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Publication numberUS3330527 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 11, 1967
Filing dateFeb 20, 1964
Priority dateFeb 20, 1964
Publication numberUS 3330527 A, US 3330527A, US-A-3330527, US3330527 A, US3330527A
InventorsIgnatius Nurkiewicz
Original AssigneeStop Fire Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fire extinguisher valve mechanism
US 3330527 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 11, 1967 I. NURKIEWICZ FIRE EXTINGUISHER VALVE MECHANISM Filed Feb. 20, 1964 lGNA T/US N URK IE W/CZ United States Patent Ofifice 3,330,527 FIRE EXTINGUISHER VALVE MECHANISM Ignatius Nu'rkiewicz, Princeton, N.J., assignor to Stop- Fire, Inc., Monmouth Junction, NJ. Filed Feb. 20, 1964, Ser. No. 346,233 2 Claims. (Cl. 251114) The present invention relates to discharge mechanisms for fire extinguishers, more particularly, to an improved valve mechanism adapted to discharge a powder fire extinguishing composition from an extinguisher of the fluid sealed pressure type.

In such fire exintguishers wherein the material for application to fires is in the form of a powder or finely divided solid particles which are fluid borne, and maintained under pressure for application to fires, it is essential that the valve mechanism for controlling the discharge of the material tightly close the fire extinguisher so as to prevent loss of pressure after use. It is particularly important that such discharge valve mechanisms repeatedly tightly close the fire extinguisher even after a number of uses. The valve must close tightly so as to prevent even a very slow leak of gas pressure from the fire extinguisher in order to obtain a reliable fire extinguisher which will function properly even after long periods of non-use.

Difl'iculties have been encountered, however, in providing a leakproof valve controlling the discharge of fluid borne powders from such fire extinguishers. Solid particles of the fire extinguishing composition tend to remain on the valve seat and are caught between the valve and its seat so as to prevent a tight seal of the valve. This failure of the valve to fully close often causes slow leakage which results in a loss of gas pressure. The gas pressure in such fire extinguishers must be maintained constant so that the fire extinguisher is ready for instant use even after long periods of storage.

It has also been observed that not only must the valve close fully during its operation so as to wipe solid particles off of the seat, but the length of the stroke of the valve should be positively and accurately controlled. By positively controlling the length of the stroke, the fire extinguishing composition can be discharged at the most effective rate as previously determined by the manufacturer.

It is therefore the principal object of this invention to provide a novel and improved discharge valve mechanism for powder fire extinguishers wherein fluid borne solid particles are discharged under pressure.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a discharge valve for powder fire extinguishers wherein complete closure of the valve is obtained even after repeated use so that the pressure within the fire extinguisher is maintained constant.

It is an additional object of the present invention to provide a discharge valve mechanism for a powder fire extinguisher wherein the stroke of the valve is positively and accurately controlled.

The discharge valve of the present invention essentially comprises a valve body having a valve seat therein comprising an annular wiping surface and anannular seating surface inclined so as to be directed toward the inlet of the valve. There is a valve member having a metal portion which seats upon the seating surface. The valve member also has a compressed resilient member which extends radially outwardly of the metal portion so as to engage the Wiping surface prior to the seating of the metal portion on the seating surface. As the resilient member moves along the wiping surface, any particles of powder adhering to this surface are wiped off and complete closure is obtained when the valve is seated. Since the closure position of the valve member is de- 3,330,527 Patented July 11, 1967 termined by the seating of the metal portion on a seating surface, the resilient member will be further compressed to the same degree at each closure of the valve with this degree of compression being predetermined to provide a leak-proof seal when the valve is closed.

A spring is provided to hold the valve in the closed position and an operating handle coacts with the valve stem to urge the valve against the force of the spring thereby to open the valve.

Other objects and advantages of the present invention will be apparent upon reference to the accompanying description when taken in conjunction with the following drawings wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a-vertical sectional view taken through the central axis of the valve and associated mechanism of this invention;

FIGURE 2 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view on an enlarged scale and illustrating the valve member and associated components in open position;

FIGURE 3 is a similar fragmentary vertical sectional view of the valve mechanism as in FIGURE 2, but illustrating the valve and associated components in closed position; I

FIGURE 4 is a fragmentary sectional view illustrating on an enlarged scale the inwardly flared seat surfaces and showing the angular displacement of these surfaces with respect to the horizontal; and

FIGURE 5 is a longitudinal sectional view of the valve member showing the several components thereof in position but prior to assembly.

With reference to the drawings wherein like reference symbols indicate the same parts throughout the various views, a specific embodiment of this invention will be described in detail.

With particular reference to FIGURE 1, there is indicated at 10 a pressurized container or cylinder in which is contained the powder fire extinguishing composition which is to be discharged. The pressurized container 10 comprises an upper internally threaded neck 12 which receives an externally threaded body portion 14 of a valve body 15. A valve member 16 is disposed within the valve body 15 so as to control the passage of the fire extinguishing powder which is contained in the cylinder 10. Upon opening of the valve member 16, the powder fire extinguishing composition is forced out through a pipe 17 which extends downwardly into the container and tden upwardly through the bore 18 of the valve body 15. The bore 18 comprises an inlet portion 18a and an outlet portion 18b which communicates with the discharge nozzle passage 19 upon which is mounted a connecting hose 20. The fire extinguishing powder is thus dischargedthrough the nozzle passage 19 and the hose 20 onto its objective.

Movement of the valve member 16 between its open and closed positions is accomplished by reciprocation of a valve stem21 which is slidably mounted in the valve body 15 and upon which the valve member 16 is mounted.

The principal features of theinvention relate to the arrangement of the valve member structure and valve seating areas wherein the valve seat surfaces are maintained free of any particles upon closure of the valve.

The valvemember 16 and its seating surface areas are constructed as shown in detail in FIGURES 2, 3 and 4,. The valve member 16 which is mounted on areduced diameter portion 22 of the valve stem 21 comprises a resilient member 23 madeof neoprene rubber, or may be made of a plastic, and which is resistant to abrasion and chemical action of the fire extinguishing composition. This resilient member 23 has a durometer hardness of 85. The resilient member 23 is compressed between an inverted saucer-shaped metal nut 26 and a cup-shaped nut 27 which is threaded on the lower end of the'valve stern portion 24. The lower extremity of the nut 27 is slotted at 29. The compression of the resilient member 23 is limited by a metal bushing 28 interposed between the metal nut 26 and the cup-shaped nut 27. If desired, the valve stem 21 with its reduced diameter portion 22, bushing 28 and metal nut 26 may be fabricated as a single unit.

The resilient member 23 is initially shaped to its approximate size, as shown in FIGURE 5 which illustrates the valve member components before assembly.

After the valve member has been assembled by screwing the cup-shaped nut 27 a predetermined distance onto the valve stem portion 24 so that the resilient member 23 is compressed to a predetermined degree as limited by the bushing 28, the valve member including the resilient member 23 is finished to dimension to obtain the proper shape and concentricity. By precisely measuring the distance to which the cup-shaped nut 27 is threaded onto the valve stem, and by finishing the resilient member 23 to dimension after assembly, a precise and uniform relationship is obtained between the several components of the valve member. The shape of the resilient member 23 after assembly of the valve member 16 may be seen in FIGURE 2.

During assembly of the valve member, the resilient member 23 is compressed between 25 %-35 of its total compressibility so that only a portion of the entire compressibility remains. Thus, a considerable amount of energy is stored in the compressed resilient member 23 but some resiliency remains. This resiliency manifests itself in that portion of the resilient member exposed between the metal nut 26 and cup-shaped nut 27. This remaining resiliency is utilized by the engagement of the peripheral surface 32 of the resilient member 23 to wipe the valve seat area 30 during closing of the valve. Thus, a considerable portion of the elasticity of the resilient member 23 is stored in the major portion of the resilient member 23 since only a small portion of this member is exposed and used in sealing of the valve during closmg.

The metal nut 26 has a peripheral tapered surface 35 which engages the compound conical-shaped valve seating area as illustrated in FIGURE 2, and indicated generally at 31; The valve seat 31 essentially comprises a plurality of tapering annular surfaces with the intermediate one of these tapering surfaces comprising a wiping seat area 30. The seat area 30 is wipingly engaged by the tapered peripheral surface area 32 of the resilient member 23 as shown in FIGURE 3, during closure of the valve member 16. Thus, no particles of powder will remain between the peripheral surface area 32 of the resilient member 23 and the seat area 30 when the valve is closed as shown in FIGURE 3. These particle-free surfaces result in a tight leakproof seal of the valve when closed.

The diameter of the tapered valve seat area 30 is substantially equal to the diameter of the inwardly tapered conical area 35 of the metal nut 26. Accordingly, when the conical area 35 of the metal nut 26 is seated on the tapered valve seat 34, there is formed a positive stop seating area. The precise moment of closing of the valve member is thus determined solely by the engagement of the conical area 35 against the surface area 34. The metal nut 26 is made of a tough and durable metal such as a nickel alloy or brass.

The resilient member 23 is finished to such a diameter so that this resilient member is slightly compressed to seal the valve when the metal nut 26 is seated on the surface area 34. This further small compression of the precompressed resilient member 23 results in the improved sealing characteristics of this valve member. The precise amount of compression occurring during closing is accurately limited by the positive stop provided by the engagement of the metal nut 26 with the surface area 34.

Any powder remaining between the conical area of the metal nut 26 and the seating area 34 will have no effect on the operation of this valve mechanism; since the seating area 34 is formed with a shallow pocket or recess to collect any adhering powder particles.

The valve seat further comprises an outwardly tapering annular surface 36 which connects the wiping seat portion 30 with the inlet end 18a of the bore. As may be seen in FIGURE 4, the wiping surface area 30 tapers upwardly and inwardly to form an angle of about 75 to the horizontal. The next adjacent positive stop seating area 34 is likewise tapered inwardly but at an angle of about 45% to the horizontal. These particular angular relationships and their coaction with the components of the valve member as described above, form the leakproof valve mechanism of the present invention.

The valve mechanism is actuated by urging downwardly an operating handle 40 by gripping the handle 40 and a grip 41 with the hand and applying pressure. The operating handle 40 is pivoted at 42 to the upper portion 43 of the valve body 15. An insert member 44 having a portion of hardened material at 45 is mounted on the operating handle 40 so as to frictionally engage the upper end of the valve stem 21. The length of the stroke of the valve member downwardly to the open position is limited by the engagement of the insert portion 45 with the abutment surface 47 on the valve body.

A locking lever 50, pivotably mounted at 52, is provided to lock the operating handle 40 in position to prevent accidental manipulation thereof. The upper end of locking lever 50 extends through a slot 56 in the operating handle 40 so as to provide a thumb actuable portion 57. The locking lever further comprises a cam projecting ear 58 which engages the under-surface of the operating handle 40 at 59 when the locking lever 50 is positioned as shown in FIGURE 1, so as to lock the operating handle with the valve being in the closed position.

The locking lever 50 is maintained in the locking position by a yieldable metallic button 60 comprising a friction disc 61 backed by a spring rubber pad or other resilient member 62 so as to continuously exert a predetermined quantity of friction brake pressure against a circular cam member 64 which is an integral part of the locking lever 50. The friction disc 61 yieldably engages a cam surface 66 of the cam member 64 and continuously maintains the locking lever under friction pressure. This structure enables the locking lever 50 to be moved to locked or unlocked position and the locking lever is then automatically retained in that position by the action of the friction brake button 60.

The valve is held in the closed position by a coil spring 68 which is positioned in the inlet end 18a of the bore 18 and has one end acting upon the lower surface of the cup-shaped nut 27. The other end of the spring acts on the bottom of a recess 70 provided in a plug 72 which is threaded into the open end of the bore, as shown at FIGURE 1.

In order that the fluid pressure in the container 10 of the fire extinguisher is indicated at all times, a pressure gauge (not shown) is mounted on the valve body 15 and communicates through suitable passages with the interior of the container 10. Such a gauge has been conventionally used, but if desired may be eliminated when utilizing the leakproof valve mechanism disclosed as this invention.

It is to be noted that the spring 68 maintains the valve in the closed position so that in order to open the valve a force is exerted against the valve stem by the operating handle against the force exerted by the spring. Further, since the valve member is positioned in the inlet end of the bore and the valve surfaces are inclined downwardly toward the inlet end, it can be seen that the pressure within the container also acts upon the valve member to maintain the valve member in a closed position.

Thus, this improved valve structure provides a valve member having a resilient member which both wipes the seating surface clean and seals the valve and the valve seat when the valve member is in the closed position.

As the valve is being closed, the upper edge of the peripheral surface 32 of the resilient member 23 will contact the wiping surface 30 and move along this surface to wipe away any particles adhering thereto. Thus, when the peripheral surface 32 of the resilient member is in the closed position and compressed, as shown in FIGURE 3, there will be no solid particles between the resilient member and the wiping surface 30. Accordingly, a tight seal will be provided by the intimate engagement of the resilient member 23 with the tapering wiping surface 30.

The particular angular relationships of the valve seating areas and coacting valve surfaces, together with further compression of a precompressed resilient member on the valve provide a highly efiicient valve mechanism which functions to seal completely the pressure cylinder after each use. This valve thus prevents any loss of fluid pressure from the cylinder upon each closure of the valve even after long periods of storage.

It will be understood that this invention is susceptible to modification in order to adapt it to different usages and conditions and, accordingly, it is desired to comprehend such modifications within this invention as may fall within the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. In a fire extinguisher, in combination, a discharge head connectable with a pressurizable container for holding fire extinguishing material which is discharged therefrom through said head as gas borne material, a movable valve member for controlling the discharge of said fire extinguishing material and comprising a resilient member having -a peripheral wiping surface area, said valve member including a metal portion which is engageable with an inwardly inclined valve seat area directed toward said metal portion, said valve seat area having a wiping seat surface which is engageable by said resilient member and a positive valve stop seating surface which is engageable by said valve member metal portion, a spring urging said valve member metal portion against said positive valve stop seating surface, an operating handle pivoted on said dicharge head and movable in engagement With said movable valve member for unseating said valve again-st the force of said spring, cam means on said fire extinguisher and a locking lever actuating said cam means for locking said operating handle in an inoperative position and positionable in the locking and unlocking positions.

2. In a fire extinguisher, in combination, a discharge head connectable with a pressurizable container for holding fire extinguishing material which is discharged therefrom through said head as gas borne material, a movable valve member for controlling the discharge of said fire extinguishing material and comprising a resilient member having a peripheral wiping surface area, said valve member including a metal portion which is engageable with an inwardly inclined valve seat area directed toward said metal portion, said valve seat area having a wiping seat surface which is engageable by said resilient member and a positive valve stop seating surface which is engageable by said valve member metal portion, a spring urging said valve member metal portion against said positive valve stop seating surface, an operating handle pivoted on said discharge head and movable in engagement with said movable valve member for unseating said valve against the force of said spring, a cam actuating locking lever for locking said operating handle in an inoperative position, and means comprising a yieldable member coacting with a cam means integral with said locking lever for continuously maintaining said locking lever under friction brake pressure.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 960,912 6/1910 Heany 251-116 2,485,092 10/ 1949 Gannon 251-332 2,904,305 9/1959 Novotny 251332 3,009,681 11/1961 Carter et a1 251-332 ALAN COHAN, Primary Examiner. M. CARY NELSON, Examiner. R. C. MILLER, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US960912 *Apr 16, 1909Jun 7, 1910Heany Lamp CompanyPiston-valve.
US2485092 *May 20, 1944Oct 18, 1949Fluid Control Engineering CoValve construction
US2904305 *Jul 11, 1957Sep 15, 1959Novotny Milton ADischarge control apparatus for powder fire extinguisher
US3009681 *Dec 30, 1955Nov 21, 1961Casco Products CorpFire extinguisher valves
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3396937 *Mar 28, 1966Aug 13, 1968Standard Machine & Mfg CompanyLatch mechanism for spray gun
US3396939 *Apr 25, 1966Aug 13, 1968James Pond & Clark IncHigh-pressure bleed valve
US3473783 *Aug 24, 1966Oct 21, 1969Self Richard EHigh-flow capacity balanced spindle valve
US4105164 *Nov 26, 1976Aug 8, 1978Binks Manufacturing CompanyTrigger lock mechanism for spray guns
US4512369 *Nov 24, 1982Apr 23, 1985Niigata Engineering Co., Ltd.Emergency disconnector for fluid loading and unloading lines
US8297593 *Sep 28, 2007Oct 30, 2012Luxembourg Patent Company S.A.Valve, namely for bottles for ultra-high purity gas
US20070246099 *Mar 12, 2007Oct 25, 2007Pacific Industrial Co., Ltd.Valve core
US20100001222 *Sep 28, 2007Jan 7, 2010Luxembourg Patent Company S.A.Valve, namely for bottles for ultra-high purity gas
WO1984002967A1 *Jan 19, 1984Aug 2, 1984Swagelok CoCoupling
Classifications
U.S. Classification251/114, 251/332
International ClassificationA62C13/00
Cooperative ClassificationA62C13/003
European ClassificationA62C13/00B