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Publication numberUS3332563 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 25, 1967
Filing dateNov 26, 1965
Priority dateNov 26, 1965
Publication numberUS 3332563 A, US 3332563A, US-A-3332563, US3332563 A, US3332563A
InventorsJohn Reshan
Original AssigneeJohn Reshan
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Receptacle holding apparatus
US 3332563 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 25, 1967 .1. RESHAN RECEPTACLE HOLDING APPARATUS 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Nov. 26, 1965 INVENTOR. JOHN RESHAN ATTORNEY FIG. 2

July 25, 1967 J, REsHAN I 3,332,563

RECEPTACLE HOLDING APPARATUS Filed Nov. 26, 1965 3 Sheets-Sheet FIG.4

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I ENTOR.

-*-'' I JOHN HAN 23 BY 654i FIG. 5 ATTORNEY July 25, 1967 RESHAN 3,332,563

RECEPTACLE HOLDING APPARATUS Filed Nov. 26, 1965 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTOR. dOH N R ESHA N ATTORNEY United States Patent 3,332,563 RECEPTACLE HOLDING APPARATUS John Reshan, 2.71 E. Moler St., Columbus, Ohio 43207 Filed Nov. 26, 1965, Ser. No. 509,752 12 Claims. (Cl. 215-7) The invention which is disclosed herein and illustrated in the appended drawings, relates generally to apparatus for holding a receptacle for liquid materials in suspended relationship with a fixed object. More specifically, this invention relates to apparatus for holding an infants nursing bottle in suspended relationship with a fixed ob ject, such as a person attending an infant, for example.

A number of devices have been developed for thus securing a nursing container. However, no provision is made in presently known devices for minimizing leakage of liquid contents from the receptacle through the customary perforate nipple; when the container is inadvertently dropped or thrown to a position beyond the range of manual control of the attendant.

Neither do such devices include disposable means, for safeguarding a nipple closure from contamination during the frequently substantial period of time, which may intervene between preparation of a nursing bottle and its ultimate use. Nor do known devices of this class provide disposable means, for minimizing the rate of heat loss from contained liquids; during periods when a nursing bottle is maintained in a ready state, for use at a later time, according to the attitude and demands of the infant.

Objects One object of this invention is to provide disposable means, for containing a liquid receptacle; which includes separately disposable means, for safeguarding a closure portion of the receptacle against contamination.

A second object of the present invention is to provide means, for insulating a filled nursing bottle against heat loss; which may include insulating means, for visual inspection of the level of liquid contained within the bottle.

Another object of the present invention is to provide means, for pivotally securing a prepared nursing bottle in a substantially upright position, in suspended relationship with the attendant of an infant; so as to minimize loss of contained liquid through a perforate nipple closure, at times when the prepared bottle is not in operational use.

Still further objects and features of this invention will be apparent from the subjoined specification and claims, when they are considered together with the associated drawings.

Drawings FIG. 1 is a view in perspective showing apparatus of the present invention, readied for use in the dispensing operation of feeding an infant, the upper portion of the suspending means being eliminated from the drawing for clarity.

FIG. 2 is a view in section taken along the line 22 of FIG. 1, showing the operational relationship between the collar and the tube member of the invention, and a con-. tained nursing bottle receptacle.

FIG. 3 is a view in perspective showing an insulating tube member, provided with insulating visual access means.

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary view in section, taken along the line 4-4 of FIG. 3, showing related elements of the tube on an enlarged scale, the lower portion of the tube being omitted for clarity.

FIG. 5 i a fragmentary view of the tube of FIG. 3, showing a preferred location of annular perforations, with reference to structural elements of a contained nursing bottle receptacle.

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary view illustrating the configuration of the upper portion of the tube of FIG. 4, when secured to a nursing bottle, with the upper terminal portion of the tube arranged in protective relationship with the nipple closure of FIG. 5.

FIG. 7 is a plan view of the lanyard of FIG. 1.

FIG. 8 isa plan view, showing one embodiment of the collar member of FIG. 2, in blank.

FIG. 9 is a plan view, showing the bearing arm of FIG. 2 in blank.

FIG. 10 is a perspective view, showing a second embodiment of the collar member of FIG. 2.

FIG. 11 is a view in section, taken along the line 11-11 of FIG. 10, showing the cross-sectional configuration of the embodiment of FIG. 10 on an enlarged scale.

FIG. 12 is a plan view, showing in blank one terminal portion of the embodiment of FIG. 10.

FIG. 13 is a plan view, showing in blank a second terminal portion of the embodiment of FIG. 10.

FIG. 14 is a view in section, taken along the line 1414 of FIG. 10, showing the assembled relationship of a terminal portion of the embodiment of FIG. 10.

Description Briefly summarized, the present invention is seen in FIG. 1 to be an apparatus, designated generally as 15, for holding a receptacle 16 for liquids 17, comprising: means 21), comprising a tube 20, for containing receptacle 16; means 39, comprising a collar 31, for retaining said containing means 20 upon receptacle 16; means 40, comprising bolt 41 and nut 42, for releasably securing retaining means 30 upon tube 20 and receptacle 16; means 50, comprising an annular row of perforations 51 (FIG. 3) formed upon tube 20, for severing a terminal portion 22 of tube 20 in order to gain access to liquids 17; means 60, comprising a transparent portion 61 formed upon tube 20, for displaying the level of liquids 17; means 70, comprising lanyard 71, for suspending containing means 20 from a fixed object; and means 90, comprising a bearing arm 91 secured to retaining means 40, for interconnecting retaining means 40 with suspending means 70.

Referring more specifically to the drawings for a detailed description of the apparatus of this invention, it will be seen in FIG. 1 that receptacle 16 comprises an infant nursing bottle 18 of known configuration; which is adapted for containing and dispensing an infant feeding formula 17, in liquid form. Liquid formula 17 is dispensable in the usual manner, through perforate nipple closure 19, removably secured to bottle 18; when receptacle 16 is prepared for use.

Means 20, for containing receptacle 16, comprises a tube 20, which is preferably formed with the generally cylindrical configuration shown in FIG. 3. Outer tube 21 is preferably formed with an integral bottom portion 23 (FIG. 5) and an upwardly disposed circumferential edge 24, defining an opening 25, in communication with an internal cavity 26, defined by inner surfaces of tube means 20. Tube 21 is so proportioned that opening 25 will be suitable for receiving, and internal cavity 26 will be sufficient for containing, a nursing bottle receptacle 16. Tube means 20 is preferably formed from a relatively inexpensive material; so as to be economically disposable after initial use. For example a kraft paper, having suitable weight, strength and liquid resistant properties, is satisfactory for forming tube 21.

A heavier weight of kraft paper, than that determined solely by strength and abrasion considerations, will provide a relatively higher heat insulation factor; and thus operates to maintain liquid 17 at a prepared dispensing temperature for longer periods of time. While manufacturing costs may be somewhat enhanced; an economically disposable tube 21 may be formed from a resilient 3 plastic film material, now in general use; such as a vinyl plastic film, for example. The heat insulating properties of such materials are known to be substantially higher than untreated kraft paper of comparable gauge.

Alternatively, kraft papers may be treated in a number of ways to increase their heat insulating properties. For example, it is known that impregnation of paper products with a variety of oils, such as tung oil, linseed oil, soybean oil, and fish oil, for example, will serve to increase the heat insulation factor of the fundamental material; so as to retard the natural transfer of heat from the contained liquid 17.

Oil impregnation of paper material, for use in tube means 20, will provide an additional desirable result by making tube 20 resistant to absorption of liquids. Other means, such as wax, paralfin or a suitable plastic coating will also render a paper product sufficiently moisture resistant to provide a satisfactory outer tube 21 in the present invention. Thus, separate means may be associated with a paper product to provide the desired moisture repellent property and heat insulation factor in tube means 20.

A relatively higher heat insulation factor may be provided, without materially decreasing the defonnability and resistance to abrasion of tube 20; by providing a separate tubular inner liner 27 (FIG. 4), which conforms substantially to inner surfaces of outer tube 21. Liner 27 is secured by a suitable adhesive 28, located adjacent coincident margins of tube 21 and liner 27. Adhesive 28 is preferably applied, intermediate tubes 21 and 27, in sufiicient thickness for establishing and maintaining a sealed cavity 29, for containing trapped air. The air thus confined in cavity 29 serves to enhance the heat insulating properties of tube means 20 and to retard heat losses from contained liquid 17.

Liner 27 may, if desired, be formed from a suitable deformable metallic material, such as aluminum foil, for example; in combination with an outer tube 21, formed from a kraft or manilla paper product. Although such construction of tube means 20 may increase manufacturing costs; it appears that the resulting manufactured article may reasonably be considered economically disposable after initial use. The enhanced heat insulating property of partially metallic construction appears to justify an additional increment of manufacturing cost; under circumstances where a dispensing temperature is to be maintained in liquid 17 in a relatively cool environment for considerable periods.

Means 38, for retaining tube 20 upon receptacle 16; comprises a suitable collar member, such as collar 31 of the first embodiment illustrated in FIG. 2, for example. Collar 31 is preferably formed with the blank configuration of FIG. 8; wherein a centrally disposed spanner portion 32 terminates at opposite ends in depending ear members 33 and 34.

Ear 34 is preferably provided with a bore 35. A slot 36 may be formed in oppositely disposed ear portion 33. Collar 31 is further formed in the general plan configuration of FIG. 2, with the axis of bore 35 in substantial alignment with that of slot 36.

Means 40, for releasably securing collar 31 upon tube and receptacle 16; preferably comprises a bolt 41, in combination with cooperable threaded means, such as wing-nut 42 for example. Wing-nut 42 may be formed integrally with an elongated hub portion 43; which serves to separate handle portion 44, of wing-nut 42, from bearing surface 45, by a distance, sufficient to permit Wingnut 42 to be rotatably manipulated past adjacent surfaces of tube 20 and collar 31. Thus, securing means 40 cooperates with collar 31, so as to clampingly engage tube 20 and receptable 16.

Means 50, for severing a terminal portion 22 of tub 20 in order to gain access to dispensing means 19 of liquids 17; comprises an annular row of perforations 51 (FIG. 3) arranged circumferentially of tube 20. Perforations 51 are spaced circumferentially about tube 20 along a line, which is located between closed end 23 and upper edge 24 of tube 20. Severing means 50 is so located upon tube 20 that perforations 51 are positioned intermediate collar 31 and upper edge 24 of tube 2%), substantially as illustrated in FIG. 6; at times when tube 28 is secured to a receptacle 16 by retaining collar means 30.

Means 60, for displaying the level of liquids 17; comprises a transparent portion 61 (FIG. 3) formed upon tube 20. A lateral opening 62 (FIG. 4) is defined by a peripheral margin 64 of the circumferential wall of tube 20. Opening 62 preferably has a substantially rectangular configuration; and is located along a longitudinal axis of tube 20. A suitable transparent panel 63 (FIG. 4) is secured by adhesive means 65 along marginal edge 64 in sealed engagement with tube 21.

Rectangular frame member 66 is similarly secured to tube 21 and transparent panel 63. Frame 66 operates to reinforce the seal of adhesive 65 and to protect the edges of transparent panel 63 against accidental displacement, which might otherwise result from abrasive contact dur ing use.

Where tube means 20 is formed with a plurality of circumferential walls 21 and 27, defining an intermediate air space 29; a transparent inner panel 67 may, if desired, be similarly secured in sealed marginal engagement with inner tube 27; so as to define an intermediate pocket 68 in display means 60, for containing trapped air. Air, trapped within cavity 68 will then operate to reduce heat losses from contained liquid 17, through lateral opening 62 of tube means 20.

Means 70, for suspending tube means 20 from a fixed object; comprises a lanyard apparatus, designated generally as 71 in FIGS. 1 and 7. Lanyard 71 is formed with an adjustable loop portion 7 2, a resilient swivel portion 73, and a connector portion 74. Loop portion 72 preferably comprises a resilient cord member 75, in combination with a suitable slide device 76.

Cord 75 may be formed from any suitable linear material, having substantially flexible characteristics. For example, cord 75 may be of Woven fiber composition. Alternatively, cord 75 may be formed from a plastic filament or tube. Another satisfactory form of cord 75 may comprise a plastic or metallic chain, of known configuration.

Slide 76 is preferably formed with a pair of integrally associated barrel portions 77 and 78. Barrel portion 77 is rigidly secured to one end of cord 75. A portion, adjacent the opposite end of cord 75, is threaded through and slidabl-y contained within barrel 78. A suitable loop 88, formed in the unsecured end of cord 75, is maintained therein by clamping means 79.

One eye element 81, of swivel means 73, is contained within loop '80 of cord 75 (FIG. 1), Swivel means 73 is provided with a depending eye member 83, pivotally journaled in a vertical bearing of eye 81. Depending eye 83 is formed with a substantially vertically disposed stem 82, rotatable within bearing 85. Eye 83 is retained, in pivotal engagement with superposed eye 81, by a head portion 84 formed upon stem '82. v

A resilient'link 88, is contained within depending eye 83 of swivel 82. Link 88 is preferably formed with the generally circular configuration of FIG. 7. Link 88 or!- erates to absorb shock stresses, which might otherwise be transmitted along lanyard 70 to nipple closure 19. Therefore, link 88 is preferably formed from a characteristically resilient material, such as rubber for example. A suitable harness hook means 74 is contained within resilient link 88 and depends therefrom, for releasably connecting lanyard 71 to container 20 and receptacle 16.

Means 90, for interconnecting retaining means 40 with suspending means 70, comprises a bearing arm 91. Bearing arm 91 is formed from a substantially rigid material, with the general configuration shown in the plan View of FIG. 9. Arm 91 is provided, adjacent one of its opposite ends, with a bolt bore 92, having a dimension sufficient for slidably receiving bolt 41, A plurality of bearing bores, similar to bores 93 and 94, are preferably spaced apart along the longitudinal axis of arm 91.

Arm 91 is preferably located upon bolt 41, intermediate oppositely disposed ear portions 33 and 34 of collar 31, with bolt 41 contained within bore 92.

Suitable spacing bushings 46 and 47 may, if desired, be arranged upon bolt 41 between arm 91 and opposite ear members 33 and 34; so as to retain arm 91 substantially radially disposed with reference to collar 31, and pivotable about bolt 41.

An alternative embodiment of retaining means 30 (FIG. 1) comprises collar 53, which is shown in the perspective view of FIG. 10. Collar 53 comprises a relatively flexible spanner portion 58, in combination with car members 54 and 56 secured to opposite ends of the spanner portion.

Spanner 58 is seen in the cross-sectional view of FIG. 11 as comprising a central web portion 55, formed with marginal tube portions 57 and 59. A plurality of filaments 97 and 99 are arranged longitudinally within tube portions 57 and 59, respectively; and serve to reinforce the margins of spanner 58 against longitudinal deformation.

Web portion 55 of spanner 58 is preferably formed from a characteristically resilient material, such as rubber or a suitable resilient plastic. Filaments 97 and 99 are formed from a relatively inelastic material, such as metallic wire, for example.

Ear member 56 is preferably formed from a material which is less deformable than Web portion 55 of scanner 58; with the general blank configuration shown in FIG. 12. The blank form of ear member 56 includes mutually registerable bores 86 and 37, spaced oppositely from the transverse axis of blank 56.

A suitable opening 89 is located adjacent one end of blank 56. Similarly spaced, with reference to the opposite end of blank 56, is a tooth portion 93, arranged to be upset within opening 89; when ear portion 56 is folded in the general configuration of FIG. 14, with web 55 of spanner 58 arranged between the parallel terminal portions of ear member 56.

Opposite ear portion 54 is preferably formed in blank, to the general configuration seen in FIG. 13. Slotted openings 94 and 96 are arranged in blank 54, so as to be mutually registerable when blank 54 is folded to the parallel configuration of FIG. 10. Cooperable tooth member 95 and opening 69, defined by blank 54, serve to secure slotted ear 54 upon web 55 of spanner 58; substantially in the manner illustrated and described in specific reference to opposite ear portion 56 (FIG. 14).

Operation In the operation of the apparatus of the present invention, a nursing bottle receptacle 16 (FIG. 1) is prepared in the usual manner to meet the requirements and preferences of the infant. Formula 17 may be heated to the desired temperature and bottle 13 is filled in the usual manner with formula thus prepared. A suitable nipple closure 19 may then be installed upon bottle 18 to complete the assembled receptacle 16.

Receptacle 16 is positioned within central cavity 25 of tube means 20, with liquid level index markings, commonly provided on nursing bottles 18, in register with and visible through transparent portion 61 of insulating tube 20.

Retaining means 30 is then arranged circumferentially of tube 20, so as to be disposed about tube 20 and nursing receptacle 16. That portion of tube 20, which is located immediately subjacent the row of perforations 50, is then gathered and positioned in frictional contact with the outer surface of bottle 18; by digital compression of oppositely disposed ear portions 33 and 34 of collar 30.

Bolt 41 is slidably inserted in bore 35 of collar 30. Bushing 46, arm 90, bushing 47 and wing-nut 42 are then arranged upon bolt 41, in the general configuration of FIG. 2. Bolt 41 is inserted in slot 36 of collar 30. Wingnut 42 is then threaded upon bolt 41, so as to draw the related elements of FIG. 2 into close frictional engagement; thereby causing collar 31 to gather and draw upper portion 22 of tube 29 into circumferential envelopment with bottle 18 and nipple closure 19.

Upper portion 22 of tube 20 is thus deformed by collar 31, substantially as illustrated in FIG. 6. Upper portion 22 is then folded about nipple closure 19, substantially in the conical configuration of the drawing. When thus arranged, tube 21 operates to shield a prepared nipple 19 against contaminating contact with other objects, until such time as dispensing operation of receptacle 16 becomes practicable. During periods of storage after preparation, upper portion 22 also serves to contain increments of liquid 17, which may accidentally leak from nipple closure 19.

Clip 74 of suspending means 71 is manually secured in linked engagement with one of bearing bores 93 and 94, which are spaced along bearing arm 91. Bearing bores 93 and 94 serve to provide alternately positioned fulcrums, for suspension of the apparatus of the present invention from a relatively fixed object.

The several locations of bearing bores 93 and 94 permit adjustment of the suspension point, to allow for variation in the mass of various types of bottle members 18, which are now in general use. It will be apparent that certain types of bottles 18, are commonly formed of glass. Such receptacles are considerably more dense, than similar containers, commonly formed of rubber and plastic materials now in general use.

It is thus apparent that hook 74 may be connected within bore 94 which is located more remotely, from the mass of a glass receptacle 18, than bore 93. Such connection results in a relatively dense receptacle 16 gravitating to a freely suspended position, substantially as seen in FIG. 1.

In the angularly disposed attitude of FIG. 1, receptacle 16 is conveniently accessible to a natural manual grasp. However, the attitude of FIG. 1 is sufficiently close to a vertical disposition that liquid contents 17 of the receptacle will not leak through the perforate nipple closure 19.

Connection of hook 74 in pivotal, linked engagement with bore 93 will result in a substantially similar spacial attitude of nursing receptacle 16, when bottle 18 is formed from a less dense material, such as rubber or plastic for example.

Rotation of arm 99 about bolt 41, before tightening wing-nut 42, will operate to rotate bearing bores 93 and 94 outwardly from tube 29. Such adjustment operates to selectively change the natural gravitational attitude of a freely suspended nursing receptacle 16 to a less perpendicular configuration; when the apparatus is suspended from a fixed object by means of loop portion 75 of lanyard 72.

Loop portion 75 permits the attendant of an infant to retain the apparatus of the present invention within the range of convenient manual access, at times when the apparatus is suspended from the body of the attendant. Loop 75 may be positioned around the neck of the attendant of an infant; or over the shoulder, according to common practice. Thus, loop 75 is operable to releasably embrace either the person of an attendant or another relatively fixed object.

When it is desired to ready apparatus 15 for dispensing operation, upper portion 22 is separated from tube 21), by severing the material of tube 20 located between spaced apart perforations 51. Upper portion 22 may then be removed; and may be disposed of, along with any leakage liquid 17 contained therein. Removal of portion 22 thus exposes closure 19 for dispensing use, as shown in FIG. 1.

Both before and during a dispensing operation, tube means 20 operates to retard heat losses from contained nursing formula 17 to the atmospheric environment. Contained air space 68, located between transparent panels 63 and d7, similarly operates to reduce the rate of heat transfer between contained liquids and the outside atmosphere. Thus it is seen that tube 20 operates to maintain liquid 17 in a warmed state for substantial periods of time. This feature is especially useful int-he case of an infant with leisurely eating habits; and at other times when receptacle 15 must be prepared substantially in advance of infant demand.

During times when liquid 17 is being dispensed from receptacle 16, loop 75 of lanyard means 70 is preferably arranged about the neck or shoulder of the attendant, as previously described. If the bottle is inadvertently dropped, it may fall only to the adjustable :limit of the length of lanyard means 70. Such length, is adjustable by repositioning barrel 78 of slide 76 along cord 75'.

When a receptacle 16, contained within tube member 20, gravitates to the limit of suspending means '70; the predetermined attitude of the longitudinal axis of receptacle means i=6 is gravitationally assumed, "Wlth nipple closure 19 positioned well above the upper limit of contained liquid 17. It is thus apparent that the probability of accidental breakage of bottle 18, and accidental loss of prepared liquid 17, through nipple closure 19, are both substantially minimized by use of the apparatus of the present invention in the manner described herein.

The apparatus of this invention has proven especially useful in the management and feeding of'infants in environments characterized by closely restricted space limitations. For example, suspension of the apparatus from the person of the attendant of an infant, when traveling in an automobile, train or airplane, serves to retain receptacle '16 Within the range of convenient manual access of the attendant at all times. The heat insulating properties of tube 20 operate to maintain a prepared formula 17 at temperatures suitable for dispensation; for considerable periods of time, Without recourse to Warming facilities.

It is to be understood that the above embodiments of the present invention are shown and described for purposes of illustration only. Various changes may be made therein Without departing from the spirit and scope of the disclosed invention.

I claim:

1. Apparatus for holding a receptacle for liquids, comprising: means, for containing said receptacle; means, for retaining said containing means upon said receptacle; means, for releasably securing said retaining means upon said containing means; means, for suspending said receptacle from a fixed object, said suspending means including a lanyard formable into a loop, a slide secured to said lanyard for forming a loop of variable diameter and a hook secured to said lanyard; means, connecting said securing means and said suspending means for selectably adjusting the gravitational attitude of said receptacle, at times when said receptacle is in a state of free suspension.

2. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein said containing means comprises a tube, formed from a thermal insulating material.

3. The apparatus of claim 1, in combination with means, for displaying the level of said liquid.

4-. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein said suspending means includes means, for absorbing shock vibrations transmitted along said suspending means.

5. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein said containing means comprises a plurality of tube members.

6. The apparatus of claim 5, wherein severable means is provided, for guarding said receptacle against contamination during periods when said receptacle is maintained in a prepared state.

7. The apparatus of claim 5, wherein said plurality of tube members is resistant to heat transmission.

8. Apparatus for holding a receptacle for liquids, comprising: means, for containing said receptacle; means, for retaining said containing means upon said receptatcle; means, for releasably securing said retaining means upon said containing means; means, for suspending said receptacle from a fixed object; means, connecting said securing means and said suspending means for selectably adjusting the gravitational attitude of said receptacle, at times when said receptacle is in a state of free suspension; and means, for severing a terminal portion of said containing means in order to obtain access to said liquid.

9. Apparatus for holding a receptacle for liquids, comprising: means, comprising a plurality of tube members arranged to define an intermediate trapped air chamber, for containing said receptacle; means, for retaining said containing means upon said receptacle; means, for releasably securing said retaining means upon said containing means; means, for suspending said receptacle from a fixed object; means, connecting said securing means and said suspending means for selectably adjusting the gravitational attitude of said receptacle, at times when said receptacle is in a state of free suspension.

10. Apparatus for holding a receptacle for liquids, comprising: means, comprising a plurality of tube members, resistant to heat transmission, for containing said receptacle; means, for retaining said containing means upon said receptacle; means, for releasably securing said retaining means upon said containing means; means, for suspending said receptacle from a fixed object; means, connecting said securing means and said suspending means, for selectably adjusting the gravitational attitude of said receptacle at times when said receptacle is in a state of free suspension; and means, defining an intermediate trapped air chamber, for displaying the level of said liquid.

11. Apparatus for suspending a liquid receptacle from a fixed object, comprising:

(a) means, comprising a lanyard, formed from a resilient material, of linear configuration, and formable into a loop, for releasably embracing said fixed object;

('b) means, comprising a slide, secured to said lanyard for forming a loop of variable diameter, in one end of said lanyard;

(c) means, comprising a hook secured to said lanyard,

for releasably connecting said lanyard to said receptacle;

( d) means, comprising a collar, for clampingly engaging said receptacle;

(e) means, comprising an arm, defining a 'bearing bore and secured to said clamping means, for pivotally receiving said connecting means.

12. The apparatus of claim 11, wherein said arm means is pivotally secured to said collar and connected in linked engagement with said hook means.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,077,190 10/ 1913 Degenfelder. 1,692,098 11/ 1928 Sullivan 248104 2,090,749 8/ 1937 Corsi et :al. 2,522,381 9/1950 Kramer 215l1 X FOREIGN PATENTS 547,660 9/ 1922; France. 408,477 4/ 1934 Great Britain.

JOSEPH R. LECLAIR, Primary Examiner. D. F. NORTON, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1077190 *Feb 21, 1913Oct 28, 1913Alois J DegenfelderDevice for supporting containers.
US1692098 *Aug 4, 1926Nov 20, 1928Sullivan Maurice SNursing-bottle holder
US2090749 *Jun 20, 1936Aug 24, 1937Eustace G MarandinoNursing bottle
US2522381 *Jan 24, 1948Sep 12, 1950Kramer WilliamTemperature retaining cover for baby bottles and other receptacles
FR547660A * Title not available
GB408477A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3514113 *Jul 26, 1967May 26, 1970Konrad WeiswurmSealing mechanism for high pressure piston pumps
US4228758 *Mar 23, 1979Oct 21, 1980Dornau Peter GLabelled bottle-boat fender
US4733807 *Jun 14, 1982Mar 29, 1988Porter Robert EContainer for medicinals
US4993611 *Oct 28, 1988Feb 19, 1991Rocco LongoBeverage container support
US5356046 *Nov 1, 1990Oct 18, 1994Melissa BurkeCover for bottled water dispenser
US5531338 *Nov 4, 1994Jul 2, 1996Sklar; Jeffrey S.Infant nursing device
US5971238 *Dec 31, 1997Oct 26, 1999Malvasi; GiuseppeRetractable bottle retaining holder
US6772891 *Jan 6, 2003Aug 10, 2004Karen May SongComfort grip bottle holder
US7152750 *Aug 20, 2004Dec 26, 2006Conor CoffeyBaby bottle cover
Classifications
U.S. Classification215/365, 248/318, 215/395, D24/199, 215/11.6, 215/399, 215/13.1, 215/12.1, 248/102
International ClassificationA61J9/06
Cooperative ClassificationA61J2009/0676, A61J2009/0646, A61J9/06
European ClassificationA61J9/06