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Publication numberUS3330558 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 11, 1967
Filing dateApr 27, 1964
Priority dateApr 27, 1964
Publication numberUS 3330558 A, US 3330558A, US-A-3330558, US3330558 A, US3330558A
InventorsJr William H Simons
Original AssigneeRay Lunceford
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Torsional twist manual exerciser device
US 3330558 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 11, 1967 w. H. SIMONS, JR

TORSIONAL TWIST MANUAL EXERCISER DEVICE 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed April 27, 1964 ATTORNEYS a; MA NH NH EH WA Winn III II IN] m UHIW July 11, 1967 w, H SIMONS, JR

TORSIONAL TWIST MANUAL EXERCISER DEVICE 2 Sheets-Sheet 2.

Filed April 27, 1964 INVENTOR 5 m M. 5 H M A l L m w ATTORNEYS United States Patent Office 3,330,558 Patented July 11, 1967 3,330,558 TORSIONAL TWIST MANUAL EXERCISER DEVICE William H. Simons, Jr., Silver Spring, Md., assignor of one-half to Ray Lunceford, Silver Spring, Md. Filed Apr. 27, 1964, Ser. No. 362,759 20 Claims. (Cl. 27268) The present invention relates to exerciser devices, and more particularly, to an improved manual exerciser device that is especially useful for exercising and strengthening the joints and muscles of the wrists and forearms, thereby promoting a stronger, firmer and more controllable grip and action of the users hands and wrists.

My exerciser device is a great aid to many classes of users, including those engaged in such sports as golf, baseball, football, tennis, bowling, archery, harness race driving, small boat racing, etc., as well as for therapeutic applications in hospitals, clinics, sanitariums and in the private home in cases of persons suffering from arthritis, rheumatism, strokes, poor blood circulation, or recovering from sprained or broken arms or wrists. It is additionally useful in professional occupational fields where firm and steady hands, with a high degree of controllability, is desired or required, as in the case of dentists, surgeons, chiropracters, tool-makers, cabinet-makers, sculptors, boxers, wrestlers, etc. It is to be understood, however, that my invention is not confined to these uses, and that those specifically mentioned represent only a few practical examples of many, as will be obvious from the following description.

One of the primary objects of the invention is to provide an exerciser device of this character which is simple in construction, yet effective in operation, and also relatively inexpensive in cost. To this end, the device is preferably composed of only a few component parts, almost all of which can preferably be made of an appropriate moldable plastic composition such as high-impact, light-weight polypropylene or its equivalent. Polypropylene has the properties of great durability and high resistance to heavy and sharp impacts, crushing and cracking, warping, heat fatigue (both intermittently to slightly above 450 F. and continuously to above 200 F.), Weather elements, including the effects of sun, substantial immunity to alkalis and most acids, as well as being susceptible to high production yield which makes it possible to form the components of my exerciser by injection molding at a high speed or rate. Polypropylene also readily lends itself to tooling, if any tooling is desired or required, without injury to the tools, although in the case of my exerciser device, little or no tooling is usually required. It also lends itself to production in a wide range of colors. When the components of my device are molded therefrom, they may be ejected from the mold while still hot (even as hot as 190 P.) which greatly contributes to the high rate of production with a minimum of molding and manufacturing equipment. The naturally smooth surface of such a plastic composition not only enhances the appearance of my device, but contributes greatly to the comfort of the users grip thereon, as well as reduces the danger of blistering and soreness of the users hands even under conditions of prolonged and/or frequently repeated periods of use, as attributable at least in part to the fact that polypropylene is a very poor conductor of heat, whether the heat is produced by friction or tends to be absorbed from contact with the users hands. The self-lubrication properties of such material also results in less internal friction and assures a smooth-working and long-lasting exerciser device, with little or no special care reqquired, and rarely if any repair or replacement of any component parts. Being the lightest in weight of all thermoplastic, it affords greater comfort to the user and substantially lowers the cost of handling and shipping the finished devices.

A still further object of my invention is to provide an exerciser device of the aforementioned type which is capable of operation by a twisting action of the hands in either direction but relatively opposite to each other, while smoothly increasing the resistance to the twist in proportion to the degree of force applied by the users hands in which the device is gripped, with the hands normally disposed in a more or less contiguous side-by-side position.

Another object of the invention is to provide an exerciser device as referred to in the foregoing which permits simple and quick variation of resistance to twisting forces without adversely affecting smoothness of operation, as desired to avoid undue strain during first or other early stages of use, or to accommodate users of different classes, according to age, physical strength, sex or other factors.

Still another object of my invention is to provide an improved twistable exerciser device embodying a pair of tubular hand-grip members disposed in contiguous endto-end relation on a common central longitudinal axis and operatively interconnected with each other to prevent axial separation thereof during exercising use, but allowing relative rotative movements therebetween, said tubular members having a substantially rigid longitudinally extended core member coaxially disposed with in same, with the major length of the core member spaced radially inwardly from the interior surface of the tubular members, and one or more axially elongated flexible resilient members, preferably in the form of straight lengths of music wire or spring steel rod, disposed between the core member and the interior surface of the tubular members, but adjacent and substantially parallel to the core member, with the opposite ends of the flexible resilient member or members operatively connected to the respective tubular members so that at least a portion of the flexible resilient member or members is free to bend or flex about the core member substantially in the form of a helix of relatively low pitch responsive to relative rotative movements of the tubular members in opposite direction. By utilizing such music wire or spring steel rod members as referred to above, unlimited bending movements without breakage or permanent distortion are assured under conditions normally encountered in the use of my exerciser device, while having the ability to always return to their original straight shape. Moreover, they have the further important advantages of being the simplest to manufacture of all spring forms, require no expensive shaping tools, jigs or forms. No close tolerances need be observed other than a reasonable adherence to wire size or diameter, and they lend themselves readily to highspeed machine or hand assembly, without the aid of special spreading or compression tools or other expensive assembly equipment.

My invention further contemplates an exerciser device as noted in the immediately preceding paragraph, wherein the resistance to twisting of the tubular hand grips and consequent bending or flexing of the resilient member or members which preferably are of filamentary form, may be easily and quickly varied by selective variation of the fulcrum afforded by the core member to change the bending moments of the resilient member or members, or by selectively increasing or decreasing the number of resilient members assembled in the device as desired, or by a combination of both types of variations.

Other and further objects and advantages of the invention will be hereinafter described or will be apparent from the following description, and the novel features thereof will be defined in the appended claims.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of an exerciser device according to one embodiment of my invention;

FIG. 2 is a view in longitudinal cross-section as taken centrally through the device of FIG. 1 on an enlarged and substantially full-size scale, and additionally showing partly in section and partly in elevation a typical tool as used to compress the ends of the central core member to enable disassembly of the device;

FIG. 3 is a view in elevation of the device of FIG. 2, with a portion of each hand grip broken away to expose the interior details of the device, with the resilient members being shown in one typical flexed condition about the central core member as the result of twisting the hand grips in relative opposite directions as indicated by the arrows in this view:

FIG. 4 is an exploded perspective view of the device of FIGS. 1 to 3;

FIG. 5 is a view in end elevation of one of the hand grips, corresponding to the right-hand one as viewed in FIGS. 2 to 4, as viewed in looking toward the inner end thereof and with the resilient members removed therefrom;

FIG. 6 is a corresponding end elevation of the opposite or left-hand hand grip;

FIG. 7 is a transverse sectional view as taken on the line 7-7 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 8 is an end elevation of one of the slotted compressible end heads of the central core member;

FIG. 9 is a longitudinal central sectional view generally corresponding to FIG. 2, but illustrating a modified embodiment of the invention having an axially shiftable central core member as represented in full and broken lines, respectively illustrating the general limits of axial movement of the core member;

FIG. 10 is a view of said modified embodiment as subjected to twisting of the hand grips under conditions generally corresponding to that of FIG. 3, and showing one of the flexed conditions of the interior flexible members when the central core member is in a position intermediate the full and dotted line positions of FIG. 9.

FIG. 11 is a perspective exploded view of the modified embodiment of FIGS. 9 and 10;

FIG. 12 is a transverse sectional view as taken on the line 12-12 of FIG. 9;

FIG. 13 is an end elevation view of one of the grip members as seen looking toward the inner end thereof;

FIG. 14 is an enlarged perspective view of the connector sleeve;

FIG. 15 is a detailed end elevation of the connector sleeve or bushing as seen from one end thereof; and

FIG. 16 is a detailed end elevation of the connector sleeve of FIG. 15 as seen from the opposite end thereof.

Like reference characters designate corresponding elements in the various figures of the drawings.

Referring first to FIGS. 1 to 8 inclusive of the drawings, the elements designated 1 and 2 have the general form of tubular members disposed in contiguous end-to-end relation on a common central longitudinal axis and constituting a pair of generally similar hand grips or handles which may be conveniently and comfortably grasped and firmly gripped by the hands of the user of the exerciser device. The exterior surfaces of said hand grips at their contiguous inner ends are preferably marked or calibrated as best seen in FIG. 1, to indicate the etxent of relative rotative movements of the tubular grip members during exercising use, as by a zero indicator line 3 on the member 1 which is normally aligned with a corresponding zero line 4 on the member 2, the latter member also having additional graduations 5 on each side of the zero line 4.

One of the hand grips, such as 2, is axially extended to provide an elongated tubular sleeve 6 which snugly fits within the bore 7 provided in the opposed member 1, with the sleeve being freely rotatable within the bore to allow the members 1 and 2 to be rotatively displaced relative to each other responsive to twisting motions in opposite directions as imparted to the hand grips by the users hands.

Both members 1 and 2 are further provided with reduced central bores respectively designated 8 and 9, each terminating in counterbores of somewhat larger diameter formed within the outer ends of the members 1 and 2, said counterbores being respectively designated 10 and 11.

Extending coaxially within the members 1 and 2 is a central core member or spreader 12 of generally cylindrical form, but preferably of stepped dimensions defining a plurality of annular shoulders as indicated at 1313 and 1414. As best seen in FIGS. 2 and 4, the core member 12 is largest in diameter at its mid-portion, but is spaced radially inwardly from the interior surfaces of the tubular members 1 and 2 and the sleeve 6 lying between the bores 8 and 9 in which the opposite outer ends of the core member are snugly but freely slidably fitted.

At each extreme outer end of the core member 12, there is provided a slightly enlarged head as at 1515, each head defining an annular radially extended shoulder as at 16, and each head preferably being diametrically slotted as at 17, with the slots of each head being disposed at right angles to each other and preferably being extended into the body of the core member 12 somewhat inwardly beyond the shoulders 16.

All of the component parts as described in the foregoing and consisting of only three elements, may be readily formed of an appropriate moldable thermo-plastic composition, preferably high-impact polypropylene or its equivalent, thereby attaining the many and important advantages as more particularly described at the commencement hereof.

For the purpose of yieldably resisting rotative movements of the grip members 1 and 2 relative to each other when my exerciser device is in use, it is provided with one or more resilient members 18, each being preferably of filamentary form such as a suitable straight length of spring steel wire or rod (commonly known as music wire) of relatively small but appropriate diameter to afford suitable stiffness thereto. In the illustrated embodiment of my invention, I have utilized six resilient members 18, but it is to be understood that the invention is not limited to this number which can be increased or diminished as desired. For all practical purposes, the multiple wire arrangement as shown suflices to provide the maximum resistance desirable for the exerciser device of this kind, and allows easy and quick removval of as many of the resilient members as may be desired, according to the particular conditions of use and/ or the age, strength or sex of the user.

To this end, the opposite ends of the members 18 are snugly but slidably seated in sockets 19 provided interiorly of the respective grip members 1 and 2, with the members 18 equidistantly spaced from each other and parallel to the control core 12 and slightly spaced therefrom, with each member 18 being free to flex in the manner of a bending or wrapping action about the body of the core 12 responsive to relative rotative or twisting movements of the hand grips 1, 2. Thus, my exerciser device employs bending moments of straight spring steel wire or rods, rather than torque or torsion forces imposed on a resistive element, to achieve the resisting or opposing motivative force within it. The central core 12 prevents the assembly of resilient members 18 from collapsing together as the bending of the members 18 increases toward the maximum limit and thus acts as a spreader, but allows each individual wire or rod to bend around the core or spreader in the form of a helix of relatively low pitch, as shown somewhat exaggerated in FIG. 3. As the bending forces increase, the wires or rods approach and ultimately cont-act the core successively at the shoulders 13 and 14 which serve as fulcrum points during the later stages of the bending action and assure a smooth transition of the progressively increasing resistance to twisting of the hand grips or handles 1, 2, without sudden jerks or other irregular actions, thereby contributing to the users comfort and benefit.

In assembling my exerciser device, which may be readily performed by hand or by machine or in part by both, the resilient wires or rods 18 are first loaded in one of the hand grips or handles 1 or 2, or partly in each, as by inserting the members 18 end-wise into the sockets 19 which may be flared or belled outwardly at their open ends to facilitate such insertion. Thereafter, the core of spreader 12 may be fully or partially inserted in at least one of the grip members 1 or 2 and the grip members are then moved end-wise toward each other until the wires or rods 18 are fully seated in the sockets 19 of both grip members, while at the same time, the ends of the core 12 are forced through the bores 8 and 9 until the heads 15 and 16 emerge and lie within the respective counterbores 19 and 11, with the shoulders 16 of each head positioned outwardly beyond the shoulders 20 and 21 at the base of the respective counter-bores and 11. During the assembly as just described, the slots 17 in the heads allow the heads to be compressed as the heads are slidably forced through the bores 8 and 9, and then the heads Will automatically expand to a normally uncompressed condition, with the shoulders 16 overhanging the shoulders 20, 21 to prevent axial separation of the hand grips 1, 2 during normal exercising use.

Relative rotative movements of the hand grips 1, 2 are preferably limited to a maximum of about 180, as by providing an inwardly projecting stop lug 22 on the extreme inner end of the sleeve 6 and a corresponding stop lug or abutment 23 within the bore 7 of hand grip 1 for cooperative engagement with lug 22 in either direction of relative rotative or twisting movements of the members 1, 2.

To permit disassembly of the device, as for the purpose of removing one or more of the wire or rod members 18 to reduce the resistance of the device while in use, as the circumstances may require or make it desirable, an appropriate tool, as designated 24 in FIG. 2, may be employed to compress either or both heads 15 of the core or spreader 12, thereby permitting the head or heads to freely pass through the bore or bores 8, 9 on pulling the grip members 1, 2 apart axially, i.e., away from each other end-wise. As shown in FIG. 2, the tool 24 is in the form of a hollow tube, at least at one end as at 25, with the extremity of the tube outwardly flared or belled somewhat to receive and compress the rounded extremity of the core head with an inward wedging action when the tool 24 is forced against the head in the direction of the arrow 26 in FIG. 2. The interior diameter of the tubular portion 25 of the tool 24 is less than the diameter of the head when compressed so that the head cannot completely enter the tool, thus limiting engagement of the tool with only the extreme outer end of the head but far enough onto the end of the head to compress the same to an extent sufficient to retract the shoulder 16 from engagement with the shoulder or 21, as the case may be, thereby allowing the core to be withdrawn through the hand grip or grips, as will be obvious.

Referring now to the modified embodiment of my invention as shown in FIGS. 9 to 16 of the drawings, the hand grips or handles 1, 2 are generally similar to those of the first-described form of the exerciser device, but are identical to each other and therefore can be formed in the same or identical molds. Each hand grip has a relatively large main hexagonal bore 7 extending from near its inner end, with a smaller cylindrical bore 8' extended outwardly therefrom to an enlarged cylindrical counter-bore 10. In this modification, the hand grips are connected together by a separate sleeve or collar 6' having a pair of annular ribs or beads 27, 27 formed on the exterior thereof near the respective opposite ends of the sleeve, as best shown in FIGS. 9, 11 and 14. When assembled, the sleeve snugly fits in the contiguous inner ends of the members 1', 2', with the beads seating in annular grooves 28 formed about the inner surfaces of the grip members near the inner ends of the same, but

allowing rotative or twisting movements of the grip members relative to each other. To permit the annular beads 27, 27 of the sleeve 6' to pass into the respective inner ends of the hand grips 1, 2', each end of the sleeve is longitudinally slotted, as best seen in FIGS. 11, and 14 to 16, said slots being designated 29. Preferably three slots are provided in each end, with the slots preferably spaced as indicated in FIGS. 15 and 16, and the slots at one end being displaced relative to those at the opposite end, and each slot terminating near the middle of the sleeve. These slots allow both ends of the sleeve to contract sufiiciently as it is axially forced into the hand grips 1', 2 until the respective beads 27, 27 snap into the grooves 28, 28. By applying a substantial pulling force axially on the hand grips to separate the same, the sleeve will likewise contract at least at one end and allow one hand grip to be displaced axially away from the other.

One end of the sleeve 6 is extended as at 22' to provide a stop lug or abutment for cooperation with a corresponding stop lug or abutment 23' provided in each identical hand grip so that the sleeve 6 can be assembled with the stop lug 22 received in either hand grip. In order to orient the sleeve 6' so that the stop lug 22 will be normally spaced diametrically opposite the cooperative stop lug 23' in the hand grip in which the stop lug 22 is received during assembly of the exerciser device, the opposite end of the sleeve 6' is provided with a notch 30 in which the stop lug 23' within the opposing hand grip is received. Thus, the sleeve 6 cannot rotate relative to one hand grip, but allows free rotative movements of the opposed hand grip on the sleeve, with this latter rotation limited by the cooperative stop lugs 22, 23 within said opposed hand grip to the extent of about In this modified embodiment of the invention, the central core or spreader 12 is free to shift axially within the hand grips 1', 2', as indicated by the arrows in FIGS. 9 and 10. As seen in FIG. 9, the core 12 is shown in full lines at the limit of its axial movement leftward, and in broken lines near the limit of its axial movement rightward, while in FIG. 10, the core is shown in a position intermediate these limits. By applying pressure axially on one end or the other of the core, as imparted thereto by a finger of the users hand, or by any appropriate tool which will freely fit in the bores 10' of the hand grips, the core can be shifted axially to any desired position within its opposite limits referred to in the foregoing. This arrangement allows simple, easy and quick variation of the resistance to twisting of the hand grips 1', 2 relative to each other in a manner which will not be described.

As in the first-described embodiment, similar straight lengths of spring steel wire or rods 18', preferably six in number, are employed in the modified embodiment, with the opposite ends of the wires held captive in sockets 19 provided in the identical hand grips 1', 2', with the wires being freely insertable and displaceable at will to vary the number used at one time, according to the users requirements or desires. As best shown in FIGS. 9 to 11, the central core or spreader member 12 is provided with an annular enlargement 31 preferably of hexagonal configuration, with six equidistantly spaced small bores 32 extended axially therethrough adjacent to the outer periphery thereof and through which the wires or rods 18' are freely slidable in assembling the exerciser device and in axially shifting the core 12 as previously described. The position of the member 31 thus can be utilized to vary the effective length of the wires or rods, with consequent variation of the resistance to rotative or twisting movements of the hand grips 1', 2'. The bores 7 of the respective hand grips 1', 2' are preferably of hexagonal cross-section beyond the extreme ends of the connector 7 sleeve 6' and throughout the zone in which the member 31 is shiftable.

It will be noted from FIGS. 9 and 11 that the enlargement 31 of the core or spreader 12' is formed thereon somewhat closer to one end of the core than the other so that the maximum effective length of the wires or rods 18 occurs when the enlargement abuts the shoulder 33 within the hand grip 1, at which time the extreme left-hand end of the core is disposed substantially at the outer end of the bore of hand grip 1', while the extreme right hand end of the core is retracted somewhat inwardly beyond the bottom of the bore 10' in the opposed hand grip 2'.

Axially spaced from the enlargement 31 of the core, but axially spaced inwardly from the extreme opposite end of the core, there is provided a single annular shoulder 13 which suflices in this embodiment as a fulcrum point for the wires or rods 18 in the same manner and for the same purpose as the shoulders 13, 14 in the first-described embodiment. However, in the modified embodiment, the shoulder 13 shifts with axial shifting movements of the core and cooperates with the effective length of each wire or rod as the latter flex about the core with a helical bending action of low pitch responsive to twisting or rotative movements of the hand grips 1, 2 relative to each other in either direction.

It is obvious from the foregoing that the modified embodiment of my invention as shown in FIGS. 9 to 16 provides for instantaneous adjustment of the resistive forces of the exerciser device as achieved by what may be generally termed a push-button control, said push buttons being represented by the extreme opposite cylindrical ends of the core or spreader 12 which are accessible from one or the other ends of the device. When the cfiective length of the resilient wires or rods 18' is reduced by shifting the core to the right, as viewed in FIGS. 9 and 10, the bending moments of the wires or rods are increased relative to the number of degrees the hand grips or handles 1, 2 are twisted or rotated relative to each other in either direction, and vice versa.

As in the case of the first-described embodiment, the modified embodiment of my invention is composed of only a few component elements, and with the exception of the wires or rods 18, all of the components may be formed of molded plastic, preferably polypropylene or its equivalent, and all of the components readily lend themselves to either machine or hand assembly.

While the specific details of the invention have been described in the foregoing, the invention is not confined thereto as other changes and alterations may be made without departing from the spirit thereof as defined in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. An exerciser device of the class described, comprising a pair of tubular hand grips disposed in contiguous end-to-end relation on a common central longitudinal axis, said hand grips being operatively interconnected with each other so as to normally maintain their contiguous relation aforesaid, but permitting rotative movements thereof relative to each other about their common axis during exercising use, a central longitudinally extended generally cylindrical core member disposed coaxially within said hand grips in radially inwardly spaced relation thereto for a substantial portion of its length and having at least one bearing fulcrum intermediate its ends, and at least one longitudinally extended flexible resilient member disposed within the hand grips and normally lying substantially parallel to the central core member, said resilient member being connected at its opposite ends with the respective hand grips so that it is free to flex helically about the core member and into bearing contact with the fulcrum aforesaid responsive to relative rotative movements imparted to the respective hand grips in opposite directions, While yieldably resisting such relative rotative movements in proportion to the degree of relative rotation thereof.

2. An exerciser device of the class described, comprising a pair of tubular hand grips disposed in contiguous end-to-end relation on a common central longitudinal axis, said hand grips being operatively interconnected with each other so as to normally maintain their contiguous relation aforesaid, but permitting rotative movements thereof relative to each other about their common axis during exercising use, a central longitudinally extended generally cylindrical core member disposed coaxially within said hand grips in radially inwardly spaced relation thereto for a substantial portion of its length and having at least one bearing fulcrum intermediate its ends, and at least one longitudinally extended flexible resilient member of filamentary form disposed within the hand grips and normally lying substantially parallel to the central core member, said resilient member being connected at its opposite ends with the respective hand grips so that it is free to flex helically about the core member and into bearing contact with the fulcrum aforesaid responsive to relative rotative movements imparted to the respective hand grips in opposite directions, while yieldably resisting such relative rotative movements in proportion to the degree of relative rotation thereof.

3. An exerciser device of the class described, comprising a pair of tubular hand grips disposed in contiguous end-to-end relation on a common central longitudinal axis, said hand grips being operatively interconnected with each other so as to normally maintain their contiguous relation aforesaid, but permitting rotative movements thereof relative to each other about their common axis during exercising use, a central longitudinally extended generally cylindrical core member disposed coaxially within said hand grips in radially inwardly spaced relation thereto for a substantial portion of its length and having at least one bearing fulcrum intermediate its ends, and a plurality of longitudinally extended flexible resilient members disposed within the hand grips and normally lying substantially parallel to the central core member, said resilient members being connected at their opposite ends with the respective hand grips so that they are free to flex helically about the core member and into bearing contact with the fulcrum aforesaid responsive to relative rotative movements imparted to the respective hand grips in opposite directions, while yieldably resisting such relative rotative movements in proportion to the degree of relative rotation thereof.

4. An exerciser device of the class described, comprising .a pair of tubular hand grips disposed in contiguous end-to-end relation on a common central longitudinal axis, said hand grips being operatively interconnected with each other so as to normally maintain their contiguous relation aforesaid, but permitting rotative movements thereof relative to each other about their common axis during exercising use, a central longitudinally extended generally cylindrical core member disposed coaxially within said hand grips in radially inwardly spaced relation thereto for a substantial portion of its length and having at least one bearing fulcrum intermediate its ends, and a plurality of longitudinally extended equidistantly spaced flexible resilient members of filamentary form disposed within the hand grips and normally lying substantially parallel to the central core member, said resilient members being connected at their opposite ends with the respective hand grips so that they are free to flex helically about the core member and into bearing contact with the fulcrum aforesaid responsive to relative rotative movements imparted to the respective hand grips in opposite directions, while yieldably resisting such relative rotative movements in proportion to the degree of relative rotation thereof.

5. An exerciser device of the class described, comprising a pair of tubular hand grips disposed in contiguous end-to-end relation on a common central longitudinal axis, said hand grips being operatively interconnected with each other so as to normally maintain their contiguous relation aforesaid, but permitting rotative movements thereof relative to each other about their common axis during exercising use, a central longitudinally extended generally cylindrical core member disposed coaxially within said hand grips in radially inwardly spaced relation thereto for a substantial portion of its length and having at least one bearing fulcrum intermediate its ends, and at least one longitudinally extended flexible resilient member disposed Within the hand grips and normally lying substantially parallel to but spaced from the central core member, said resilient member being connected at its opposite ends with the respective hand grips so that it is free to flex helically about the core member and into bearing contact with the fulcrum aforesaid responsive to relative rotative movements imparted to the respective hand grips in opposite directions while yieldably resisting such relative rotative movements in proportion to the degree of relative rotation thereof.

6. An exerciser device of the class described, comprising a pair of tubular hand grips disposed in contiguous end-to-end relation on a common central longitudinal axis, said hand grips being operatively interconnected with each other so as to normally maintain their contiguous relation aforesaid, but permitting rotative movements thereof relative to each other about their common axis during exercising use, a central longitudinally extended generally cylindrical core member disposed coaxially within said hand grips in radially inwardly spaced relation thereto for a substantial portion of its length and having at least one bearing fulcrum intermediate its ends, and at least one longitudinally extended flexible resilient member disposed within the hand grips and normally lying substantially parallel to the central core member, said resilient member being soeketed at its opposite ends within the respective hand grips so that it is free to flex helically about the core member and into bearing contact with the fulcrum aforesaid responsive to relative rotative movements imparted to the respective hand grips in opposite directions, while yieldably resisting such relative rotative movements in proportion to the degree of relative rotation thereof.

7. An exerciser device of the class described, comprising a pair of tubular hand grips disposed in contiguous endto-end relation on a common central longitudinal axis, said hand grips being operatively interconnected with each other so as to normally maintain their contiguous relation aforesaid, but permitting rotative movements thereof relative to each other about their common axis during exercising use, a central longitudinally extended generally cylindrical core member disposed coaxially within said hand grips in radially inward-1y spaced relation thereto for a substantial portion of its length and having at least one bearing fulcrum intermediate its ends, and at least one longitudinally extended flexible resilient member disposed Within the hand grips and normally lying substantially parallel to the central core member, said resilient member being slip-fitted at its opposite ends within the respective hand grips so that it is free to flex helically about the core member and into bearing contact with the fulcrum aforesaid responsive to relative rotative movements imparted to the respective hand grips in opposite directions, while yieldably resisting such relative rotative movements in proportion to the degree of relative rotation thereof.

8. An exerciser device of the class described, comprising a pair of tubular hand grips disposed in contiguous end-to-end relation on a common central longitudinal axis, said hand grips being operatively interconnected with each other so as to normally maintain their contiguous relation aforesaid, but permitting rotative movements thereof relative to each other about their common axis during exercising use, a central longitudinally extended generally cylindrical core member disposed co- 10 axially within said hand grips in radially inwardly spaced relation thereto for a substantial portion of its length, at least one longitudinally extended flexible resilient member disposed within the hand grips and normally lying substantially parallel to the central core member, said resilient member being connected at its opposite ends with the respective hand grips so that it is free to flex helically about the core member responsive to relative rotative movements imparted to the respective hand grips in opposite directions, while yieldably resisting such relative rotative movements in proportion to the degree of relative rotation thereof, and the core member having at least one annular enlargement intermediate its ends and defining a fulcrum for contact with the flexible resilient member during flexing of the latter to change the bending moment of the resilient member as the flexing action continues beyond a predetermined amount, thereby assuring a smoothly progressive transition of resistance to flexing thereof responsive to relative rotative movements of the hand grips.

9. An exerciser device as defined in claim 1, wherein the core member is axially shiftable to different positions to vary the position of the fulcrum contact with the resilient member and the effective length of the resilient member and consequently vary the bending moments thereof to a greater or less degree according to the selected positions of the core member.

10. An exerciser device as defined in claim 1, wherein the core member is interlockingly interengaged at its opposite ends with the respective hand grips to normally maintain the contiguous coaxial relation of the hand grips during exercising use.

11. An exerciser device as defined in claim 1, wherein the core member is interlockingly interengaged at its opposite ends with the respective hand grips to normally maintain the continguous coaxial relation of the hand grips during exercising use, but being releasable from interlocking engagement with the hand grips to permit axial separation thereof from each other and from the core member.

12. An exerciser device as defined in claim 1, wherein the core member terminates at each end in the form of a head defining an annular shoulder for normal cooperative rotatably abutting engagement with an interior annular shoulder within the respective hand grips, said heads on the core member being compressible to disengage the annular shoulders aforesaid and thereby allow axial separation of the hand grips from each other and from the core member.

13. An exerciser device as defined in claim 1, wherein the hand grips and the core member are formed of moldable plastic material.

14. An exerciser device as defined in claim 1, wherein the hand grips and the core member are formed of highimpact polypropylene material.

15. An exerciser device as defined in claim 1, wherein the core member terminates at each end in the form of a head defining an annular shoulder for normal cooperative rotatably abutting engagement with an interior annular shoulder within the respective hand grips, said heads on the core member being compressible to disengage the annular shoulders aforesaid and thereby allow axial separation of the hand grips from each other and from the core member, and the resilient member has the form of a normally straight length of spring steel Wire or rod.

16. An exerciser device of the class described comprising a pair of tubular members disposed in contiguous end-to-end relation on a common central longitudinal axis and operatively interconnected with each other to prevent axial separation thereof while allowing relative rotative movements therebetween during exercising use, a substantially rigid central longitudinally extended core member disposed Within the tubular members in radially inwardly spaced relation thereto for a substantial part of its length and having at least one bearing fulcrum intermediate its ends, and at least one axially elongated flexible resilient member having its opposite ends operatively connected with the respective tubular members while normally disposed intermediate its ends adjacent and parallel to the core member aforesaid and free to bend helically about the core member and into bearing contact with the fulcrum aforesaid responsive to relative rotative movements of the tubular member in 0pposite directions.

17. An exerciser device as defined in claim 16, wherein one of the tubular members is provided with a tubular extension which is telescopically and rotatively fitted within the other tubular member.

18. An exerciser device as defined in claim 16, wherein one of the tubular members is provided with a tubular extension which is telescopically and rotatively fitted within the other tubular member, and said tubular extension aforesaid being formed with an abutment operatively engageable with a complemental abutment within said other tubular member for limiting relative rotative movements of the tubular members.

19. An exerciser device as defined in claim 16, wherein one of the tubular members is provided with a tubular extension which is telescopically and rotatively fitted within the other tubular member, and said tubular members 12 have cooperative markings delineated on the exterior of the contiguous ends thereof for indicating the extent of rotative movements of the tubular members relative to each other.

20. An exerciser device as defined in claim 16, wherein the tubular members are releasably interconnected by a tubular sleeve having a snap fit within the contiguous ends of the respective tubular members.

References ited UNITED STATES PATENTS 903,879 11/1908 Nusly. 2,973,962 3/1961 Grifiin 27267 3,019,622 2/ 1962 Fermier. 3,084,547 4/ 1963 Nielsen 272-68 X 3,132,861 5/1964 Horney 27268 FOREIGN PATENTS 767,478 8/1952 Germany.

218,114 7/1924 Great Britain.

376,607 7/ 1932 Great Britain.

ANTON O. OECHSLE, Primary Examiner.

25 RICHARD C. PINKHAM, A. W. KRAMER,

Assistant Examiners.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification482/46, 267/154
International ClassificationA63B23/14, A63B23/035
Cooperative ClassificationA63B23/14, A63B21/0455
European ClassificationA63B23/14