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Publication numberUS3332430 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 25, 1967
Filing dateDec 27, 1965
Priority dateDec 27, 1965
Publication numberUS 3332430 A, US 3332430A, US-A-3332430, US3332430 A, US3332430A
InventorsBusch Otto F
Original AssigneeBusch Otto F
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Disk assorting and counting apparatus
US 3332430 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 25, 1967 o. F. BUSCH DISK ASSORTING AND COUNTING APPARATUS 2 Sheets-Sheet l Filed Deo. 27, 1965 32 fag/..72 l,

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DISK ASSORTING AND COUNTING APPARATUS Filed Dec. 27, 1965 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 I| 2/4- f /r/ 3 f Z0? 220 -24 ,/55 /55 2 /50 I /56 l I 226 coa/WER 236 ATTORNEYS.

United States Patent O 3,332,430 DISK ASSORTING AND CUNTTNG APPARATUS Otto F. Busch, 147 Clover Ave., Croydon, Pa. 19020 Filed Dec. 27, 1965, Ser. No. 516,233 10 Claims. (Cl. 133-3) The present invention provides apparatus whereby disks are passed down an inclined chute and assorted into varying size classifications. As a part of the invention, means `are provided for counting the number of individual coins assorted into each classification. Moreover, means are provided for blocking the passage of other coins along the chute while an individual coin is being assorted and counted.

This invention relates to a disk asserting and counting apparatus. More particularly, this invention relates to apparatus for assorting disks, such as coins, into predetermined size classifications and counting the number of disks in each classification.

It therefore is a general object of the present invention to provide a novel disk assorting apparatus.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a novel disk counting and assorting apparatus.

It is still another object of the present invention to provide a novel apparatus for counting disks of varying sizes.

It is yet another object of the present invention to pro- Vide a novel apparatus for assorting disks into varying size classifications and counting the number of disks in each such classification.

It is still a further object of the present invention to provide a novel disk assorting apparatus having means to release a disk to be assorted and temporarily block the passage of unassorted disks until such disks are properly assorted.

Other objects will appear hereinafter.

For the purpose of illustrating the invention, there is shown in the drawings a form which is presently preferred; it being understood, however, that this invention is not limited to the precise arrangements and instrumentalities shown.

FIGURE l is a longitudinal sectional view of the apparatus illustrating the assorting mechanism.

FIGURE 2 is a partial sectional view of the apparatus shown in FIGURE 1 taken along the line 2--2.

FIGURE 3 is a partial sectional view of the apparatus shown in FIGURE l taken along the line 3 3.

FIGURE 4 is a perspective view of the reciprocal disk release and blocking member.

FIGURE 5 is `a perspective view of a coin box.

FIGURE 6 is a schematic illustration of the electrical circuit associated with the apparatus.

Referring now to the drawing in detail, wherein like numerals indicate like elements, there is shown in FIG- URE 1 a disk assorting apparatus designated generally as 10. The present invention will be described in connection with asserting and counting coins, and particularly coins of the United States monetary system. But as will be readily understood by those skilled in the art, the apparatus has application to assorting other types of disks. Thus, the apparatus has application in the asserting of tokens and the like.

As shown, the counting apparatus 10 is mounted within a housing l2 -which is divided into two diverging sections 14 and 16. Only section 14 will be described in detail, it being understood that section 16 is structurally the same. The housing y12 includes a top wall 18, end wall 20, and side walls 20 and 22. A plurality of partitions 26, 28, 30, 32, 34 and 36 extend downwardly and transversely of the side wall 22, 24. The partitions 26-36 together with side wall 22 define individual coin collecting ice compartments within the housing 12. Firusto-conical shaped members 48, 42, 44, 46 and 48 extend downwardly from the bottom of said compartments. The frustoconical members 40-48 define circular openings at their center with anges or lips 50, 52, 54, 56 and 58 projecting outwardly at the bottom edges thereof. The lips 50-58 permit a coin bag, such as the bag 60 to be tied or otherwise supported in open communication with the interior of the compartments. Thus, coins or tokens assorted into the individual compartments will fall into the bag. Alternatively, a coin box such as the box 62 shown in FIGURE 5 may be slid into the compartments for collecting and retaining the assorted and counted coins. The coin box 62 is shown in the second compartment from the right in FIGURE l. Additional coin boxes 64, 66 and 68 of similar construction are shown in the remaining compartments.

The housing l2 is provided with a slot-like opening 70 into which disks or coins to be assorted and counted are deposited. The opening 70 may be in communication with a hopper or other coin receiving member. The width of slot 70 is such that it is only slightly wider than the largest coin or token to be received therethrough. Thus, if the apparatus 10 is designed to accept and assort the most common United States coins, then the width of slot 70 should be only slightly more than the width of a fifty cent piece so as to permit it to fall freely therethrough. Since the slot 70 must also accept coins of smaller width, there is the possibility that two coins, such as two dimes or a penny and nickel falling through the slot together would have a combined width greater than that of slot 70, and jam. Accordingly, a rectangular opening is formed so as to extend across the slot 70. The height of opening `72 is sufficient to permit the surface of a roller 74 to project partially therethrough. The axis of roller 74 is parallel to the longitudinal axis of opening 72 and is rotatably supported on appropriate bearings. A motor 76 is mounted on a bracket 78 and drives the roller so that the surface exposed through the opening 72 moves in an upward direction. The effect of the rotating roller is to frictionally engage one lsurface of any two coins that may be passing through the slot 70 in a manner which would result in their becoming jammed. In this manner, the roller engages one of the coins and drives it upwardly until the other coin falls through the slot 70.

The slot 70 provides access for the coins to an inclined chute 80. Coins passing through the slot 70 may also be received in an inclined chute 82 which is part of section 16. Since the apparatus operates the same for either chute, only section 14 is described herein.

The chute 84 is defined by Ia pair of spaced-apart walls 84 and 86 supported in vertical disposition lby the housing 12. In the embodiment shown, the walls 84 and 86 are supported in a vertical disposition by securing them to the top wall 18. In a preferred embodiment, the walls 84 and 86 are spaced apart 0.88 inch to permit free passage therebetween of a half dollar which is the widest coin or disk described for use with the present invention.

The bottom wall of chute is defined by the top edges `of a plurality of longitudinally spaced-apart spacing members 88, 90, 92, 94, 96 and 98. As shown, the spacing members 88-98 are bolted, riveted or otherwise secured to the walls 84 and 86. The spacing members 8898 are mounted Ibetween the walls 84 and 86 so that their top edges are parallel and aligned. Accordingly, disks or coins passing through the slot opening 70 will roll down the chute 80 with their peripheral edges on the top edges of spacing members 88-98. The longitudinal distance between spacing members 88-98 is arranged so as to be successively decreasing. Thus, the distance between member 88 and member 90 is greater than the distance Ibetween member 90 and member 92. Similarly, members 92 and 94, 94 and 96, and 96 and 98 are spaced apart lesser distances. The distance between each of the members 88- 98 is chosen so as to Ibe approximately equal to the diammeter of the particular coin or token to tbe passed therethrough. Thus, if it is desired to pass half dollars through the spacing between members 88 and 90, then the distance between such members will be adjusted to be slightly larger than the diameter of a half dollar. For example, this distance may be 1.312 inches. Similarly, the distance between members 90 and 92 may be for a quarter, which would make it equal to 1.062 inches; the distance between members 92 and 94 may Ibe for a nickel, which would make it .937 inch; the distance between members 94 and 96 may be for a penny, which would make it approximately .875 inch. The distance between members 96 and 98 is not critical since it is not intended that any coin except a dime should pass that far down the chute 80. However, if desired, the distance may be adjusted to be just slightly larger than the diameter of a dime.

The top Wall of the chute 80 is defined by Ia plurality of spacing members 110, 112, 114, 116 and 118. The spacing member 110 has a vertical portion that extends upwardly to define the side of slot 70. Moreover, the end of the upward extension is cut at an angle so that the slot 70 is enlarged for easy reception of a coin or token.

A plurality of stop members 2li, 122, 124, 126 and 128 are mounted between spacing members 110-118. As shown, the stop members 1Z0-128 are of successively greater length so that their lower edges are progressively positioned closer to the bottom of chute 80. The distance between each of the stop members 120-128 and the bottom of chute 80 is such that it will engage a disk or coin of predetermined size rolling down the chute but will permit other coins of smaller diameter to continue down the chute 80. The lower corner closest to the entrance of chute 80 of each ot the stop members 1Z0-128 is provided with ia chamfered edge 130, 132, 134, 136, and 138 respectively. The chamfered edges 13G-138 each support a stop contact 140, 142, 144, 1416 and 148, each of which extends transversely across the chute 80 and through the walls 84 and 86. The distance between each of the stop contacts 140-148 and the bottom of chute 80 is such that it will engage a disk or coin of a predetermined size rolling down the chute 80 but will permit other coins of smaller diameter to continue down the chute. As shown in FIGURE l, the stop contact 140 has engaged a half dollar and is preventing it from rolling further down the chute 80. However, a quarter, nickel, penny or dirne may pass under the contact 14) and stop member 120 to continue down the chute 80. Similarly, the stop contact 142 prevents a quarter from continuing further down the chute, while permitting a nickel, dime or penny to continue beneath it. The contact 144 stops nickels, the contact 146 stops pennies, and the contact 148 stops dimes.

A half dollar 150 has been shown in abutting relation with the stop Contact 140. A penny 152 is shown immediately behind it. On the other hand, the remaining coins have been shown in phantom merely to illustrate their relative diameters and positions. v

As illustrated in FIGURE 3, each of the reeds 140- 148 extends through and is supported by the walls 84, 86. The stop contacts 140-148 are made of an electrically conductive material, such as aluminum, silver or copper Iand provided with an electrically conductive wire. The Wires permit the stop contacts 140-148 to be connected in the electrical control circuit to be described below.

A reciprocable disk release and blocking plate is mount ed over the open space between each -of the spacing members 88-98. One such reciprocable disk release and blocking plate 156 is shown in FIGURE 4. The plate 156 is the same as the plate in FIGURE l on which the half dollar 150 rests. Similar plates 158, 160, 162 and 164 are provided for each of the remaining coins. These plates are similar in construction to the plate 156 'but may be of a smaller size.

As mounted, the top surface of each of the plates 156-164 is ush with the top edge of each of the spacing members 88-98. Accordingly, when the plaes 156-164 are in position overlying the opening between the spacing members 88-98, they form, together with the top edges of said spacing members, a continuous bottom wall for the chute 80. Thus, a coin deposited through the slot opening 70 will continue to roll down the chute 80 until it engages one of the stop cont-acts -148.

Each of the plates 156-164 is supported in reciprocable sliding relation with the spacing members 88-98. The plates are provided with a hole through which a fastener may extend so as to connect the plates to a solenoid armature. In FIGURE 3, the plate 156 is shown connected to the armature 166 of solenoid 168. In FlGURE 2, the plate 158 is shown connected to the armature 170 of the solenoid 172. The several solenoids are mounted to the wall 84 by means of brackets 174. Actuation of the solenoid coils will cause the respective armatures to reciprocate thereby drawing the plates 156-164 with them.

As shown in FIGURE 4, ia pair of legs 176 and 178 extend laterally from each end of the plate 156. Similar legs extend from the remaining plates 158-164. The plate 156, as Well as the plates 158-164, is mounted so that the arms 176 and 178 normally rest on the bottom of an opening in the wall 86. The arms may even extend beyond the wall 86 as 'best shown in FIGURES 2 and 3. The arms 176 and 178 are positioned to deiine an open space between them through which a coin will drop when the plate 156 or its equivalent is reciprocated toward the respective solenoid coils.

In FIGURE 2, the plate 156 is shown in its reciprocated position land the plate 158 is shown in its normal position. The half dollar would have come to rest against the stop contact 140. With the plate 156 reciprocated as shown, the half dollar 150 is about to drop through the open space between the legs 176, 178 and spacing members 88, 90. The half dollar will fall into the compartment defined by partition walls 34, 36 and side wall 22. In the embodiment shown, it will fall through this compartment into the coin lbag 60. Arms 176 and 178 are of suilicient length so that they continue to rest on the top edges of the spacing members when the plates are reciprocated. This provides support for the plates in their reciprocated disposition.

Each of the plates 156-164 is provided with a blocking flange 181i extending upwardly from the inner side of the arm 178. The plates 156-164 are mounted so that the respective arms 178 and flanges 180 are on the upper side of the inclined plane dening the bottom wall of chute 80. Thus, when a plate is reciprocated by its solenoid, the flange extends across the space between walls 84 and 86 and blocks further progression of coins or tokens down the chute 80. In the illustrated embodiment, the plate 156 has been reciprocated beneath the half dollar 150 and thereby moves the blocking ilange 180 across the chute 80 and prevents the penny 152 from continuing down the chute. After the half dollar 150 has fallen through the space lbetween stop members S8 and 90, and the plate 156 has been reciprocated to its normal position overlying said space, the penny 152 will be freed to continue rolling down the chute 80 until it engages the stop contact 146. In so rolling down the chute, it will not engage the stop contacts 142 and 144 since they are spaced far enough above the bottom wall to avoid contact with penny 152. The ultimate position of the penny 152 is illustrated in phantom.

A plurality of brackets such as the brackets 182 and 184 are mounted along the wall 86. Each bracket supports a microswitch such as the microsWitc-hes 186 and 188. The microswitches are of the normally closed type which will open an electric circuit when its toggle arm 19t), 192, 194, 196, or 198 is pivoted downwardly by a coin falling through the openings between the spacing members. Since each toggle arm 190-198 extends transversely across the open space between the stop members 88-98, a coin falling through such open space will engage the toggle arm and thereby cause the switch to which it is connected to momentarily open. After the coin falls away from the respective toggle arm, it will resume its normal position and thereby close the electric circuit. Each microswitch is connected in electric circuit relation with the contacts of a relay circuit.

When a solenoid is deenergized, the plate to which its armature is connected returns to its normal position overlying the opening between the spacing members 88-98. Each of the plates 156-164 are biased to their normal position by means of a pair of elongated flat resilient spring members. Two such spring members 200 and 202 are shown in their biased position attached to the wall 84 by screws 212 and 214 extending through the ends thereof. The springs 200 and 262 extend vertically down the walls to a position overlying the side edge of the plate 156. When the solenoid coil 168 is energized to join the armature 166 and thereby reciprocate plate 156, the free ends of springs 200 and 202 are biased outwardly away from the wall 84. Deenergization of the coil 168 permits the bias of springs 200 and 202 to cause the plate to reciprocate back to its normal position. Similar springs 216 and 218 are shown for biasing the plate 158.

A bracket 220 is mounted to the wall 86 and supports a relay 222. The purpose of relay 222 will be made clear from the description of the apparatus as set forth below.

From the foregoing, it is apparent that when one of the slides 156-164 which are mounted in overlying relation with the open spaces between the spacing members 88-98 is reciprocated, the open space below it will be exposed. Each of the slides 156164 is mechanically attac-hed to the armature, such as the armatures 166 and 170, of a solenoid, which when energized, causes the slide to reciprocate. Deenergization of one of the solenoids permits the armatures and plates to be biased back to their overlying position by means of resilient springs such as the springs 200 and 202. The ange 18)` and similar flanges on the remaining slides is positioned so as to block the chute 80 when the slide is reciprocated, This stops the further passage of coins down the chute until the particular coin resting on the slide falls through the opening between the spacing members 88-90. Below each slide is mounted one of the toggle arms 190-198 of the microswitches, such as microswitches 186 and 18S. The toggle arms 190-198 are positioned so as to be biased downwardly by a coin passing through the opening.

Reference is now made to FIGURE 6 wherein a schematic illustration of the electrical circuit is shown. The operation of the assorting and counting apparatus will be described in conjunction with the description of the schematic illustration.

To place the apparatus 10 in operating condition, the switch contacts 224 are closed, thereby energizing the transformer 226. Following this, it is presumed that a plurality of coins or other tokens of unlike diameters have been deposited through the slot opening 70 and are proceeding down the chute 80 after moving past the rotating roller 74. It is of course to be understood that some of the coins will lalso proceed down the chute S2, but since both chutes are alike, only the operation of the apparatus 10 associated with chute 80 will be described. In the embodiment described, it will be assumed that the apparatus 10 is going to count fifty-one cents in the form of a half dollar and penny deposited through the opening 70.

As shown in FIGURE 1, the half dollar 150 was deposited first and has proceeded down chute 80 until it came to rest against the contact stop 140. The coin, being made of silver or a combination of silver and copper, completes an electrical circuit between the stop contact 140 and ground. The ground terminal is provided by making the plates 156-164 of an electrically conductive material, such as aluminum, and either con- 6 necting them or the solenoid armatures to ground. In FIGURE 3, the plate 156 is shown connected to a lead wire 226 which in turn is connected to ground. It is to be understood that other methods of completing the circuit to ground may be provided. Thus, the stop co-ntact 146 should be lresiliently biased into connection by the half dollar 150, thereby completing a connection to ground. This type of connection could be substituted when tokens made of nonconductive material are used.

When the half dollar 150 cornes to rest against the stop contact 140, an electric circuit is completed from the secondary of transformer 226 through the relay coil 222, through the normally closed microswitch 186 and back to the transformer secondary. Transformer 226 is energized by a source of alternating current (not shown) connected to the primary through switches 224. The flow of current through relay coil 222 energizes it, thereby closing relay contact 228 with xed relay contact 230 and closing relay contact 232 with fixed relay Contact 234. The closing of contact 232 with contact 234 locks the -relay 222. The relay 222 remains locked in its energized condition even though the half dollar falls out of contact with the stop contact 140. The closing of contact 228 against fixed contact 230 permits current to flow through the solenoid 168 thereby drawing in the armature 166. The plate 156 reciprocates across the opening between spacing members 88 and 90 thereby moving the flange 180 into blocking position. This stops the further movement of penny 152 down the chute 80. Simultaneously, the opening between spacing members 88 and 90 is exposed and the half dollar 150 falls therethrough.

The closing of contacts 228 and 230 also energizes the counter 236, which registers a change of one integer in response to such energization. This type of counter is well known and need not be disclosed in detail.

After the half -dollar has cleared the plate 156, it will strike the toggle arm thereby causing microswitch 226 to momentarily open the circuit from the secondary of transformer 226. This deenergizes the relay coil 222, opening contacts 228-23() and 232-234. The solenoid 168 therefore releases and the bias of springs 200 and 202 closes the plate 156. The circuit is now in condition to await another coin.

The movement of plate 156 back to its normal position unblocks the penny 152 which then proceeds down the chute 80 until it strikes the stop contact 146. The stop contact 146 is connected in a circuit similar to that illustrated in FIGURE 6. In fact, a circuit similar to that of FIGURE 6 is provided at each of the assorting positions. However, to avoid unnecessarily complicating the description of this invention, only one such circuit has been shown. It is of course to be understood that only one transformer 226 may 'be necessary. Similarly, a single counter 236 capable of receiving inputs from each of the circuits may be provided.

The present invention may be embodied in other specific forms without departing from the spirit or essential attributes thereof and, accordingly, reference should be made to the appended claims, rather than to the foregoing specification las indicating the scope of the invention.

I claim:

1. An apparatus for sorting discs of different -dimensions comprising an inclined sorting chute, contact members positioned in said chute for engagement by discs of varying dimensions, openings in said chute adjacent said contact members, collection means in communication with said openings for receiving sorted discs, disc release and blocking mechanisms for `said openings, said mechanisms comprising a blocking member for preventing passage of discs along said chute and a disc release member normally obstructing one of said openings, means responsive to contact 'between a disc and a contact member for its particular dimension to actuate one of .said disc release and blocking mechanisms so that said blocking member is moved to an operative position in alignment with said chute and said disc release member is removed from its position obstructing said one of said openings, said blocking member being ldisposed upwardly of said chute from said one of said openings so that actuation of said disc release and blocking mechanism permits a disc to enter said one of said openings while preventing other discs from so doing.

2. An apparatus in accordance with claim 1, and trip mechanisms in .said openings and positioned to be engaged by -released discs, said trip mechanisms causing the blocking members for their respective openings to move to an inoperative position out of alignment with sai-d chute and the disc release members for 4their respective openings to move to positions normally obstructing said openings.

3. Apparatus in Iaccordance with claim 1 wherein said disc release member is a reciprocable member normally overlying said one of said openings in said chute, said blocking member projecting from said disc release member and normally otset from .alignment with said chute, means to reciprocate said disc release member when said contact is engaged by a disc, said means reciprocating said disc release member to expose said opening and to position said blocking member in blocking alignment across said chute.

4. Apparatus in accordance with claim 1 wherein said disc release member is a reciprocable plate normally overlying said one of said openings in the bottom wall of said chute, said blocking member comprising a llange adjacent the upper side of said plate and normally offset `from alignment with said chute, means to reciprocate said plate when said contact is engaged by a disc, said means reciprocating said plate to expose said opening and to position said flange across said chute.

5. Apparatus in accordance with claim 1 wherein said collection means includes partitions for maintaining said discs in an assorted condition.

6. Apparatus in accordance with claim 1 wherein said disc release and blocking mechanism includes a solenoid, a relay for switching said solenoid into an electric circuit, said relay being connected to one of said contact members, said contact members including means to close an electric circuit to energize said relay.

7. An apparatus in accordance with claim 1, and trip mechanisms in said openings positioned to be engaged by released discs, said trip mechanisms for their respective openings to cause said blocking member to move to an inoperative position out of alignment with said chute, .and said disc release member to move to its position normally obstructing the opening.

8, An appartus in accordance with claim 6, and a trip mechanism disposed in said opening and positioned to be engaged by a released disc, said trip mechanism being coupled to said relay to deenergize said relay in response to engagement by a released disc.

9. An apparatus in accordance with claim 7, and a disc counter coupled to said trip mechanism for operation in response to engagement of said trip mechanism by a released disc.

10. An apparatus for assorting coins comprising an inclined sorting chute down which coins of different value and diameter are adapted to roll, a collection means into which the coins are deposited, electrical contact members positioned at successively decreasing distances above the bottom wall of said chute for engagement by coins of varying diameters, a coin release and blocking mechanism operative, when a coin has engaged the contact member for its particular diameter, to release the coin from the chute and block the passage of other coins .along said chute, each of said contact members being adapted to close an electrical circuit to energize a switch connected thereto, each said coin release and blocking mechanism including a reciprocable plate overlying an opening in said bottom wall, a coin blocking member projecting from said plate and adjacent the upper end of said plate, electrically actuated means for reciprocating said plate to expose said opening and release said -coin therethrough, said blocking member being positioned on said plate to be out of blocking relation with said chute when said plate overlies said opening and to be in blocking relation with said chute further up said chute than said opening when said plate is reciprocated to expose said opening, said electrically actuated means being connected to said switch, said switch being adapted to close an electrical circuit through said electrically actuated means, a microswitch, said microswitch having a movable contact arm positioned below said plate for engagement by a released coin passing through said opening, said microswitch being adapted to be connected to a counter for registering the passage of a coin.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,338,575 l/l944 Daugherty 133-3 3,032,162 5/1962 Huckins 133-8 X 3,040,858 6/1962 Almquist 133--3 X ROBERT B. REEVES, Primary Examiner.

STANLEY H. TOLLBERG, Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2338575 *Jan 2, 1940Jan 4, 1944David R FrancisCoin handling and totaling device
US3032162 *Nov 21, 1958May 1, 1962Alvin E HuckinsSeparating and counting machine
US3040858 *Jul 6, 1959Jun 26, 1962 Apparatus for counting and sorting coins
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3431920 *Feb 16, 1967Mar 11, 1969Zimmermann GertMethod and apparatus for sorting and counting coins and other workpieces
US3521649 *Mar 13, 1967Jul 28, 1970Wolverine Toy CoCoin bank and method of classifying coins
US3776338 *Feb 3, 1972Dec 4, 1973Seeburg CorpCredit pulse generating system for vending machines
US4059122 *Feb 5, 1974Nov 22, 1977Glory Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaCoin classifying and counting machine
US4100925 *Dec 17, 1976Jul 18, 1978Glory Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaCoin jamming detecting device
US4239121 *Apr 23, 1979Dec 16, 1980Martin HodesVitamin organizer
Classifications
U.S. Classification453/5, 453/32
International ClassificationG06M7/04, B07C5/04, G06M1/10, B07C5/06, G06M1/00, G07D3/00, G07D3/14, G06M7/00
Cooperative ClassificationG06M7/04, G06M1/10, G07D3/14, B07C5/065
European ClassificationG07D3/14, G06M7/04, G06M1/10, B07C5/06A