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Publication numberUS3329432 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 4, 1967
Filing dateJan 29, 1965
Priority dateJan 29, 1965
Publication numberUS 3329432 A, US 3329432A, US-A-3329432, US3329432 A, US3329432A
InventorsGoodrich B Pratt
Original AssigneeBrunswick Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Arrow return and quiver loading mechanism
US 3329432 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 4, 1967 G. B. PRATT 3,329,432

ARROW RETURN AND QUIVER LOADING MECHANISM Filed Jan. 29. 1965 United States Patent 3,329,432 ARROW RETURN AND QUIVER LOADING MECHANISM Goodrich B. Pratt, Grand Haven, Micl1., assignor to Brunswick Corporation, a corporation of Delaware Filed Jan. 29, 1965, Ser. No. 429,017 Claims. (Cl. 273-103) This invention relates to archery.

The object of the invention, in general terms, is to provide a new and improved arrow return and quiver loading mechanism for an archery range.

More specifically, it is an object of the invention to provide means for returning fired arrows to a quiver adjacent the archer so as to eliminate delays incurred in retrieving fired arrows, while miniminzing both the possibility of damage to the arrows While they are in transit and the number of arrows required :by the archer.

Another object of the invention is the provision of means for returning fired arrows to a quiver adjacent the archer so as to eliminate delays incurred in retrieving fired arrows including conveyor means for delicately handling the arrows by the fletching wherein the contact pressure is applied generally in a direction opposite to their normal course of flight so that the contact between the fietching and the surrounding surfaces is in a direction running with the grain of the fletching to preclude damage thereto.

Another object of the invention is the provision of an arrow return and quiver loading mechanism including spaced arrow supporting surfaces for supporting arrows by the fietching and conveying them in a predetermined orientation to means for returning the arrows to a point adjacent a firing line, and means adjacent the firing line for receiving such arrows including second spaced arrow supporting surfaces for ejecting the arrows into a quiver where the arrows are held in readiness for an archer.

Another object of the invention is the provision of an arrow return and quiver loading mechanism including a collector member adapted to underlie an archery target :and backstop, a first pair of narrowly spaced conveyor belts disposed to receive arrows from the collector member, conveyor means for receiving arrows from the first pair of narrowly spaced belts and for conveying the arrows to a remote point, and a second pair of narrowly spaced conveyor belts at the remote point for receiving arrows from the conveyor means and for conveying arrows to a subjacent quiver and ejecting the arrows pointed end first into the quiver.

Another object of the invention is the provision of such an arrow return and quiver loading mechanism wherein the spacing between the upper runs of the pairs of belts is such as to support arrows by the fietching, and the spacing between the lower runs of the pairs of belts is such as to preclude arrow damaging interference between the lower runs and arrows supported by the upper runs of the pairs of belts.

Other objects of the invention will become readily apparent from the following detailed description taken in connection with the drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a longitudinal section through a preferred form of the invention, approximately along the line 1-1 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 2 is a transverse section of FIG. 1 taken approximately along the line 22; and

FIG. 3 is another transverse section of FIG. 1 taken approximately along the line 33.

An archery range in which an arrow return and quiver loading mechanism according to the invention may be used, although not limited thereto, is shown in FIGS. 1- 3 and is described in detail in the copending application 3,329,432 Patented July 4, 1967 Ser. No. 432,787, filed Feb. 15, 1965, and assigned to the same assignee as the instant application, the disclosure of which is herein incorporated by reference.

The range includes a shooting station or firing line 20 remotely located from a target 26. An archer 22 may occupy the shooting station 20 and fire arrows 24 at the target 26. Scanning means 25 are provided adjacent the target 26 for scanning the flight path of an arrow 24 fired at the target 26 to determine the point at which the arrow 24bit the target 26.

A target monitor 38 is placed near the shooting station 20 and includes means responsive to the scanning means 25 for indicating to the archer 22, and such spectators as may be present, the point on the target 26 hit by the arrow 24. Additionally, a backstop 28, preferably of the self-ejecting type disclosed in the above cited copending application, is placed behind the target 26 and is arranged to stop arrows passing through the target 26.

An inclined collector plate 29 (see FIGS. 1 and 2) underlies the target 26 and backstop 28 and receives arrows discharged by the latter. A first pair of narrowly spaced belts 30a, 30b (see FIGS. 1 and 2) are mounted for movement within their upper runs adjacent the lower edge of the collector 29. The spacing between the upper runs of the belts 30a, 30b is sufliciently wide such that the shaft of an arrow will pass therebetween but sufficiently narrow such that the arrow fietching will not pass between the upper runs. Additionally, the lower ends of the belts 30a, 30b are horizontally displaced away from the space between the upper runs such that the spacing between the lower runs is significantly greater than the space between the upper runs. This arrangement is extremely desirable for reasons that will be seen hereafter. The belts 30a, 30b are driven in the same direction and at the same speed by a motor and transmission arrangement, shown generally at 300, of suitable construction. Deflectors 31 (see FIG. 2) are arranged along the lower edge of the collectors 29 and the upper runs of the belts 30a, 30b and are spaced upwardly therefrom such that an arrow must be substantially in contact along its entire length with the collectors 29 to pass to the belts 30a, 30b.

Once on the collectors 29, the arrows slide or roll down the incline to the lower edge thereof. The deflectors 31 orient the rolling or sliding arrows such that they are parallel to the upper runs of the belts 30a, 30b. The arrows continue to slide or roll until they contact and rest upon the upper runs of the belts 30a. 30b. At this point, the shaft of the arrow drops between the belts 30a, 3% resulting in the arrow being suspended substantially vertically with its fletching resting on the upper runs of the belts 30a, 30b. Since the lower runs of the belts 30a, 3%, which are moving in an opposite direction from the upper runs, are outwardly displaced from the upper runs, there is no interference between the arrows and the lower runs that would result in injury to the arrows.

Below the end of the run of the belts 30a, 30b is a conveyor 32 of the belt type which returns ejected arrows to the shooting station or firing line 20'. Preferably the conveyor 32 is operated by a suitable motor and transmission 32a at a higher speed than the belts 30a, 30b such that an arrow hanging vertically from the belts 30a 30b will engage the conveyor 32 with its point which will then be drawn forwardly of the fletching as seen in FIG. 1. When the belts 30a, 30b discharge the fletched end of the arrow, it will fall on the conveyor 32 behind the point of the arrow. Thus the arrow will be moved in a direction similar to its normal flight whereby the fletching will not be damaged by moving contact with the walls surrounding the conveyor 32. Reflectors 33 (see FIG. 2) are placed on either side of the conveyor 32 to maintain proper alignment of the arrow on the conveyor 32.

Below the end of the run of the conveyor 32 as seen in FIGS. 2 and 3 is a lowermost end of the run of an inclined pair of narrowly spaced belts 34a, 34b which are driven in the same upwardly direction and at the same speed by a motor and transmission 340. With the exception of the upward inclination of the belts 34a, 34b, the relationship of upper and lower run spacing and displacement is substantially identical to that between belts 30a, 30b, and accordingly, further description is believed unnecessary. When the belts 34a, 34b are in operation, an arrow being carried by the conveyor 32, because of the alignment function of deflectors 3-3, will be projected between the belts 34a, 34b until its fietching comes in contact with the upper runs of the belts 34a, 34b. The belts 34a, 34b willthen carry the arrow by its fletching and in a substantially vertical position forwardly and upwardly to the upper end of the run of the belts 34a, 34b. The arrow is then dropped pointed end first from the belts 34a, 34b into a quiver generally designated 36 placed adjacent the firing line 20.

The quiver 36 (see FIG. 1) comprises a bottom wall 150 placed a distance greater than the length of an arrow directly below the upper end of the inclined belts 34a, 34b and having an upwardly projecting retaining flange 152. Partially surrounding the bottom 150 is a wall 154 which is inclined toward the archer and has an access opening 156at its upper edge. The combination of the inclined belts 34a, 34b and the quiver 36 is arranged to preclude arrows dropping from the belts 34a, 34b to the quiver 36 from falling backwardly over the upwardly projecting retaining flange 152 into the return mechanism and fouling the latter. Because of the motion of the arrow imparted in the direction of the inclined wall 154 by the inclined belts 34a, 3412, the inertia of the arrow will cause it to hit the inclined wall 154 where it will come to rest. Thus, when arrows 24 are delivered upwardly by the belts 34a, 34]) they fall therefrom and strike the bottom 150 of the quiver and come to rest leaning against the bottom 150, the retaining flange 152 and the wall 154 in close proximity to the access opening 156, whereby the archer may simply pick up additional arrows 24 as he requires them,

Having disclosed a specific embodiment of my invention, I do not intend that my invention be limited to the specific construction set forth, but rather construed broadly according to the true spirit thereof as set forth in the following claims.

I claim:

1. An arrow return and quiver loading mechanism comprising: an inclined member adapted to underlie an archery target and backstop for collecting arrows, a first pair of conveyor belts trained along a lower edge of said member, said first belts having parallel portions spaced apart a distance less than the distance between the outermost extremities of the fletching of an arrow whereby an arrow will hang substantially vertically between said first belts suspended by its fietching, conveyor means below the end of the run of said belts for receiving arrows dropped therefrom and conveying them to a remote point, a second pair of conveyor belts disposed in an inclined plane and extending from below said remote point to a location above said conveyor means, said second belts having parallel portions spaced apart a distance less than the distance between'the outermost extremities of the fletching of an arrow whereby said arrow will hang substantially vertically between said second belts suspended by its fietching, and a quiver for receiving arrows from said second belts comprising a bottom with a upwardly directed retaining flange, a wall partially surrounding said bottom and having an access opening therein, said bottom being disposed .below said location a distance greater than the length of an arrow, whereby arrows from said second belts will drop therefrom and come to rest against said bottom, said returning flange and said wall in close proximity to said access opening.

2. The arrow return and quiver loading mechanism of claim 1 wherein said parallel portions of said first and second pairs of belts comprise the upper runs of said belts and wherein the lower runs of said first and second pairs of belts are spaced apart a distance greater than the spacing between said parallel portions, whereby an arrow suspended from said parallel portions will not engage said lower runs and be damaged by contact therewith.

3. The arrow return and quiver loading mechanism of claim 1 wherein said conveyor means includes means for driving said conveyor means at a speed greater than that of said first belts whereby an arrow will always be carried by said conveyor means with its pointed end forwardly of its fletched end to preclude damage thereto.

4. An arrow return and quiver loading mechanism comprising; arrow collecting means for collecting spent arrows, means adjacent said collecting means for delivering arrows in a substantially vertical position to a conveying means, said conveying means being operable to deliver arrows to a remote point, means at said remote point for receiving arrows from said conveying means and delivering arrows in a substantially vertical position with the fletched end uppermost to a quiver means, said quiver means being arranged to hold arrows in readiness for an archer.

5. An arrow return and quiver loading mechanism comprising: a collector adapted to underlie a backstop for receiving spent arrows therefrom, first conveyor means adjacent said collector having two arrow supporting surfaces for supporting arrows received from said collector by the fletching and conveying arrows in a predetermined orientation to a second conveyor means, said second conveyor means including means for delivering arrows received from said first conveying means to a remote point, quiver means adjacent said remote point for receiving and holding arrows, and third conveyor means interposed between said remote point and said quiver and having two arrow supporting surfaces for (1) receiving arrows from said second conveyor means at said remote point, (2) supporting the arrows by the fletching and conveying them to said quiver and (3) ejecting the arrows pointed end first into said quiver, whereby the arrows will not be damaged during the return thereof to the quiver.

6. The arrow return and quiver loading mechanism of claim 5 wherein said two arrow supporting surfaces are spaced apart a distance less than the distance between the outermost extremities of the fietching of an arrow.

7. The arrow return and quiver loading mechanism of claim 6 wherein said two arrow supporting surfaces comprise a pair of belts.

8. An arrow return and quiver loading mechanism comprising: conveying means for conducting spent arrows along a range toward a firing line, means for collecting spent arrows adjacent a target and delivering the same to the conveying means, quiver means adjacent the firing line for holding arrows vertically disposed in readiness for an archer and means for receiving arrows from said conveying means and delivering all arrows thus received substantially vertically disposed with the fletched end uppermost from said conveying means to said quiver means.

9. An arrow return and quiver loading mechanism comprising: conveying means for conducting spent arrows toward a firing line on an archery range, a pair of conveyor belts disposed in an inclined plane and extending from a point below the conveying means to a location above the conveying means, said belts having parallel portions spaced apart a distance less than the distance between the outermost extremities of the fletching of an arrow whereby an arrow will hang substantially vertically between said belts suspended by its fletching engaging said belts, and a quiver for receiving arrows from said belts comprising: a bottom with an upwardly extending retaining flange, a wall partially surrounding said bottom and having an upper access opening therein for arrow removal, said bottom being disposed below said location a distance greater than the length of an arrow whereby arrows from said belts are dropped therefrom and come to rest in an upright position with the lower end on said bottom and retained by said flange and the upper end leaning against said wall.

10. An arrow return and quiver loading mechanism according to claim 9 wherein said conveying means comprises a conveyor and arrow collecting means for collecting spent arrows and delivering the arrows to said conveyor.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS Richards 221156 Riohards 221156 X Hofheimer 273101 Marker 273--101 Devitt et a1. 273105.6 X Andersen et al. 273l00 RICHARD c. PINKHAM, Primary Examiner.

M. R. PAGE, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US326153 *Dec 26, 1884Sep 15, 1885The american Button Fastener Companyrichards
US326246 *Sep 13, 1884Sep 15, 1885The ameeican Button Fastenee Companyrichards
US690288 *Jan 5, 1901Dec 31, 1901Maurice HofheimerGame apparatus.
US2064310 *Aug 28, 1930Dec 15, 1936Mitchell M MarkerAmusement apparatus
US3006648 *Feb 11, 1960Oct 31, 1961Roland D CiccaroneArchery range
US3216726 *Apr 3, 1963Nov 9, 1965AndersenScoring apparatus for remotely scored games
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3398959 *May 3, 1967Aug 27, 1968Brunswick CorpArchery range with arrow return conveyor
US3510133 *Mar 21, 1968May 5, 1970Brunswick CorpSelf-ejecting backstop for archery range
US3563549 *Feb 14, 1969Feb 16, 1971Brunswick CorpArrow storage quiver and conveyor belt for transporting arrows to the quiver
US3652089 *Jun 6, 1969Mar 28, 1972Brunswick CorpArrow return coveyor
US4076246 *Nov 14, 1975Feb 28, 1978Meyer Leonard STarget particularly for archery
US5056782 *Feb 28, 1990Oct 15, 1991Master Pitching Machine, Inc.Ball return conveyor system for baseball pitching machine cages
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/395, 221/156, 198/567
International ClassificationF41J11/00
Cooperative ClassificationF41J11/00
European ClassificationF41J11/00