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Publication numberUS3330471 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 11, 1967
Filing dateAug 16, 1965
Priority dateAug 16, 1965
Publication numberUS 3330471 A, US 3330471A, US-A-3330471, US3330471 A, US3330471A
InventorsLeon M Timms
Original AssigneeLeon M Timms
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Packing unit with viewing window
US 3330471 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 11, 1967 M. TIMMS PACKING UNIT WITH VIEWING WINDOW Filed Aug. 16, 1965 EN VELO PE. UND EENEATH CONTAINS MR mm E W 01 E L ,Zra 32 33 Ill 1 A OQ EY United States Patent 3,330,471 PACKING UNIT WITH VIEWING WINDOW Leon M. Timms, 636 Amherst Drive, Burbank, Calif. 91504 Filed Aug. 16, 1965, Ser. No. 479,977 Claims. (Cl. 229-74) This invention relates to an aid for use in preparing an article for shipping, and more specifically for securing to the article or its container a packing slip or other item having subject matter printed or written on the item.

A major object of the invention is to devise a packing unit of the above discussed general type which is capable of very easily securing a packing slip or the like to an article, in a manner enabling detachment of the item from the article being shipped upon arrival at the ultimate destination, and further in a manner rendering the markings on the packing slip or other item readily visible after application of the unit to the shipped article, so that these markings may function typically as the address for the article, to indicate the name and location of the addressee without the necessity for application of this information to the article at another location. Thus, the single procedure of applying a unit embodying the invention to an article serves the dual purposes of attaching a packing slip or the like to the article, to indicate the contents of the package, and addressing the article.

In two copending applications, specifically my prior application Ser. No. 306,031, filed Sept. 3, 1963, now Patent No. 3,250,385 on Role of Shipping Units For Holding Packing Slip Or The Like, and my application Ser. No. 479,735, filed Aug. 16, 1965 on Packing Unit, I have disclosed a unique type of unit for holding a packing slip or the like, and which includes a carrier sheet having a pocket at its rear side into which the packing slip or other item is insertible. Outwardly beyond this pocket, the carrier sheet has adhesive material which is adapted to contact an article being shipped, and to secure the preassembled carrier sheet and pocket structure to that article. A unit embodying the present invention includes this same basic structure found in my prior applications, but in addition is so designed as to render the packing slip or similar item visible from the outer side of the carrier sheet after application of the assembly to an article to be shipped. For this purpose, the carrier sheet and pocket are constructed to enable viewing through both of these items of the markings carried on an item in the pocket. This may be accomplished by the provision of appropriate viewing windows, either in the form of transparent walls or wall apertures. For example, in a presently preferred form of the invention, I form the pocket of a transparent paper, such as the paper conventionally referred to as glassine, and provide the carrier sheet with a viewing aperture or window opposite the pocket, so that the interior of the pocket may be seen through the window of the carrier sheet and the wall of the pocket. In this connection, it is noted that where the term transparent is employed in the present application, this term is not intended to require complete transparency of the material being designated, but instead specifically includes materials having some translucence, but which are sufficiently transparent to render the address or other markings on an item in the pocket legible from the outside of the unit. The glassine paper referred to is itself of a character having a degree of translucence, but through which printing can be read, at least when the printing is closely proximate to the paper.

The above and other features and objects of the invention will be better understood from the following detailed description of the typical embodiment illustrated in the accompanying drawing, in which:

FIG. 1 is a view representing a dispensing roll consisting of a series of packing units formed in accordance with the invention;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged fragmentary perspective view showing the end of the roll of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 shows fragmentarily the forward side of one of the packing units constructed in accordance with the invention;

FIG. 4 illustrates the back side of one of the packing units;

FIGS. 5 and 6 are sections taken on lines 55 and 6-6 respectively of FIG. 3;

FIG. 7 is a view representing the manner of formation of the pockets of the device;

FIG. 8 is a view similar to FIG. 6, but showing the unit as it appears when applied to a shipping carton.

With reference first to FIG. 1, I have shown at 10 a roll of packing units formed in accordance with the invention, and contained within a dispensing container 11. The units are wound about a core 12, which may be rotatably mounted on a shaft 13 mounted in the container, with the units being successively discharged from the container through an outlet slot 14 in one of its walls.

In FIG. 3, there is illustrated at 15 one of the packing units, which includes a main carrier sheet 16 and a pock t 17 secured to its rear surface. A series of these carrier sheets 16 are formed as successive portions of an elongated strip 18 of sheet material, which is of uniform width between two opposite parallel side edges 19 and 20, and which has transverse perforations 21 at locations spaced evenly along the entire length of the strip 18. It will, of course, be apparent from FIG. 3 that the individual carrier sheets 16, when torn from strip 18, are desirably of rectangular configuration. Strip 18 and its carrier sheet portions 16 may be formed of any suitable flexible sheet material, which is preferably waterproof or water resistant in character. The presently preferred material is a suitable waterproof paper.

Each carrier sheet 16 is desirably cut away or apertured to form a viewing window 22 at a predetermined location directly opposite a portion of the inner pocket 17. This window then allows for viewing of that portion of the pocket from the outer side of the carrier sheet. The inner surface of the carrier sheet is coated, desirably continuously across its entire area, by an adhesive substance, which is for best results a Waterproof, pressure sensitive, permanently and aggressively tacky adhesive 23. The pocket 17 is generally rectangular in shape, but somewhat smaller than the rectangular carrier sheet 16, and is secured by adhesive 23 to the imier surface of carrier sheet 16 in a centralized location such as that shown in FIG. 4, so that adhesive exposed for contact with an article to be shipped may extend entirely about the periphery of, and completely encircle, the pocket 17.

The outer surface 24 of carrier sheet 16 may carry appropriate printing or other markings, as indicated at 25 in FIG. 3, for indicating to a recipient of the shipped article the contents of pocket 17. For example, these markings may state Envelope Underneath Contains Packing Slip. Additional printing 26 on the outer surface 24 of the carrier sheet may also notify the recipient that he may strip the carrier sheet 16 at least partially from the shipping carton or article, to an extent enabling access to the open end 127 of pocket 17, by pulling the carrier sheet at a particular corner. When the series of packing units, including carrier sheet 16 and their pockets 17, are wound in roll form as seen in FIG. 1, the adhesive 23 may be received at the radially inner side of each layer of the strip 18, and may contact outer surface 24 of the next successive layer to retain the strip in rolled form. To enable unrolling of the units when desired, surface 24.

should be treated to give it the characteristics of a release surface, to which adhesive 23 will adhere sufficiently to retain the assembly in the FIG. 1 roll form, but from which the adhesive is easily unwound without damage to surface 24. To attain this result, surface 24 may be coated with an appropriate silicone or other known release agent.

Pocket 17 is formed of sheet material, and is preferably open along only one of its edges 127, and is closed along its other three edges. The sheet material is shaped and folded to provide a first wall or layer 27 of the pocket or bag, adjacent and adhered to the adhesive coating 23 of the carrier sheet, and a second wall or layer 28 superimposed on layer 27 and peripherally connected thereto. These two layers may be formed from a single sheet of material in the manner brought out in FIG. 7, with this sheet being folded inwardly along two fold lines 29 so that its two opposite side edges overlap at 30 to form together the first mentioned wall or layer 27 of the pocket. Thus, the pocket of FIG. 7 may be considered as being essentially tubular in shape, and in accordance with my copending application Ser. No. 479,735, a series of such tubular pockets may be formed by folding an elongated strip of paper or other sheet material to form an elongated tube, and then cutting off the tube at appropriate locations 31 and in the manner illustrated in FIG. 7. More particularly, the cuts at the opposite ends of the pockets may be formed to provide a transverse end edge 32 at one end of the wall 28, with the inturned overlapping edges of the sheet which form wall 27 projecting beyond edge 32 to form together a tab 33. At the opposite end of each pocket, wall 28 may have a transverse edge 34, which projects beyond a cutaway 35 formed in the inturned edges of the sheet material which form wall 27. When a pocket of this tubular construction is moved into contact with the adhesive 23 in the relation illustrated in FIG. 4, the adhesive acts to retain the two inturned portions forming wall 27 in fixed relative positions to hold them in closed relation forming a single wall, and the adhesive also contacts the portion of wall 28 which is adjacent edge 34, and is between that edge and edge 35, to close the third side of the pocket or bag. The overlapping area of the two edges at 30 is preferably offset from viewing window 22, with only one of the two overlapping flaps which form wall 27 being exposed at the window 22, and with that flap being peripherally adhered to and in contact with the adhesive 23 continuously entirely about the window, to form a watertight seal thereabout (see FIGS. 3, 4 and As indicated previously, the sheet material from which pocket 17 is formed is sufiiciently transparent to enable an address or other printed subject matter carried by a packing slip or item 36 within the pocket to be read through wall 27 of the pocket and window 22. In many instances, an appropriate slightly translucent glassine type paper will serve as the material for forming pocket 17. To increase the versatility of the unit, the pocket may be formed of a waterproof material such as a suitable transparent resinous plastic sheet material, e.g. vinyl film or the like, in a manner preventing access of moisture to the contents of the pocket through window 22. At other locations, the waterproof adhesive 23 protects and shields the packing slip or other item 36 from water in transit. It will of course also be apparent that the pocket may be formed of a fully transparent material, such as cellophane, rather than a slightly translucent material.

As stated previously, adhesive 23 is preferably a waterproof pressure sensitive type of adhesive, which without the use of a solvent is permanently and aggressively tacky, so that the adhesive will adhere to release surface 24 and pocket 17, and to an article or carton being shipped, upon contact therewith, or upon the application of light finger pressure. Any of the many known adhesives of this type may be utilized. As an example, I may employ a suitable latex base adhesive, preferably consisting of crude natural rubber and/ or synthetic rubber combined with suitable resins for increasing the tackiness of the elastomer, and typically also including other additives such as plasticizers, fillers and the like in proportions giving to the ultimate combination the desired permanently and aggressively tacky characteristics.

In using the packing units described above, the individual units are successively pulled off the roll 10 of FIG. 1, and torn from the rest of the roll at the locations of perforated lines 21. After one of the units has been torn from the roll, a packing slip or item 36 (FIG. 8) is slipped into the pocket 17 of that unit, through the single open end 127 of the pocket, and to a position in which there is visible through window 22 the name and address of the party to whom the carton or article is to be shipped, or if desired other markings may be so positioned. In FIG. 3, the location of this address or other subject matter is indicated at 37. The unit is then applied to the outer surface of a container or article, with adhesive 23 contacting the article entirely about the pocket to form a watertight seal thereabout, so that if the pocket itself is waterproof, the contents of the pocket are completely protected against any contact with moisture. When the article reaches its destination, the recipient may pull carrier sheet 16 away from the article, starting at the designated corner 26, so that the packing slip or other contents 36 of the pocket may be withdrawn from the pocket.

Iclaim:

1. A packing unit to be applied to an article being shipped comprising a carrier sheet having inner and outer sides, a thin pocket formed of two layers of sheet material for receiving an item which carries markings, both layers of said pocket being formed separately from said carrier sheet but being adhesively secured to and carried by said carrier sheet prior to application of the carrier sheet and pocket as a unit to said article, adhesive material coating said inner side of the carrier sheet and having a first portion contacted by a first of said layers forming the pocket to secure it to the carrier sheet, said adhesive material having a portion outwardly beyond the pocket exposed for contact with said article to secure the carrier sheet thereto, said first layer forming the pocket and said carrier sheet being constructed to enable a person to view and read therethrough, from said outer side of the carrier sheet, markings on an item contained in the pocket.

2. A packing unit as recited in claim 1, in which said adhesive is a waterproof pressure sensitive adhesive having exposed portions completely encircling the pocket for contact thereab out with said article.

3. A packing unit to be applied to an article being shipped comprising a carrier sheet having inner and outer sides, a thin pocket formed of two layers of sheet material for receiving an item which carries markings, both layers of said pocket being formed separately from said carrier sheet but being adhesively secured to and carried by said carrier sheet prior to application of the carrier sheet and pocket as a unit to said article, adhesive material coating said inner side of the carrier sheet and having a first portion contacted by a first of said layers forming the pocket to secure it to the carrier sheet, said adhesive material having a portion outwardly beyond the pocket exposed for contact with said article to secure the carrier sheet thereto, said carrier sheet having a viewing window opposite said pocket and through which the pocket can be seen from said outer side of the carrier sheet, said first layer of the pocket being constructed opposite said window to enable viewing through said window and through said pocket of markings on an item contained in the pocket.

4. A packing unit to be applied to an article being shipped comprising a carrier sheet having inner and outer sides, a thin pocket formed of two layers of sheet material for receiving an item which carries markings, both layers of said pocket being formed separately from said carrier sheet but being adhesively secured to and carried by said carrier sheet prior to application of the carrier sheet and pocket as a unit to said article, adhesive material coating said inner side of the carrier sheet and having a first portion contacted by a first of said layers forming the pocket to secure it to the carrier sheet, said adhesive material having a portion outwardly beyond the pocket exposed for contact with said article to secure the carrier sheet thereto, said carrier sheet being constructed to enable viewing of said pocket therethrough from said outer side of the carrier sheet, and said first layer of the pocket forming a transparent wall adjacent the carrier sheet through which a person can view markings on an item in the pocket from said outer side of the carrier sheet.

5. A packing unit to be applied to an article being shipped comprising a carrier sheet having inner and outer sides, a thin pocket formed of two layers of sheet material for receiving an item which carries markings, both layers of said pocket being formed separately from said carrier sheet but being adhesively secured to and carried by said carrier sheet prior to application of the carrier sheet and pocket as a unit to said article, adhesive material coating said inner side of the carrier sheet and having a first portion contacted by a first of said layers forming the pocket to secure it to the carrier sheet, said adhesive material having a portion outwardly beyond the pocket exposed for contact with said article to secure the carrier sheet thereto, said carrier sheet having a viewing window opposite said pocket and through which the pocket can be seen from said outer side of the carrier sheet, said first layer of the pocket forming a transparent wall opposite said window and through which markings on an item contained in the pocket can be viewed.

6. A packing unit to be applied to an article being shipped comprising a carrier sheet having inner and outer sides, a thin pocket formed of two layers of sheet material for receiving an item which carries markings, both layers of said pocket being formed separately from said carrier sheet but being adhesively secured to and carried by said carrier sheet prior to application of the carrier sheet and pocket as a unit to said article, adhesive material coating said inner side of the carrier sheet and having a first portion contacted by a first of said layers forming the pocket to secure it to the carrier sheet, said adhesive material having a portion outwardly beyond and completely encircling the pocket exposed for contact with said article to secure the carrier sheet thereto, said carrier sheet being constructed to enable viewing of said pocket therethrough from said outer side of the carrier sheet, and said first layer of the pocket forming a transparent wall adjacent the carrier sheet through which a person can view markings on an item in the pocket from said outer side of the carrier sheet, said adhesive being a Waterproof pressure sensitive adhesive contacting said first layer of the pocket about said window to secure the pocket to the carrier sheet.

7. A packing unit as recited in claim 6, in which said transparent wall of the pocket is waterproof.

8. A packing unit as recited in claim 4, in which said transparent wall of the pocket is waterproof.

9. The combination comprising an article to be shipped, a packing uni-t as recited in claim 1 adhered to said article, and an item in said pocket carrying markings visible from the outer side of said carrier sheet.

10. The combination comprising an article to be shipped, a packing unit as recited in claim 6 adhered to said article, and an item in said pocket carrying markings visible from the outer side of said carrier sheet.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,099,007 11/ 1937 Elmore 229-72 2, 170,147 8/1939 Lane. 3,155,234 11/1964 Knoll et al. 229--37 X 3,159,930 12/1964 Allen et al. 22937 X 3,199,769 8/1965 Hillman et al. 22974 FOREIGN PATENTS 426,682 4/1935 Great Britain.

JOSEPH R. LECLAIR, Primlary Examiner. D. M. BOCKENEK, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2099007 *Sep 23, 1935Nov 16, 1937Pilot Letter Label CoEnvelope
US2170147 *Jan 21, 1937Aug 22, 1939John D LanePackage of gummed bands or stickers
US3155234 *Jun 7, 1962Nov 3, 1964Knoll DavidShipping document jacket with protective identification cover
US3159930 *Jun 4, 1963Dec 8, 1964Dewar L AllenShipping means
US3199769 *Jan 27, 1964Aug 10, 1965Tension Envelope CorpLabel pocket
GB426682A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3530494 *Apr 25, 1968Sep 22, 1970Vincent J BarattaRibbon of bandages and dispenser
US3595247 *Aug 1, 1969Jul 27, 1971Campana William AnthonyHair roller pads
US3835992 *Oct 24, 1972Sep 17, 1974J AdamsBandage dispensing package
US4060168 *Oct 31, 1975Nov 29, 1977Fleming-Potter Company, Inc.Label construction
US4103821 *Jul 22, 1977Aug 1, 1978Pak-Well CorporationShipping envelope
US4807753 *Mar 14, 1988Feb 28, 1989Goldstein Nancy HDispenser and packaging for bandage strips
EP0126833A1 *May 25, 1983Dec 5, 1984Swefix AktiebolagDevice for dispensing plastic pockets to be applied to parcels
Classifications
U.S. Classification229/74, 206/820
International ClassificationB65D75/52
Cooperative ClassificationY10S206/82, B65D75/52
European ClassificationB65D75/52