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Publication numberUS3332101 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 25, 1967
Filing dateAug 12, 1964
Priority dateAug 12, 1964
Publication numberUS 3332101 A, US 3332101A, US-A-3332101, US3332101 A, US3332101A
InventorsArne Domstedt Johan, Eric Leinfelt Karl
Original AssigneeElectrolux Ab
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Surface cleaning apparatus
US 3332101 A
Abstract  available in
Images(8)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 25, 1967 K. E. .LEINFELT ETAL 3,332,101

SURFACE CLEANING APPARATUS Filed Aug. 12, 1964 8 Sheets-Shet 1 {,3 ATTORNEY y 25, 1957 K. E. LEINFELT ETAL 3,332,101

SURFACE CLEANING APPARATUS Filed Aug. 12, .1964

8 Sheets-Sheet 8 fla; ATTORNEY y 1967 K. E. LEINFELT ETAL SURFACE CLEANING APPARATUS Filed Aug. 12, 1964 8 Sheets-Sheet 5 W WATTORNEY July 25, 1967 y K. E. LEINFELT ETAL 3,332,101

SURFACE CLEANING APPARATUS Filed Aug. 12, 1964 8 Sheets-Sheet 4.

lug R5 8 h g/a W'I'TORNEY y 25, 1967 K. E. LEIN FELT ETAL 3,332,101

SURFACE CLEANING APPARATUS 8 Sheets-Sheets Filed Aug. 12, 1964 July 25, 1967 K. E. LEINFELT ETAL I 3,332,101

SURFACE CLEANING APPARATUS Filed Aug. 12, 1964 8 Sheets-Sheet G 23 ATTORNEY y 25, 1957 K. E. LEINFELT ETAL 3,332,101

SURFACE CLEANING APPARATUS 8 Sheets-Sheet 7 Filed Aug. 12, 1964 TTORNEY Zf a ilk-4M Filed Aug. 12, 1964 J ly 1957 K. E. LEINFELT ETAL SURFACE CLEANING APPARATUS 8 Sheets-Sheet 8 MATTORNEY United States Patent 3,332,101 SURFACE CLEANING APPARATUS Karl Eric Leinfelt, Solna, and Johan Arne Domstedt,

Hagersten, Sweden, assignors to Aktiebolaget Electrolux, Stockholm, Sweden, a corporation of Sweden Filed Aug. 12, 1964, Ser. No. 388,999 11 Claims. (Cl. 15-321) This invention relates to surface cleaning apparatus of the kind employing an air ejector and operable by air supplied thereto under pressure.

It has already been proposed to provide surface cleaning apparatus of this type which is operable to supply liquid cleaning agent from a first receptacle on the apparatus to a surface to be cleaned and to withdraw dirty liquid from the surface and store such liquid in a second receptacle on the apparatus. After the supply of liquid cleaning agent to the surface is discontinued and before liquid is withdrawn from the surface, the apparatus desirably is manipulated over the surface to effect cleaning thereof.

An object of the invention is to provide improved control mechanism for surface cleaning apparatus of this type for regulating the supply of liquid cleaning agent to the surface to be cleaned and the withdrawal of dirty liquid from the surface.

Another object of the invention is to provide an improved control mechanism having a single control member for regulating the supply of liquid cleaning agent to the surface to be cleaned and the withdrawal of dirty liquid from the surface.

A further object of the invention is to provide an improved control mechanism in which the nozzle of the air ejector forms a unitary part of the single control member.

A still further object of the invention is to provide an improved'control mechanism in which the nozzle of the air ejector seats and snugly fits within a stationary cylindrical sleeve and functions as a valve sleeve movable about its axis to a number of different operating positions by the single control member.

A still further object of the invention is to provide an improved control mechanism in which liquid cleaning agent from a first receptacle on the surface cleaning apparatus is supplied to the surface to be cleaned with the aid of air under pressure which is diverted from its path of flow in the ejector nozzle.

A still further object of the invention is to provide an improved control mechanism in which dirty liquid is withdrawn from the surface by suction effect resulting from a partial vacuum produced by the air ejector and the magnitude of the partial vacuum is controlled to regulate the withdrawing of the dirty liquid.

A still further object of the invention is to provide an improved surface cleaning apparatus of the above type in which liquid cleaning agent is supplied to a surface to be cleaned from a receptacle in a path of flow which terminates at the vicinity of the discharge orifice of the air ejector nozzle to promote atomization of the liquid in an environment at a partial pressure and entrainment of the liquid in the form of drops in the stream of air discharged from the ejector tube on the surface to be cleaned.

Further objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent as the following description proceeds, and the features of novelty which characterize the invention will be pointed outwith particularity in the claims annexed to and forming a part of this specification.

For a better understanding of the invention, reference may be had to the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:

3,332,101 Patented July 25, 1967 FIG. 1 is a perspective view of surface cleaning apparatus which embodies the invention and a suction cleaner connected to the apparatus for supplying air under pressure thereto;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged side elevational view of the apparatus shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a vertical sectional view, taken at line 3-3 of FIG. 4, of the apparatus shown in FIG. 2-;

FIG. 4 is a sectional view taken at line 4-4 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a sectional view taken at line 5-5 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 6 is a vertical sectional view taken at line 6-6 of FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is a top plan view of the apparatus shown in FIGS. 1 and 2;

FIG. 8 is a fragmentary bottom plan view of the apparatus shown in FIGS. 1, 2 and 3;

FIG. 9 is a side elevational view of surface cleaning apparatus illustrating a modification of the invention;

FIG. 10 is a vertical sectional view of the apparatus shown in FIG. 9;

FIG. 11 is a fragmentary bottom plan view of the apparatus shown in FIGS. 9 and 10;

FIG. 12 is a vertical sectional view, similar to FIG. 6, of the apparatus shown in FIGS. 9 and 10;

FIG. 13 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view of parts shown in FIG. 12 to illustrate the construction more clearly;

FIG. 14 is a fragmentary sectional view taken at line 14-14 of FIG. 13;

FIG. 15 is a perspective view of surface cleaning apparatus illustrating another modification of the invention;

FIG. 16 is a front elevational view of the apparatus shown in FIG. 15;

FIG. 17 is a vertical sectional view of the apparatus shown in FIGS. 15 and 16;

FIG. 18 is a sectional view taken at line 18-18 of FIG. 17;

FIG. 19 is a fragmentary sectional view taken at line 19-19 of FIG. 18;

FIG. 20 is a front elevational view illustrating a further modification of the invention;

FIG. 21 is a vertical sectional view of the apparatus shown in FIG. 20; and

FIG. 22 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken at line 22-22 of FIG. 20.

Referring to FIG. 1, the surface cleaning unit comprises surface cleaning apparatus 10, a flexible hose 11 for supplying air under pressure to the apparatus 10, and a suction cleaner 12 which serves as a source of supply of air delivered under pressure to the hose 11. The suction cleaner 12 includes a casing 14 having an end cover 15 provided with an outlet 15a to which the hose 11 is adapted to be removably secured in any suitable manner (not shown). Air is drawn into the casing 14 through an inlet, which is at the end of the casing opposite the end cover 15, by a suitable motor-fan unit (not shown) disposed therein. Air discharge under pressure from the outlet 15a serves as an excellent source of supply of air under pressure for the surface cleaning apparatus 10.

In FIGS. 1 to 8 of the drawings, the invention has been shown in connection with surface cleaning apparatus 10 which comprises an elongated multi-si-ded elongated housing 16 having a bottom end wall 17, and a top part or cover 18 which is detachably secured at 19, as by cap screws, for example, to the upper end of the housing 16. As shown in FIGS. 3 and 6, a sealing member 26 formed of suitable material is interposed between rims of the housing 16 and cover 18 to provide a fluid-tight joint therebetween, the sealing member having a peripheral edge portion 20a which extends upward at the exterior of the cover 18 and conceals the cap screws 19 from view.

An air ejector is provided for the surface cleaning apparatus which includes a nozzle 21 disposed within the cover 18 and a discharge tube 22 in axial alignment therewith. This discharge tube 22 extends lengthwise of the housing 16 from an opening in the bottom end wall 17 to the top edge of the housing. The sealing member forms a partition between the housing 16 and the cover 18 and includes a vertically extending portion 2011 which snugly fits within a cylindrical sleeve 23 provided in the cover 18 and a curved portion 200 which slopes inward and downward therefrom and terminates in a ring-shaped portion at 24 against the upper narrow end of the discharge tube 22, as best shown in FIG. 6.

Air under pressure fiows from the hose 11 into the upper end of the conduit 25 which is carried by the cover 18 in a manner which will be described presently, the air passing from the conduct 25 into the ejector nozzle 21 from which the air is discharged through an opening 26 having a diameter less than that of the ring-shaped portion 24 of the partition 20.

The air ejector comprising the nozzle 21, discharge tube 22 and curved portion 20c of the partition 20 coacting with the discharge tube produces a partial vacuum which is transmitted through a passage or gap 27 between the nozzle 21 and curved portion 200 of the partition 20 to a chamber 28, the outer wall of which is formed by the cylindrical sleeve 23 and upper part 18b of the cover 18, as shown in FIG. 3.

The space of annular form defined by the housing 16 and the discharge tube 22 extending therethrough is divided by a partition 16a to form a first receptacle 29 for holding a body 30 of clean water and a second receptacle 31 for holding a body 32 of dirty water, as best shown in FIGS. 3 and 4.

Under certain operating conditions, as will be described hereinafter, the partial vacuum produced in the chamber 28 is employed to induce flow of air into a nozzle 33 and withdraw water from a surface being cleaned. As best shown in FIGS. 7 and 8, the nozzle 33 comprises an elongated body 34 to an intermediate region of which is connected an upwardly inclined pipe or tubular member 35. A passage is provided in the body 34 through which air is drawn toward the pipe 35 from the region of an elongated inlet opening 36.

As shown in FIG. 3, the upper end of the pipe 35 is formed to receive the lower end of a suction tube 37 which is disposed within the receptacle 31 and extends upward therein from an opening in the bottom wall 17 of the housing 16 and terminates at a region 37a spaced from the top edge of the housing. An inverted cup-shaped member 38 at the upper end 37a of the suction tube 37 functions to separate water from the mixture of water and air drawn upward through the tube 37 from the nozzle 33. The water separator 38 includes a closed end 38a and a hollow sleeve portion 3812 depending therefrom which is of larger diameter than the tube 37 and is in telescopic relation therewith to form a passage or gap 39 therebetween. Water entrained in air discharged from the upper end of the tube 37 into the water separator 38 flows downward through the gap 39 and collects in the bottom of the dirty water receptacle 31.

The closed end 38a and sleeve portion 38b of the water separator may be formed integrally with the sealing member or partition 20 which, at the vicinity of the suction tube 37, is spaced from the wall of the housing 16 to provide a gap or passage 40 therebetween through which air passing downward from the :gap 39 can flow upward into a chamber 41 defined by the cover 18 and cylindrical sleeve 23. In a manner which will be described hereinafter, air flowing into chamber 41 can pass therefrom into chamber 28 in which a partial vacuum is produced responsive to operation of the air ejector, and the air in chamber 28 moves through the gap 27 and mixes with air discharge from the ejector nozzle 21 and flows through the ejector discharge tube 22 and is discharged from the bottom of the housing against the surface being cleaned.

The housing 16 is formed with openings 29a and 31a for introducing and removing water or other liquid into and from the upper parts of the receptacles 29 and 31, respectively. The openings 29a and 31a are closed by closure members 2% and 31b which may be resilient in character and formed as flaps which are integral with the sealing member 20 and movable thereon between the solid line and dotted line positions shown in FIG. 3.

One or more anti-foam bodies 32a may be placed in the receptacle 31 which are adapted to float on the surface of the body 32 of dirty water therein. The bodies 32a employed to inhibit foaming contain a suitable antifoaming agent, such as cetyl alcohol, for example, which is dispersed in a solid carrier that is soluble in water, the anti-foaming agent being released as the carrier dissolves in the dirty water.

In accordance with the invention, the cleaning apparatus 10 embodies structure for flowing clean water from the receptacle 29 to the surface to be cleaned. In a manner which will be described hereinafter, a part of the air delivered under pressure to the ejector nozzle 21 can be diverted therefrom into a chamber 42 defined by the ejector nozzle and the vertical wall of a sleeve 43, as shown in FIG. 6. The diverted air under pressure flows downward through a tube 44 into the upper part of the receptacle 29 above the liquid surface level therein and causes liquid to flow therefrom through a vertically extending tube 45 into another chamber 46 defined by the ejector nozzle 21 and the sleeve 43. Liquid flowing into the chamber 46 can pass therefrom through a passage 47 toward the opening 26 of the ejector nozzle 21 and mix with air discharged therefrom.

Due to the partial vacuum produced in the gap 27, liquid discharged from the passage 47 into the gap at the discharge opening 26 of the nozzle 21 atomizes and the atomized liquid in the form of liquid drops is entrained in air flowing through the discharge tube 22 to the surface to be cleaned. In this way the air directed against the surface, while the cleaning apparatus 10 is being moved back and forth over an area being cleaned, will deposit a layer of clean water on the surface.

In further accord with the invention, the ejector nozzle 21 functions as a valve for controlling the operation of the cleaning apparatus 10, the nozzle 21 being rotatable or angularly movable about its longitudinal axis to three operating positions. In the first position of the nozzle 21, clean water is discharged from the receptacle 29 to the surface to be cleaned in the manner described above. In the second position of the nozzle 21, the supply of clean water from the receptacle 29 to the surface is discontinued and the cleaning apparatus 10 is manipulated back and forth over the surface to effect cleaning. In the third position of the nozzle 21, dirty water is removed from the surface and collected in the receptacle 31 in the manner described above.

The ejector nozzle 21 includes a bottom section 21a in the form of a truncated cone and a top section 21b in the form of a cylindrical tube which is fixed to the conduit or wand 25 in any suitable manner, as by a screw 48, for example, and is angularly movable or turnable therewith. The ejector nozzle 21 is seated and snugly fits in the hollow sleeve 43 which includes a bottom section 43a in the form of a truncated cone and a top section 43b in the form of a cylindrical tube. In order to prevent leakage of air between the hollow sleeve 43 and ejector nozzle 21 and secure the latter against axial movement, a packing joint 49 is provided between the top sections 21b and 43b of the nozzle and hollow sleeve, respectively.

The hollow sleeve 43 forms a stationary part of the cover 18 and is connected by radially extending webs 50 to the cylindrical sleeve 23 which in turn is connected by radially extending webs 51 to the wider bottom part 18a of the cover 18. The upper narrow part 18b of the cover 18 and top sleeve section 43b are radially spaced from one another and are connected at their upper ends by a transverse wall 52 having openings 53 distributed about the hollow sleeve 43. A control member 54, which is fixed to the top section 21b of the ejector nozzle 21 and is angularly movable or turnable therewith, includes a first portion 54a which overlies the apertured transverse wall 52 and a second portion 54b of tubular form which snugly fits about the upper narrow part 18b of the cover 18 and rests against a shoulder 55 at the juncture of the upper and bottom parts 18b and 18a, respectively,

' of the cover. The first portion 54a of the member 54 is formed with openings 54c which can be moved into alignment with the openings 53 in the transverse wall 52 so that chamber 28 will be open to the atmosphere. By turning the control member 54 so that openings 53 in the connecting wall 52 are closed by the first portion 541: thereof, the chamber 28 no longer will be open to the atmosphere. The second portion 54b of the control member 54 may be serrated at 54d to facilitate turning the control member 54 and ejector nozzle 21, as shown in FIGS. 2 and 7.

While the bottom section 43a of the hollow sleeve 43 for the greater part defines a truncated cone, as shown in FIG. 3, it will be noted in FIGS. 5 and 6 that regions of the bottom sleeve section 43a extend vertically downward for a short distance from the upper section 43b to form bulges defining the chambers 42 and 46 to which the upper ends of the tubes 44 and 45, respectively, are connected. The outer surface of the bottom section 21a of the ejector nozzle 21 is formed with an axially extending groove defining the passage 47 which, when the nozzle is moved by the control member 54 to its first position explained above, provides a path of flow for clean water from the chamber 46 to the discharge opening 26 of the nozzle at which region clean water is discharged from the passage 47. With the ejector nozzle 21 in its first position, an opening 56 in the wall of the bottom section 21a thereof is directly opposite the chamber 42, whereby a part of the air delivered under pressure to the nozzle is diverted into the chamber 42 and flows through the tube 44 into the upper part of the receptacle 29 to force clean water upward through the tube 45 to the chamber 46.

When the ejector nozzle 21 is in its first position, the openings 540 in the member 54 are in alignment with the openings 53 in the top connecting wall 52 of the cover 18 and the chamber 28 will be open to the atmosphere. Under these operating conditions, secondary air will be drawn from the atmosphere through the openings 53 into the chamber 28 and the partial vacuum produced therein by ejector action, as explained above, will be reduced sufficiently to render the cleaning apparatus inefiective to withdraw water from the surface to be cleaned.

When the control member 54 is turned to move the ejector nozzle 21 to the second position described above, the opening 56 in the bottom section 21a of the nozzle will be shifted from a position opposite the chamber 42 to a region opposite an imperforate part of the bottom sleeve section 43a and air under pressure no longer will be diverted from the nozzle 21 into the chamber 42. When the ejector nozzle 21 is moved to its second position, the groove 47 in the outer surface thereof will be shifted from a position opposite the chamber 46 to a region opposite an imperforate part of the lower sleeve section. Hence, in the second position of the nozzle 21 clean water no longer will be supplied from the receptacle 29 to the surface to be cleaned. However, the openings 54c in the member 54 will remain in alignment with theopenings 52 of the cover 18 in the second position of the nozzle 21 and secondary air will continue to be drawn from the atmosphere into the chamber 28, so that the partial vacuum therein will be reduced sufiiciently to render the cleaning appara- 6 tus 10 ineffective to withdraw water from the surface to be cleaned. Under these operating conditions, the cleaning apparatus 10 can be manipulated over the surface to effect cleaning. 7

In the third position of the nozzle 21, the opening 56 and groove 47 in the lower nozzle section 21a are out of communication with the chambers 42 and 46, respectively, and clean water will not be supplied from the receptacle 29 to the surface. However, movement of the nozzle 21 to its third position by the control member 54 renders the latter operable to close the openings 52 in the cover 18 so that the chamber 23 no longer will be open to the atmosphere. Under these operating conditions, the air delivered under pressure to the nozzle 21 will render the cleaning apparatus 10 operable to produce a partial vacuum in chamber 28 sufficiently high to induce flow of air into the nozzle 33 and withdraw dirty water from the surface, as explained above. After the dirty water is separated from the air and collects in the receptacle 31, the air from which water has been separated flows through the gap 40 into chamber 41. As een in FIGS. 3 and 5, the cylindrical sleeve 23 is formed with an opening 23a so the air drawn into chamber 41, which is defined in part by a pair of webs 51 at opposing vertical edges of the opening 23a, can pass into the chamber 28. It will be understood that the webs 50 extend axially of the bottom sleeve section 43a from the shoulder 55 to the highest part of the curved portion 200 of the sealing member or partition 20. Accordingly, air can readily flow from the chamber 41 into the chamber 28 and pass from the lower end thereof into the gap 27. Also, atmospheric air drawn through the openings 52 in the cover 18 can readily flow lengthwise through the chamber 28 toward the gap 27, as shown in FIG. 6.

The suction nozzle 33 comprises the body 34 having a bottom opening arranged to receive an insert 57 having a vertical slot 58 therein, the part of the slot removed from the air inlet 36 being narrow and the part thereof adjacent to the air inlet being wide. Two members 59 formed of porous resilient material, uch as cellular plastic, for example, are anchored in any suitable manner in the wide part of the slot 58 at opposite sides of a plane passing through the narrow part of the slot. The members 59 project downward beyond the bottom surface of the insert 57 and are formed with lips 59a which are circular in crosssection and adapted to contact the surface to be cleaned. An essentially flat flap 60 is mounted for movement within the insert 57 between the members 59. The flap 60 is flexible and formed of resilient material, such as rubber, for example, and the outer free edge thereof projects slightly beyond the lips 59a of the members 59.

When the surface cleaning apparatus 10 is being moved back and forth on the surface to be cleaned, the flexible flap 60 positions itself adjacent the lip 59a at the air inlet 36 which, when the nozzle 33 is being moved in a given direction, i at the rear part of the nozzle body 34. In this way water accumulates ahead of and in front of the flexible flap and in vertical alignment with the slot 58. Air drawn in the inlet 35 by the suction efiect produced by the air ejector 21-22 picks up drops of the accumulated water and the water entrained in the air fiows upward through the suction tube 37 and water separator 38 into the receptacle 31. The porous elastic members 59 also pick up Water from the surface regions with which they come in contact to prevent dirt streaks forming and promote effective cleaning of the surface. The air discharged from the ejector tube 22 toward the surface to be cleaned also promotes drying of the damp surface after removal of water therefrom.

The body 34 of the suction nozzle 33 is provided with a hood 61 which extends upward therefrom to the bottom 17 of the housing 15 and is fixed thereto in any suitable manner. The hood 61, which conceals the pipe 35 from view, is multisided with the four sides thereof serving as the extensions of the four front sides of the housing 16. As shown in FIG. 8, the part of the hood 61 abutting the 7 bottom wall 17 of the housing 16 is recessed at 62 so that an unobstructed path of flow will be provided for air which is discharged from the lower end of the ejector tube 22 toward the surface to be cleaned, such air being directed to the surface at a region closely adjacent to the suction nozzle 33.

A modification of the invention is illustrated in FIGS. 9 to 14 which is generally like the embodiment shown in FIG. 1 to 8 and just described and in which similar parts are referred to by the same reference numerals. The modification of FIGS. 9 to 14 differs from the embodiment first described in that adjacent sides at the front of the hood 61', which extend upward from the suction nozzle body 34, are formed with large openings covered by screens 63, as shown in FIGS. 9 and 11. A shown in FIG. 10, bot tom wall 17 of the housing 16' and the hood 61' cooperate to define a passage 64- through which air flows from the lower discharge end of the ejector tube 22 to the screens 63. With this arrangement air discharged from the air ejector tube 22 flows upward from the screens 63 which are disposed above the suction nozzle 33. Therefore, in the modification of FIGS. 9 to 14, the air flowing from the ejector tube 22 is directed upward from the surface to be cleaned and not toward the surface.

The modification of FIGS. 9 to 14 differs in another respect from the first-described embodiment in that clean water forced upward through tube 45 is delivered through a tube 65 to the surface to be cleaned. As shown in FIGS. and 12, the tube 65 extends lengthwise of and within the ejector tube 22 and projects downward through an opening in the bottom wall 17 of the housing 16 and terminates at a region immediately behind the suction nozzle 33.

The upper part of the tube 65 is bent and extends upward from the discharge opening 26' of the ejector nozzle 21' along the outer wall surface of the bottom sleeve ection 43a in which the ejector nozzle 21' is rotatable. The bottom sleeve section 43a is formed with a boss 66 having a pair of vertical openings 67 and 68 therein, the lower ends of which receive the tubes 45' and 65, respectively, as best shown in FIGS. 13 and 14. The upper ends of the openings 67 and 68 are in communication with the chamber 46' which is of annular form and disposed about the bottom section 21a of the ejector nozzle 21'. A flange 69 is formed integrally with the ejector nozzle 21 and projects radially outward therefrom into the chamber 46. The flange 69 essentially forms a projecting part at one region of which is formed an inverted U-shaped passage 70. When the control member 54 is turned to move the nozzle 21 to its first position to render the surface cleaning apparatus operable to supply clean water from the receptacle 29 to the surface to be cleaned, the ejector nozzle 21 is moved to the position shown in FIG. 14 in which the vertical legs of the inverted U-shaped passage 70 are in communication with the openings 67 and 68. Under these operating conditions, clean water forced upward through the tube 45 flows through inverted U-shaped passage 70 into tube 65 from which it is discharged at its lower end on the suface to be cleaned. When the U-shaped passage 70 is in communication with the openings 67 and 68, another passage 56' in flange 69 is in the position shown in FIG. 13. The upper end of the passage 56' terminates at an opening 56 at the inside wall surface of the ejector nozzle 21' and the lower end thereof is in communication with a vertical opening 44a in the boss 66 which receives the upper end of the tube 44'. Hence, the opening 56 in ejector nozzle 21' will be in communication with tube 44' to permit air diverted through the passage 56 to flow through tube 44 to receptacle 29.

When the control member 54 is turned to move the nozzle 21' to its second and third positions explained above, clean water from the receptacle 29 will not be delivered to the surface to be cleaned. Under these operating conditions, the inverted U-shaped passage 70 will be shifted angularly with respect to the boss 66 and imperforate regions of the flange 69 will bear against the upper ends of the openings 67 and 68 in the boss 66. Also, the passage 56' will be shifted angularly with respect to the boss 66 and an imperforate region of the flange 69 will bear against the upper end of the opening 44a. In other respects, the operation of the modification of FIGS. 9 to 14 is the same as that of the first embodiment and will not be repeated here.

Another modification of the invention is shown in FIGS. to 19 which is particularly useful for cleaning a variety of surfaces, such as glass windows, for example.

. FIG. 15 illustrates a surface cleaning apparatus 110 cmployed to clean a window 175 and to which air under pressure is supplied through a flexible hose 111 from a suitable source of supply like a suction cleaner, for example. The surface cleaning apparatus comprises an elongated housing having section 116 and 118 threadedly connected together at 119.

An air ejector is provided for the surface cleaning apparatus 110 which includes a nozzle 121 disposed within the housing section 118 and a discharge tube 122 in axial alignment therewith which is disposed within the housing section 116. The housing section 116 is provided with an end cover 117 which i threadedly connected thereto at 176. The end cover 117 is formed with an opening 117a and a tubular member 11712 extending inward therefrom in which one end of the discharge tube 122 is anchored. The opposite end of the discharge tube 122 is formed to provide a wall member which is anchored against an internal shoulder 116a of the housing section 116.

When the parts thus far described are assembled and connected to one another, a partition 177 is clamped between the housing section 116 and 118. The partition 177 includes a centrally disposed hollow truncated cone 121a which is in axial alignment with the ejector nozzle 121 and functions as a tip therefor having a discharge orifice 126.

The annular space between the ejector nozzle 121 and housing section 118 defines a first receptacle 129 for holding a body 130 of clean water, and the annular space between the discharge tube 122 and the housing section 116 defines a receptacle 131 for holding a body 132 of dirty water. The cover 117 and housing sections 116 and 118 can be disconnected from one another to introduce clean water into the receptacle 129 and remove dirty water from the receptacle 131. One or more anti-foam bodies 132a, which are similar to the anti-foam bodies 32a in the firstdescribed embodiment and adapted to float on the surface of the body of dirty water, may be placed in the receptacle 131.

The air ejector comprising the nozzle 121, discharge tube 122 and member 120 coacting with the latter produces a partial vacuum which is transmitted through a gap 127 to a space 128 disposed about the nozzle tip 121a. Under certain operating conditions, as will be pointed out hereinafter, the partial vacuum produced in the space 128 is employed to induce flow of air into a nozzle 133 and withdraw water from the surface to be cleaned. The nozzle 133 comprises an elongated body 134 to an intermediate region of which is connected a pipe 135. The construction of the nozzle 133 may be like the nozzle 33 shown in the first embodiment and described above and include an insert 157 having a slot 158 having narrow and wider parts, and porous members 159 in the wider part of the slot at opposite sides of a plane passing through the narrow part of the slot. Further, the porou elastic members 159 may be formed with lips 159a and a flexible flap 160 disposed therebetween. It will be understood that the operation and function of the nozzle 133 is the same as that of the nozzle 33 and will not be repeated here.

As shown in FIG. 16, the nozzle 133 is provided with a hood 161 which is similar to the hood 61 in the firstdescribed embodiment. The hood 161 conceals the pipe from view and is fixed to the housing section 116 in any suitable manner.

The pipe 135 may be formed integrally with the cover 117 for flowing air and entrained water into the receptacle 131 for holding dirty water. The inside of the cover 117 is provided with a cup-shaped recess 138 into which extends one end of a suction tube 137. The recess 138 and tube 137 function as a water separator. Air from which water has been separated flows through a gap 140 between the tube 137 and the wall of the recess 138 into the upper end of the tube 137 which extend downward through the receptacle 131, the lower end of the tube terminating at the space 128. Air flowing into the space 128 from the tube 137 moves into the gap 127 and mixes with air discharged from the ejector nozzle 121 and flows through the ejector tube 122 and is discharged at 117a on the surface to be cleaned.

In accord with the invention, the modification of FIGS. to 19 embodies structure for flowing clean water from the receptacle 129 to the surface to be cleaned. In a manner which will be described presently, a part of the air delivered to the ejector nozzle 121 can be diverted therefrom through an opening 156 in the Wall of the tip 121a into a passage 178 which is formd in the partition 177 and extends radially outward from the nozzle tip 121a and terminates at an opening 179 at the periphery of the partition. The diverted air under pressure flows downward from the passage 178 through a tube 144 which extends axially of the housing section 118 and terminates at a level above the bottom of the clean water receptacle 129. This causes clean water to flow upward from the receptacle through a tube 145 which extends through an opening in the partition 177 and terminates at 180 at the vicinity of the discharge opening 126 of the ejector nozzle 121. Due to the partial vacuum produced in the gap 127, liquid discharged at 180 from tube 145 atomizes and the atomized liquid in the form of drops is entrained in air flowing through the discharge tube 122 toward the surface to be cleaned.

In further accord with the invention, a control member 154 is provided which is movable to three different positions for respectively rendering the surface cleaning apparatus 110 operable to supply clean water from the receptacle 129 to the surface to be cleaned, to stop the supply of clean water to the surface and effect cleaning of the surface by manipulating the cleaning apparatus on the surface, and thereafter to remove dirty water from the surface and collect it in the receptacle 131. The control member or collar 154 .is of annular form and rotatable about the housing sections 116 and 118 at the vicinity of the partition 177. As best shown in FIG. 17, the control member 154 is anchored between external shoulders 181 and 182 of the housing to prevent axial movement thereof while permitting it to be turned or rotated about its axis.

The control member 154 is formed with a cavity or recess 183 at a peripheral zone thereof which is open at the top and extends downward to a level below the opening 179 of the passage 178. When the control member 154 is turned about its axis, thecavity 183 may be positioned opposite the opening 179, whereby the passage 178 will be open to the atmosphere. Similarly, the control member 154 can be turned about its axis to position the cavity 183 opposite an opening or vent 184 in the bottom part of the housing section 116. As shown in FIG. 19, the vent 184 is located at the same level as the opening 179. When the cavity 183 of the control member 154 is opposite the vent opening 184, the space 128 is open to the atmosphere.

When the control member 154, which functions as a. sleeve valve, is in its first position, the opening 179 will be closed by a part of the member 154 angularly offset from the cavity 183 and the cavity is opposite the vent 184 in the housing section.116, so that space 128 Will be open to the atmosphere. Under these conditions, secondary air will be drawn from the atmosphere through the opening 184 into the space 128 and the partial vac- 10 uum produced therein will be reduced sufliciently to render the cleaning apparatus ineffective to withdraw water from the surface to be cleaned.

With opening 179 closed by the control member 154, the part of the air diverted from the nozzle 121 through the opening 156 therein into the passage 178 will be effective to supply clean water from the receptacle 129 to the surface to be cleaned in the manner described. This is so for the reason that, since the opening 179 of the passage 178 is closed, the diverted air under pressure will flow downward in the tube 144 and force clean water in the receptacle 129 to flow through the tube 145.

When the control member 154 is turned to its second position, both the openings 179 and 184 will be opposite the cavity 183, so that both the space 128 and passage 178 will be open to the atmosphere. Under these operating conditions, the partial vacuum in the space 128 will continue to remain sufficiently reduced to render the cleaning apparatus 110 ineffective to withdraw water from the surface to be cleaned. Since the passage 178 is open to the atmosphere, air diverted from the nozzle 121a through the opening 156 into the passage 178 will be discharged from the opening or vent 179 into the atmosphere and the cleaning apparatus will be rendered inoperable to supply clean water from the receptacle 129 to the surface to be cleaned. Under these operating conditions, the cleaning apparatus 110 can be manipulated over the surface to effect cleaning.

In the third position of the control member 154, the opening or vent 179 of the passage 178 will be opposite the cavity 183 and open to the atmosphere and the cleaning apparatus will remain inoperable to supply clean water from the receptacle 129 to the surface to be cleaned, as explained above. However, in its third position, a part of the member 154 angularly offset from the cavity 183 will close the opening 184, so that the space 128 no longer will be open to the atmosphere. Under these operating conditions, the ejector nozzle 121-122 will be operable to produce a partial vacuum in the space 128 sufficiently high to induce flow of air into the nozzle 133 and withdraw dirty water from the surface to be cleaned, as explained above in describing the operation of the embodiment shown in FIGS. 1 to 8.

A further modification of the invention is illustrated in FIGS. 20 to 22 which is generally like the modification shown in FIGS. 15 to 19 and just described and in which similar parts are referred to by the same reference numerals. The modification of FIGS. 20 to 22 differs from the embodiment of FIGS. 15 to 19 in that the front of hood 161 for the nozzle 133 is formed with an opening covered by screens 163, as shown in FIG. 20. As shown in FIGS. 21 and 22, the end cover 117' and hood 161' are formed to define a passage 164 through which air flows from the discharge end 11711 of the discharge tube 122' to the screens 163, the air passing about the pipe which extends through the passage 164. With this arrangement, air discharged from the air ejector tube 122. passes over the nozzle 133 in a direction from the surface to be cleaned and not toward the surface, as in the modification of FIGS. 15 to 19.

The modification of FIGS. 20 to 22 differs in another respect from the embodiment of FIGS. 15 to 19 in that clean water forced from the clean water receptacle 129' flows therefrom through a tube which passes through an opening in the partition 177' and extends lengthwise within the ejector tube 122. The tube 145' includes an end portion 145" which extends beyond the discharge opening 117a of the tube 122' and is substantially parallel to the pipe 135', so that clean water will be supplied to the surface to be cleaned at the vicinity of the nozzle 133.

While particular embodiments of the invention have been shown and described, such variations and modifications are contemplated as fall within the true spirit and 1 1 i scope of the invention, as pointed out in the following claims.

What is claimed is:

1. Surface cleaning apparatus comprising a housing having a pair of receptacles for liquid, a suction nozzle, surface contacting means carried by said suction nozzle and movable over a surface, air ejector means comprising an air ejector nozzle, a discharge tube in axial alignment with said ejector nozzle and a space maintained at a partial vacuum, a fluid line comprising piping and one of said receptacles having one end in communication with said suction nozzle and the opposite end in communication with said space, said space having a vent, means connected to said ejector nozzle for delivering thereto air under pressure from a source of supply, means comprising tubing in communication with the other of said receptacles for conducting liquid therefrom to the surface at a region thereof adjacent to said suction nozzle, means communicating with the interior of said ejector nozzle for inducing flow of liquid in said liquid conducting means, and control mechanism comprising structure movable to close and open said vent to regulate the magnitude of the partial vacuum in said space and to control said flow inducing means to regulate flow of liquid in said liquid conducting means, said control mechanism having at least two operating positions in one of which said mechanism functions to render said structure operable to open said vent and to render said flow inducing means operable to etfect flow of liquid in said liquid conducting means and in the other of which said mechanism functions to render said structure operable to close said vent and to render said flow inducing means inoperable to effect flow of liquid in said liquid conducting means.

2. Apparatus as set forth in claim 1 in which said control mechanism has a third operating position in which said mechanism functions to render said structure operable to open said vent and to render said flow inducing means inoperable to effect flow of liquid in said liquid conducting means.

3. Surface cleaning apparatus comprising a housing having a pair of receptacles for liquid, a suction nozzle, surface contacting means carried by said suction nozzle and movable on a surface, air ejector means comprising an air ejector nozzle, a discharge tube in axial alignment with said ejector nozzle and a space maintained at a partial vacuum, a fluid line comprising piping and one of said receptacles having one end in communication with said suction nozzle and the opposite end in communication with said space, said space having a vent, a source of supply of air under pressure, means connecting the source of air supply to said air ejector nozzle for delivering thereto air under pressure, means comprising tubing in communication with the other of said receptacles for conducting liquid therefrom to the surface at a region thereof adjacent to said suction nozzle, means responsive to air under pressure from said source of supply for inducing flow of liquid in said liquid conducting means, and control mechanism comprising structure movable to close and open said vent to regulate the magnitude of the partial vacuum in said space and to control said flow inducing means to regulate flow of liquid in said liquid conducting means, said control mechanism having at least two operating positions in one of which said mechanism functions to render said structure operable to open said vent and to render said flow inducing means operable to effect flow of liquid in said liquid conducting means and in the other of which said mechanism functions to render said structure operable to close said vent and to render said flow inducing means inoperable to effect flow of liquid in said liquid conducting means.

4. Surface cleaning apparatus as set forth in claim 3 in which said means for inducing flow of liquid in said liquid conducting means comprises a gaseous fluid line having one end connected to receive air under pressure from said source of supply and the other end in communication with the other of said receptacles.

5. Surface cleaning apparatus as set forth in claim 4 in which said structure of said control mechanism includes valve means for controlling flow of air under pressure in said gaseous fluid line, said valve means being open in said one operating position of said control mechanism and closed in said other operating position of said control mechanism.

6. Surface cleaning apparatus as set forth in claim 4 in which said gasoline fluid line intermediate the ends thereof has a vent and said structure of said control mechanism includes a part movable to close and open said vent in said gaseous fluid line for controlling flow of air under pressure in said gaseous fluid line to said other receptacle, said part closing said vent in said gaseous fluid line in said one operating position of said control mechanism and said part opening said vent in said gaseous fluid line in said other operating position of said control mechanism.

7. Surface cleaning apparatus comprising a housing having a pair of receptacles for liquid, a suction nozzle, surface contacting means carried by said suction nozzle and movable over a surface, air ejector means comprising an air ejector nozzle, a discharge tube in axial alignment with said ejector nozzle and a space maintained at a partial vacuum, a fluid line comprising piping and one of said receptacles having one end in communication with said suction nozzle and the opposite end in communication with said space, said space having a vent, means connected to said ejector nozzle for delivering thereto air under pressure from a source of supply, means in communication with the other of said receptacles for conducting liquid therefrom to the surface at a region thereof adjacent to said suction nozzle, a connection for effecting flow of liquid in said liquid conducting means by air under pressure from said source of supply, said connection including valve means movable to open and closed positions for controlling flow of air under pressure from said source of supply to said liquid conducting means, and control mechanism comprising structure movable to close and open said vent to regulate the magnitude of the partial vacuum in said space and to move said valve means to its open and closed positions, said control mechanism comprising a single manually movable member of annular form which is rotatable about its axis and has at least two operating positions which are angularly offset with respect to one another and in one of which said mechanism functions to render said structure operable to open said vent and move said valve means to one of its positions for effecting flow of liquid in said liquid conducting means and in the other of which said mechanism functions to render said structure operable to close said vent and move said valve means to the other of its positions for stopping flow of liquid in said liquid conducting means.

8. Surface cleaning apparatus as set forth in claim 7 in which said manually movable member in said one of its operating positions functions to render said structure operable to open said vent and move said valve means to its open position for effecting flow of liquid in said liquid conducting means and in said other of which said mechanism functions to render said structure operable to close said vent and move said valve means to its closed position for stopping flow of liquid in said liquid conducting means.

9. Surface cleaning apparatus as set forth in claim 7 in which said manually movable member in said one of its operating positions functions to render said structure operable to open said vent and move said valve means to its closed position for effecting flow of liquid in said liquid conducting means and in said other of which said mechanism functions to render said structure operable 13 to close said vent and move said valve means to its open position for stopping flow of liquid in said liquid conducting means.

10. Apparatus as set forth in claim 3 in which said control mechanism has a third operating position in which said mechanism functions to render said structure operable to open said vent and to render said flow inducing means inoperable to efiect flow of liquid in said liquid conducting means.

11. Surface cleaning apparatus as set forth in claim 7 l in which said single manually movable member has a third operating position which, is angularly offset with respect to said two operating positions and in which said mechanism functions to render said structure operable to open said vent and move said valve means to the other of its positions for stopping flow of liquid in said liquid conducting means.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 7/ 1909' Kindel 15-369 1/1953 Holte 239-343 3/1953 Smith 15-369 X 2/1956 Erbs 15-320 X 10/1958 Hansen 15-323 X 6/1959 Welford 239-311 X 8/1962 Kemnitz 15-321 3/1963 Yonkers et a1 15-353 X 2/1964 Ballantyne 15-533 X FOREIGN PATENTS 1/1950 France. 9/ 1949 Great Britain.

ROBERT W. MICHELL, Primary Examiner.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification15/321, 15/421, 15/353, 15/401
International ClassificationA47L11/29, A47L11/30
Cooperative ClassificationA47L11/30, A47L11/4016, A47L11/4094, A47L11/4088
European ClassificationA47L11/40D2, A47L11/40R, A47L11/40N6, A47L11/30