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Publication numberUS3327901 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 27, 1967
Filing dateDec 13, 1963
Priority dateDec 13, 1963
Publication numberUS 3327901 A, US 3327901A, US-A-3327901, US3327901 A, US3327901A
InventorsSimon Yerkovich
Original AssigneeJet Dispenser Corp, Myco Ind Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dispenser
US 3327901 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

27, 1967 s. YERKOVICH DISPENSER 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Dec. 13, 1963 INVENTOR. @MQY Xzezo wo/ 02 M June 27, 1967 s. YERKOVICH 3,327,901

DISPENSER Filed Dec. 13, 1965 4 heets-Sheet 2 4 (M WWW w T V 1 5 Tu W. 6 2 m M v hfi 7 -MM4 m AW 2 m June 1967 s. YERKOVICH 3, 0

DISPENSER Filed Dec. 15, 1963 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 SOLE/VOID INVENTOR.

June 27, 1967 s. YERKOVICH DISPENSER Filed Dec.

4 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTOR d'x/wo/v ysezawaq OW WM 47r0eA/Es 5 United States Patent 3,327,901 DISPENSER Simon Yerkovich, Culver City, Calif., assignor of onehalf to Jet Dispenser Corp, a corporation of California,

and one-half to Myco Industries, Inc., a corporation of Californa Filed Dec. 13, 1963, Ser. No. 330,341 12 Claims. (Cl. ZZZ-52) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A liquid dispensing apparatus for automatically dispensing small, predetermined quantities of a liquid material such as soap, when a receiving body, such as a hand, is placed in a position to receive such quantity of material. A reservoir is provided for containing the liquid material, a pump is positioned under the reservoir with its inlet communicating directly with the bottom of the reservoir with its discharge downwardly directed therebelow, and a photoelectric device positioned adjacent the discharge of the pump to actuate the pump to deliver such quantity of material when a body, such as a hand, is positioned adjacently below the pump discharge in a material receiving position.

This invention relates to dispensing devices and, more particuarly, to a device for automatically delivering small predetermined quantities of liquid soap or the like detergent materials onto the hands'of a user without requiring manual operation thereof or any physical contact therewith. 1

The apparatus of tihs invention is generally suited for use in washrooms or public buildings, restaurants, hospitals, and the like, but its primary purpose and most important function is as a surgeons antiseptic soap dispenser.

Heretofore, hand washing processes, particularly preparatory to performance of surgical operations, have required some kind of manual operation or handling of a soap con- 7 tainer or dispenser, either by the surgeon himself or by an assistant, and such conditions were undesirable, both from the standpoint of insuring sterile working conditions and requiring additional assisting personnel. Also by reason of the peculiar, viscous, thixotropic and semiplastic properties of the soap mixture usually employed,,the dispensing apparatus heretofore employed therefor has been erratic and unreliable in operation. 7

It is accordingly an object of this invention to furnish an improved automatic soap dispenser.

It is another object of this invention to furnish a soap dispenser which may be operated at will by the operator alone, without requiring any physical contact whatsoever wtih the apparatus.

It is still another object of this invention to furnish a soap dispenser device which is automatically actuated merely by placing the hands or other object to which the soap is to be applied in apredetermined soap-receiving position relative to the apparatus.

It is a further object of this invention to furnish an automatic dispenser which embodies improved mechanical and electrical features which render it more reliable and durable and more economical in operation than those herteofore available.

It is a still further object of this invention to furnish an automatic dispenser which embodies improved mechanical and electrical features which render it more reliable and durable and more economical in operation than those heretofore available.

ICC

It is a still further object of this invention to provide an improved automatic soap dispenser which can be more easily and effectively maintained in a clean and sanitary condition.

Important features of this invention by which the foregoing objects of this invention are attained and which particularly suit it to hand washing operations wherein conditions of maximum surgical sterility must be maintained, reside in its improved dispensing mechanism and its completely automatic operation, whereby upon each placing of ones hands in position to receive soap therefrom, a measured quantity thereof is automatically ejected upon the hands without requiring manual operation of or any physical contact whatsoever with the dispensing device.

These and other objects and advantages and features of novelty will be evident hereinafter.

In the drawings which illustrate a presently preferred embodiment of the invention and in which like references characters designate the same or similar parts throughout "the several views:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of the apparatus of the invention as it appears within its enclosing cabinet, and illustrating a wall-mounting arrangement thereof for convenient use over a typical wash basin.

FIGURE 2 is a plan sectional view of the assembly of the apparatus taken on a horizontal plane located approximately on line 2-2 of FIGURE 1.

FIGURE 3 is an enlarged frontal view of the general assembly of the apparatus, partly in elevation and partly in vertical section, and showing the initial position of the actuating mechanism prior to initiating a cycle of operation.

FIGURE 4 is an enlarged, fragmentary end elevational view of a portion of the apparatus as viewed from line 4-4 of FIGURE 3. l FIGURE 5 is a fragmentary, detailed elevational view of a portion of the actuating mechanism shown in FIG- URE 3, showing the position of the parts thereof at an intermediate stage in its first one-half cycle of operation.

FIGURE 6 is another fragmentary, detailed view of the same mechanism shown in FIGURE 5, showing the position of the parts thereof at the completion of its one-half cycle of operation.

FIGURE 7 is still another fragmentary, detailed view of the same mechanism'shown in FIGURES 5 and 6 showing the position of the parts thereof at an intermediate stage in the second one-half cycle of its operation.

FIGURE 8 is a partially exploded, detailed perspective view of the apparatus elements of the actuating mechanism shown in FIGURES 3, 5, 6 and 7.

FIGURE 9 is a detailed perspective view of one of the parts of the apparatus of FIGURE 8.

Y FIGURE 10 is a detailed perspective view of another part of the apparatus of FIGURE 8.

FIGURE 11 is a schematic wiring diagram of the electrical control circuit and electrical apparatus elements employed in the apparatus of the invention.

FIGURE 12 is a schematic wiring diagram of an alternative electrical control circuit which may be employed instead of that shown in FIGURE 9.

Referring to the drawing, and first primarily to FIG- URES 1, 2 and 3, the apparatus elements of the invention are housed in a cabinet, indicated generally at 10 which is adapted to be positioned upon a suitable supporting means, or preferably as illustrated in FIGURE 1, mounted on a wall in position for convenient use either adjacent to or over a wash basin 12.

The cabinet 10 includes as its principal components, a rectangular base plate 14, a pair of downwardly extending, hollow, box-shaped leg members 16 and 18 attached to the lower surface of the base plate 14 adjacent the opposite ends thereof, and a removable top cover 20 which normally rests upon the marginal portion of the base plate 14 and forms therewith an upper enclosure for portions of the apparatus to be hereinafter described.

The base plate 14 together with the leg members 16 and 18 and a back panel 22 which extends between the rearward surfaces thereof, forms an approximately rectangular recess into which ones hands may be extended for receiving soap from the outlet nozzle -2 of a soap dispensing pump 49 which projects downwardly into said recess through an intermediate portion of the base plate 14. The leg members 16 and 18 which may be made integral with the base plate or attached thereto by suitable means such as by welding are provided with removable end panels 24 and 26 for access to the interior thereof.

The top cover 20 is provided with means for locking it in closed position upon base plate 14, which includes at one end thereof a tongue member 28 fastened to the inner lower edge of the top cover in position to extend slidably under a clip 30 attached to an adjacent portion of the top surface of the base plate 14, and at the other end a locking attachment means which includes a conventional key operated cylindrical type lock mechanism fixed through the end wall of the top cover as shown at 32 and carrying at its innermost end a finger latch member 34 rotatable by a suitable key into and out of locking engagement with a slotted clip 36 fixed to the base plate 14. The left hand, forward corner of the top cover 20, as viewed in FIGURE 1, is provided with a hinged opening 38 through which convenient access may be had to an inlet opening 40 in the lid 42 of a soap reservoir 44.

The soap reservoir 44, which may be made of Monel metal, stainless steel, plastic or the like suitable noncorrosive material, is supported upon and attached to the upper surface of the base plate 14 by suitable means which includes a cross-wise extending bottom leg member 46 adjacent one end, and adjacent the other end by means of an integrally formed annular outlet nipple 47 which extends downwardly, from the lowest point in the bottom of the reservoir, through a correspondingly sized circular opening 48 in the base plate 14.

Connected to the lower end of the annular outlet nipple 47 of the reservoir 44 and extending downwardly therefrom below the base plate 14 is the beforementioned soap dispensing pump shown generally at 49. The dispensing pump 49 includes a pump cylinder 50, the upper end of which is attached to the bottom of the outlet nipple 47 and also clamped in retaining engagement with the surrounding marginal portion of the base plate opening 48. Also attached to the lower end of the cylinder 50 is the beforementioned discharge nozzle 52. The outlet nipple portion 47, pump cylinder 50 and dischage nozzle member 52 are bolted coaxially together, as before described, by means of a plurality of circumferentially spaced-apart, axially extending through-bolts as shown at 54, the upper ends of which are threaded into the lower end of the outlet nipple 47 as shown at 56. The outlet nipple 47, pump cylinder 50 and the discharge nozzle member 52 are formed with interconnecting, coaxial bores 58, 60 and 62 respectively of the same inside diameter, and which are in direct communication through the outlet nipple 47 with the lowermost interior portion of the bottom of the soap reservoir 44.

Clamped in a radially inwardly facing, annular groove 64 formed between the upper end of discharge nozzle for example, rubber, neeoprene plastic or the like resilient material, is formed at its apex with an upwardly extending button-like supporting attachment projection 70 which is detachably press-fitted into a central opening in the diaphram 66. The maximum diameter of the rim of the cup-shaped portion of the valve member 68 is normally slightly greater than the inside diameter of bore 62 of the discharge nozzle 52 whereby upon installation within the bore 62 as shown in FIGURE 3, its periphery makes suificiently firm sealing engagement with the surrounding wall of the bore normally to prevent escape of fluid, such as liquid soap, from the reservoir 44 through the pump, and out of the discharge nozzle, but to be automatically deflectable upon application of increased pressure in excess of a predetermined maximum value in the lower end of the bore of the cylinder caused by downward movement of the pump piston, to permit discharge of liquid soap from the discharge nozzle 52.

Vertically,, reciprocally supported within the beforementioned bores 58 and 60 is a loose-fitting piston 72. The outside diameter of piston 72 is less than the inside diameter of the bores 58 and 60 to provide an annular clearance space therebetween sufficient to prevent sealing engagement between the piston and core but small enough to permit generation of a substantial differential fluid pressure thereacross upon rapid axial movement of the piston 72 in the cylinder as will be further explained in connection with the operation of the apparatus. The piston 72 is vertically reciprocally supported within the beforementioned pump bores 58 and 60' by means of a verticalpiston rod 74, which extends through a slot 75 formed in the edge of cover 42, and which is in turn pivotally coupled at its upper end as shown at 76 to the outer end of a lever member 78, which is connected to and forms a part of a solenoid-operated dispenser pump-actuating mechanism shown generally at 80 in FIGURES 3, 5, 6, 7 and 8.

The lever member 78 is constructed of two interconnected parallel, arms 82 and 84 which are pivoted adjacent their mid-points on a common fixed bearing 86 which consists of a spacer bearing bushing 88 supported between a pair of vertical, spaced-apart, outer supporting plates 90 and 92 by means of a coaxial roll pin 94. The supporting plates 90 and 92 are both formed at their lower edges with horizontally extending angle legs as shown at 96, by means of which they are fixed to the upper surface of base plate 14.

The inner end of lever member 78 carries a cam follower roller which is retained between the inner end portions of the lever arms 82 and 84 by means of a roll pin 102. Positioned between the lever arms 82 and 84 and encompassing the cam follower roller 100 is an opencentered, cam head 104 which is constructed of two parallel, spaced-apart, interconnected cam members 106 and 108 having generally triangular cam openingstherethrough as shown at 110 and 112, and through which the beforementioned cam follower roller extends.

The cam members 106 and 108 are supported for limited rocking motion upon integrally formed, downwardly extending cam levers 114 and 116 whichare in turn pivotally supported adjacent their mid-sections upon a fixed pivot bearing 118 which is supported by means of a roll pin 120 extending between the 'beforementioned supporting plates 90 and 92. The lower ends of cam levers 114 and 116 are provided with longitudinally elongated holes 122 and 124 through which they are pivotally coupled as shown at 126 to the outer end of a solenoid armature 128 which extends from and is axially reciprocable relative to'a solenoid electromagnet field assembly shown generally at 130. The solenoid assembly 130 is fixedly supported by means of an angle clip, the horizontal leg 132 of which is fastened to the base plate 114 and the vertical leg 134 of which is bolted, as shown at 136 and 138, to a flanged member 140 attached to and forming a portion of th housmg of the solenoid electromagnet assembly 130.

The arm levers 114 and 116 and the cam members 106 and 108 carried thereby are constantly urged pivotally counterclockwise, toward the position thereof shown in FIGURES 3 and 8 by means of a helical spring 131, one end of which is attached to a pin 133 extending between the supporting plates 90 and 92 and the other end of which is connected through a pair of links 133 and 135 pivotally to the outer ends of a roll pin 142 which extends crosswise between the cam lever arms 114 and 116.

Referring again to the cam head 104, rotatably supported between the inner faces of the cam levers 114 and 11-6 upon the roll pin 142, is a star wheel 144 having four, equally circumferentially spaced-apart, approximately radially extending arms as shown at 146, 148, 150, and 152. The pivot of the star wheel 144 is so positioned on the cam levers 114 and 116 that by rotation of the star Wheel, the arms 146, 148, 150 and 152 thereof are rotationally movable in succession into positions in which they project into the opening in the cam head 104 as best shown in FIGURES 3, 5, 6 and 7.

Also fixedly positioned between the cam levers 114 and 116 by means of roll pins 120 and 142 is a ratchet pawl device shown generally at 154, and which consists of two spaced-apart hook-shaped, spring members 156 and 158, between which the star wheel is rotatably supported upon the beforementioned roll pin 142. The pawl spring members 156 and 158, as best shown in FIGURE 9, are formed with downwardly convergingly inclined tips as shown at 160 and 162 which are resiliently biased toward closed engagement with one another, are deflectable apart to permit passage of star wheel arms therebetween when the star wheel is rotated clockwise as viewed in the figures. However, counter-clockwise rotation of the star wheel is prevented by the pawl and normally stopped from such rotation at a position such as shown in FIGURES 3, 5 and 6 at which the closed ends 160 and 162 of the pawl members 156 and 158 engage a laterally extending edge surfaces of a star wheel arm.

The beforementioned generally triangular opnings 110 and 112 formed through the two cam head member 106 and 108 are shaped such as to provide a pair of identically shaped, side-by-side continuous cam surfaces, such surface each havingan arcuate section as indicated at 166 concentric with the cam head pivot 120, and two radially opposite angularly disposed, substantially straight sections as indicated at 168 and 170. Such cam surface sections are interconnected by circular sections each of which has a radius substantially equal to the radius of the cam follower roller 100. In operation, upon imparting pivotal rocking motion to the cam head 104 about its pivot center 120, the cam follower 100 is caused to move in accordance with the contour of the continuous cam'surface, in a generally counter-clockwise direction relative thereto, as will be further explained hereinafter in connection with the operation of the apparatus.

Referring again primarily to FIGURE 3, contained Within the box-shaped leg member 16 adjacent the lower end thereof and directly behind a circular aperture 172 formed through the inwardly facing wall thereof, is a light source 173 comprising preferably an incandescent electric lamp 174. A suitable reflector 176 is positioned back of the lamp 174 and a collimating lens 178 is positioned in the aperture 172 in front of the lamp and retained there by means of a retainer ring 80. The reflector 176 and lens 178 are designed, as is well'known in the art, to direct a relatively narrow light beam across the space separating the leg members 16 and 18, as indicated by the broken lines 182. Located within the box-shaped leg member 18 adjacent the lower end thereof, and directly behind a circular aperture 192 formed through the inwardly facing wall thereof, directly opposite the beforementioned light source 173, is a light sensitive cell 184. The cell 184 may be any one of a number of suitable light sensitive devices, used in conjunction with suitable electrical circuits, such as, for example, a cadmium sulfide photoconductive cell manufactured by the International Rectifier Corporation. This cell is usually provided with a forward, multi-lenticular-shaped transparent covering as shown at 186, and in the present arrangement a relatively long light entrance tube 188 is additionally provided between the front surface of the covering 186 and the aperture 192, having a plurality of longitudinally extending, cross-wise baffies for the purposes of'excluding extraneous ambient-light from the cell 184. The circular aperture 192 is preferably closed by a protective, transparent disk 194.

Referring next primarily to FIGURE 2, the electrical components of the apparatus are suitably supported, as shown, on the upper surface of the base plate 14 and are enclosed under a box-shaped cover 196 which is secured by a plurality of machine screws as shown at 198, in gastight sealing engagement with the upper surface of the base plate 14. The electrical components comprise a solenoid control relay 200, a rectifier 220, a relay-contact arc suppressor network 204, and a smoothing capacitor 210.

Referring now principally to the circuit diagram shown in FIGURE 11, the electrical elements and circuits for the apparatus, generally described in connection with FIGURE 2, are as follows: A plug 212 is provided for making electrical connection to a conventional volt A-C electric power source outlet. From the connectorplug 212 electrical connection is made through conductor 214, rectifier 202, conductor 216, photoconductive cell 184, conductor 218 and through the windings of the electromagnet of the control relay 200 and return through conductor 220 to the plug 212. The capacitor 210 is connected between the conductors 216 and 220- on the output side of the rectifier 202 and serves to smooth the rectified, pulsating direct current which, in operation, is applied by the rectifier 202 across the photoconductor cell 184 and windings of the relay 200. The effect of the capacitor 210 is thus to smooth the action of the relay 200 when actu: ated. The field windings of the electromagnet of the solenoid are connected across the conductor 214 and 220 by way of conductor 222, thermostat circuit breaker 224, conductor 226, relay contacts 228 and 230, which are normally open, and return through conductor 232. The series connected resistor 208 and capacitor 206 of the beforementioned arc suppressor network 204 are connected across the relay contact points 228 and 230, and serve to suppress arcing which tends to occur between the contact points when they open. The light source for the photoconductive cell 184 which, as hereinbefore men'- tioned, preferably consist of an incandescent electric lamp 174, is connected through conductors 234 and 236, directly across conductors 214 and 220 leading from the connector plug 212.

The electrical apparatus elements which have been found satisfactory for the before described circuitry of FIGURE 11 are as follows: Solenoid 130 may be a No. AC-102 alternating current solenoid, manufactured by West Coast Electric Manufacturing Company. The thermostat circuit breaker 224 may be a hermetically sealed Klixon protector Mod. 7895, manufactured by Texas Instruments Incorporated, and designed to open at a temperature in excess of 170 F. and to close at about F. This thermostat is fastened in close thermal proximity to the windings of the solenoid 130 whereby in event the temperature of the windings exceed the predetermined value of approximately F., the solenoid 'elecertcial circuit will open and remain open until the solenoid cools to a temperature of approximately 140 F.

The rectifier 202 may be a conventional silicon power rectifier, rated at 750 peak inverse volts and capable of passing up to 50 ma. D-C. The cell 184 as beforementioned may be a cadmium sulfide photoconductive cell, such as an I.R.C. No. CS 120M6, manufactured by International Rectifier Corporation. This cell has a resistance of approximately 1600 ohms under an illumination intensity of 100 foot-candles. The relay 200 may be a Guardian No. 111625-10 manufactured by Guardian Electric Manufacturing Company of California, Incorporated, and which has a windings resistance of approximately 10,000 ohms. The resistor 208 has a resistance of 150 ohms and is rated at one-half watt, and the capa citor 206 has a capacity of 0.1 mfd. with a maximum rating of 600 volts. The light source 174 is preferably 110 volt 10 watt incandescent electric lamp.

Reference is next directed to FIGURE 12 in which an alternative, so-called solid state version of the electrical components of the circuits of the apparatus are shown and in which the control relay 200 and its associated contacts 228 and 230 have been eliminated, thereby minimizing certain hazards which might otherwise exist by reason of arcing at the relay contact points, such as for example, the danger of explosions occurring in an atmosphere containing combustible anesthetics. The power economy and reliability of operation of the apparatus as a whole is also improved.

In the electrical circuits of FIGURE 12, electrical connection is made from the connector plug 212, through conductor 238, a semiconductor controlled rectifier 240, and conductor 242 to the electromagnet windings of the solenoid 130 and return through conductor 244 to the connector plug 212. Connected between the conductor 238 and the control or .gate terminal 246 of the controlled rectifier 240, is a series electrical circuit consisting of rectifier 248, resistor 250, conductor 252, resistor 254, and a Zener voltage regulator diode 247. Connected between conductor 1252 and conductor 244 is the photoconductive cell 284. Also, connected in shunt to the electromagnet windings of the solenoid 130 is a rectifier 255, with its polarity reversed relative to that of rectifier 240, and which serves in effect as a capacitance which smooths the pulsating direct current from the controlled rectifier 240 and acts as a conductive shunt to absorb inductive counter potential surges from the solenoid coil which occurs upon deenergization thereof. Thus, in operation, the rectifier 255 serves to smooth out the action of the solenoid and protect the other elements of the circuit. The thermostat 224 shown in this circuit serves the same purpose as that hereinbefore described in connection with the circuit of FIGURE 11.

The electrical apparatus elements which have been found satisfactory for the before described circuitry of FIGURE 12 are as follows: the solenoid 130 may be the same as or similar to that hereinbefore described in connection with FIGURE 11. The controlled rectifier 240 may be a silicon controlled rectifier No. 3RC25 manufactured by the International Rectifier Corporation. The rectifiers 2'48 and 255 may each be a No. 10D3 silicon rectifier rate at 300 peak inverse volts, 210 r.m.s. voltage input and 1000 ma. D-C output. The resistor 250 may be variable from to 50,000 ohms with a 1 watt rating, and resistor 254 may have a value of 10,000 ohms with a rating of 2 watts. The diode 247 may be a Zener I.R.C. No. IZ6.8T20, manufactured by the International Rectifier Corporation. The photoconductive cell 184 and the light source 174 may be the same as those hereinbefore described in connection with FIGURE 11.

The operation of the apparatus as controlled by the electrical apparatus hereinbefore described in connection with FIGURE 11 is as follows:

Upon energization of the electrical circuit, of FIG- URE 11, and so long as the light beam 182 between the light source 174 and the photoconductive cell 184 remains uninterrupted, the conductivity of the photoconductive cell 184 will be sufiicient to permit rectified alternating current to flow from the rectifier 202 through the windings of the control relay'200, thereby energizing the control relay 200 sufficiently to maintain open the normally closed relay contacts 228 and 230, under which conditions the solenoid 130 remains unenergized. Upon interruption of the light beam 182 by any means, such as by positioning ones hands, in the path of the beam below the soap dispensing nozzle 52, illumination of the photoconductive cell 184 is cut off causing its resistance immediately to rise sufficiently to cut off substantially all flow of current from the rectifier 202 through the control relay 200. The control relay 200 being thus deenergized, the normally closed relay contacts 228 and 230 close, thereby completing the electrical circuit from the power source through the solenoid 130 by way of conductors 222, 226 and 232. Upon thus energizing the solenoid 130, the solenoid armature 128 is pulled into the solenoid core, thereby pivoting the cam levers 114 and 116 and the cam head i104 carried thereby in a clockwise direction about the cam lever pivot bearing 118, from the initial position shown in FIGURES 3 and 8 to that shown in FIGURE 6. Such movement of the cam head 104 relative to the cam follower roller results in movement of the cam follower roller along the slot formed between the cam section 170 and the adjacent parallel upper edge of arms 148 of the star wheel 144, until the cam follower reaches a point adjacent the outer end of such arm as shown in FIGURE 5. During this time the star wheel is locked in the position shown by the pawl device 154. Following this the cam follower roller continues to move relative to the cam head 104 along the cam section 168 to a position at the juncture of the cam sections 168 and .166 shown in FIGURE 6. Such motion of the cam follower roller 100 relative to the cam surfaces 170 and 168 within the cam head 104 results in first rocking the lever member 78 in a clock-wise direction as shown by arrow 79 from its position shown in FIGURES 3 and 8, to the position shown in FIGURE 5, followed immediately by rocking the lever member 78 in the reverse direction indicated by arrow 81 to the position shown in FIGURE 6, which is the same position the lever member initially occupied as shown in FIGURES 3 and 8. This results in a complete reciprocatory cycle of operation of the piston rod 74 and of the piston 72 within the bores 58 and 60 of the pump cylinder 50, from the uppermost position thereof shown in FIGURE 3 to the lowermost position as shown in FIGURE 5 and returned to the uppermost position as shown in FIGURE 6. The piston 172 is thus positively actuated throughout both its downward and upward motions for each single energization of the solenoid 130.

Upon removal of the obstruction from the light beam 182, the photoconductive cell 184 is again fully illuminated whereupon its resistance drops sufficiently to permit sufiicient flow of rectified direct current through the windings of the control relay 200 to open its contact points 228 and 230 thereby interrupting the flow of current through the solenoid and thereby deenergizing the solenoid 130. Upon such deenergizing of the solenoid 130, the solenoid armature I128 moves outwardly from the solenoid 130 under the force of spring 131 acting on the cam levers 114 and 116, through the linkages 133, thereby pivoting the cam head 104 in a counterclockwise direction, thereby returning it to its initial position shown in FIGURE 3. Upon such return counterclockwise movement of the cam head 104, the cam follower 100 moves along the arcuate cam section 166 until it engages the inwardly projecting end of the arm 148 of the star wheel 144 causing the star wheel to rotate in a clock-wise direction as indicated by the arrow 145 shown in FIGURE 7, thereby permitting the cam follower roller 100 to continue to move along the arcuate section 166 until it comes to rest in the position it initially occupied relative to the cam head 104, shown in FIGURE 3. Inasmuch as the cam section 166 is concentric with the pivot point 188 of the cam head 104, no rocking motion is imported to the lever member 78 during this return motion.

Upon each cycle of actuation of the soap dispenser pump, as before described, the piston 72 is moved downwardly within the cylinder 50 with suflicient velocity to discharge a quantity of liquid soap past the valve member 68 despite the relatively large clearance between the piston and cylinder bore. Upon the upward return stroke of the piston 72, the cup-shaped valve member 68 assumes its normally closed position thereby causing a reduction in pressure in the cylinder bore 60 below the piston 72 sufficient to draw liquid soap from the reservoir 44 through the clearance space between. the piston 72 and the bore 70, thereby refilling the cylinder bore below the piston 72 in readiness for another cycle of operation.

Important advantages reside in constructing the soap dispensing pump, as hereinbefore described, with the inlet end of the pump bore 60 in direct communication with the bottom of the reservoir 44, with the piston 72 in direct agitating contact with the contents thereof and with a relatively large clearance provided between the piston 72 and the inside of the cylinder bore 60. Among these advantages are the resultant constantly self-priming and selfcleaning action of the pump and the elimination of all interconnecting tubing and all pump intake valve mechanisms which would otherwise be necessary. Difliculties heretofore encountered in connection with such dispensing mechanisms, particularly when employed in connection with a material such as a so-called liquid soap, which often exhibits some of the properties of a semi-plastic material and which also has a tendency to build-up solidified deposits when in use and to settle out and solidify upon remaining quiescent for a length of time, has thereby been minimized. Furthermore, the employment of the kind of discharge valve 68 herein disclose-d has also minimized many difficulties. hereinbefore encountered, such as clogging of the valve and adjacent discharge opening of the dispensing mechanism by reason of progressive accumulation of solidiled soap within and adjacent the discharge valve and within the discharge nozzle. Dripping of soap from the nozzle following each use is also minimized.

The operation of the apparatus when employing the alternative electrical elements and circuits shown in FIG- URE 12 is similar to that heretofore described and is as follows: While the light beam extending from the light source 174 to the photoconductive cell 184 remains uninterrupted, the resistance of the photoconductive cell 184 remains sufiiciently low to permit sufiicient rectified direct current to flow from conductor 238 through rectifier 248,

resistor 250, through the photoconductive cell 184 and return to the conductor 244 to lower the DC potential of the circuit consisting of conductor 252, resistor 254, Zener diode 247, and gate terminal 246 of the silicon controlled rectifier 240, sufficient to prevent initiation of conductivity thereof. Thus, while the light beam remains uninterrupted, the solenoid 130 remains unenergized. Upon interruption of the light beam 182, the resistance of the photoconductive cell 184 rises sutficiently to substantially cut off flow of current through the rectifier 248 and resistor 250 thereby permitting the potential of the circuit consisting of conductor 252 and resistor 254 to reach the conductive potential of the Zener diode 247, whereupon the potential of the gate terminal 246 suddenly rises sufiiciently to initiate conductivity of the silicon con trolled rectifier 240, thus permitting rectified direct current to flow from conductor 238 through rectifier 240 and conductor 242 through the solenoid 130 and return through conductor 244, thereby energizing the solenoid electromagnet 130 which in turn results in actuation of the dispenser pump actuating mechanism through the first half of its operating cycle, as hereinbefore described in connection with the circuit of FIGURE 11. Upon removing the obstruction to the light beam 182, permitting it to again illuminate the photoconductive cell 184, the resistance thereof lowers sufliciently again to lower the potential across the Zener diode 247 to a value at which it is nonconductive and thereby in turn lowering the potential of the gate terminal 246 of the silicon controller rectifier 240 whereupon the silicon controlled rectifier 240, by reason of the reversing nature of the alternating current 10 applied thereto, returns to its non-conductive condition, thereby cutting off the flow of current through the solenoi-d and permitting the dispenser pump actuating mechanism to complete the second half of its cycle of operation, under the force of spring 131, as hereinbe-fore described in connection with the circuit of FIGURE 11.

It is to be understood that the foregoing is illustrative only and that the invention is not limited thereby but may include various modifications and changes made by those skilled in the art Without distinguishing from the scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

What is claimed is: I

1. In a fluid dispensing device having a pump cylinder, and a piston axially reciprocably contained in said cylinder, apparatus for imparting a positive reciprocation cycle to said piston relative to said cylinder in response to a single power impulse applied thereto, comprising:

a lever rockably supported at a point intermediate its opposite ends, said lever being coupled adjacent one end to said piston and carrying adjacent the other end a cam follower;

a cam head pivotally supported on a cam pivot for pivotal movement through a predetermined limited angle, said cam head having a continuous cam surface having inner and outer radially oppositely positioned sections, a first of such sections having a circular curvature substantially concentric with said cam pivot, and the second of such sections having a curvature, at least a portion of which has a radius substantially less than, and eccentric to that of said first of such sections;

means carried by said cam head for restraining said cam follower substantially to continuous following travel in one direction around said continuous cam surface from and return to a given point thereon, said travel being first along said second one of said sections as said cam head is pivoted from an initial position forward through said predetermined angle and second along said first one of said sections back to said given point thereon as said cam head is pivoted back through said predetermined angle to said initial position, thereby imparting one completerocking movement cycle to said lever in response to said forward pivotal movement of said head from said initial position through said predetermined angle, and imparting no rocking movement to said lever in response to pivotal movement of said head back through said predetermined angle to said initial position;

power means coupled to said cam head and energizable for positively imparting pivotal movement of said cam head forward and back through said predetermined angle;

and control means actuatable for intermittently energizing said power means.

2. Apparatus according to claim 1 in which said power means comprises an electromagnet having an armature means movable in response to energization' of said elec tromagnet;

and lever means coupling said armature means to said cam head.

3. In a fluid dispensing device having a pump cylinder,

and a piston axially reciprocably contained in said cylinder, apparatus for imparting a positive reciprocation cycle to said piston relative to said cylinder in response to a single power impulse applied thereto, comprising:

a lever rockably supported at a point intermediate the opposite ends thereof, said lever being coupled adjacent one end to said piston and carrying adjacent the other end a cam follower;

. a cam head pivotally supported on a cam pivot for pivotal movement through a predetermined limited angle, said cam head having a continuous cam surface encircling said cam follower and having radially inner and outer oppositely confronting sections, a

first of such sections having a circular curvature substantially concentric with said cam pivot, and the second of such sections having a curvature, at least a portion of which has a radius substantially less than and eccentric to that of said first of such sections;

means carried by said cam head for restraining said cam follower substantially to continuous following contact in one direction around said continuous cam surface from and return to a given point thereon, first along said second one of said sections as said cam head is pivoted from an initial angular position through said predetermined angle in a first direction, and second along said first one of said sections in return to said given point thereon as said cam head is pivoted back through said predetermined angle in a direction opposite said first direction, to said initial position, thereby completing one circuit of said cam follower around said continuous cam surface and imparting one complete rocking movement cycle to said lever in response to pivotal movement of said head through said predetermined angle in said first direction, and imparting no rocking movement to said lever in response to pivotal movement of said head through said predetermined angle in said direction opposite said first direction;

and power impulse producing means coupled to said cam head for positively imparting pivotal movement of said cam head through said first predetermined angle in said first direction each time a power impulse is produced thereby;

and resilient means for imparting return pivotal movement of said head through said predetermined angle in said direction opposite said first direction.

4. Apparatus according to claim 3 in which said power impulse producing means comprises an electromagnet having an armature means movable in response to energization of said electromagnet;

and lever means coupling said armature means to said cam head, whereby energization of said electromagnet means imparts said pivotal movement of said cam head through said first predetermined angle in said first direction.

5. Apparatus according to claim 3, and control means actuatable to cause such power impulse to be produced once each time said control means is actuated.

6. In a fluid dispensing device, apparatus comprising:

a reservoir for containing a quantity of fluid to be dispensed;

a pump cylinder extending from the bottom of said reservoir and having a pump bore therethrough in direct communication with the interior of said eservoir;

a piston reciprocably contained in said pump bore;

a discharge opening from the lower end of said pump bore below said piston;

a one-way outlet valve in said discharge opening, openable in response to pressures in excess of a predetermined fluid pressure in said lower end of said pump bore to permit discharge of fluid therefrom through said discharge opening;

a lever rockably supported at a point intermediate its opposite ends, said lever being coupled adjacent one end to said piston and carrying adjacent the other end a cam follower;

a cam head pivotally supported on a cam pivot for pivotal movement through a predetermined limite'd angle, said cam head having a continuous cam surface having inner and outer radially oppositely positioned sections, a first of such sections having a circular curvature substantially concentric with said cam pivot, and the second of such sections having a curvature, at least a portion of which has a radius substantially less than, and eccentric to that of said first of such sections;

means carried by said cam head for restraining said cam follower substantially to continuous following travel in one direction around said continuous cam surface from and return to a given point thereon, said travel being first along said second one of said sections as said cam head is pivoted from an initial position forward through said predetermined angle, and second along said first one of said sections back to said given point thereon as said cam head is pivoted back through said predetermined angle to said initial position, thereby imparting one complete rocking movement cycle to said lever in response to said forward pivotal movement of said head from said initial position through said predetermined angle, and imparting no rocking movement to said lever in response to pivotal movement of said head back through said predetermined angle to said initial position;

power means coupled to said cam head and energizable for positively imparting pivotal movement of said cam head forward and back through said predetermined angle;

and control means act-uatable for intermitently energizing said power means.

7. Apparatus according to claim 6 in which said power means comprises an electromagnet having an armature means movable in response to energization of said electromagnet;

and lever means coupling said armature means to said cam head.

8. In a dispensing device, apparatus comprising:

a reservoir for containing a quantity of fluid to be dispense-d;

a pump cylinder in communication with said reservoir and having its upper end in substantially direct communication with the interior thereof;

a piston axially reciprocably contained in said cylinder;

electric power means actuatable to impart reciprocation to said piston relative to said cylinder;

and control means for actuating said power means,

said control means including:

a semiconductor controlled rectifier having an input terminal, an output terminal and a control gate terminal;

a series circuit including conductor means connecting said rectifier through said input and output terminals in series with said power means;

conductor means for connecting said series circuit across an A-C power source, whereby said power means may be energized with rectified D-C through said rectifier when said rectifier is conductive;

means including light sensitive means for applying a potential difference between said input and control gate terminals of said rectifier such as to initiate con ductivity of said rectifier when said light sensitive means is subjected to one illumination intensity and insufficient to initiate conductivity of said rectifier when said light sensitive device is subjected to another illumination intensity.

9. In a fluid dispensing system having a reservoir for material to be dispensed, a pump cylinder in communication with said reservoir, a piston reciprocable in said cylinder, and power means actuatable to impart reciprocation to said piston relative to said cylinder, control means for actuating said power means comprising:

a first supply conductor means for connection to one side of an AC power source;

a second supply conductor means for connection to the other side of an A-C power source;

a semiconductor controlled rectifier having an input terminal, an output terminal, and a control gate terminal, said input terminal being connected to said first supply conductor;

conductor means connecting said output terminal,

through said power means to said second supply con- 3,327,901 13 14 ductor means, whereby said power means may be connected to said control gate terminal of said controlled energized with unidirectional current through said rectifier.

controlled rectifier when said controlled rectifier is 11. Apparatus according to claim 10 and aresistor conconductive; nected between said second end of said resistor and said a second rectifier having its input terminal connected input terminal of said Zener diode.

to said first supply conductor on the input side of 12. Apparatus according to claim 11 and an electric said controller rectifier; light source connected across said first and second supply a photoconductive device; conductors, and positioned normally to illuminate said a resistor having a first end thereof connected to the p c nductive d vice.

output of said second rectifier and the second end thereof connected through said photoconductive de- References Cited vice to said second supply conductor, whereby uni- UNITED ATES PATENTS directional current flows through said resistor and said photoconductive device when said photoconducfi i *[iVG device iS COHdHCt Ve; 2,609,966 9 1 952 g 222 f33'3 X a control conductor means interconnecting said second 2702655 2/1955 L 222 333 X end of said resistor to said control gate terminal of 2912999 11/1959 a ersh 137-525 X said controlled rectifier, whereby when said photo- 3 001 557 9/1961 K k 222 76 X conductive device is conductive or noncond-uctive the 3019764 2/1962 S 15 222 64 X potential of said control gate terminal is such as to 3O97763 7/1963 i g ig X render said controlled rectifier respectively conduc- 1/1964 Mitt 61 "f"; '1' 222 tive and noncondu-ctive when energized by said A-C 3130876 4/1964 Baker e ger e a X power source, thereby respectively energizing and 3206079 9/1965 Mancus'i 222 494 X deenergizing said power means. 10. Apparatus according to claim 9 wherein said con- ROBERT B REEVES, Primal), Emmi-"en trol conductor means includes a Zener -d1ode in series therein with its efi'ective input terminal connected to said LANE, Assistant Examinerseoond end of said resistor and its eifective output end

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Classifications
U.S. Classification222/52, 222/333, 222/639
International ClassificationG01F11/02, A47K5/12, A47K5/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47K5/1217, G01F11/021
European ClassificationG01F11/02B, A47K5/12E