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Publication numberUS3331513 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 18, 1967
Filing dateJun 24, 1965
Priority dateJun 24, 1965
Publication numberUS 3331513 A, US 3331513A, US-A-3331513, US3331513 A, US3331513A
InventorsCappelli Sylvie S
Original AssigneeCappelli Sylvie S
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe butler
US 3331513 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J ly 1967 s. s. CAPPELLI SHOE BUTLER Filed June 24, 1965 I NVEN TOR. 64/ 420 zqr A TTORNE Y8 United States Patent 3,331,513 SHOE BUTLER Sylvie S. Cappelli, 823 S. Oak Park Ave., flak Park, 1]]. 60304 Filed June 24, 1965, Ser. No. 466,609 6 Claims. (Cl. 211-34) This invention relates to an article holding device and more particularly to a device for storing shoes or a shoe butler.

Although the novel holding device of the invention easily lends itself to other applications, it will be described in connection with a preferred use as a home shoe butler. Conventional shoe butlers are devices for holding the shoes and slippers which are not being worn by an individual or family. They are customarily used in a bedroom closet.

It is the general object of this invention to provide a new and improved article holding device.

It is a more particular object of the invention to provide a new and improved article holding device of the shoe butler type.

It is an object of the invention to provide such a holding device of large capacity relative to the floor space and general area occupied.

It is another object of the invention to provide a shoe butler which is collapsible, easily stored and transported.

It is another object of the invention to provide a shoe butler of simplified and economical construction.

In achieving these objects a novel holding device constructed in accordance with the invention comprises a collapsible tubular member having a plurality of compartments for receiving shoes, the compartments being located on the outer and inner surfaces of the member.

The organization and manner of operation of the invention, together with further objects and advantages thereof may best be understood by reference to the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, in the several figures of which like reference numerals identify like elements, and in which an exemplification of the invention is illustrated.

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a shoe butler constructed in accordance with the invention;

FIG. 2 is a sectional view of the shoe butler of FIG. 1 as seen along the line II1I in FIG. 1; and

FIG. 3 is an interior view, partly in section, of the shoe butler of FIGS. 1 and 2 as seen along the line IIIIII in FIG. 2.

Referring to FIG. 1 there depicted is a device for holding articles of the shoe butler type generally indicated by the numeral 10. The shoe butler comprises a tubular sheet or bag 12 constructed of a flexible material such as plastic cloth. It is preferably of washable cloth. The tubular bag 12 has a plurality of shoe-receiving pockets 14 for receiving footwear such as shoes 16. The pockets 14 are constructed from a rectangular-shaped sheet of flexible material, preferably of the same material as the tubular bag 12. The longitudinal edges 14a of the pocket are bonded by means of longitudinal seams 11a, to the bag 12. The seams 1111 are at a circumferential separation that is less than the width of the transverse lower edge 13 or upper edge 15. The lower edge 13 is also bonded by transverse seams 11b to the bag 12, preferably with pleatings 21 formed in the lower edge 13. The upper edge 15 forms an opening or pocket 14 which freely allows articles to be inserted therein. The pockets 14 are of a size so as to receive freely the conventional shoes 16 while preferably displaying part of the shoe above the pocket opening 15. The pockets 14 are also preferably afiixed adjacent one another encircling the outer surface of the tubular bag 12 and extend one above the other for "ice approximately the longitudinal length of the bag 12. Structural rigidity is provided for the shoe butler 10 by shape-defining and support means comprising a discshaped rigid planar member 20 of a circumference approximately equal to that of the tubular bag 12. The member 20 has a freely rotatable hook 22 centrally affixed to and extending above the outer surface thereof. For ease of installation, a conventional keyhole clip 24 may be captivated by an eyelet 22. Extending longitudinally along the tubular bag 12 between adjacent columns of the shoe pockets 14 there is provided a slit or opening 26 made up of two adjacent edges 26a and 26b which is preferably selectively scalable by means of a Zipper 28.

As is best shown in FIG. 2, the interior surface of the tubular bag 12 is also provided with a plurality of shoereceiving pockets 14 in a manner similar to the outside pockets 14 of the outer surface of the tubular bag 12. For additional structural rigidity a second disc-shaped planar member 27 is provided at the other longitudinal end of the tubular bag 12. As the space within the tubular bag 12 is limited, fewer columns of pockets 14' are provided. The columns of pockets 14' are provided opposite to the opening 26 so as to be readily seen from that opening when the zipper 28 is opened and the longitudinal opening edges 26a and 26b are spread apart. The interior pockets 14' are formed in a similar manner to the exterior pockets 14 with an opening 18'. For ease of construction, the pockets 14 have common seams 11, 13 as the pockets 14. The excess transverse dimension of the edges 18, 18' is preferably taken up by folds or pleats 21 which may be impressed into the fabric of the pockets 14, 14'.

As may best be seen in FIG. 3, the bag 12 is supported by a rigidity-giving member 20 by means of a narrowing at its upper edge diameter. The freely rotating supporting member 22 is provided at the center point by a disc-shaped member 20 approximately along the central axis 38 of the tubular bag 12.

As depicted in FIG. 3, the bottom-most inner surface above the member 27 of the tubular bag 12 does not have pockets 14 provided. This provides easy access to receive larger articles, such as boots, which may rest against the upper inside surface of the member 27.

The upper rigidity providing and supporting discshaped member 20 has a circular outer edge 20G, and wear preventing means composed of a C-shaped (in cross-section) circular rubber member 23 affixed about the outer edge 20e with the ends of the C-shaped (crosssection) member abutting against the upper and lower planar surfaces of the member 20.

The tubular bag 12 is aflixed to the member 20 by means of a decreased circumeferential upper edge 12a which is formed by an open hem 12b and a draw cord 30. The draw cord 30 is of a lesser length than the circumference of the support member 20 and allows the bag 12 to be supported thereby. Similar circumference decreasing provisions are provided at the opposite longitu dinal end of the bag 12 for supporting the member 27. These provisions comprise a hem 12c and a draw cord 12d for decreasing the circumference at the bag edge 12g.

In use the shoe butler It} is suspended by a keyholeshaped clip 24 so that it may rotate about the axis 38 and the shoes 18 are positioned within the pockets 14, 14' of the device. As the shoe butler is readily rotatable about the center axis, all of the shoes positioned within the bag 14 are readily brought into sight during the revolution of the device. The shoes within the tubular bag 12 within the shoe pockets 14 are accessible by simply unzipping the zipper 28 exposing the openings 26 in spreading the two side edges of the openings 26, 26a and 26b apart.

The interior position provides additional protection and may be used for the storage of the users better shoes or least-used footwear. As is readily apparent fromthe above description, when the shoes 16 are not positioned within the pockets 14, 14', the shoe butler may be easily collapsed by advancing the end support rigiditygiving means 20 and 27 together.

The end supports may be easily removed through the slit 25 by releasing the draw cord 30 or by turning them edgewise and allowing the opening formed by the bag edges 12a and 12g to assume an oval shape with major diameter greater than the diameter of the members 20, 27. In this latter configuration, the members 20, 27 may be easily removed. This removability is an added convenience for the user as it allows the shoe bag 12 to be laundered or cleaned without excessive bother.

It will be apparent that many modifications and variations may be effected without departing from the scope and the novel concepts of the present invention.

I claim as my invention:

1. An article holding device comprising:

a tubular-shaped bag having a plurality of article-receiving pockets positioned about its outer and inner surfaces and means for supporting said tubular bag for rotation, said tubular bag further having access means for selectively achieving access to said inner surface pockets.

. An article holding device comprising:

. a tubular-shaped bag having a plurality of article-receiving pockets positioned about its outer and inner surfaces, means for vertically supporting said tubular bag for rotation, said tubular bag further having access means comprising a longitudinal slit and zipper for selectively achieving access to said inner surface pocket.

. An article holding device comprising:

tubular-shaped bag having a plurality of article-receiving pockets positioned about its outer and inner surfaces and means for vertically supporting said bag for rotation, said means for supporting said bag comprising a generally disc-shaped planar member having a circumference approximately equal to the upper end circumference of said tubular bag aflixed at said upper end of said tubular bag and having a centrally located pivotal support hook aflixed thereto, said tubular bag further having access means comprising a longitudinal slit therein and a zipper affixed thereto for selectively achieving access to said inner surface pockets, and further having a shape defining a generally planar disc-shaped bottom member afiixed at the bottom end of said tubular bag transverse to said bag and having a diameter approximately equal to the diameter of said tubular bag at the bottom of said bag.

4. An article holding device of the shoe butler type constructed in accordance with claim 3 and further characterized by having said tubular bag of a. generally cylindrical shape, of fabric construction and said tubular bag being affixed to said disc-shaped member by means of a decreasing circumferential upper tubular edge overlying said disc-shaped support member.

5. A shoe butler comprising:

a tubular cloth b ag having a plurality of shoe-receiving pockets positioned adjacent one another about the outer surface of said bag and further including a plurality of shoe-receiving pockets positioned adjacent one another about the inner surface of said bag and a disc-shaped structural rigidity-providing mem- .,ber at one end of said bag, said disc-shaped member having a rotatable support means afiixed thereto at the center of said disc-shaped member for axially supporting said bag, said bag having means for decreasing the upper edge circumference of said tubular bag to a lesser circumference than said discshaped member for overlying said member about the periphery thereof and further including a lower discshaped planar member at the other end of the bag, and means for decreasing the lower edge circumference of said tubular bag to a lesser circumference than said lower disc-shaped member for underlying and supporting said lower member.

6. An article storing device of the shoe butler type comprising:

a disc-shaped planar upper support member having a circular outer edge;

a circular rubber restraining member having a C- shaped cross-section open to the center of the circular member and affixed about the outer edge of said disc-shaped member with open ends of said C- shaped cross-section abutting opposite planar surfaces of said member to provide a high friction nonabrasive covering for said edge;

an eye hook rotatably affixed to said support member at the center of said member to project normally from said member for providing the sole support for said device;

a tubular cloth bag having a right circular configuration and having a zippered longitudinal slit therein for providing access to the interior of said tubular bag, said bag having a circumference approximately equal to said disc-shaped upper support member, but having an upper edge circumference less than that of said member, said upper edge overlying the upper surface of said member and said bag being supported thereby, said bag further having a lower edge circumference approximately equal to said upper edge circumference;

a plurality of generally rectangular upwardly opening pockets for receiving footwear positioned about the outer surface of said bag, said pocket being positioned adjacent one another in rings about said bag and further being positioned above and below one another transversely along said bag in columns;

a plurality of generally rectangular upwardly opening pockets for receiving footwear positioned about the inner surface;

said inner and outer pockets being formed by a plurality of transverse and longitudinal seams at the junction of said pockets; and

a disc-shaped planar bottom member of a circumference approximately equal tothe circumference of said tubular bag and said upper member positioned transversely in said bag and resting against and supported by the lower portion of said bag adjacent said lesser diameter lower edge of said bag.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,770,227 7/1930 Buckingham 211--163 1,909,942 5/1933 Fingerman 1 2,326,064 8/1943 Pittman 312'305 2,832,389 4/1958 Smith 1501 3,039,599 6/1962 Mintz 206-7 3,135,389 6/1964 Farley 2l1-37 3,294,134 12/1966 Matross et a1. 150 -1 CHANCELLOR E. HARRIS, Primary Examiner.

K. J. WINGERT, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1770227 *Feb 18, 1926Jul 8, 1930Buckingham William FDisplay device
US1909942 *Aug 1, 1930May 23, 1933Ira FingermanShoe holder
US2326064 *Apr 16, 1941Aug 3, 1943Pittman Walter VRotary wardrobe
US2832389 *Nov 7, 1955Apr 29, 1958Esther SmithCovered shoe bag
US3039599 *Dec 29, 1961Jun 19, 1962Seal Sac IncCloset bag
US3135389 *Apr 26, 1961Jun 2, 1964Farley Aileen BRotatable shoe rack
US3294134 *May 21, 1964Dec 27, 1966Montrose Mfg Company IncWardrobe bag
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3669276 *Nov 6, 1970Jun 13, 1972Wilwood IncShoe display bag and system
US3789897 *Sep 13, 1971Feb 5, 1974Shinwa Kagaku Kogyo KkPacking containers
US3834497 *Oct 19, 1972Sep 10, 1974Furst BStorage bag for clothing articles or the like
US3961655 *Sep 16, 1974Jun 8, 1976Frank NattrassBulk material containers
US4585127 *Sep 25, 1984Apr 29, 1986Benedict Engineering Co., Inc.Extendable closet organizers
US4765472 *Mar 30, 1987Aug 23, 1988Robert DentBucket attachment tool holder
US4858772 *Nov 17, 1987Aug 22, 1989Theodore PhillipsonCarousel accessory unit
US4949843 *Aug 31, 1989Aug 21, 1990Stokes William TOne-piece multi-pocketed storage device
US5125519 *Nov 20, 1990Jun 30, 1992Cambria Susan KArticle storage system
US5813547 *Jan 28, 1997Sep 29, 1998Rice; Sherrie D.Clothing accessories storage rack
US6086171 *Feb 11, 1999Jul 11, 2000Ashley; Cynthia H.Carousel shoe cabinet
US6119871 *Nov 8, 1999Sep 19, 2000Mengel; Christa T.Carousel style suspended shoe rack
US6719157Dec 13, 2001Apr 13, 2004Rubbermaid Closet & Organization Products CompanyOrganizer
US20120085759 *Oct 6, 2010Apr 12, 2012Pro-Mart Industries, Inc.Connector for hanging collapsible shelves
WO2007047415A2 *Oct 12, 2006Apr 26, 2007For Your Ease OnlyCloset organizer
Classifications
U.S. Classification211/34, 383/39
International ClassificationA47G25/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47G25/005
European ClassificationA47G25/00B