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Publication numberUS3329109 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 4, 1967
Filing dateOct 5, 1964
Priority dateOct 5, 1964
Publication numberUS 3329109 A, US 3329109A, US-A-3329109, US3329109 A, US3329109A
InventorsBenjamin Bloom, Hibbs James E, Portnoff Lawrence A
Original AssigneeRes & Dev Co Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automatic program-controlled sewing machines
US 3329109 A
Abstract  available in
Images(16)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 4, 1967 A. PORTNOFF ETAL 3,

AUTOMATIC PROGRAM-CONTROLLED SEWING MACHINES Filed Oct. 1964 16 Sheets-Sheet 1 8 I co 9 L N IO ATTORNEY July 4, 1967 L. A. PORTNOFF ETAL 3,329,109

AUTOMATIC PROGRAM-CONTRQLLED SEWING MACHINES Filed Oct. 1964 16 Sheets-Sheet 2 FIG. 2

INVENTORS. LAWRENCE A.PORTNOFF BENJAMIN BLOOM BYJAMES E.HIBBS TORNEY J ly 4, 1967 1.. A. PORTNOFF ETAL 3,329,109

AUTOMATIC PROGRAM-CONTROLLED SEWING MACHINES Filed Oct 5, 1964 16 Sheets-Sheet 5 IO 66 llO INVENTORS. LAWRENCE A.VPORTNOF F BENJAMIN BLOOM Y JAMES E. HIBBS TTORNEY July 4, 7 L. A. PORTNOFF ETAL I 3,329,109

AUTOMATIC PROGRAM-CONTROLLED SEWING MACHINES Filed Oct. 5, 1964 16 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTORS. v LAWRENCE A.PORTNOFF I BLOOM BENJAMIN BYJAMES. E. HIBBS ZATTQRNEY. z-

3,329,109 AUTOMATIC PROGRAM-CONTROLLED SEWING MACHINES 1964 July 4, 1967 A. PORTNOFF ETAL 16 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Oct. 5,

FIG.?

FIG-8.

INVENTORS- 1 July 4, 1967 A. PORTNOFF ETAL 3,

AUTOMATIC PROGRAM-CONTROLLED SEWING MACHINES Filed Oct. 1964 16 Sheets-Sheet 6 INVENTORS. LAWRENCE A.PORTNOFF BENJAMIN BLOOM JAMES E. HIBBS ATTORNEY July 4, 1967 L. A. PORTNOFF ETAL 3,329,109

AUTOMATIC PROGRAM-CONTROLLED SEWING MACHINES Filed Oct. 5. 1964 16 Sheets-Sheet 7 INVENTORS. LAWRENCE A. PORTNOFF BENJAMIN BLOOM YJAMES E. HIBBS ATTORN E Y y 4, 1967 L. A. PORTNOFF ETAL 3,329,109

AUTOMATIC PROGRAM-CONTROLLED SEWING MACHINES Filed Oct. 1964 16 Sheets-Sheet 8 76 I III F IG- I2 I92 I I4 h 7 L I 1 L o o o 0} I 7 f I s I83 |84 .l9l gg |l=l 4 lg] \\|87 I5 I89 I5 J I o o o 0 j W INVENTORS. FIG. l3 LAWRENCE A. PORTNOFF I BENJAMIN BLOgM JAMES E. HIBB BY ATTORNEY y 4, 1967 L. A. PORTNOFF ETAL 3,329,109

AUTOMATIC PROGRAM-CONTROLLED SEWING MACHINES Filed Oct. 5, 1964 16 Sheets-Sheet 9 II I I I ,4, 771 I FIG. l4

INVENTORS.

LAWRENCE A. BENJAMIN BLO B LQ JAMES E- HIBBS ATTORNEY y 4, 1967- I A. PORTNOFF ETAL 3,329,109

AUTOMATIC PROGRAM-CONTROLLED SEWING MACHINES Filed OCt. S, 1964 16 SheetsSheet 1O LAWRENCEUXVE'IBTOIBNSOFF' BENJ AMIN BLoo JAME E. HIBBS ATTORNEY July 4, 1967 L. A. PORTNOFF ETAL 3,

AUTOMATIC PROGRAM-CONTROLLED SEWING MACHINES 16 Sheets-Sheet 11 Filed Oct. 5, 1964 ONdE I l I I I I l l I I 1 LAWRENCE A. PORTNOFF BENJAMIN BLOOM IAMES E. HIBBS July 4, 19 7 L. A. PORTNOFF ETAL 3,329,109

AUTOMATIC PROGRAM-CONTROLLED SEWING MACHINES Filed ct. 5. 1964 16 Sheets-Sheet 12 I N VILNTOR S:

LAWRENCE A. PORTNOFF BENJAMIN BLOOM IAMES E. HIBBS BYWW- July 4, 1967 L. A. PORTNOFF ETAL 3,329,109

AUTOMATIC PROGRAM-CONTROLLED SEWING MACHINES Filed Oct. 5, 1964 16 Sheets-Sheet 13 INVENTORS:

LAWRENCE A. PORTNOFF BEN AMIN BLOOM JAMES E. HIBBS AUTOMATIC PROGRAM-CONTROLLED SEWING MACHINES July 4,1967 L. A. PORTNOFF ETAL 16 Sheds-Sheet; 1 4

Filed Oct. 5, 1964 BENJAMIN BLOOM JAMES E. HIBBS WI/(2W July 4, 1967 L. A. PORTNOFF ETAL 3,

AUTOMATIC PROGRAM-CONTROLLED SEWIN G MACHINES Filed Oct. 5. 1964 16 Shets-Sheet 15 LAWRENCE A. PORTNOFF BENJAMIN BLOOM JAMES E. HIBBS July 4, 1967 A. PORTNOFF ETAL 3,329,109

AUTOMATIC PROGRAM-CONTROLLED SEWING MACHINES Filed Oct. 5. 1964 16 SheetsSheet l6 EIEICIEIEI FIG. 25

SEDDEIDDEIEICICIEJUDEIDIIICICIEICIEIUDDEJEIEICIDD INVENTOR. LAWRENCE A- PORTNOFF BENJAMIN BLOOM JAMES E. HIBBS United States Patent 3,329,109 AUTOMATIC PROGRAM-CONTROLLED SEWING MACHINES Lawrence A. Portnolf, St. Louis, Benjamin Bloom, Kansas City, and James E. Hibbs, Grandview, Mo., assignors to Research & Development Co., Inc., Kansas City, Mo., a corporation of Missouri Filed Oct. 5, 1964, Ser. No. 401,591 22 Claims. (Cl. 112-2) This invention relates in general to automatic programcontrolled sewing machines.

In the garment-making industry, it is frequently neces sary to stitch two or more pieces of material together by some form of linear or curved seam or line of stitches. For example, in applying pockets to shirt fronts, the pocket which has been cut out of a suitable piece of material and marginally turned under is laid upon the material constituting the shirt-front and stitched thereto by a U- shaped line of stitches which extends down one side, across the bottom, and up the other side. Similarly, in attaching to an applique of either symmetrical or non-symmetrical shape, the figure constituting the applique may be cut out of a separate piece of fabric and placed in the proper location upon the underlying piece of fabric. It is then necessary for the operator to stitch the applique in place by a continuous and circuitous line of stitches which follows the outline or edge of the applique. Such stitching operations require a high degree of skill on the part of the operator for a number of reasons. In the first place, the line of stitches must accurately follow the margins of the piece of material which is being stitched in place, and must be spaced inwardly from such margins by some prescribed distance which must be uniform. In the second place, the work cannot be fed beneaththe needle in a continuous straight line but must be rotated with respect to the needle and presser foot as the line of stitches changes its course of direction. In shifting the work around, the operator must be careful to avoid wrinkling or soiling the Work, and should maintain a reasonable degree of speed without sacrificing accuracy. Even the most experienced operators cannot maintain particularly high production yields in performing such operation and, furthermore, even the most careful operators will make certain numbers of errors in the course of a days work, resulting in pieces which do not pass inspection.

It is, therefore, the primary object of the present invention to provide an automated program-controlled sewing machine which is capable of performing either linear or curved stitching operations in any and all directions within a relatively large area of the work automatically and without requiring guidance on the part of the operator.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a sewing machine of the type stated which can be operated at a relatively high rate of speed with precision and accuracy and with a minimum amount of personal attention, so that a single worker can supervise several such automated sewing machines.

It is an additional object of the present invention to provide a sewing machine of the type stated into which work-pieces-can be placed easily, quickly and accurately by a worker having minimum skill and training so that precise and accurate garment-sections can be manufactured at relatively high production rates.

It is also an object of the present invention to provide a sewing machine of the type stated which can be quickly set up, perform a wide variety of sewing operations, or can be quickly changed from one sewing operation to another without requiring any appreciable period of downtime for set-ups and adjustments.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a sewing machine of the type stated which is relatively simple in construction and, therefore, can be manufactured economically at comparably low cost.

It is an additional object of the present invention to provide a sewing machine of the type stated which is rugged, durable, and requires minimum maintenance.

With the above and other objects in view, our invention resides in the novel features of form, construction, arrangement and combination of parts presently described and pointed out in the claims.

In the accompanying drawings- FIG. 1 is a perspective view of an automatic programcontrolled sewing machine constructed in accordance With and embodying the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary top plan view of the automatic program-controlled sewing machine shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary side elevational view of the sewing machine as viewed from the right side of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a front elevational view of the sewing machine partially broken away to show interior construction;

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary side elevational view of the sewing machine as viewed from the left side of FIG. 1;

FIG. 6 is a rear elevational view of the sewing machine partially broken away to show interior construction;

FIG. 7 is a horizontal sectional view taken along line 7-7 of FIG. 4;

FIGS. 8 and 9 are fragmentary sectional views taken along lines 8-8 and 9-9, respectively, of FIG. 2;

FIG. 10 is a fragmentary sectional view taken along line 10-10 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 11 is a fragmentary sectional view taken along line 11-11 of FIG. 10;

FIG. 12 is a fragmentary sectional view taken along line 12-12 of FIG. 11;

FIG. 13 is a fragmentary top plan view of the workholding fixture and related mechanism forming a part of the present invention, said work-holding mechanism being shown in work-holding position;

FIGS. 14, 15, and 16 are fragmentary sectional views taken along lines 14-14, 15-15 and 16-16, respectively, of FIG. '13;

FIG. 17 is a fragmentary sectional view taken along line 17-17 of FIG. 2;

FIGS. 18 and 19 are fragmentary sectional views taken along lines 18-18 and 19-19, respectively, of FIG. 17;

FIGS. 20, 21, 22, 23, and 24 are schematic wiring diagrams illustrating the various electrical connections constituting the circuitry of the present invention; and

FIG. 25 is a schematic fragmentary plan view of the program tape or film utilized in connection with the present invention.

Referring now in more detail and by reference characters to the drawings, which illustrate a preferred embodiment of the present invention, A designates an automatic program-controlled sewing machine comprising a base frame 1, integrally including vertical front legs 2, 3, and vertical rear legs 4, 5, which are integrally connected at their upper ends by four rectangularly arranged horizontal cross-members 6. Rigidly mounted upon the crossmernbers 6 is a horizontal top 7 consisting of a front rail 8, rear rail 9, two side rails 10, and an intermediate cross- -beam 11. Mounted between the front rail 8 and cross-beam 11 is a horizontal front board 12 which extends transversely across the front of the machine and provides a surface upon which the operator can initially arrange the work for placement in the machine. The rear rail 9 and cross-beam 11 are proivded with a series of tapped apertures or boltholes 13, 13', arranged symmetrically on opposite sides of the longitudinal centerline of the machine A, each aperture 13 being align-ed with a corresponding aperture 13. Between the cross-beam 11 and rear rail 9, the top 7 is substantially open and is centrally subdivided by two spaced parallel medial bars 14, 15, into a work area 16.

3 The bars 14, are held in any one of several selected positions by bolts 17, 17', which can be threaded into any of the apertures 13, 13', so that the transverse width of the work area 16 can be varied as may be desired.

Rigidly secured at their ends to, and extending horiozntally between, the legs 2, 3, 4, 5, respectively, are horizontal cross-beams 18, 19, which are located at the same vertical height and supported therefrom by pairs of short vertical legs 20, 20', 21, 21', are two transversely extending horizontal parallel slide rails 22 of identical construction and each integrally comprising a flat bottom flange 23, a vertical web 24, and a horizontal head section 25 of circular cross-sectional shape. Mounted for transverse sliding movement upon the head sections 25 are two identical slide frames 26, each including a horizontal channel 27 integrally provided at its opposite ends with upwardly extending legs 28, 29. The channels 27 are each provided along their under faces with downwardly opening slots or grooves 30 and rigidly mounted therein are elongated rectilinear downwardly presented slide bearings 31, which are operatively engaged upon the head sections 25 of the slide rails 22. The forward slide rail 22 (reference being made to the bottom of FIG. 2) is rigidly provided across its right end (reference being made to the right side of FIG. 2) with a stop plate 32 which projects laterally outwardly on opposite sides of the vertical web 24, and is interposed in the path of movement of the forward slide frame 26 for operatively contacting the plunger 33 of a limit switch 34 mounted adjacent to the right end of the channel 27 forming a part of such slide frame 26. Similarly, the rear slide rail 22 is provided, on its left end, with a stop plate 35 which projects laterally outwardly on opposite sides of the vertical web 24 of such rear slide rail 22 and is thus interposed in the path of the rear slide frame 26 for abutting engagement against the plunger 36 of a limit switch 37 mounted on the left hand end of such rear slide frame 26.

Rigidly mounted upon, and extending longitudinally between, the upper ends of the legs 28, 29 of each slide frame 26 are horizontal slide rails 38 of identical construction, and each integrally comprising flat bottom flanges 39, vertical webs 40, and head sections 41 of circular cross-sectional shape. Mounted for longitudinal shifting movement upon the head sections 41 are two identical slide frames 43, each including a horizontal channel 44 integrally provided at its opposite ends with upwardly extending legs 45, 46. The channels 44 are each provided along their under faces with downwardly opening slots or grooves 47 and rigidly mounted therein are elongated rectilinear downwardly presented slide bearings 48 which are operatively engaged upon the head sections 41 of the slide rails 38. The left slide rail 38 is rigidly provided across its forward end with a stop plate 49 which projects laterally outwardly on opposite sides of the vertical web 40, and is interposed in the path of movement of the right hand slide frame 43 for operatively contacting the plunger 50 of a limit switch 51 mounted adjacent to the forward portion of the channel 44 forming a part of such slide frame 43. Similarly, the right slide rail 38 is provided, on its rear end, with a stop plate 52, which projects laterally outwardly on opposite sides of the vertical web of such right slide rail 38 and is thus interposed in the path of the left slide frame 43 for abutting engagement against the plunger 53 of a limit switch 54 mounted adjacent to the rear end of such left slide frame 43.

Rigidly mounted upon the upper ends of the legs 45, 46, is the flat horizontal platen or bed plate 55 of a sewing machine head 56 which is substantially conventional and is, therefore, not illustrated or described herein in specific detail. It is sufiicient for present purposes to indicate that the sewing machine head 56 consists of a tubular vertical standard or leg 57 merging arcuately at its upper end into a horizontal top-housing 58 which extends, in the clear, in upwardly spaced relation above the plane of the front board 12, and is provided at its forward end with the usual downwardly extending housing-arm 59, the latter being operatively provided with an oscillatory needle shaft 60 which is conventionally provided at its lower end with needle mounting means 61. It will, of course, be evident that the length of the housing 58 will establish limits in the longitudinal size of the work area 15, and such limits can be varied as desired by selecting a desired length for the top housing 58. Preferably mounted upon the lower end of the needle shaft 60 and disposed, in the manner of a guard, externally around the needle mounting means 61, is a downwardly and outwardly flaring conical spring-helix 62, the convolutions of which are widely spaced so that when the needle shaft 60 approaches the lower limit of its travel, the lowermost convolutions of the spring-helix 62 will engage the work and the remainder of the spring-helix 62 will be more or less compressed. Similarly, as the needle shaft leaves its lower limit of travel, the spring-helix 62 will still engage the work for a brief instant, thereby momentarily continuing its hold-down action until the needle is fully clear of the work.

J ournaled in, and extending rearwardly from, the standard 57 is a main shaft 63 which is operatively connected interiorly of the standard 57 to a conventional sewing machine mechanism (not shown) by which the needle shaft 60 is oscillated up and down responsive to the rotative movement of the shaft 63. Rigidly secured upon the shaft 63 directly to the rear of the standard 57 is a set collar 64 which bears operatively on its rearwardly presented face against a conventional sleeve bearing 65, which is also mounted upon the shaft 63, and supports a shallow-grooved idler pulley-wheel 66 which is thereby freely rotatable with respect to the shaft 63. Trained around the idler pulley-wheel 66 is a belt 67 which is also trained around a drive pulley 68 pinned upon the shaft 69 of a conventional electric motor 70 suspended upon the underside of, and carried by, the platen 55.

Pinned upon the shaft 63 in close, but nevertheless rearwardly spaced, relation to the idler pulley-wheel 66, is a pulley-wheel 71 of the same diameter as the pulleywheel 66 and is adapted to receive and be drivingly engaged by the belt 67 whenever the latter is shifted from the idler pulley-wheel 66 to the pulley-wheel 71. On its rearwardly presented face, the pulley-wheel 71 is rigidly provided with a cam-shaped stop-member 72 having a radial detent notch 73, a radial stop-face or abutment 74 and a low-point 75.

The shifting of the belt 67 is accomplished by a beltshifter 76 which is swingably mounted at its lower end upon the upper face of the platen 55 by means of a suitably supported pintle 77 which extends at right angles to the longitudinal axis of the shaft 63 so that the upper end of the belt-shifter 76 can rock toward and away from the pulley-wheel 71 and its associated stop-member 72. The belt-shifter 76 is integrally provided with a forwardly extending arm 78 having a belt-encircling loop 79 by which the belt 67 is shifted between the pulley-wheels 66, 71, responsive to rocking movement of the belt-shifter 76. Along its right lateral face, the belt-shifter 76 is provided with a vertical slot 80 which is open at its upper end and, in effect, bifurcates the upper portion of the belt-shifter 76 to form front and rear side walls 81, 82, connected by a back wall or bight 83. For purposes of illustration herein, the motor 70 is assumed to rotate in such direction as to turn the shaft 63 in the direction of the arrow, as shown in FIG. 8, and thus the slot 80 will open laterally away from the direction of rotation of the stop-member 72. Extending horizontally between the side walls 81, 82, is a pivot pin 84 which rockably supports a stop-arm 85 integrally provided on its lower end with a tail-plate 86. Interposed between the tail-plate 86 and the inner face of the back wall 83 is a strong compression spring 87 which biases the stop-arm 85 in a counter-clockwise direction against the back wall 83.

In its upper end, the stop-arm 85 is axially drilled, counterbored and tapped in the provision of an elongated cylindrical recess 88 which is internally threaded at its upper end to receive a tubular stop-nut 89. Slidably disposed in the recess 88 and extending through the stop-nut 89 is a pin-like stop-finger 90 which is urged resiliently upwardly by means of a spring 91 seated within the recess 88. At its upper or projecting end, the stop-finger 90 is adapted to ride against the rear face of the cam-shaped stop-member 72 and rock forwardly to ride endwise against the periphery of the stop-member 72 when the low-point 75 thereof rotates into downward position. Upon continued rotation, the periphery of the stop-member 72 will push the stop-finger 90 downwardly a short distance, compressing the spring 91 and causing the stopfinger 90 to drop into the detent notch 73.

On its forward face, the side wall 82 of the belt-shifter 76 is integrally provided with an apertured boss 92 for retentively engaging the rear end of a strong tension spring 93 which is, in turn, hooked at its forward end in a similar apertured boss formed on the sewing machine standard or leg 57. The spring 93 normally urges the beltshifter 76 forwardly toward the cam-shaped stop-member 72.

Welded or otherwise rigidly mounted upon the upper face of the platen 55 along the rear margin thereof and on opposite sides of the standard 57, are two heavy arms 94, 95, formed preferably of angle-iron of sufficient size and strength so as to be capable of supporting a substantial outboard load without significant deflection. At their rear ends, the arms 94, 95 are rnitered and bent upwardly to form two vertical legs '96, 97, the rnitered joints being preferably welded so that the arm 94 and leg 96 form a unitary L-shaped bracket-like structure and, similarly, the arm 95 and the leg 97 form a matching unitary L-shaped bracket-like structure. Welded or otherwise secured upon the upwardly presented flatfaces of the arms 94, 95, is a horizontal mounting plate 97', and similarly welded or otherwise secured upon the rearwardly presented faces of the legs 96, 97, is a vertical mounting plate 98.

Rigidly bolted or otherwise secured upon the upper face of the horizontal mounting plate 97 is a heavy duty solenoid 99 which is provided with a horizontally reciprocal plunger 100 which is, in turn, hingedly connected at its forward end by means of a short link 101 to an apertured boss 102 formed integrally upon the rear face of the side wall 81 of the belt shifter 76. When the solenoid 99 is energized, the plunger 100 will be pulled rearwardly, thereby rocking the belt-shifter 76 to the position shown in FIG. 11 and causing the belt 67 to move over onto the pulley-wheel 71, thereby driving the shaft 63. As the beltshifter 76 moves to this position, the stop-finger 90 will, of course, be entirely disengaged from the stop-member 72.

Similarly bolted or otherwise rigidly secured upon the upper face of the horizontal mounting plate 97', directly beneath the drive shaft 63, is another heavy duty solenoid 103 having a horizontally reciprocal outwardly spring biased plunger 104 which ishingedly connected at its outer end by means of a short link 105 to a detent hook 106 which is rockably mounted upon the forward face of the mounted plate 98 by means of a pintle stud 107. The forward portion of the detent hook 106 extends laterally in the path of the belt-shifter 7'6 and snaps into engagement therewith as the latter is pulled back to the position shown in FIG. 11, thereby holding the belt-shifter 76 in such position even though the solenoid 99' is deenergized. When, however, the other solenoid 103 is energized, the detent hook 106 is momentarily withdrawn, allowing the belt-shifter 76 to swing forwardly into engaged position with the stop-member 72, pushing the belt 67 back onto the idler pulley-wheel 66 and bringing the shaft 63 to a stop at the predetermined position shown in FIG. 8. As the abutment 74 strikes the stop-finger 90, the

stop-arm will yield slightly to absorb the shock and then the stop-finger will drop into the detent notch 73 to hold the shaft in said predetermined or indexed position. This position is selected so that when the shaft 63 stops, the needle shaft 60 will be at the uppermost limit of its vertical travel. As long as the solenoid 99 remains deenergized, the shaft 63 will be locked in this position. In this locked position, the detent notch 73 will be positioned substantially opposite and in line with the plunger of the solenoid 99.

Also bolted or otherwise rigidly secured upon the upper face of the mounting plate 97 is a bracket 108 having vertical bracket plate 109 and supported thereon are four microswitches, namely, a clutch microswitch 110, a stop microswitch 111, a thread-cutter microswitch 112, and a start microswitch 113, all being normally closed and respectively arranged as shown in FIG. 11 for actuation by the belt-shifter 76. In other words, when the belt-shifter 76 is in rearward position, the switches 112, 113, are open and the switches 110, 111, are closed. Conversely, when the belt-shifter 76 is in forward position, the switches 110, 111, are open and the switches 112, 113, are closed.

As will be seen by reference. to FIG. 10, the rear end of the shaft 63 terminates at a substantial distance forwardly from the vertical mounting plate 98, and at such rear end is provided with a plurality of uniformly spaced axial spline-slots 114 and an annular peripheral groove 115 located adjacent to the forward end of the spline-slots 114, for receiving a snap ring 116. Mounted for axially shiftable movement upon the rear splined end of the shaft 63, is a spline sleeve 117 adapted for snug-fitting slidable disposition within the spline-slots 114. At its rear end, in overhanging relation to the end face of the shaft 63, the spline sleeve 117 is integrally provided with a diametrally enlarged circular clutch plate 118 made of magnetic material. Mounted in forward spaced parallel relation to the vertical mounting plate 98 is an apertnred auxiliary mounting plate 119 located in concentric relation to, and spaced rearwardly from, the shaft 63. Secured upon the forward face of the auxiliary mounting plate 119 is a cylindrical shell 120 made of non-magnetic material and having a forwardly projecting annular skirt 121 which extends loosely around the periphery of the clutch plate 118 and is interiorly provided with a plurality of electromagnetic coils m. The shell 120 and electromagnetic coils in are disposed concentrically around the centerline of the shaft 63 and are spaced rearwardly therefrom.

Journaled in and extending horizontally through the mounting plate 98 in coaxial alignment with the shaft 63 is an auxiliary shaft 122 which terminates at its forward end in closely adjacent, but nevertheless rearwardly spaced relation, to the rear end face of the shaft 63. Rigidly secured upon the forward end of the auxiliary shaft 122 is a diametrally enlarged circular clutch plate 123, which is parallel to, and of the same diametral size as, the clutch plate 118. The forwardly presented face of the clutch plate 123 is coated or otherwise provided with a suitable friction material, such as asbestos fiber molded in a hard synthetic resin or other similar material of the same nature as that which is commonly used for making automotive brake linings and automotive clutch facings. Whenever the electromagnetic coils in are energized, the clutch plate 118 will be pulled rearwardly into tightly bound engagement with the clutch plate 123 so that the shaft 63 and the auxiliray shaft 122 will be locked together. On the other hand, when the electromagnetic coils in are not energized, then engagement between the clutch plate 118 and the clutch plate 123 will be released and the shaft 63, and the auxiliary shaft 122, will be disengaged from each other.

Keyed or otherwise mounted upon the auxiliary shaft 122 in the space between the auxiliary mounting plate 119 and the mounting plate 98 is a relatively large diametral spur gear 124, which projects, for a segment of its peripheral surface, outwardly from the lateral edge of the auxiliary mounting plate 119, and meshes with an idler gear 125, which is suitably journaled upon the mounting plate 98. The idler gear 125, in turn, meshes with an auxiliary drive gear 126 keyed upon the shaft 122 of an auxiliary motor 127 conventionally supported upon the forward face of the mounting plate 98. Whenever the auxiliary motor 127 is energized, rotary movement will be transmitted from the auxiliary drive gear 126 through the idler gear 125 to the spur gear 124 and the auxiliary shaft 122. It will, of course, be evident that by means of electrical circuitry presently to be more fully described the auxiliary motor 127 can only be energized for purposes of rotating the auxiliary shaft 122 when the electromagnetic coils in are de-energized and the auxiliary shaft 122 is not engaged with the shaft 63.

The auxiliary shaft 122 extends beyond the mounting plate 98 and at its rear extremity is provided with a film sprocket 128 which is operatively located between two conventional film-guiding idler spools 129, 129', mounted on idler shafts 130, 130', respectively, the latter being rigidly mounted at their inboard ends in a support-arm 131, which is, in turn, rockably mounted on the rear end of a horizontal spindle 132 rigidly mounted at its forward end on the mounting plate 98. The support-arm 131 is provided with a detent notch 133 and a flat faced detent finger 134. Operatively supported upon the mounting plate 98 in downwardly and laterally spaced parallel relation to the auxiliary shaft 122 is a horizontal leaf spring 135 adapted for retentive engagement optionally against the flat face of the detent finger 134, or within the detent notch 133. When the leaf spring 135 is flexed downward to the position shown in FIG. 17, it is engaged against the fiat face of the detent finger 134 and thereby urges the idler spools 129, 129, down into film-engaging position, as will be presently more fully discussed.

Also mounted upon the rear face of the mounting plate 98 and projecting horizontally rearwardly therefrom in downwardly spaced parallel relation to the shaft 122 is an idler shaft 136 upon which a second film sprocket 137 is operatively journaled in downwardly aligned registering position directly beneath the film sprocket 128. Moreover, the film sprocket 137 is operatively located between the idler spools 138, 138, which are respectively journaled upon the rearward free end of the idler shafts 139, 139'. At their forward ends, the idler shafts 139, 139 are rigidly mounted upon, and project from, a support-arm 140, which is swingably mounted upon the rear end of a spindle 141, the latter being rigidly mounted at its forward end on the mounting plate 98. The support-arm 140 is substantially of the same shape as the previously described support-arm 131 and includes a detent notch 142 and a fiat faced detent finger 143. Operatively supported on the mounting plate 98 is a leaf spring 144 adapted for optional engagement against the fiat faced detent finger 43 or the detent notch 142. Bolted or otherwise rigidly secured upon and extending from the mounting plate 98 is an L-shaped bracket arm 145 which is, in turn, bolted at its outer end to the cylindrical outer face of a tubular sensing head 146, which is provided in its end face with a photoelectric cell 147 having six separate vertical sensing zone or so-called tracks and is conventionally connected through a multi-conductor cable 148 to a controlamplifier C which will be presently more fully described and explained.

Along its lower margin, the mounting plate 98 is integrally provided with a rearwardly projecting horizontal shelf 149, which is provided in its upper faces with three triangularly juxtaposed vertical spindles 150, 151, 152, and operatively journaled thereon are three vertical film-supporting idler spools 153, 154, 155, respectively. Welded or otherwise rigidly secured upon the upper face of the shelf 149 is a film-guiding arm 156, which is located approximatley along the centerline of the triangular defined spindles 150, 151, 152, and projects upwardly and forwardly at an angle of approximately 45 Similarly mounted rigidly upon the rear face of the mounting plate 98 is an auxiliary film-guiding rod 157, which is located in laterally displaced relation to the film-guiding rod 156 and extends downwardly and angularly toward the shelf 149, terminating at a substantial distance above the upwardly presented face thereof. An endless band of thirtyfive millimeter film f of the so-called moving picture type is wrapped around the idler spools 153, 154, 155, in as many layers as may be necessary to accommodate the desired length. A portion of the film f is brought up in an endless or so-called Mobius loop by means of the angularly positioned film-guiding rod 156 and the loop thus formed is trained around the sprockets 128, 137, and caused to pass across the face of the photocell 147. The film ;f is imprinted, by conventional photographic techniques, with six tracks consisting of transparent and nontransparent band which, in effect, create a series of discrete non-transparent spots or sections.

Finally, a constant intensity light source L is operatively mounted on the mounting plate 98 in horizontal alignment with the sensing head 145, and on the opposite side of the film f with respect to the photocell 147 and has a guide block 158 that bears operatively against the film f and holds it firmly against the face of the photocell 147 as it travels downwardly. It will thus be evident that as the film travels downwardly past the photocell 147, each of the six tracks thereon will cause the photocell 147 to transmit four sets of discrete electrical pulses which are linearly spaced in terms of time in any desired manner, so as to create some predetermined and desired program.

Rigidly secured upon the upper face of the flange 23 of the rear slide rails 22, and along the forward side of the vertical web 24, is a rack-bar '159 provided with a relatively long line of upwardly presented teeth 160. Bolted or otherwise rigidly secured on the horizontal channel 27 of the rear slide frames 26 is an L-shaped bracket 161, which mechanically supports an electrical stepping servo motor 162 having a drive shaft 163 provided with a drive pinion 164 which meshes with the teeth of the rack-bar Rigidly mounted upon the upper face of the bottom flanges 39 of the left slide rails 38, on the interior side of the vertical webs 40 thereof, is an upwardly presented rack-bar 166 and bolted or otherwise rigidly mounted centrally upon the horizontal channel 27 of the left slide frames 43 is a bracket 167 for mechanically supporting an electrical stepping servo motor 168 having a drive shaft 169' and a drive pinion 170 which meshes with the teeth of the rack-bar 166.

The stepping servo motors 162, 168 are identical in size, mechanical construction, and electrical configuration, and contain D.C. windings of such a nature that the rotor will advance through a single arcuate increment of rotation for each discrete electrical pulse fed into it. Moreover, the stepping servo motors 162, 168, as a result of the circuitry herein disclosed, will stop very precisely at the end of such arcuate increment after each pulse. It has been found that motors of this type are thus made to function in an extremely accurate and precise manner as to the amount of movement occurring during each pulse and are capable of receiving and reacting to a very large number of discrete closely spaced pulses occurring within a relatively small interval of time. Moreover, the stepping servo motors are reversible and will rotate in one direction or the other, depending upon whether the pulse is negative or positive. The electrical stepping servo motors 162, 168 are also provided with additional two-phase synchronous windings, which, when energized instead of the stepping windings, will run the motor continuously in either direction, depending upon polarity. By energizing these two-phase synchronous windings, it is possible to index the sewing machine head 56 very rapidly to some initial or starting position whenever desired.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3385244 *Oct 31, 1966May 28, 1968Her Majesty Underwear CompanyElectronic control system for automated sewing machine apparatus
US3450076 *Oct 7, 1966Jun 17, 1969Bender Thomas A EStitching,tufting and carving machine
US3459144 *Dec 27, 1966Aug 5, 1969Her Majesty Ind IncAutomatic embroidery system
US3459145 *Dec 27, 1966Aug 5, 1969Her Majesty Ind IncSelf-programmed automatic embroidery system
US3468268 *Aug 2, 1967Sep 23, 1969Zangs Ag MaschfEmbroidery frame adjusting arrangement
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Classifications
U.S. Classification112/470.13, 112/80.4, 112/102, 112/470.6, 112/80.23, 112/308
International ClassificationG05B19/40, D05B21/00
Cooperative ClassificationD05B21/00, G05B19/40
European ClassificationD05B21/00, G05B19/40