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Publication numberUS3332399 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 25, 1967
Filing dateOct 20, 1965
Priority dateOct 20, 1965
Publication numberUS 3332399 A, US 3332399A, US-A-3332399, US3332399 A, US3332399A
InventorsHoward Patrick James, Zilka Thomas J
Original AssigneeModern Wholesale Stationers In
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Copy holder
US 3332399 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 25, 1957 J. H. PATRICK ETAL' 3,332,399

COPY HOLDER Filed Oct. 20, 1965 4 Sheets-Sheet l i FIE-.2.

' INVENTORS JAMES HOWARD PAT/PICK THOMAS J. Z/L/(A zcjj 26 ATTOR/VEVS y 1967 J. H. PATRICK ETAL 3. .3

COPY HOLDER 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Oct. 20, 1965 FIE--5 \I'lIIIlI/IIIIIIII a A mz A 0 NPZ I E 1T v Q NDJ M5 u WA W 0 E W 1 E 6 My B j ATTOENEY5 J. H. PATRICK ETAL 3,332,399

July 25, 1967 COPY HOLDER 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed 001.. 20, 1965 [196 III NBA G SINGLE LT1 VbO/f TRLPLE c 194A 94B m I940 170 I m l 58A 2 0) 4 F I E- 1 [:1

* INVENTORS J AM ES HOWARD PATRICK moms J. z/um ate}; 21 9 340.}.

FIE-:7- BY ATTORNEYS 1967 J. H. PATRICK ETAL 3,332,399

COPY HOLDER Filed Oct. 20, 1965 4 Sheets-Sheet FIE--5- INVENTORS JAMES HOWARD PATRICK THOMAS J. Z/L/(A United States Patent 3,332,399 COPY HOLDER James Howard Patrick, Burlingame, and Thomas J. Z1lka,

Mill Valley, Calif., assignors to Modern Wholesale Stationers, Inc, San Francisco, Calif., a corporation of California Filed Oct. 20, 1965', Ser. No. 498,630 8 Claims. (Cl. 120-34) This invention relates to a copy holder for holding copy to be transcribed and more particularly to a copy holder which includes a line guide member extending thereacross and movable theeralong under control of an electrically operated means.

A copy holder is often used by the operator of key operated machines such as a typewriter to support a document in a generally upright position for ease in viewing while transcribing information from the document to the machine keyboard. A typical copy holder includes a generally rectangular-shaped plate against which the copy is held. Often a line guide extends across the plate and is movable therealon-g to the desired line to guide the operator in reading the copy. With many prior art arrangements the line guide is manually movable by the operator. Thus, each time the operator completes a line of information from the document the line guide is moved down to the next line of information. This requires removal of the operators hand or hands from the keyboard to the copy holder to manually advance the line guide.

An object of this invention is the provision of an improved copy holder having a remotely controlled line guide.

An object of this invention is the provision of an electrically operated line guide for use with a copy holder, which line guide is movable upon actuation of a switch under control of the operator.

An object of this invention is the provision of an electrically operated line guide for use with a copy holder, which line guide is movable automatically by means of a periodic supply source therefor.

An object of this invention is the provision of a copy holder with improved spring biased retaining means for retaining the copy on the holder.

An object of this invention is the provision of an improved connecting means between a generally horizontally disposed base member and the inclined plate against which the copy is held.

These and other objects and advantages are provided by attaching the line guide to a mounting head which is movable along a notched rod extending longitudinally of the copy holding plate. A pawl is pivotally attached to the mounting head which pawl is normally resiliently biased by a spring into engagement with the notched rod to support the mounting head thereon. A solenoid is provided 'to actuate said pawl, and energization of the solenoid may be under control of a switch which is conveniently located for actuation by the operator. Alternatively, the solenoid may be periodically energized by the connection of a source of periodic current pulses thereto. When the solenoid is energized the pawl is moved to its actuated position and returns to normal position upon deenergization. During operation of the solenoid the head drops by gravity to step the line guide. By pulsing the solenoid, the

mounting head may be stepped along the rod and if desired a suitable switching means may be employed for single, double and triple space stepping of the line guide.

In the drawings wherein like reference characters refer to the same parts in the several views:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of a copy holder embodying this invention;

FIGURE 2 is a front view of the copy plate taken along line 2-2 of FIGURE 1;

3,332,399 Patented July 25, 1967 FIGURE 8 is a fragmentary front elevational view of v the mounting head and rail shown in FIGURE 7;

FIGURE 9 is a fragmentary cross sectional view taken on line 9-9 of FIGURE 7; and

FIGURE 10 is a circuit diagram showing the electrical circuit for the modified form of invention shown in FIGURES 7 through 9.

Referring now to FIGURE 1 of the drawings a copy holder is shown comprising a generally horizontal base member 10 which may be provided with legs 12 adjacent the corners thereof for support on a generally plane surface. An inclined copy holder or panel member 14 is supported on the base. An upwardly extending flange 15 is formed at the forward edge of the base which flange is formed with a forwardly inclined shelf or ledge 16 at the upper free end thereof. As best seen in FIGURES 5 and 6 the shelf is provided with a pair of spaced slots 17 adapted to receive forwardly extending tabs 18 formed at the lower end of the panel member 14. As seen in FIG- URE 1, a bracket 20 formed of heavy gauge wire or the like extends between the panel and base for support of the panel at the desired angle. The bracket 20 is of a generally U-shape with the horizontal base of the bracket attached to the base 10 by a resilient clip 22 fixed by rivets 24 or other suitable means to the base. The bracket may be slid into and out from under the arcuate free end of the clip, and is held firmly in position on the base when engaged by the clip. The upper ends 26 of the bracket are bent inwardly and engage loops 28 at the rear face of the copy plate 14. The loops may be simply formed by slitting the plate 14 along parallel lines and pressing the portion therebetween outwardly toward the rear of the copy plate.

For storage and transportation of the device the plate 14 is removed from the base 10 by disengaging the wire bracket 20 from the clip 22 and then sliding the tabs 18 out of the slots 17. The bracket may then be pivoted against the rear face of the copy holder 14 and the copy plate disposed on the base.

In use, the document 30 to be transcribed (such as a sheet of paper or the like shown in broken lines in FIGURE 1) lies against the copy plate 14 with the bottom edge supported on the shelf 16. A pair of resiliently biased clamp members 34A and 34B are pivotally supported on pins 36 extending from the bottom of the shelf for clamping the lower end of the sheet 30 to the plate 14. The clamp members 34A and 34B are of similar construction and as best seen in FIGURES 2 and 5 each includes a laterally extending arm portion 37 with generally upright outer ends which may be covered with a tubular gripping member 38 of suitable material such as plastic, rubber or the like, for engagement with the sheet 30. The inner ends of the members 34A and 34B are formed with generally rearwardly extending tabs 40 having downwardly bent ends which are interconnected by a tension spring 42 to resiliently bias the gripping members against the sheet 30. A pair of generally forwardly extending arms 43 having downwardly bent finger gripping ends 44 are formed at the inner ends of the arms 37. When the ends 44 are urged together by the operator as by gripping the same between the thumb and forefinger,

the clamp members are pivoted away from the copy sheet for removal thereof and insertion of another sheet. The single tension spring 42 serves to return both members to clamping position when the lever arms are released.

The copy plate or panel member 14 is formed with two pairs of apertures 50 and 52 adjacent the corners thereof, and short length tube sections 54 extending to the rear of the panel are attached to the panel at the apertures by swaging, welding or other suitable process. A notched rod 56 (comprising a stationary rack member) with rearwardly directed arms 58 at the opposite ends thereof is removably mounted in either of the pair of apertures 50 at the left-hand side of the plate 14 or the pair 52"( as illustrated) at the right-hand side, as desired. A tight frictional engagement of the arms 58 in the holes is provided by constructing the notched rack member 56 of resilient steel and forming the arms 58 with a small non-parallelism, such that when the arms 58 are inserted into the holes a tight frictional engagement is provided. With this arrangement the arms may be inserted a variable amount to accommodate copy of varying thickness.

A mounting head 60 carrying a line guide 62 is adapted for axial movement along the racks 56. As seen in FIGURES 3 and 4 the head is shown comprising a generally rectangular shaped block 63 which is provided with a bore 64 through which the rack 56 extends. A slot 65 is formed in the block and extends from the bore 64 to the front face thereof. A double ended pawl 66 is pivotally mounted in the slot on a pivot pin 68 extending between the slot walls, which pawl cooperates with the rack 56.

As seen in FIGURE 3, one end 70 of the double ended pawl is normally disengaged from the rack 56 and preferably this end is smoothly curved for reasons which will become apparent hereinbelow. The other end of the double ended pawl 66 is provided with a separate pawl element 72 pivotally mounted on a pin 74 carried by the pawl. The pawl element 72 is preferably provided with a generally flat edge 76 which normally engages a flat land portion 78 of one of the notches formed on the rack 56. In the position of the pawl element 72 illustrated in FIGURE 3, further clockwise rotation thereof is prevented by engagement of the pawl element with a shoulder 80 formed on the pawl 66. The head 60 is thereby locked against downward movement along the rack 56 by the positive engagement of the pawl element 72 with a notch on the rack. The head 60 can, however, be raised by simply pushing the same upwardly along the rack. As the head is raised, the pawl element 72 pivots in a counterclockwise direction about the pin 74 as viewed in FIGURE 3 as the pawl element rides along the inclined truncated face 82 of the adjacent higher notch. A leaf spring 84 suitably attached to the pawl 66 as by welding or the like and engaging the pawl element 72 resiliently biases the pawl element in a clockwise direction as viewed in FIGURE 3 toward engagement with the abutment 80 to return the pawl element to the illustrated position as the head is pushed upwardly and the pawl element enters the adjacent higher notch.

Pivotal movement of the pawl 66 about the pivot pin 68 is under control of a solenoid 86 carried by the head. As seen in FIGURES 3 and 4 a U-shaped channel bracket 88 is attached by screws 90 to the block 63, with one end of the bracket extending upwardly therefrom. The solenoid 86 is attached to the other side of the bracket at the upper end thereof by screws 92. The solenoid comprises a coil 94 carried by a bracket 96 and an armature 98 reciprocably movably mounted within the coil. The pawl 66 is formed with an arm 100 which extends from the block 62 and outwardly through a slot 102 in the bracket 88. The arm is connected to the armature through a connecting link 104 and suitable connecting pins 106. A compression spring 108 between the bracket 96 and pawl arm 100 serves to resiliently bias the pawl 66 in a clockwise direction about the pivot pin 68 as viewed in FIGURE 3 for engagement of the pawl element 72 with the rack. A stop member 109 carried by the screws 90 spans the slot 102 and limits clockwise rotation of the pawl 66. When the solenoid is energized, the armature 98 is drawn upwardly into the coil whereupon the spring 108 is compressed and the pawl 66 is pivoted in a counterclockwise direction as viewed in FIGURE 3 for engagement of the pawl end 70 with the rack. When the solenoid is deenergized, the spring 108 expands to return the pawl to the illustrated position. A two piece housing comprising wall part 110 and a separate bottom 112 encloses the head with the wall part 110 clipping over the block 93 and the bottom fastened thereto by screws 114.

The solenoid may be energized by any suitable supply source such as batteries or dry cells, not shown, which may be carried on the base 10, if desired. In the illustrated arrangement the solenoid is shown attached to a plug 116 which is adapted for connection to a 110 volt A.C. supply through a normally open switch 118. The switch may be located adjacent the keyboard of the typewriter for finger actuation by the operator, or it may be suitably located for foot or knee actuation. If desired, the switch may be incorporated in the keyboard of the typewriter or the like machine for actuation by a key thereof.

Regardless of the location of the switch or the source of solenoid power, when the switch 118 is closed, the solenoid is energized and the pawl 66 is rapidly pivoted whereupon the pawl member 72 is withdrawn from one notch of the rack and the other end 70 of the pawl enters another notch. The actuation of the armature 98 and attached pawl 66 is sufliciently rapid such that upon energization of the solenoid, the head and attached line guide 62 remain substantially stationary.

When the solenoid is deenergized upon reopening of the switch 118, the armature 98 and attached pawl 66 are returned to the illustrated normal position by the spring 108. The return of the solenoid from the energized position to the normal deenergized position under the combined force of the pring 108 and the force of gravity on the movable parts is at a much slower rate than when the solenoid is energized. Consequently, during the time that the pawl 66 pivots back to normal position the head 60 with the attached line guide 62 drops the distance of one notch on the rack at which point the pawl element 72 engages the next lower notch on the rack. The weight of the head and strength of the spring 108 are selected to provide for the above-described head movement for the distance of one notch upon deenergization of the solenoid. It will be apparent, therefore, that the head 60 may be moved downwardly with a step-by-step movement by alternately energizing and deenergizing the solenoid 86. If desired, the head may be moved down manually by energizing the solenoid and pushing down on the head. The curved pawl end 70 in engagement with the rack 56 then functions substantially as a detent member which is resiliently urged against the rack by the solenoid action. With this arrangement after the copy sheet is put on the plate, the operator can easily and rapidly move the line guide down to the desired level. Also, as mentioned above, with the solenoid deenergized, the line guide is easily manually moved upwardly aaginst the action of the spring biased paw-l member 72.

The notches on the rack 56 preferably extend around the entire periphery thereof whereby the head is povita-ble about the rack axis. When inserting a copy sheet on the plate 14 the line guide 62 therefor may be swung outwardly away from the plate and out of the way as viewed in broken lines in FIGURE 4.

In the illustrated arrangement the rack 56 and head 60 are located adjacent the right-hand edge of the copy plate 14. For convenience some operators may prefer that the rack and head be located adjacent the left-hand edge of the plate. With this arrangement, this may be accomplished by simply removing the arms 58 of the rack from the apertures 52 in the plate 14 and reinserting them into the apertures 50 adjacent the left-hand longitudinal edge of the plate. The line guide 62 which is pivotal about the axis of a mounting pin 126 is pivoted to extend in the opposite transverse direction across the plate 14. Holes 128 (see FIGURE 4) are formed at diagonally opposite points from the pin 126 and receive a spring biased detent number 138 carried by the block 63, which detent member is received in the holes to releasably lock the line guide in either transverse extending position. Also, as mentioned above, the rack arms 58 may be inserted through the sleeves 54, any desired amount to accommodate copy of various thickness. With this arrangement therefore a single sheet or an entire book may be placed on the copy holder and the line guide positioned adjacent thereto.

When required, a retaining device 132, as seen in FIG- URES l and 2 may be mounted on the upper leg 58 of the rack for holding the upper end of the copy sheet against the plate 14. The novel retaining device is made of resilient rod material and has an elongated arm portion 134 which is coiled at one end 136. The coiled portion, is slid onto the upper arm 58 prior to insertion of the arm into its mounting hole. The other end of the arm 134 is bent to extend rearwardly and is provided with a rubber or plastic tip 138 which engages the copy. The device may be removed from the copy by lifting the arm 134 to bend the same and swinging the arm about the axis of the upper leg 58 to the desired position. When the arm is released it springs back into engagement with the copy sheet 3% to hold the same against the plate 14.

For multiple space operation of the line guide, the switch 118 may be pressed and released the number of times required for the desired spacing. In an alternative arrangement illustrated in FIGURES 7 to 10 the solenoid is provided with an energization circuit for pulsing the same one, two or three times upon actuation of a control switch for single, double or triple space operation of the control head. With this arrangement a rod 56A with rearwardly directed arms 58A is attached to a copy plate or panel member 14A as by screws 152 (as seen in FIGURE 9). A mounting head 60A with a line guide 62A extending therefrom is adapted for longitudinal movement along the rod 56A. In the illustrated arrangement the head is provided with a pair of inwardly facing carriages 154A and 154B having flanged wheels 156 which ride on tracks 158A and 158B attached to the front and rear faces 160A and 16813, respectively, of the rod for travel therealong. Obviously, a sliding engagement or other suitable means may be employed for movably mounting the head 60A on the rod 56A.

The carriages 154A and 154B are attached to the inner faces of front and rear frame members 162A and 162B, respectively, of the head by any suitable means not shown. The ends of the frame members are interconnected by an end frame member 164 and the solenoid housing 166 at opposite ends thereof attached thereto by screws 168. It will be seen that the frame members 162A, 162B and 164 together with the solenoid housing 166 form a head having a central opening through which the rod 56A eX- tends.

One side of the rod 56A is provided with teeth 170 extending therealong and comprising a stationary rack for cooperation with the double ended pawl 66 pivotally mounted on a pin 172 extending between opposite walls of the solenoid housing 166. The pawl 66, may be of the same construction as the pawl 66 shown in FIGURES 3 and 4 and described in detail above and requires no further description. Further, the solenoid 86 for operation of the pawl may also be of the same type as described above. The pawl and rack function in the same manner as described. Briefly, with the solenoid deenergized the pawl 66 is pivoted by the spring 108 into a position wherein the pawl element 72 engages the rack to lock the head against downward movement along the rod. When the solenoid is energized the pawl element 72 is withdrawn from one notch of the rack and the other end 70 rapidly enters another notch to prevent the head from dropping downwardly under the force of gravity along the rod 56A. When the solenoid is denergized the pawl 66 is returned to the normal position illustrated in FIGURE 8. During this return movement of the pawl the head 60A drops the distance of one notch on the rack to advance the line guide 62A one space. The details of this operation are the same as described above with reference to the embodiment shown in FIGURES 1 to 6.

The pulsing circuit for the solenoid 86 includes a selector switch 176 and an interrupter switch 178 as best seen in FIGURE 8. The selector switch 176 may be mounted within the solenoid housing 166 and provided with a control knob 180 for manual actuation of the switch. The interrupter switch 178 is also mounted within the housing 166 by any suitable means not shown and has normally closed switch contacts which are under control of the solenoid 86. When the solenoid 86 is energized the normally closed interrupter switch contacts are opened by the member 182 extending between the pawl 66 and one switch arm.

The pulsing circuit further includes an elongated strip 184 of conducting material attached to the rod through an insulating member 186. Any suitable means such as cement or adhesive may be employed for fastening the strips together and to the rod 56A. The strip 184 includes two parallel rows designated 188 and which extend longitudinally thereof. Each row includes alternate electrical conducting and electrical insulating areas, the insulting areas being designated 192. Such areas simply may comprise apertures formed in the conducting strip which are filled with insulating material. Alternatively, the conducting strip 184 may be deposited on the insulating base 186 in the illustrated pattern using printed circuit techniques. Obviously, any other suitable means may be used to form the rows of alternate electrical insulating and conducting members.

The one row 188 is employed for double spacing and the other row 190 is employed for triple spacing. (Neither row is required for single spacing.) The electrical insulating areas 192 in the row 188 are spaced apartthe distance of two notches on the rack, while the insulating areas 192 in the row 190 are spaced the distance of three of said notches.

For brushes 194A, 194B, 194C and 194D are carried by the head 60A, with the outer two brushes 194A and 194D in contact with rails 158A and the inner two brushes 194B and 194C in contact with the rows 188 and 190 of the strip 184. As the head moves along the rail the two outer brushes remain in contact with the rails whereas the two inner brushes alternately contact conducting and insulating portions of the strip 184.

Reference is now made to the schematic circuit diagram of FIGURE 10 wherein a low voltage supply such as a battery 196 is shown for energization of the device. One battery terminal connects through a lead wire 198 to one rail 158A which rail connects through the brush 194A and a lead wire 200 to one terminal of the solenoid 86. The other terminal of the battery connects through a normally open push button switch 118A, the other rail 158A, brush 194D, a lead wire 202 and the interrupter switch 178 to the other terminal of the solenoid 86. The switch 118A is suitably located for actuation by the operator, and when the switch is closed it will be apparent that the solenoid 86 will be energized. Upon energization of the solenoid the interrupter contacts 178 open whereupon the solenoid is immediately deenergized. As described above the weight of the head 60A and strength of the spring 108 are selected to provide for the downward movement of the head along the rod a distance of one notch on the rack 170 for each cycle of operation of the solenoid. With the selector switch 176 in the illustrated single step position, it will be apparent that if the switch 118A is held closed by the operator the interrupter contacts 178 will alternately open and close whereupon the head 68A will move downwardly step-by-step along the rod until it reaches the lower end of travel or until the switch 118A is reopened. In operation, the switch 118A is normally only momentarily closed by the operator for single step operation of the device when the switch 176 is in the illustrated position. It will here be noted that the brushes 194A and 194D could be eliminated from the construction of the device by simply connecting the battery 196 and switch 118A directly to the solenoid and contacts 178 rather than through said brushes and rails 158A.

For double and triple spacing operation the selector switch is set to the appropriate double or triple space position for connection of one of the brushes 194B or 194C to the interrupter switch 178. It will be seen that the brushes 194B and 194C connect through conductors 204 and 206, respectively, to the selector switch 176. The brushes 1943 and 194C, associated conductors 204 and 206 and switch 176 are in shunt circuits with the switch 118A, which circuits include also the coded contact strip 184 and a conductor 208 connecting the battery 196 to said strip 184.

Assuming that the selector switch is set to the double space position, a circuit from the battery 196 through lead wire 208, the strip 184, brush 194B, conductor 204, and switch 176 to the interrupter contacts 178 is completed whenever the brush 194B leaves an insulating section 192 and contacts the conducting strip 184. The adjacent insulating sections 192 in the double spacing row 188 are spaced apart the length of two notches on the rack 170 and stepping of the head is stopped when the brush 194B is in contact with an insulating section 192. In double spacing operation, when the operator momentarily closes the switch 118A, the solenoid 86 is energized through said switch for a single step of the head along the rack 170 in the manner described above. When the head drops one step the brush 194B contacts the strip 184 and electrical connection therethrough from the battery to the interrupter switch 178 is completed for again energizating the solenoid 86 when the interrupter contacts reclose. Consequently the head 60A will step again. At the end of the second step the brush 194B engages an insulating member 192 whereupon the head 69A stops after stepping twice for double spacing of the line guide 62A.

The triple spacing operation is accomplished in substantially the same manner as the above described double spacing function. With the selector switch 176 set for triple spacing, the head 60A is stopped with the brush 194D in engagement with one of the insulator members 192. When the switch 118A is momentarily closed the solenoid 86 is energized in the manner described above to step the head 60A the distance of one notch along the rack. With the head so disposed, the brush 194C contacts the electrically conducting strip 184 for energization of the interrupter contacts 178 through the switch 176. After two more cycles of operation of the solenoid 86 the brush 194C will engage another insulating section 192 whereupon stepping of the head 68A ceases. Since the insulating sections 192 in row 190 travelled by the brush 194C are spaced the distance of three notch lengths of the rack 170 the line guide triple spaces upon momentary closure of the switch 118A. It will be apparent, therefore, that with a single actuation of the switch 118A, the line guide may he stepped one, two or three spaces depending upon the setting of the selector switch 176, for copying single, double and triple spaced copy material.

If desired, the contacts 118 or 118A may be actuated periodically for periodic actuation of the solenoid 86. For example, the contacts 118 or 118A may be included in a timer switch, with the contacts under control of a motor driven cam member. With the motor operating at a constant speed the switch contacts 118 or 118A are periodically closed by the cam for periodic energization of the apparatus. Speed control means may be included in the energization circuit of the motor if desired, to control the motor speed for control of the rate at which the line guide is stepped.

The invention having been described in detail in accordance with the requirements of the patent statutes, various other changes and modifications may suggest themselves to those skilled in this art within the spirit and scope of the invention defined in the appended claims.

We claim:

1. A copy holder comprising a substantiantially fiat copy plate adapted to receive copy thereon;

a line guide extending across said plate;

a mechanism including a mounting head carrying said line guide and movable longitudinally along said copy plate upon actuation thereof to effect movement of said l-me guide over copy carried by said copy plate;

a solenoid carried by said movable mounting head for actuation thereof; and

an electrical circuit for energization of said solenoid to control actuation of said mechanism, said electrical circuit for energization of said solenoid includ ing an interrupter switch under control of said solenord, and switching means under control of the mounting head position in series circuit with said interrupter switch.

2. A copy holder comprising a substantially flat copy plate adapted to receive copy thereon;

meatns supporting said plate in a generally upright posr ion;

a rack with teeth formed thereon carried by said copy plate and extending longitudinally thereof;

a mounting head carried by said rack and movable there-along;

a line guide carried by said mounting head and extending generally transversely across said copy plate;

a pawl pivotally mounted on said mounting head and engageable with said rack for supporting said mounting head when the pawl is in engagement with said rack; and

means carried by said mounting head and movable therewith for pivoting said pawl for disengaging the same from the rack to permit movement of said mounting head therealong;

said last-mentioned means comprising an electrically operated solenoid carried by said mounting head, and an electrical circuit connected to said solenoid for momentarily energizing said solenoid, said electrical circuit including switch means for pulsing said solenoid once for single spacing and a plurality of times for multiple spacing of said line guide.

3. A copy holder comprising a generally horizontally I disposed base member having an upright flange along the front edge thereof;

a copy shelf formed by a forwardly inclined upper end on said flange;

means forming a slot in said copy shelf;

a generally upright copy plate having a tab formed at the lower end thereof for insertion through said slot and support of said copy plate on said shelf;

means between said base member and copy plate for support of said copy plate in a generally upright position; and

a pair of copy clamping members pivotally mounted on the bottom of said copy shelf and having bent end portions extending generally upwardly for engagement with said copy plate; and

resilient means attached to said copy clamping members beneath said shelf for resiliently biasing the bent end portions into engagement with said copy plate.

4. A copy holder comprising a substantially fiat copy plate adapted to receive copy thereon:

a line guide extending across said plate;

a mechanism including a mounting head carrying said line guide and movable longitudinally along said copy plate upon actuation thereof to eflect movement of 10 resilient arm extend for attachment of said arm to said copy plate with said bent end thereof in engagement with said copy plate; said resilient arm being pivotable about said mounting said line guide over copy carried by said copy plate; arm for selectively positioning the bent end thereof a solenoid connected to said mechanism for actuation on the copy supported by said copy plate.

thereof; and 7. A copy holder comprising a substantially flat copy an electrical circuit for energization of said solenoid to plate adapted to receive copy thereon;

control actuation of said mechanism, which electrical means supporting said plate in a generally upright pocircuit includes an interrupter switch under control sition; of said solenoid, an elongated strip of electrical cona rack with teeth formed thereon carried by said copy ducting material with insulating portions spaced plate and extending longitudinally thereof; therealong, a brush carried by said mounting head a mounting head carried by said rack and movable and slidably engaging said strip and insulating portherealong; tions thereon, and means electrically connecting said a line guide carried by said mounting head and extendinterrupter switch and brush to said solenoid for autoing generally transversely across said copy plate; matic stepping of said mounting head when said brush a pawl pivotally mounted on said mounting head and engages said strip. engageable with said rack for supporting said mount- 5. A copy holder comprising a generally horizontally ing head When the pawl is in engagement with said disposed base member having an upright flange along the rack; front edge thereof; means for pivoting said pawl for disengaging the same a copy shelf formed by a forwardly inclined upper end from the rack to permit movement of said mounting on said flange; head therealong; means forming a slot in said copy shelf; said pawl having first and second ends and being pivota generally upright copy plate having a tab formed at able between first and second positions wherein the the lower end thereof for insertion through said slot respective first and second ends engage teeth on the and support of said copy plate on said shelf; rack for the support of the mounting head; and means between said base member and copy plate for said mounting head being moved by gravity one tooth support of said copy plate in a generally upright polength along the rack when said pawl is disengaged sition; from said rack during pivotal movement thereof a clamp member for holding the upper end of copy to from said first position to said second position.

said copy plate; 8. The copy holder recited in claim 7 wherein said said clamp member comprising an elongated arm of mounting head remains substantially stationary on said resilient material which iscoiled at one end and bent ra k du ing pivo al m vement of Said pawl from said secat an angle at the other end; and- 0nd position to said first position. a cylindrical mounting arm extending from said copy plate adjacent the upper end thereof over which the References Cited turns of the coiled end of said resilient arm extend UNITED STA PATENTS for attachment of said arm to said copy plate with 1 571 658 2/1926 coles g g l end thereof In engagement wlth sald py 40 1,800,071 4/1931 Hamper 120 34 said resilient arm being pivotable about said mounting g ii arm for selectively positioning the bent end thereof 1980300 11/1934 i on the copy supported by said copy plate. 2283493 5/1942 i ii 120-34 6. A copy holder comprising a copy plate; 1c mson et 12034 2,311,717 2/1943 Warren 120-28 a clamp member for holding copy to said copy plate; said clamp member comprising an elongated arm of O EIGN PATENTS resilient material which is coiled at one end and bent 2 213 12 190 Great Britain. at an angle at the other end; and 312 10 Italy a cylindrical mounting arm extending from said copy plate over which the turns of the coiled end of said LAWRENCE CHARLES, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
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US1800071 *Sep 12, 1929Apr 7, 1931Hevenor Charles DAutomatic line finder
US1881102 *Mar 8, 1932Oct 4, 1932Sperling Frank MCopyholder
US1881103 *Jun 16, 1932Oct 4, 1932Sperling Frank MCopyholder
US1980300 *Mar 7, 1934Nov 13, 1934Sperling Frank MCopyholder
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US2311717 *Mar 7, 1942Feb 23, 1943Warren Harold MDevice for holding multiple-part forms
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IT312110B * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4582285 *Feb 11, 1985Apr 15, 1986Bello Raymond PCopy holder
US4667919 *Nov 18, 1985May 26, 1987Teague John EClipboard holder
US4770115 *Mar 30, 1987Sep 13, 1988Gillum Jr Richard RLine guide for copy stand
US5219381 *May 22, 1991Jun 15, 1993Jacecko Jr John MAttachable power-assisted copy indicator
US5274935 *Dec 22, 1992Jan 4, 1994Frenette Albert ECopyholder with mechanized line guide
US5343625 *Nov 25, 1992Sep 6, 1994Chen Chiang MPortable magnetic drafting board
US20130026115 *Jul 28, 2011Jan 31, 2013Umbra LlcMounting shelves with concealment means
US20130214114 *Feb 20, 2013Aug 22, 2013George P. GruberPortable device stand
Classifications
U.S. Classification248/441.1, D19/91
International ClassificationB41J29/15
Cooperative ClassificationB41J29/15
European ClassificationB41J29/15