panel comprising a rectangular panel sheet, an angle secured to each of a pair of opposed edges of said sheet and extending along the length of said edges, one leg of said angle being disposed normal to the said panel sheet and the other leg being disposed parallel to and extending away from said panel sheet, said angles being in an opposed relationship with the corresponding faces of the extending legs facing in opposite directions, said panel having spaced holes in each angle leg to permit bolted attachment of adjacent panel angles to form corner columns.

9. A prefabricated panel for a bin assembly comprising a rectangular panel sheet, angles secured to a pair of opposed edges of said sheet and extending along the length of said edges, a first leg of each of said angles extending away from and parallel to said panel sheet, each angle being joined to the respective sheet edge along the longitudinal center line of the outer face of a second leg thereof, said panel having spaced holes in each angle leg to permit bolted attachment of adjacent panel angles to form corner columns.

10. A prefabricated panel for a bolted bin assembly comprising a rectangular panel sheet, angles secured to a pair of opposed edges of said sheet and extending along the length of said edges, a first leg of each of said angles extending away from and parallel to said panel sheet, each angle being joined to the respective sheet edge along the longitudinal center line of the outer face of a second leg thereof, a plurality of spaced buckstays secured to said panel sheet extending between and substantially perpendicular to said angles, and a plurality of aligned, spaced holes in each leg of said angles adapted to permit the bolted attachment of adjacent panel angles to form corner columns.

11. A prefabricated panel for a bolted bin assembly comprising a rectangular panel sheet, angles secured to a pair of opposed edges of said sheet and extending along the length of said edges, a first leg of each of said angles extending away from and parallel to said panel sheet, each angle being joined to the respective sheet edge along the outer face of the second leg thereof, said angles being in an opposed relationship with the corresponding faces of the extending legs facing in opposite directions, a plurality of spaced buckstays secured to said panel sheet extending between and substantially perpendicular to said angles, said buckstays being mounted on both sides of said panel sheet in opposed relation with the ends thereof being secured to the outer face of the second legs of each of said angles, a plurality of aligned, spaced holes in each leg of said angles adapted to permit the bolted attachment of adjacent panel angles in a bin assembly to form corner columns.

12. A prefabricated panel as claimed in claim 11 including a plurality of nuts secured to the interior faces of said angles aligned with said spaced holes to facilitate the bolted assembly of said panel with similar panels.

13. A tubular quadrilateral column comprising four intercoacting angles, one leg of each angle defining a quadrilateral face of the column, the outer leg thereof inwardly overlapping the face-defining leg of an adjacent angle, and means for securing said overlapping legs.

14. A column as claimed in claim 13, wherein said means comprises spaced, aligned holes in said overlapping legs, nuts secured to the inner face of the inwardly overlapping legs aligned with the holes in said legs, and

bolts extending through said holes threadedly engaging said nuts.

15. A tubular quadrilateral bin corner column for joining a plurality of bin panel sheets comprising four intercoacting angles, a first leg of each angle defining a quadrilateral face of the column, the second leg thereof inwardly overlapping the face-defining leg of an adjacent angle, each said panel sheet being joined along an edge thereof to the first leg of one of said angles, and means for securing said overlapping legs.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 821,102 5/ 1906 Jeiferis 52-624 912,260 2/1909 Paulson 1'38-160 1,605,513 11/1926 Connery 5257 3 1,813,873 7/1931 Brogden 522()5 3,123,185 3/1964 Van Der Rijst 189-34 JOHN PETO, Primary Examiner. W. D. LOULAN, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
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US912260 *Feb 7, 1908Feb 9, 1909Charles E PaulsonNewel-post for stairs or other support.
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US1813873 *Dec 28, 1926Jul 7, 1931David Luptons Sons CoMetallic partitioning
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Referenced by
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US3521420 *Apr 1, 1969Jul 21, 1970Oliver Wayne HBin panel construction
US3822521 *Feb 7, 1973Jul 9, 1974Lucas RModular wall panel section and bolted wall construction
US3971180 *Oct 25, 1974Jul 27, 1976Frederick Charles VWall structure
US4008553 *Apr 19, 1976Feb 22, 1977Oliver Wayne HWall panel structure and connecting means therefor
US4112639 *Feb 18, 1977Sep 12, 1978Az0-Maschinenfabrik Adolf ZimmermannShell silo
US4136495 *Jul 22, 1976Jan 30, 1979Frederick Charles VWall panel
US4218859 *May 22, 1978Aug 26, 1980Sams Michael LWorking bin
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US4607754 *May 19, 1983Aug 26, 1986Wolf Morris AMerchandising display system and method
US4893445 *Apr 28, 1988Jan 16, 1990M.A.H. Construction & Engineering Ply-Ltd.Construction system
US5368174 *Jul 21, 1993Nov 29, 1994Unr Industries, Inc.Storage rack beam having surface enabling indicia at high or low elevation to be easily read
US5386917 *Apr 6, 1994Feb 7, 1995Unr Industries, Inc.Storage rack system with fire extinguishing device
US5492231 *Nov 18, 1994Feb 20, 1996Unarco Material Handling, Inc.Storage rack having support seam with outer, generally arcuate, indicia-receiving surface
US5526945 *Nov 18, 1994Jun 18, 1996Unarco Material Handling, Inc.Storage rack having support beam with channel profile and inclinded surface
US5655675 *Jan 25, 1996Aug 12, 1997Unarco Material Handling, Inc.Storage rack system with fire extinguishing device
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US6139241 *Sep 16, 1999Oct 31, 2000Jenike & Johanson, Inc.Multi-faceted modular silo for bulk solids
US7316333 *Nov 17, 2004Jan 8, 2008Mixer Systems, Inc.Modular volume storage bin
US7392624 *Jan 26, 2004Jul 1, 2008Dwight Eric KinzerModular load-bearing structural column
US7735293May 10, 2008Jun 15, 2010Dwight Eric KinzerMethod of constructing a modular load-bearing structural column
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US20050279901 *Jun 17, 2005Dec 22, 2005Mccoy Kevin LStud securing system
US20060102658 *Nov 17, 2004May 18, 2006Wegner Allen DModular volume storage bin
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Classifications
U.S. Classification211/183, 52/234, 52/801.11, 52/197
International ClassificationB65D88/32, B65D88/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65D88/32
European ClassificationB65D88/32